Picks

Newbreed – The Bongolian

The Bongolian are based in Wales & London, UK with band members being: Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos, Johnny Drop: Drums, Glyn “tufta” Edwards: Electric Piano, Dan Rooms: Percussion, Trev Harding: Bass Guitar.We recently caught up with Nass and had a good old chatter!

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 17 years , The Bongolian was originally my studio project, but as soon as the LP was released, and such a huge success we are asked by the organisers of France’s biggest festival; Transmusicale to perform the LP live then other offers flooded in so the need for a full live band came about.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love of Nandos, check trousers and eggnog.

03. Many folks reading this interview will be aware of your other band Big Boss Man, so why did you form Bongolian and what are the main differences?

Trev from BBM slaps the bass guitar rather than his usual axe work, and it’s a much more percussive, rhythmic and V-neck jumper based affair.

04. How would you describe the style you play?

Chaotic! Space-age Latin Boogaloo.

06. What are your live shows like?

The live show is a celebration of heavy bongo beats, funky organ and grinding oscillator work. Brian Auger meets Mongo Santamaria in Carnaby Street.

07. What are your main influences in music?

Mod-Jazz with a touch of Psychedelic Bongos!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Wood Carving ( mainly medieval cutlery; spoons, knives, forks etc.)

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes all the songs and Subject matters usually revolve around past experiences of his childhood in Bolton.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Psyche Yam from the Blue Print LP is my live fave at the mo. My fave song by another artist is “Simply the Best – T Turner” or anything from “No Jacket Required”!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate, especially enjoyed the New LP “Moog Maximus” Launch in London’s Blow Up club in Soho.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Creating all layered analog synth tones for the LP Moog Maximus and then arranging for live performance.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse in Beat Mountain, (www.beatmountain.com) – we stay in the studio for weeks on end, carving out the musical maze that is the sound of The Bongolian. We have had quite lot of plays on BBC Radio so we are aiming to tour UK/Europe in Autumn. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Quite good!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Pine Cone are a great band!

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Lonnie Smith at Abbey Road or Electric Ladyland would be good!

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

I’m working on a hard, uptempo, latin-soul album, and working with Big Boss Man on a new LP, and setting up a new UK and European tour for Autumn. Also check out: www.beatmountain.com  – where I have recorded 548 drum and bongo breaks for use in any musical endeavors.

Tour Dates:
27 May ‘17 Mod & Sixties Festival, Margate, UK
01 July ’17 South London Soul Train, Peckham, UK
22 Sep ‘17 International Festival of Psychedelia, Liverpool, UK
Autumn ‘17 Moog Maximus, European Tour, TBA Europe.

Discography: Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2002: Bongo Head
LPs :
2002: ‘The Bongolian’,
2005: ‘Blue Print’,
2007: ‘Outer Bongolia’,
2011: ‘Bongos for Beatniks’
2016: ‘Moog Maximus’
Main Site:
bongolian.com
Social Networks:
facebook.com/thebongolian
twitter.com/@the_bongolian
spotify.com/thebongolian


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Club Soul Front Page Interviews ModJazz Picks Psych UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

The Kinks on Pye: Part 2 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Collectors Corner 5

During our last article, we concentrated on The Kinks hit-packed period when they never seemed to be off the charts. As psychedelia took hold of 1967 and strangled most British bands in beads and flowers, The Kinks took off in a different direction and released some wonderfully wistful and melancholic masterpieces. These songs seemed to hark back to a more innocent time which probably only existed through rose-tinted (psychedelic) spectacles anyway. Ray proceeded to write a series of genius 45’s, and more importantly, albums which unbelievably sold less and less with each release. 1968 started well for the boys with the budget LP release “Sunny afternoon” hitting the top ten during the important Christmas market and selling very well indeed. So when Pye released the first new material of the year in April 1968, the lovely and restrained stand-alone 45 “Wonderboy” would have been assumed to sail into the top ten, but it unbelievably stalled at a lowly number 36 in the charts. This began a run of wonderful, yet underappreciated single releases which were low sellers, hence the rarity of some of them today.

Two months later in June ’68, one of Ray’s most loved compositions, “Day’s” was released and fared much better, just stalling outside the top ten at number 12. Though all the bands singles contain nuggets hidden away on their B-sides, this one had one of the bands hardest rockers on the flip, “She’s got everything”. Originally recorded and shelved two years earlier, it could have been a big hit in 1968 as The Stones, Beatles and Move all had massive rock’n’roll influenced hit singles. Luckily it wasn’t forgotten and still fills mod dancefloors to this day as soon as it starts up. Into 1969, the thumping “Plastic man” was released and again reached no higher than number 31, a flop by the band’s lofty standards. It seemed the better Ray’s songwriting became, the fewer people bought the bands records. “Drivin'” was released in August 1969 and became the first 45 to miss the hit parade since “You still want me” in early 1964. Even worse was the total no-show of “Shangri-la” in September which sold incredibly poorly and is one of the hardest of UK Kinks singles to find. In December, the upbeat album track “Victoria” at least managed to hit the low 30’s in the chart but it took a tale of a Soho nightclub meeting with a transsexual to have the band visiting Top of the Pops again. “Lola” was soon flying up the charts and hit the number two slot in August, kept off the top by Elvis. Shortly after “Apeman”, backed with the wonderful “Rats” on the flip, became the group’s last UK top ten hit when it reached number five in the summer. “Days”, “Lola” and “Apeman” apart, these 45’s are now quite hard to find, especially in top condition and prices have risen in the last few years. Expect to pay between £10-20 for the low sellers and up to £30 “Shangri-la”. All were pressed up as yellow demo copies, these are also really sought after and can reach £100+ at auction. A quick shout must go out to Dave Davies at this point. In between 1967 and 1968, he released four cracking solo 45’s and a super rare EP, “Dave Davies Hits”, which is a £200+ artifact nowadays. All four singles (Death of a clown, Suzannah’s still alive, Lincoln County and Hold my hand) are worth seeking out, the last one, in particular, is hard to find and is coveted for it’s fantastic psychedelic B side “Creeping Jean”.

The decline of fortunes in the singles chart was mirrored with the blue label Pye album releases, none of which charted at all. The 1968 release “The Kinks are the village green preservation society” needs no introduction to Kinks aficionado’s, it’s simply one the all-time album masterpieces. Originally envisaged as a twelve track album, a handful of white label promos were pressed up before the track listing was changed to the fifteen track album we all love today. It’s impossible to put a price on the promo copies, but even the released album reaches £200+ in top condition as it sold in small amounts. This album, and it’s follow-up were both released in mono and stereo, the former the harder to locate and more valuable to collectors. They were both encased in very flimsy laminated gatefold sleeves which are invariably damaged and worn, make sure you look after any mint copies out there! “Arthur (or the decline and fall of the British empire)” was released the following year in 1969, and although similarly full of stellar Ray Davies songwriting, this one sold in small amounts too. Hence it has a £100+ price tag nowadays with the “Queen Victoria” insert still there (it’s invariably missing!). 1970’s “Lola vs Powerman and the money-go-round” was the first to be a stereo only release and sold more than the previous two, mainly due to the massive hit singles released at the same time. For a band to release so many groundbreaking and classic songs on Pye, it’s a shame that their parting shot was a soundtrack to
the 1971 Hywel Bennett film “Percy”, a comedy about a man who has a penis transplant. The album still sells for a good price, mainly due to its creators, and Pye also released four tracks from the album as a “maxi-single” with a picture sleeve at the same time. The band signed a contract with RCA in 1971, becoming the “Muswell hillbillies” of that decade who would, at last, have massive success in the USA. But it’s that catalogue on the iconic pink and blue Pye label that will always hold a place in most collectors hearts.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , ,
0 Comment

Reviews May 2017

 


Gemma & The Travellers

‘Too Many Rules And Games’  – Album

Legere Recordings are well-known for being one of the foremost soul, R&B and funk labels in Europe and are absolutely the right home for Gemma & The Travellers. This is their debut album and it has been a long time in coming. Over the last four or five years, Gemma & The Travellers have released a succession of danceable, catchy R&B/soul infused singles and slowly building a fan base across Europe. The New Untouchables recognised the potential and have welcomed the band to Shoreditch Got Soul and the Brighton Weekender in the past, but we were particularly pleased to host the official UK launch of this album. What we have are nine original compositions that show exactly why they are on a label that includes New Mastersounds, Mighty Mocambos and Nick Pride to name but three. From the first track ‘I Keep On Thinking’, you know this band is the real deal. With Gemma Marchi giving her customary fine vocal performance, superbly backed by Damien Barbe on keyboards, Kevin Hoffman on saxophone, Robert Petersson on guitar and a top-notch rhythm section of Alan Beckman on bass and Robin Tixier on drums. ‘Where I Lived Before’ is a slice of pure proper R&B, while ‘Take My Heart And Breathe’ is as fine-a-ballad as you could hear anywhere; oozing with emotion and soul. The showstopper for my money is ‘Please Don’t Forget My Name’, delivered with real punch and power. You know the saying ‘good things come to those who wait’? Well if you have been waiting for this album, it really has been worth it. If you have never heard of this band before now, you need to check them out. After all, Craig Charles isn’t a bad judge of music, and he’s a fan.

facebook.com/GemmaAndTheTravellers
legererecordings.bandcamp.com


Stone Foundation

‘Street Rituals’ – Album

Stone Foundation are a band that has defied all the odds. Their success story should be a shining example to any band or artist that is hoping to progress their career without selling your soul to a ‘major’ label or Simon Cowell. This album came out just after the last edition of Nutsmag, hence the slightly late review. It has entered the official UK charts and the band is currently on a sell-out tour to support the album. So how have they got to these dizzy heights? In my opinion, the mark of a great band is when each album is better and surpasses the previous one. Such is the case with Stone Foundation. ‘Find The Spirit’ was great; ‘A Love Unlimited’ was brilliant, this album, ‘Street Rituals’ is a masterpiece. It is the latest installment from a group of musicians who have remained dedicated, committed, determined and focused on the art of writing great songs in the belief that their hard work will eventually be recognised, and so it has proved to be. ‘Ah yes’, I hear you say, ‘but they had Weller helping on this one, so they couldn’t lose.’ It’s a fair point, but I would argue, a misguided one and I will address the ‘Weller’ issue a little later. For now, let’s look at the product. To pick a few highlights from these ten tracks is a task I find very difficult such is the high standard. As I have listened through it, my ‘favourite track’ has changed six times already. Whether it’s ‘Limit Of A Man’(shades of Style Council here), ‘Strange People’, ‘Back In The Game’ or the title track, I can’t choose. They are all unbelievably brilliant. They are songs of hope inspired and influenced by 70’s American soul, while being undeniably British soul. It’s that ‘je ne se quoi’ that sets British soul apart from the Americans. Soul2Soul had it, as did the Brand New Heavies for example and now Stone Foundation have it. As for Mr Paul Weller? He should be given the 2017 Producer Of The Year award right now for this album. Yes he plays and sings on the album and co-wrote a few tunes, but I get the sense he was energised by the whole project and it comes across in his performances. Neil Jones’ voice works so well with Mr Wellers’, ‘hand and glove’ come to mind. And I think two people also deserve special mention; engineer Charles Rees and percussionist Rob Newton. Great job fellas.

stonefoundation.co.uk
facebook.com/stonefoundation


SoulNaturals

‘Love Says Yes’ album

It has been some time since I last reviewed a release by SoulNaturals. Apart from a small handful of impressive singles, the output has been sparse, but that has mostly been due to this album being recorded and it is well worth the wait. With Tony Cannam at the helm, SoulNaturals tend to use an array of vocal talent rather than one focal singer. This album of 11 quality tracks features 10 different vocalists and each one gives a great performance. Arguably, the most notable among them is Mr. Dave Barker (of Dave and Ansell Collins fame) on ‘Let Freedem Ring’; as sweet-a-ballad as you could wish for. Other standout tracks include ‘I Got Sunshine (Enough For The World) featuring Jo Kelsey, ‘I Never Knew A Hell Like You’ with Gloria Pryce and ‘Oh Lord When Will You Free Me’; a lilting gentle reggae-meets-gospel corker with Nadia Pimentel taking the vocal duties. A couple of years ago, it really looked as if SoulNaturals were going to explode on to the soul scene. They were certainly very popular on the live circuit, so with this album to promote, they have a winner on their hands and the live dates can’t be far off.

soulnaturals.bandcamp.com/
facebook.com/soulnaturalsUK/


The Neighbourhood Strange

‘Let’s Get High’ b/w ‘One Last Chance’ – Single

This new single from the ever impressive Neighbourhood Strange brings two quality cuts of garage/neo-psych. All the component parts are present and correct; jangly guitars, catchy hook-lines and Hammond organ. ‘Let’s Get High’ is a mid-paced grower, while ‘One Last Chance’ is a slower, more deliberate song delivered with just the right amount of gusto. This Salisbury outfit is definitely one to watch out for and I, for one, will be keeping a keen eye out for the next installment.

facebook.com/TheNeighbourhoodStrange
theneighbourhoodstrange.bandcamp.com


 The Missing Souls

‘The End’ b/w ‘Mom, Won’t You Teach Me How To Monkey’ – Digital Single

The French scene is thriving right now with some really great bands making their presence felt and the Missing Souls from Lyon are no exception. They have been together for three years and gaining decent support for their brand of 60s influenced garage. Zaza, Ricky, Ian and Lester have been very impressive and this digital single continues to build on their repertoire. ‘The End’ is a proper rocking good time, while ‘Mom…’ is a slower R&B-styled groover. It all bodes well for the future and here’s hoping they will be tempted to come to the UK for live shows. I think we would all be in for a treat.

themissingsouls.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/themissingsouls


Mayfield

‘Spring’ EP

I first became aware of Mayfield with their album ‘Tempo Of Your Soul’ in 2013. Last year they released ‘Keep On The Soul Side’ while simultaneously band leader Domonic Elton built a new studio facility in his neck of the woods. But something a bit special has happened in the meantime and this EP shows exactly what that is. Their 2013 album was very good indeed, but it didn’t show just how good Mayfield are, especially when you see them play live. This EP carries three tracks, two of which are tunes given a total make-over from that album. ‘Fling’ and ‘Sunshine’ are almost unrecognisable from their previous arrangements. What is most notable is that Mayfield has found the polished soul that was lacking four years ago. I had to revisit the old versions just to remind myself and what a transformation has taken place. Superb. ‘Fling’ is now a sumptuous jazz-funk belter, while ‘Sunshine’ is descended from the great days of Acid Jazz; punchy brass, great hook-line and typically British Soul. However, I have saved the best until last. ‘This Time Around’ featuring Decosta Boyce is a soul/northern crossover monster of a tune. I love the ‘What’s Goin’ On’ style ‘Ooos and Ahhs’, the chugging guitar, driving drums and Dacosta delivers the lyrics with stylish aplomb. Of course, Andy Lewis deserves great credit for the mix as well. So welcome back Mayfield. I’m told the vinyl will be available in October, so this is download only for the time being.

facebook.com/mayfieldstudioband
mayfieldtheband.co.uk


 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , ,
0 Comment

The Kinks on Pye: Part 1 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

Although The Kinks have long been one of our most influential and cherished groups, in the last couple of years since the hit musical “Sunny Afternoon” and especially since Ray Davies joined brother Dave onstage in London back in December 2015, fans have been hopefully awaiting the reformation of this most wonderful of bands. Although The Kinks back catalogue spans over forty years it’s the halcyon Pye years from 1964 to 1971 in which the band constantly released classic hit records which have collectors scouring record shops, fairs, and the internet for hits and rarities, and a full set of UK releases will set you back a fair few quid should you wish to complete the set. For this two-part article, we’re going to give you a run through of the hard to find releases from the debut 45 back in early 64 to the “Percy” soundtrack eight years later. The first part will concentrate on the “Pink” years, when the band had a string of top ten singles, including three UK number one hits, the second part will then concentrate on the “Blue” years when Ray was at his songwriting peak but the record buying public were not buying the records in such great numbers. Hindsight shows how wrong they were.

Hailing from Muswell Hill in North London, Ray, Dave and bassist Pete Quaife were originally an R’n’B combo called The Ravens who came to the attention of ace producer Shel Talmy after he heard a demo tape and helped get the group signed to the Pye record group where they were enlisted drummer Mick Avory to complete the classic first line up. On 7th February 1964 their debut single “Long tall Sally”, a R’n’B cover of the Little Richard classic was released on the pink Pye label (7N15611) was unveiled to the record buying public. Although the single hit the lower reaches of the NME chart it was a commercial flop making copies a nice rare collector’s item today with prices usually reaching £75-120 depending on condition. The next 45 was released in April 1964 and like all the Kinks singles after the debut, it was a Ray Davies penned number “You still want me” (7N15636). Although the first single sold in respectable amounts, this one was an unjustified complete flop and is by far the hardest Kinks UK 45 to locate in nice condition. Expect to pay at least £200 for a copy of this, one even reached the amazing price of £400+ at auction in 2016! With Pye threatening to cancel the band’s contract if they didn’t have a hit single, Ray composed one of the most influential two and bit minute slabs of musical perfection ever committed to vinyl, “You really got me”. With Dave’s incendiary and groundbreaking lead guitar bursting through the track, it couldn’t fail when it was released on 7th August 1964 (7N15673). And fail it didn’t as it shot up the UK charts, reaching the coveted number one spot shortly after where it stayed for two weeks. The Kinks had arrived.

From then on every single the group released up until 1968 hit the upper regions of the UK charts, with every single release apart from “Everybody’s gonna be happy” hitting the top ten, two of them reaching the top spot. As runs of stellar 45’s go, the following one takes some beating for songcraft, influence and sheer greatness: “All day and all of the night”, “Tired of waiting for you”, “Everybody’s gonna be happy”, “Set me free”, “See my friends”, “Till the end of the day”, “Dedicated follower of  fashion”, “Sunny afternoon”, “Dead end street”, “Waterloo sunset”, “Autumn almanac”. Being massive chart smashes these are usually findable in nice condition for around £3-5 each, with a premium for truly mint copies. All the Kinks singles were also pressed as demonstration copies in small numbers, these are very desirable to collectors and can reach top prices at auction, especially in top condition with unblemished labels. Also look out for UK export release 45’s, mainly for the European market. There are four in total, including album tracks “David Watts”, “A well-respected man” and “Milk cow blues” on a 7″ format. Ray’s songwriting prowess also resulted in some fantastic and very rare releases by other artists around this time. “I go to sleep” was covered by The Applejacks, Peggy Lee, Marion, Fingers and The Truth in 1965-66 although none were hits and it wasn’t till a few years later The Pretenders took the song into the charts. Other great, obscure and coveted releases include Barry Fantoni “Little man in a little box” (Fontana), The Thoughts “All night stand” (Planet), The Cascades “I bet you won’t stay” (Liberty) and Leapy Lee “King of the whole wide world” (Decca). Ironically it’s Dave’s composition “One fine day” which was covered by Shel Naylor and released on Decca in 1964 which fetches by far the most money, with prices sometimes hitting the £500+ mark!

With the band constantly having smash hits Pye also released a nice series of EP’s in wonderful colour laminated sleeves. Five were released in total, the first three”Kwyet Kinks”, “Kinksize hits” and “Kinksize session” are not particularly hard to find, but the fourth “Dedicated Kinks” from 1966 is more elusive and the final EP “The Kinks” from April 1968 is incredibly scarce easily reaching £200+ at auction in top condition. The band’s first three LP’s “The Kinks”, “Kinda Kinks” and “The Kink controversy” were good sellers but easily sell for £50+ in nice condition with clean sleeves. Particularly coveted are rare export Stereo pressings of the first two LP’s with stickered UK sleeves as they were mono only releases in the UK. “Face to face” from 1966 was a move towards Ray’s late 60’s songwriting style and is an absolute classic but strangely failed to chart resulting in scarcity of copies today. This was followed by the live album “Live at Kelvin Hall” in early 1967 and lastly by the masterpiece “Something else by The Kinks” in September of the same year. All were released in both Mono and Stereo, the latter being the scarcer of the two, especially with the Stereo sticker still attached! Prices vary wildly from one week to the next but be prepared to have a large bank account if you want a truly mint copy of any of them. As 1968 approached Ray’s songwriting grew more world-weary and pastoral and the band embarked on an influential but poorly received at the time run of releases on the newly redesigned light blue Pye label. We’ll have a look at these next time around…


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

February 15, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Rob’s Round-Up 5

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Rob’s Roundup

Massive thanks to all those who joined us for yet another fun NYE party.

Despite the madness going on all around us the one thing that is still in our destiny is having a good time and enjoying the music and style, we are all passionate about. Our team have been working hard on our annual Easter extravaganza in central London.

Le Beat Bespoké attracts pleasure seekers from all over the globe, with only one thing in mind having a real damn good party. So, with that firmly in mind, we have assembled yet another exciting line-up across two fantastic venues in the heart of London.

Check out our brand-new website www.lebeatbespoke.com for all the info you need. We booked ten stellar live bands featuring some of the best up and coming talent alongside two stellar acts from the 20th century.

However live music is just part of what makes Le Beat Bespoké such a fun and unique event. For your dancing pleasure, we have booked a dynamic DJ line-up from across Europe armed with explosive sounds on 100% original vinyl across 3 rooms of clubbing after the live bands.

Our guest club nights for the Rhythm & Blues Weekend include Crossfire, The Pow Wow, Lady Luck & Mousetrap all at the forefront of good times and taste. The menu is served All-night and includes authentic Rhythm & Blues, Northern Soul, Jazz, Latin, Boogaloo and Ska/Reggae.

The Beat Basement hosts the wildest and grooviest Freakbeat, Garage and Psychedelic ‘nuggets’ known to man to a back drop of eye candy visuals and groovy Go-Go girls.

A brand-new location for our daytime treats on Sat & Sunday afternoon is Dingwalls one of London’s most beautiful venues, situated right next to Camden lock in the World-famous Camden market. Expect DJ’s, bands, Easter egg hunt, record fair and market.

Contact drrobert@btinternet.com for trade stand.

But before Easter, we have celebrated an incredible 26 years at Mousetrap in the same venue with the same owner virtually unheard of these days, let alone in the ever-changing landscape of London. All those that attended would have got a free 45 with two rare tracks from the club’s playlist including one that has never been released on 45 before.

Hope to see you all Easter for an epic party!

www.lebeatbespoke.com

Cheers Dr. Robert


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 21, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Clubs DJs Events Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 14 (episode 23)

NUTsCast December 2016
Join The Baron for a look back at some of the highlights of the last twelve months with live tracks recorded at Le Beat Bespoke, Margate and Crossfire by Graham Day & Forefathers, The Stairs, Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind, Wicked Whispers, Dustaphonics, Big Boss Man, Bronco Bullfrog, Paul Orwell, Cat Black and The Mynd Set.

We look ahead to our Nutty New Year’s Eve Party with DJ selections by Irish Greg, Jim Watson, Lee Miller, Peter Feely, Joel Maslin, Ady Lupton & Carolina.

So join The Baron for the last Nutscast Session of 2016.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

December 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 15 (episode 24)

*ROLL OVER IMAGE TO SEE CONTROLS*

Join the Baron for the first NUTSCAST of 2017.
On this show, we have special guest Rob Bailey talking us through the Easter extravaganza that is LE BEAT BESPOKE and the brand new LBB album.

To get you in the mood for LBB12 we have tracks from Corduroy, Novella, Lovely Eggs, Pink Floyd, New Candys, The Arrogants, Los Retrovisores, The Pacers, Stags, & Eliphant as well as selections from our DJ team.

Explore the line-up and event here at: www.lebeatbespoke.com


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 16, 2017 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

My mind’s eye – A 1966 musical Christmas

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

img162

1966 has been in the news a lot this past year. From the 50th anniversary of England’s only world cup final win, the counterculture exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, through to endless documentaries on BBC4 and magazines celebrating this seismic musical year, 1966 seems to have been everywhere. 1966 was also probably the last year when the POP 45 really was king as a groundbreaking musical device too, album sales would soon overtake it’s 7″ counterpart and the newly labelled psychedelic rock would soon transfer to the much more serious, and expansive LP format. But, although groundbreaking LP’s such as “Pet sounds”, “Revolver” and “Blonde on blonde” were released in this year, the singles chart would still host classic number one hits such as “Paperback writer”, “Paint it, black”, “Sunny afternoon” and “Reach out, I’ll be there” and untold forward thinking 7″ gems from Love, Creation, Yardbirds, The Who, Jimi Hendrix, James Brown and Otis Redding were all vying for the teenagers hard-earned cash. As the year drew to a close and Christmas came a-calling, Psychedelia was still definitely underground and not yet bothering the upper echelons of “Top of the pops” and the Hit Parade, but what was pouring out of transistors and Dansettes in the build-up to the festive season? Let’s have a look at some of the hits, and classic misses of December 1966…

img163

In the run up to Christmas, the 7th December singles chart was stuffed with great music: Number 47 found Martha & the Vandellas with “I’m ready for love” and prime US garage from Question Mark & the Mysterians “96 tears” was on it’s way up at 37. Nudging towards the top twenty you’d find The Temptations “Beauty is only skin deep” at 30, prime Stax soul from Otis, “Fa, fa, fa, fa, fa” at 28, classic UK beat from The Hollies “Stop, stop, stop” at 13 and The Kinks downbeat “Dead End Street” at 16. Just outside the top ten was a slice of pounding Australian beat from The Easybeats with “Friday on my mind”, and nestling inside the top ten you’d find stellar US soul from Lee Dorsey at 6 with “Holy cow” and blue-eyed UK soul from The Spencer Davis Group, with Stevie Winwood’s blistering vocal lighting up the number three spot with “Gimme some loving”. A trip down your local record shop on this week would find new releases from the pre-Slade combo The N’Betweens’ with “You better run”, Ella Fitzgerald’s cracking version of “These boots were made for walking”, and Herbal Mixture’s mod-psych “Machines”. None of these sold at all and are all now much in-demand slabs of vinyl.

img164

A week nearer to Christmas day, the charts of 14th December included some classy new entries to the singles charts including Donovan’s proto-psychedelic classic “Sunshine superman” straight in at number 31, classic Motown from The Supremes “You keep me hangin’ on” flying up into the top twenty at 15, and, much to the groups annoyance, The Small Faces “My mind’s eye” shot into the top ten at number 4! Available this week, and destined for the unsold bargain bins, were releases from John Patto with the double-sided aceness of “Love / Can’t stop talkin’ about my baby”, Mike Leslie’s future NUTS favourite “Right or wrong”, The Olympics soul shindig “Baby do the Philly Dog” and The Mirage’s great take on The Fab Four’s “Revolver” LP show stopper “Tomorrow never knows”.

img167

Onto the week before Christmas and the 21st December saw a multitude of new releases in the lower reaches of the chart, all of which would soon hurtle up to much higher places early in 1967. How about this lot for utter greatness: The Cream “I feel free” at 50, The wicked Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally” one place higher at 49, Motown greatness from The Temptations with “I know I’m losing you” at 47, Andover’s Troggs with “Anyway that you want me” at 39 and The Who’s future top ten hit, and ode to a seaside donkey, “Happy Jack” bursting straight in at number 30. New releases the week before Christmas which ended up in nobodies stocking included Paul Butterfield Blues Band garage stomper “Come on in”, The Flies pop-art madness “(I’m not your) Stepping stone” and The Misunderstood’s truly breathtaking “I can take you to the sun”. As usual, the more parent (and grandparent!) friendly album chart was full of the big selling easy listening gods of the day, with Jim Reeves, The Seekers and Herb Alpert hogging the high sellers league. The Kinks “Face to face”, Beatles “Revolver”, Georgie Fame’s “Sound venture” and Spencer Davis Group’s “Autumn ’66” at least made up some of the numbers below!

img169

So… finally we reached the last chart of that coolest of musical years, the Christmas chart of 28th December 1966, and only two new releases of note bothered the lower echelons, Smokey and the Miracles Motown stomper “(Come round here) I’m the one you need” entered at 45 and Georgie Fame’s cool mod take of “Sitting in the park” came in just above it at number 43. So what were the top sellers of that mighty week you may ask? Well, the album chart had The Seekers, Jim Reeves, The Beach Boys near the top, with “The sound of music” sitting on top where it had been for months! And the singles chart? The Beatles… Nah, they were in EMI studios working on their 1967 masterpiece. The Stones? The Hollies? Small Faces? The Supremes? Dusty? …. Nope, our top three had Val Doonican at 3, The Seekers at 2, and Tom “The voice” Jones on top of the pile with “The Green, Green grass of home”. Changes were definitely in the air though, as witnessed by one 45 released on 16th December 1966: “Hey Joe” by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. This would blow the UK music aristocracy apart with it’s moving of sonic of sonic boundaries, and soon shot into the UK top ten in January. 1967 was just round the corner and our radios and televisions would be introduced to the new sounds and delights of Hendrix, The Pink Floyd, Kaleidoscope, The Doors, Move and many, many more new and exciting artists. Merry Christmas!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

December 7, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 11 Blue Note 45s

The iconic status of Blue Note’s catalogue of LPs from the 1950s and 60s in the field of funky and soulful modern jazz is, of course, a testament to the high quality of its recording artists, the general excellence of the music and the production values instilled by owners Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff and perfected by audio engineer Rudy Van Gelder (RIP). However, it would be fair to state that the cover art, designed for the most part by Reid Miles, and with informative sleeve notes by the cream of contemporary jazz critics, together form an integral part of both the listening experience and the overall modernist package. Of those who own the vinyl, especially, who can disassociate the music of, say, John Coltrane’s Blue Train from its cover, or Dexter Gordon’s Our Man in Paris?

One consequence of this is that this most revered of labels tends to be valued for its 33 rpm products almost exclusively, something perhaps a little unusual for the world of mod music collectors. So it may come as a surprise to some (it was to me) to find out that, in addition to the 400+ LPs recorded on Blue Note between 1955 and 1972, the same period also saw something in the region of 350 7” 45 rpm singles released by the label. A handful of rare export copies came in picture sleeves, but on the whole we’re talking blue and blue and white label in paper bag territory.

The first thing to say is that virtually all the singles were sides already cut for an LP. Certainly this holds true for the ‘A’ sides, though a notable exception is the 1958 vocal version of Horace Silver’s ‘Señor Blues’ (see number two in list). The ‘A’ sides are overwhelmingly the ‘catchiest’ track on the LP, and in some cases, such as Horace Silver’s Tokyo Blues LP (1962), as many as three tracks were released on separate singles (as parts 1 & 2), such were the commercial possibilities of that finger-snapping record. Some tracks recorded in the studio for an album were edited in length for the singles or divided across both sides as ‘Parts 1 & 2’. Whether always the same take is something I haven’t yet been able to ascertain.

In future articles, we will look in more depth into the Blue Note singles catalogue (even acknowledging some of the 78s that were released from 1939 to 1955). This will involve examining the social context for their releases and their audience and reception compared with the albums. For now, though, here is an introductory selection of 10 major releases, many of which have been played over the years on the mod scene.

 


sonny_rollins

01. Sonny Rollins, ‘Decision (pts 1 & 2)’ (1957) – Blue Note-45-1669

After nine LPs for Prestige, New York-born tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins recorded four for Blue Note between December 1956 and November ’57. Four singles were culled from these sessions, including this marvellous mid-tempo slice of soulful hard-bop taken from the 1957 LP now known as Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 (BLP-1542). A stellar line-up featuring future Miles Davis pianist Wynton Kelly, drummer Max Roach, bassist Gene Ramey and trumpeter Donald Byrd trace out over 8 minutes the transition from bebop to soul jazz.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


02. Horace Silver Quintet (with Bill Henderson), ‘Señor Blues’ (1958) –Blue Note-45-1710

Horace Silver initially recorded this Latin-tinged tune as an instrumental in late 1956 for the 6 Pieces of Silver LP (BLP1539) and a shorter, alternate take was duly released as a single coupled with ‘Cool Eyes’ from the same session. Then, in 1958, a new lyric version, with a different line-up (though Donald Byrd remained) was recorded with Chicago-born actor and vocalist Bill Henderson. Apparently one of the labels best-selling 45s, ‘Señor Blues’ turned up on the excellent 1993 compilation Blue ‘n’ Groovy. Henderson, who passed away earlier this year at the age of 90, also recorded two singles with Jimmy Smith in 1958.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


03. Herbie Hancock, ‘Watermelon Man’/ ‘Three Bags Full’ (1962) – Blue Note 45-1862

Covered by John Hendricks, Mongo Santamaría and Manfred Mann, among others, Chicago-born pianist and composer Herbie Hancock’s ‘Watermelon Man’ is now a jazz standard both in this, its original form, and the electro-funk version he made over ten years later for the 1973 Head Hunters LP. Some see this track, taken from debut LP Takin’ Off as the first blueprint of one of the label’s key signatures of the next five or six years: the inclusion on an LP of at least one exotically-titled funky, latin-tinged soul-jazz number which, in edited form at least, could get dance floors moving. Featuring Dexter Gordon on tenor sax, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and, with Hancock, a rhythm section comprising Billy Higgins (drums) and Butch Warren (bass), ‘Watermelon Man’ was written with commercial success in mind and evokes from Hancock’s childhood the cry of a Chicago street vendor and the rhythmic beat of his wagon wheels.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


04. Jimmy Smith, ‘Can Heat’/’Matilda Matilda’ (1963) – Blue Note 45-1905

Taken from his penultimate Blue Note LP, Rockin’ the Boat (BLP4141), featuring Lou Donaldson on alto sax, ‘Can Heat’ is just one of over 40 singles released by Jimmy Smith on the Blue Note label between 1955 and 1972. This one, a nice slice of mid-tempo r & b/soul jazz, is classic mid-60s Smith, one for getting the dance floor bubbling as opposed to an out-and-out mover. A lovely tune, though, for relaxing to with a glass of cool beer or camomile tea for more adventurous souls.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


05. Stanley Turrentine, ‘River’s Invitation’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note 45-1917

Another stalwart of Blue Note’s soulful side, Pittsburgh tenor man Stanley Turrentine (1934-2000) had already recorded with R & B heavyweights Lowell Fulsom and Earl Bostic before teaming up with Max Roach in 1959. In 1960, he married organist Shirley Scott, going on to record with her for Prestige and Impulse! ‘River’s Invitation’, a sparkling orchestral version of Percy Mayfield’s gospel-drenched blues, is taken from Joyride (BST84201) and features Herbie Hancock and guitarist Kenny Burrell.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


06. Lee Morgan, ‘The Rumproller’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note-45-1918

Readers of our recent top 10 soul-jazz LPs will know that trumpeter Lee Morgan’s ‘The Sidewinder’ (both as single and LP) was a massive success for Blue Note in 1964. ‘The Rumproller’, released in late 65/early 66, was the follow-up single and LP (though in the meantime Morgan had recorded the excellent Search for the New Land). A funky blues in the ‘Sidewinder’ fashion, this track was written by pianist Andrew Hill, one of Blue Note’s more experimental artists whose LPs for the label are highly recommended.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


08. Lee Morgan, ‘Cornbread’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note-45-1930
Recorded at the end of the funky summer of 1965, the Cornbread LP (BST84222) reached the Billboard top 10 when it was finally released in early ’67. Featuring the great ballad ‘Ceora’, the record holds a special place in this writer’s heart as the first Blue Note LP he bought as a teenager. The title track, another infectious bit of bluesy funk, was released as a single.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE



09. Duke Pearson, ‘Sweet Honey Bee’/’Ready Rudy?’ (1967) Blue Note-45-1931
The next single in the catalogue after ‘Cornbread’, ‘Sweet Honey Bee’, by in-house Blue Note pianist and composer Duke Pearson was taken from a late ’66 LP of the same name. At this time, Blue Note was often pairing its funky players with modal modernists and here Miles Davis bassist Ron Carter provides a more spacious and contemplative feel to the rhythm section. Flautist James Spalding, though, dominates with the melody that structures this bouncy mid-tempo track.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


10. Lou Donaldson, ‘Alligator Boogaloo’/’Rev Moses’ (1967) Blue Note-45-1934

Coming on like a slower-tempo ‘Hot Barbecue’ (Jack McDuff), with Lonnie Smith at the organ, this Lou Donaldson swinging groove remains a bona fide mod jazz favourite. Though the album version weighs in at over six minutes, the single, as can be seen from the picture, is an edited version of less than 3 minutes and thus ideal for the discotheque. However, many mods will want to find the (original) vinyl LP for the iconic cover of Peggy Moffitt wearing a psychedelic Rudi Gernreich gown.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


11. Bobby Hutcherson, ‘Ummh’ (pts 1 & 2) (1970) Blue Note – 1966
And so into 1970! This list is completed with a brief homage to the late great vibes player Bobby Hutcherson (1941-2016). LA-born Hutcherson was a regular featured artist at Blue Note and played on key dates such as Eric Dolphy’s Out to Lunch (1964). His own series of dates for the label, including Dialogue (1965), Components (1966) and Happenings (1967) are among the most thoughtful and atmospheric in the entire catalogue. By the time of San Francisco (1970), he had moved from the fringes of the avant-garde into the realm of jazz fusion and funk. Taken from this album, Ummh (pts 1 & 2) features Jazz Crusader Joe Sample on electric piano, John Williams on fender bass, drummer Mickey Roker and tenor sax player Harold Land (he that inspired the title of a song by Yes). It is one relentless gargantuan groove which hopefully Bobby above is still playing along to.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


Postscript
In 1998, Dean Rudland compiled a selection of Blue Note 45s under the title ‘Blue 45s-the ultimate jukebox’. I don’t have a copy of this, but it might still be available and will no doubt have more useful information.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

December 6, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 10 – Ten Classic Soul-Jazz LPs, 1958-1967

Jazz for Modernists 10 – Ten Classic Soul-Jazz LPs, 1958-1967

Ok folks, after veering off into free improvisation and progressive rock, it’s time to steer our jazz ship back to the (perhaps) less stormy, but equally exciting, waters of soul. Sometime in the mid-1950s, partly in direct contrast to ‘cool’ or ‘West Coast’ jazz, boppers on the East Coast and in Detroit and Philadelphia began to infuse their modern jazz with healthy new doses of rhythm and blues, swing, Latin and gospel. The subsequent sound, as practised by groups such as Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, the Horace Silver Quintet and the various combos of Clifford Brown, Cannonball Adderley and Sonny Rollins, became known as
hard bop.

Before long, much of this music was being described as ‘funky’ and ‘soulful’, terms denoting the down-home earthiness of the blues and the call-and-response spiritual union of black gospel music. As early as 1953, Silver had recorded ‘Opus de Funk’ and Blakey the drum piece ‘Nothing but the Soul’ for the 10” Blue Note LP Horace Silver Trio Vol. 2 and Art Blakey-Sabu (Blue Note 5034). The gospel influence was clearer on Silver’s ‘The Preacher’, originally released in 1955 on the 10” Horace Silver Quintet, Vol. 2 (BLP 5062), a collection also featuring a track entitled ‘Hippy’.

horace_silver_trio_vol-_2

Horace Silver Trio Vol. 2 and Art Blakey-Sabu, 1953 (Blue Note 5034).

Anyway, as the 50s rolled on, ‘soul’ became an increasingly important ingredient in the hard bop vocabulary, often identified in track titles. Examples from 1957 include Cannonball Adderley’s ‘Another kind of Soul’, Milt Jackson’s ‘Plenty Plenty Soul’ and Horace Silver’s ‘Soulville’ (also the title of a track and LP by Ben Webster). Though ‘soul-jazz’ wasn’t really a distinct, recognized genre before 1959, the fusion of r & b and gospel vocal music perfected around this time by Ray Charles (what in future would be called soul) was seeping into the jazz idiom. This was virtually inevitable the great man was an accomplished jazz pianist and arranger (taught by the equally great Quincy Jones back in 1948 in Seattle) and Atlantic, his label, had been recording the Modern Jazz Quartet since early ’56.

What follows is a selection of ten LPs, one each from years 1958-1967, which forms a short introduction to soul-jazz. It’s not a ‘best of’, but something charting the development and variety of the genre during its glory years. Of course soul-jazz continued to evolve after 1967, but that’s another story.

220px-soulbrothers_raycharlesmiltjackson

1. Ray Charles & Milt Jackson, Soul Brothers (Atlantic), 1958 (1957)

The first of two 1957-8 collaborations between MJQ vibes man Milt ‘Bags’ Jackson and Ray Charles (the other, Soul Meeting, was held back until 1961), this is an important stage in the evolution of soul-jazz. Though a trained bopper, Jackson was a member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, at the time synonymous with the rather formal chamber jazz style. That Atlantic should pair him with their gospel-drenched blues genius Ray Charles was recognition that cool jazz could swing and a clear indication that future soul-jazz would benefit from the metronomic structure of cool rhythm sections (MJQ drummer Connie Kay is on both dates). Another important feature is the guitar, played by Skeeter Best on Soul Brothers and Kenny Burrell on Soul Meeting. The title track is by Quincy Jones, life-long friend of Charles and a huge influence on later orchestral settings for soul-jazz. WATCH VIDEO

220px-moanin_art_blakey

2. Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Moanin’ (Blue Note), 1959 (1958)

An essential album for any serious jazz modernist. Featuring 20-year-old Lee Morgan (trumpet), Benny Golson (tenor sax), Jymie Merritt (bass) and Bobby Timmons (piano), drummer-leader Art Blakey provides the backbone for an excellent and varied session of hard bop. Known today as ‘Moanin’’, after the Timmons-penned opening track, the album was released as Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Leonard Feather’s notes describe the opening chorus of ‘Moanin’’ as “the quintessence of funk, based on the classic call-and-response pattern, with Bobby’s simple phrases (focused on the tonic) answered by the horns and rhythm punctuations on straight, churchy pairs of chords (B Flat and F)”. Quite so, and, heard once, it remains lodged in the brain along with images of New York skyscrapers and men in pork-pie hats. Shorter vocal versions were recorded soon after by Bill Henderson and Lambert, Hendricks and Ross. WATCH VIDEO

220px-them_dirty_blues_cover

3. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet, Them Dirty Blues (Riverside), 1960

With pianist Bobby Timmons providing the link with Blakey’s Moanin’, this might well be the first bona-fide classic soul-jazz LP (though much hype surrounded the previous Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco). Leader and alto sax player Julian ‘Cannonball’ Adderley had recently excelled on Miles Davis’s timeless modal classic Kind of Blue, but his forte was definitely funky hard bop and soul-jazz. Them Dirty Blues contains three absolute classics of the soul-jazz genre: Timmons’s ‘Dat Dere’, a version of Duke Pearson’s ‘Jeannine’ and cornet player Nat Adderley’s ‘Work Song’. Mod dancers will be familiar with Oscar Brown Jr’s vocal versions of all three. WATCH VIDEO

220px-the_honeydripper_album

4. Jack McDuff, The Honeydripper (Prestige), 1961

Used in American churches since its invention in 1935 and then in pop, swing and rhythm & blues (Ethel Smith, Fats Waller, Count Basie, Wild Bill Davis, Bill Doggett), the Hammond organ, most notably the B-3, would soon become a fundamental instrument in soul-jazz. Jimmy Smith started his incredible run of Blue Note LPs in 1956 with A New Sound… A New Star and readers may be surprised not to see Back at the Chicken Shack in the list. Well, though the best of the Blue Notes are great, personally I prefer the big band sound of his Verve debut Bashin’ (see 5) and The Cat (1964). So, 1961’s soul-jazz organ spot goes to Jack McDuff’s The Honeydripper, the Illinois man’s third LP for Prestige. From the opening blast of ‘Whap!’, McDuff’s quartet (with tenor sax legend Jimmy Forrest, drummer Ben Dixon and the great Grant Green on guitar) never falters. WATCH VIDEO

220px-bashjimmy

5. Jimmy Smith, Bashin’: The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith (Verve), 1962

Smith’s first date for Verve was with a stellar big band led by Oliver Nelson, whose recording for Impulse, The Blues and the Abstract Truth (1961) will be familiar to fans of Eric Dolphy, Freddie Hubbard and Bill Evans. The arrangements of standards ‘Walk on the Wild Side’ (Bernstein & David), ‘Ol’ Man River’ and Ellington’s ‘In a Mellow Tone’ are so tight and clean that, when it arrives, the Hammond screams out at the listener. The title track, an original played just as a trio, is, in contrast, fairly gentle for a bashin’, while Nelson’s ‘Step Right Up’ echoes the jaunty Copeland feel of ‘Hoe-Down’ from the Abstract Truth LP. A fine record. WATCH VIDEO

220px-lee_morgan-the_sidewinder_album_cover

6. Lee Morgan, The Sidewinder (Blue Note), 1964 (1963)

A comeback date for the young Morgan, The Sidewinder’s title track set the bar high for finger-snapping soul-jazz/funky hard bop in both its musical execution and commercial success (the album and a parts 1&2 single of the title track made the Billboard top 100). An LP format of sorts thus evolved around 1964-8, whereby a swinging blues would be followed by two or three hard bop blowouts, a ballad and maybe something modal (though the greatest Blue Note dates of the period transcended this pattern). Echoing the bodily movements implied by The Sidewinder, examples of the mid-sixties Blue Note house style include Morgan’s The Rumproller (1965), Hank Mobley’s The Turnaround! (1965) and Horace Silver’s wonderful The Jody Grind (1966). Shorter versions of The Sidewinder by Woody Herman (with vocal), Soulful Strings, Quincy Jones and Kai Winding are popular on the dance floor. WATCH VIDEO

220px-song_for_my_father_horace_silver_album_-_cover_art

7. Horace Silver, Song for My Father (Blue Note), 1965 [1964]

As already stated, pianist Silver was at the ground zero of soul-jazz. His Cape Verdean heritage drove him on to exploring folk tunes and Latin, African and other rhythms which he combined expertly in the funky stew. By 1964, his style had absorbed some of the modal touches of players like Bill Evans and McCoy Tyner, making his 1960s recordings for Blue Note amongst the most atmospheric and exotic in the hard bop and soul-jazz cannons. Recorded with different line-ups over two dates in ’63 and ’64, Song for My Father is the crown jewel in a golden run of albums Silver recorded for the label. Check out this 1968 live version of the title track here: WATCH VIDEO

chile_con_soul

8. Jazz Crusaders, Chile con Soul (Pacific Jazz), 1965

The very epitome of Latin-inspired 60s funk, the Jazz Crusaders deserve a place in any top ten of soul-jazz. Throughout the decade, the combination of Joe Sample (piano), Wilton Felder (tenor sax), Hubert Laws (flute), Wayne Henderson (trombone), Stix Hooper (drums), Al McKibbon (bass) and others produced an incredible sequence of smooth and swinging albums for the Pacific Jazz label, including the classic 1965 ‘Chile con soul’. Highlights include opening salvo ‘Aguadulce’, a second version of ‘Tough Talk’, ‘Tacos’ and ‘Dulzura’. Warning – once heard, this music is addictive. WATCH VIDEO

220px-its_uptown

9. The George Benson Quartet, It’s Uptown (Columbia), 1966

A wonderful LP by a master guitarist, sounding as fresh today as it must have done 50 years ago. Taking his inspirations from Gershwin standards, Marvin Gaye, boleros, bossas and more, George Benson produces a record as varied and virtuosic as anything in the soul-jazz guitar canon. Though stylistically different, it shares the adventurous spirit of Davy Graham’s Folk, Blues and Beyond. For sheer excitement, opener ‘Clockwise’ and closing number ‘Mynah Bird Blues’ are hard to beat. The contributions of organist Lonnie Smith are particularly effective throughout. Dancers will want to check out ‘Summertime’, ‘Ain’t that Peculiar’ and ‘Jaguar’ (where Benson gets his guitar to sound like a flute!) WATCH VIDEO

groovin_with_the_soulful_strings_1967_lp_cover

10. The Soulful Strings, Groovin’ With the Soulful Strings (Cadet), 1967

Although Blue Note would divide some of their funkier extended tracks into parts 1&2 singles (if anyone’s got a nice 7” copy of Horace Silver’s ‘The Jody Grind’ please write in), it was not really responsible for the mid-sixties shift towards shorter, bite-sized chunks of soul-jazz aimed either at the dance floor or the singles charts. Arguably that was Chess subsidiary Cadet (earlier Argo), which, from 1965 to the 1970s, released a slew of singles and albums usually comprising shorter tunes, many influenced by, or cover versions of, contemporary pop, bossa nova and r & b songs. Amid some admittedly patchy albums between 1965 and 1967, one that definitely stands out from the pack is Groovin’ with the Soulful Strings. Mixing the cream of the Chess house band (including guitarist Phil Upchurch) with violas, violins and cellos, group leader Richard Evans takes us on a strange, at times psychedelic journey from Bach to the Beatles, via Miles Davis. The single ‘Burning Spear’, an Evans original featuring a kalimba (an African traditional instrument known also as the mbira), is big on numerous dance floors, a flute-driven precursor to Johnny Harris’ ‘Stepping Stones’. WATCH VIDEO


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

September 27, 2016 By : Category : Articles Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , , , , ,
0 Comment

Substitute! – The Sounds of the World Cup 1966

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

world_cup

50 years ago this month at Wembley stadium the England football team lifted its first, (and as I type this), only major trophy, the daddy of them all, the World Cup. Watch any programme about the ‘swinging sixties’ and chances are you’ll see clips of Carnaby Street, Twiggy, Mini cars, girls wearing mini skirts and the beautiful gold trophy being held aloft by Bobby Moore on the hallowed Wembley turf. Obviously music also played a major part in this wonderful decade, but everything seemed to come to a wonderous climax in July 1966 when anything seemed possible in Britain, and especially its epicentre, London. So we’re going to take you on a musical journey following England’s progress in the competition along with the music that soundtracked that most glorious of months, July 1966.

freatbeat_James_1

The competition started on 11 July, with England hosting Uruguay which ended in a 0 – 0 draw at Wembley. Six days previously the latest singles chart was awash with classic soul and beat 45’s, most of them homegrown too! A new entry at 49 was the majestic pop-art of “Making time” by The Creation, at 47 we had the soul from London mod club stalwart Geno Washington with “Water”, at 38 stood the Small Faces with “Hey girl” and at 23 were the Stones with their sitar drenched “Paint it black”. The top twenty included the Yardbirds groundbreaking “Over, under, sideways, down” at 12, up thirteen places to 20 stood Chris Farlowe’s “Out of time” and the top three was surely one of the best ever: Ike and Tina’s “River deep, mountain high” at 3, The Beatles “Paperback writer” at 2 and top of the pile, The Kinks majestic “Sunny afternoon”. The album chart was no less stellar, the top ten alone featuring current releases including “Animalisms”, “Small Faces”, “Pet sounds”, “Aftermath” and Georgie Fame’s “Sweet things”. Ironically topping the pile was the soundtrack to “The sound of music” but you can’t have it all! If none of these releases whetted your appetite, a trip to your local record store this week would find new releases from The Miracles “Whole lotta shakin’ in my heart” on Tamla Motown, The Spidells “Find out what’s happening” on Sue and Herbie Goins and the Nightimers club classic “Cruisin” on Parlophone.

freatbeat_James_2

On the 16th July at Wembley, England saw off Mexico 2 – 0, and then on the 20th France were also beaten 2 – 0 by them sending the team into the last sixteen of the tournament with seven points. This week the singles charts saw new entries from Otis Redding with “My lovers prayer”, The Temptations all time Motown classic “Ain’t to proud to beg”, The Lovin’ Spoonful’s claustrophobic transatlantic smash “Summer in the city” and the highest entry, at 29, was the future number one from The Troggs, “With a girl like you”. New albums making an appearance included “Otis Redding’s dictionary of soul” on Atlantic and The Yardbirds self titled final UK album, known by most of us as “Roger the engineer”. Some wonderful new release 45’s available to the British public for the first time this week, and mostly left unsold in the racks, included stellar soul from Donald Height “Talk of the grapevine”, Major Lance “Investigate”, The Orlons “Spinnin’ top”, Edwin Starr’s floor filler “Headline news”, and not forgetting Manchester’s Richard Kent Style with the great blue-eyed mover “Go Go children”.

freatbeat_James_4

On the 23rd July the quarter finals were played which saw England beating Argentina by a slim 1 – 0 margin whilst West Germany thumped Uruguay 4 – 0 up in Sheffield. New entries in the hit parade came from the Pretty things “A house in the country”, Four Tops “Loving you is sweeter than ever” and Bob Dylan’s “I want you”. Meanwhile sweet Georgie Fame swept up to the top spot for a second time with his catchy “Getaway” which stayed there for a solitary week. Meanwhile in the LP charts one of the most influential UK blues albums made its first appearance, “The Bluesbreakers featuring Eric Clapton”, complete with its iconic ‘Eric reading The Beano’ front cover. On television, “Ready, steady, go!” featured performances from Madeline Bell and The Yardbirds (unfortunately, as with most RSG footage, long missing from the archives), and new 45 releases included “Shake your hips” from Slim Harpo on Stateside and the Pye released freakbeat mega-rarity “Hungry” by the 5am event.

freatbeat_James_3

On the 25th July up in Liverpool, West Germany saw off the USSR 2 – 1 to secure their place in the final of the trophy. The next day England were to join them after beating Portugal at Wembley, also with a 2 – 1 victory. The final two teams were now ready for their showpiece showdown four days later. Meanwhile, in the new chart we saw the appearance of two all time greats from across the atlantic when the The Mamas and Papas “I saw her again” and The Beach Boys double sider “God only knows/Wouldn’t it be nice” both crashed into the UK top fifty, both soon to sail into the top ten. This weeks top three was another jaw dropping corker, with The Troggs at 3, Los Bravos Spanish groover “Black is black” at two, and top of the pile, in its iconic Immediate company sleeve, sat Chris Farlowe’s “Out of time”. On the 30th July 1966, below the twin towers of Wembley Stadium, the host nation England played a thrilling final against West Germany, eventually coming out 4 – 2 winners after extra time and a still hotly disputed third England goal. At that moment in time when the trophy was held triumphantly aloft anything seemed possible in the country that “swinged” but fifty years later we’re still waiting for that elusive second trophy… but lets hope you enjoyed our trip through that magical month of July 1966.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

June 21, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:,
0 Comment

UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Collectors Corner 2

“In my lonely room – UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside”

nm_april16_mv

After beginning to make bigger leaps into the UK record buying markets in 1963, the Tamla / Motown / Gordy group found themselves under the umbrella of the EMI subsidiary label, Stateside in October of the same year. Stateside was formed in mid 1962 by EMI to release singles under licence from American labels such as Swan, Wand and Vee-Jay in a similar style to Decca records very successful London American imprint. Licensing tracks from many independent USA labels ensured Stateside released a whole slew of great current rhythm’n’blues and soul releases, and the label soon endeared itself to mods and soul fans on this side of the Atlantic. As well as having hits with Freddy Cannon and Gene Pitney, early releases included such stellar names as The Isley Brothers, Jimmy Reed, Chuck Jackson and The Shirelles. When Oriole’s UK contract with Motown ran out the previous month the new distributor launched its first release on Stateside on 11th October 1963 with Martha and the Vandellas all time classic “Heatwave” (SS228). When sales were quite brisk, the label then released three more singles the following month by Little Stevie Wonder, Mary Wells and Marvin Gaye’s fantastic “Can I get a witness” (SS243).

nm_april16_cc

By January 1964 Motown was causing quite a stir on these shores, being regularly name checked by the UK’s biggest pop combo, The Beatles, who took Mary Wells on tour with them and mentioning Motown artists numerous times in interviews. Add to this the burgeoning underground mod and soul club scene which was hungry for the dance floor friendly sounds coming out of Detroit and it wouldn’t be long before Stateside had a bona-fide hit single on their hands. Between January and April 1964, no less than twelve 45’s were released in the UK, including tracks by The Miracles, The Marvelettes and debut UK releases from The Temptations, “The way you do the things you do” (SS278), and the group that would soon hit the top spot, The Supremes “When the lovelight starts shining thru his eyes (SS257). On May 8th 1964 Stateside released a hook laden single written by Smokey Robinson, and it was sung by Motown’s number one lady of the time, Mary Wells, “My Guy” (SS288). Two weeks later, on the 21st May 1964, “My guy” entered the UK charts at number 37, finally hitting the heady heights of number 5 the following month. Berry Gordy’s company had now scored their first of many big hit singles in Britain.

nm_april16_kw.

Between May ’64 and March 1965 Stateside issued a further 30 singles, including debuts from The Velvelettes, Earl Van Dyke, Four Tops and Kim Weston. Most of these were steady sellers, with titles by Marvin Gaye, Martha and the Vandellas, Mary Wells and The Temptations all scoring top fifty placings. On 28th August, and eight months after their initial flop, The Supremes “Where did our love go” (SS327) was released to an impressed public, who bought the single in droves, sending it number three in the chart. Less than two months later, and capitalising on the nation’s newfound love with the sounds from Motor City, “Baby love” (SS350) was released and hit the top spot soon after, with the group actually having two songs in the top ten at the same time for one week in October! Unfortunately not all releases were massive hits and some are now hard to find. These always sell for good prices when they appear on the market, especially in mint condition. Martha & The Vandellas “In my lonely room” (SS305), Brenda Holloway “Every little bit hurts” (SS307), The Tempations “Why you wanna make me blue” (SS348), Earl Van Dyke “Soul stomp” (SS357), Kim Weston “A little more love” (SS359), Four Tops “Without the one you love” (SS371), Carolyn Crawford “When someone’s good to you” (SS384) and Tony Martin “Talkin’ to your picture” (SS394) are probably the hardest to find, especially the last two. Also coming with a ridiculous price tag, all the Stateside EMI singles were sent to pluggers and radio DJ’s as red and white label demonstration discs and all are extremely collectable, and valuable too!

nm_april16_rb

EMI was also loved to release EP’s and hundreds of them were released across their labels from the early ’50’s to the late ’60’s. After no EP releases on Fontana or Oriole, Stateside bit the bullet and released no less than five of them in the time they were licensing material. Little Stevie Wonder was afforded the only single artist EP, “I call it pretty music but old people call it the blues” (SE1014) which is ridiculously hard to find. There were also four editions of a cracking new EP series, concentrating on material otherwise unavailable in the UK on 45, “R & B Chartmakers”. The series featured some great tracks, including two stellar previously USA only releases from Eddie Holland, “Just ain’t enough love” and “Leaving here”, all came in amazing picture sleeves too. Although steady sellers they’re hard to find in great condition nowadays, expect to pay between £50-£100 for each of them. By March 1965 the label was as big, if not bigger than Atlantic over here in the UK so it came as no surprise that, with a little help from super fan Dave Godin, Berry Gordy signed an exclusive deal with EMI to set up a brand new record company in Britain, Tamla Motown records. On 19th March 1965, clad in an iconic orange and white company sleeve, record stores took release of a new disc, TMG 501, “Stop! in the name of love” by The Supremes and the rest, as they say, is history.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

May 4, 2016 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Rob’s Roundup 3

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Rob’s Roundup

Welcome to part 3 of my new blog where I can chat to you about what’s going on in the NUTsWORLD. Thanks to everyone who made it along to the recent Crossfire and the 18th anniversary party events.

Our new shop is online, we offer you 20% discount on orders before 10 December, just sign up to the NUTs network here. A coupon with promo code number on will be sent out by e-mail once you signed up to apply the 20% discount.

The latest NUTSMAG has a dozen articles from our authors including a look back at the last 25 years of the Mousetrap allnighter ahead of the anniversary in February. Tune into the NUTSCAST which looks back at some of the ace live shows we recorded during 2015 including Le Beat Bespoke 10 performers, and some of the latest record releases reviewed in the NUTSMAG.

We are looking for people with a passion for writing to join the team please drop me a line if you would like to get involved. If you have a passion for films please get in touch we are looking to start a new series recommending some cool flicks to our readers.

Nutty NYE Allnighter/Weekender

Come and celebrate the New Year in style at our Nutty New Year Ball with 3 rooms of magical music. I am delighted to announce the wildest and most exciting band on the scene right now LES GRYS GRYS will see in the new year with us for their only London date, maximum fun and R&B guaranteed. A killer DJ line-up across three rooms with Northern Soul in the ballroom, authentic Mod club sounds in room 2 and sounds from the underground in room 3. Doors open at 9pm and we party right through till 6am. Tickets are £16 in advance or £22 on the door and available from www.newuntouchables.com. For those who are planning to travel or Londoner’s who want to continue partying on new year’s day the Zoo Zoo club night at Blues Kitchen is on with two great live bands and DJ’s.

Le Beat Bespoke 11 – Easter 2016

Le Beat Bespoke 11 lands in swinging London over the Easter bank holiday weekend. Expect Killer live bands & DJ’s, riverboat party, 3 dance floors, guest club nights, light show, dancers & more that will send you spinning into orbit. You can also visit the spectacular new London landmark the FUTURO. A limited amount of early bird tickets are available here – but be quick. For accommodation, travel & program announcements go www.newuntouchables.com

Moustrap 25th Anniversay Allnighter

Mousetrap allnighter silver jubilee is on Sat 20 Feb (Psych) and Sat 5 March (R&B). This will sell out – so advance tickets are advisable and available here. All customers get a FREE 45 on the door. Check out my article in the NUTSMAG on the history of the Mousetrap including some videos of the club taken in the nineties and naughties.

Brixton Got Soul

Finally a club night down the road from me in South London will make a refreshing change after decades of travelling north of the river for a night out listening and dancing to the music I love. Brixton Got Soul launches at Blues Kitchen on Friday 8 Jan. E-mail me at drrobert@btinternet.com for guestlist. The ground floor is the dining area and upstairs the club with a great sound system and stage that is perfect for our live ‘soul revues’. I booked the dynamic GIZELLE SMITH for the launch party live at 10pm followed the house band The Atlantic Soul Orch. Me and a guest DJ will play between and after the bands through till 2.30 am. A wide selection of alcoholic beverages and Soul food is available to book a table go here.

Cheers, Rob Bailey & New Untouchables Team  

Nutstore

Some great reviews and airplay recently, grab a copy on vinyl or CD while stock lasts. The other new release this year was the Mousetrap 24th anniversary 45 both available in the NUTSTORE along with Mousetrap 45’s, Le Beat Bespoke and Modstock Vinyl & CDs, The Action DVD and I’m One-21st Century Mod’s Book, Pins and T-Shirts, via the Nutstore!

RnB Records

I just added a lot of new 45’s to the website and offer 10% discount on any order over £50. Rare 45s and LPs! Clubs Sounds (RnB, Soul Jazz, Latin, Boogaloo, Blues and Funk) Freakbeat/ Garage/ Psych/ Rock/ Blue Eyed Soul, Northern Soul/ Mod Revival & Punk. Go to: RnB Records here!

Network

Why Join NUTs Network?
Get the latest NUTs news as priority, including premiere events like Le Beat Bespoké and Brighton. Network members get first opportunity to purchase tickets and receive discounts on merchandise and a chance to enter network competitions and win great prizes. It’s FREE to join and takes five minutes to create your profile. The NUTS Network is a cool, fresh place to keep in touch and meet new faces or chat with old friends! You can share pictures, videos, music, customise your own page and join the many clubs and forums to chatter away or promote your interests! Join the Network now!

Advertise with A push!

New Ad Package Deals For 2016 – Including full Event Sponsorship are available now! Contact: Rob Bailey@newuntouchables.com

Or you may need your own bespoke one-stop service (design, web, magazines, marketing, e-newletters) then please contact Pip! Pip! 

So errrr… What exactly is the New Untouchables?

The New Untouchables is a London, UK-based organisation promoting 21st century modernist & sixties underground music culture, through various methods including; nightlife, events, media, film, fashion, scootering, record collecting, with both UK and International Events!

Cheers, Rob Bailey & New Untouchables Team

Feedback here please folks! 

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

November 27, 2015 By : Category : Articles Front Page General News Picks Scene Tags:, ,
0 Comment

The Beatles Fan Club Christmas Discs

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Collectors Corner 2

NUTS Christmas Special

It goes without saying that the new Beatles #1’s DVD will be top of a lot of Fab Four fans Christmas present lists this year. Stuffed full of remastered videos and TV performances from 1962 to 1970, it’s a fans visual wet dream come true. But way back in their heyday the group had a yearly present for members of their fan club which were firstly visually stunning with fold out sleeves and inserts, and secondly chock full of exclusive messages, skits and music which to this day have mostly never been given an official release. Seven singles and one LP were sent out in total and today we’re going to have a little look through the contents of each one.

Christmas 1963

A mere year after the band hit the UK charts in 1962 The Beatles were by far the hottest band in Britain and Europe which soon led to their own monthly magazine and a fan club was soon started too. In October 1963 it was decided to send out a special flexi disc to members of the club in time for the freezing cold December of 1963. Recorded on 17th October, and scripted by well-known music scribe Tony Barrow, the disc featured skits and renditions of “Good King Wenceslas” and, erm, “Rudolph the red-nosed Ringo”! Delivered on 6th December “The Beatles Christmas record” was issued in a lovely yellow card stapled gatefold sleeve which was extremely fragile and is prone to falling apart. It’s the hardest disc to find, especially in good condition with its original brown envelope. This beautiful artefact is valued at over £100, up to £200 in pristine condition
with the envelope.

Christmas 1966

By 1964 Beatlemania had swept the globe and on 26th October the boys were back at Abbey Road recording the second flexidisc, imaginatively titled “Another Beatles Christmas record”. This one was delivered on 18th December and featured more skits, messages to fans and versions of “Jingle bells” and “Oh can you wash your fathers shirt?” in its grooves. This, like the rest that followed, was issued in a standard unlaminated card sleeve with a 7″ paper insert. 1965 saw the recording of the third flexi, the even more boringly titled “The Beatles third Christmas Record” featured such delights as an off-key “Yesterday”, “Happy Christmas to Ya List’nas” and “Auld lang syne” and a snippet of the Four Tops recent hit “It’s the same old song”. This was posted out on 17th December just in time for Christmas day! By the time the 1966 flexi disc was recorded in October the band were in the middle of recording the best ever single to reach #2, “Strawberry fields forever” and unsurprisingly the skits found in the previous years were replaced with a collection of small surreal songs around the idea of pantomine. The first to be produced by George Martin, “Pantomine, everywhere it’s Christmas” was posted out on 16th December, this also came with a newsletter insert. These three discs are the easiest to find as they were released at the height of Beatlemania, discs with inserts usually fetch between £60-100 depending on condition, but a premium is again added if they are still in the original tan envelopes.

Christmas 1967

By 1967 The Beatles had embraced psychedelia and also released the years’ defining rock album “Sgt Pepper’s lonely hearts club band” but still found time to pop into EMI on the 25th November to record their latest gift to their fans, “Christmas time is here again!”. Despatched on 15th December and again produced by George Martin this was a fantastic collage of fake BBC radio auditions with the original track “Christmas time is here again” appearing at various points of the record. This track was the only piece to ever receive a proper release when it appeared on the B side of “Free as a bird” in the mid ”90’s. It came clad in a marvellous Pepper-esque collage sleeve and insert. By the time winter 1968 came around the band were now Apple artists and slowly beginning to fall apart. Tellingly this single featured snippets recorded separately by band members and put together by radio DJ and good friend Kenny Everett. At nearly eight minutes long, “The Beatles 1968 Christmas record” was posted out on 20th December, but rather than coming with a fan club insert this one had a Superpix advert peddling some rather fetching posters of the band. The last flexi disc “Happy Christmas 1969” was posted on 19th December 1969 when the band were no longer together and the same as the previous year it was made up of seperately recorded snippets, with George hardly featuring at all. A two-sided affair, the flexi came complete with a two page letter from fan club secretary Freda Kelly. The sleeve was a beautiful full colour affair designed by Ringo and his son Zac. These discs are slightly harder to find than the 1964-66 discs and usually sell between £70-150 especially with the inserts which always seem to be missing!

Christmas 1968

By December 1970 all members had released hit solo singles and albums and The Beatles themselves had ceased to exist as a recording unit. But as one last present to their fans the club decided to collect all the previous recordings and press them up on a full length Apple 12″ LP. It doesn’t seem there were many members left by December 1970 as the album is ridiculously hard to find and easily fetches £250+ if you can find one. One warning though, it has been heavily bootlegged over the years and in good quality too. Collecting the full set can be a hard task but is a great way of capturing a different side to that fantastic band… happy hunting, and a happy-er Christmas and a “Merry Grew Year” to you all!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

December 1, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, ,
0 Comment