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Newbreed – Allah Las

Jenni and Holly had a chat with Pedrum Siadatian, the lead guitarist and vocalist with Allah Las ahead of headline show at Euro YeYe, Spain on Thursday 3 August.

1. Some of you guys met through school and working at Amoeba Records, can you tell us a bit about what brought you to start playing together and how you became The Allah-Las?

Once Spencer and I started getting acquainted at Amoeba, we shared our individual bedroom recording projects with each other and started jamming just for fun. Soon-after, we asked Matt to join us and drum because he was our friend and had similar tastes. Then they asked Miles to sing cause they knew him from high school and none of us wanted to sing.

2. Having worked in a record store prior to the band and all being big music fans, what different musical influences does each member bring to the band? Do you try to get this across in the music?

We have a lot of overlapping tastes but each of us has certain tendencies that the other doesn’t so it kind of balances out- popman, worldman, folkman, caveman.

3. Obviously California is musically one of the richest places to live with so much history and new music, how influenced are you by living there and other music coming from the area?

Bands are products of their environments just like people are, so I think whether we wanted to or not that Los Angeles was gonna come across in our music to some degree. We are really into the Byrds, Love, Seeds, Rain Parade etc.., in terms of paying homage to those influences, we did it best on our second record.

4. You’ve also had a very strong art direction with your artwork and videos, are there other influences outside of music which you draw from?

Yeah – books, movies, art, friends, and conversations. they’re all equally important.

5. Nick Waterhouse took on production duties on Worship the Sun, how did that come about? Do you have plans to work together again in the future? Or indeed are there any other people on your wish list to work with?

it came about cause he helped us with the first record and it seemed like a good move to work with him again. We also spent a lot of time with Dan Horne in the studio doing overdubs and mixing. I’m into the idea of recording ourselves for the next one!

6. Following on from Worship the Sun, Calico Review takes things a bit further and a slightly darker turn. Can you tell us a bit about the writing of the album and recording process for it?

We were just writing songs separately, a continuation of the process that had started with Worship the Sun. When it came time to start working on Calico everyone started showing the rest of the band the songs they had written and we learned em, demoed em, then recorded em proper off-and-on over the course of a year.

7. Your weekly installment of Reverberation Radio has become a bit of an institution for fans, how did that come about?

Miles had a graveyard shift time slot at KXLU every Wednesday from 2-6am and we would all go down to the station, bring records, and hang out. We got kicked off the air for playing too much old stuff, and with the help of our friend Robbie, we turned it into a weekly podcast that’s been going on for about 5 years. The four of us in the band take turns contributing, as well as six of our friends and the occasional guest.

8. What is the 60s underground scene like in LA? Is this something you are involved in as a band?

There is a small one but I don’t feel like that’s our vibe. We never wanted to be a full on 60’s homage group, even though the video for Tell Me contributed to that.

9. It feels like you’ve been touring pretty much nonstop over the past year. You’ve toured extensively across America, Europe and Australia since the release of Calico Review – what have some of the highlights been?

Some of the best shows have been the shows where we didn’t know we had an audience and loads of people came, like Cape Town, Tel Aviv, Budapest, Moscow, Bali.

10. Are you looking forward to playing at Euro Yeye? What can we expect from the set? When you record, are you always thinking about how it will sound live?

Yes, we’re gonna try to do some stuff we’ve never done live. No, that comes after it’s done!

11. As you’ve been spending a lot of time touring, has this given you much time to check out some new (old) music? What’s been your soundtrack on the tour bus over the last few months?

I’ve been listening to my friend Maston’s record that’s gonna be coming out this fall, it’s really great instrumental/soundtrack music. Also, Chris Lucey, the Only Ones, and VU always.

12. Calico Review came out last year, what are your plans for the rest of 2017? Focussing on touring or will you be heading back into the studio?

Yeah we have a short west coast tour in September but otherwise, we’re gonna start working on the next record this winter!

Band Members: Matthew Correia, Spencer Dunham, Miles Michaud, Pedrum Siadatian

Discography:
Albums

Allah-Las (2012)
Worship The Sun (2014)
Calico Review (2016)
Singles
“Catamaran”/”Long Journey” – Pres, 2011
“Tell Me (What’s On Your Mind)”/”Sacred Sands” – Innovative Leisure, 2012
“Don’t You Forget It” – Record Store Day split w/Nick Waterhouse, 2012
“Had It All”/”Every Girl” – Innovative Leisure, 2013
“501-415″/”No Werewolf” – Innovative Leisure, 2014
“Famous Phone Figure” – Mexican Summer, 2016
“Could Be You” – Mexican Summer, 2016

Main Site:  allah-las.com/

Social Networks:
Facebook Click Here
Instagram Click Here
Twitter Click Here
Soundcloud Click Here


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Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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July 17, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Interviews Picks Psych USA Tags:, ,
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Newbreed – Las Munjitas del Fuzz

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We started together as Doctor Explosion in the springtime of 1989. We were the first original line up under this name and we did hundreds of shows and five albums plus some singles and eps till 2001 when the original line up splits up, although i decide to keep going with different members as Dr Explosion after that date till nowadays. In 1993 after reading an article about obscure Spanish bands in the 60s, i discovered about Las Monjitas del Jeep, a group of real nuns who consider themselves as “ye yes”, “we are YE YEs but of the type that don’t get in troubles”. They were living in a convent and done their shopping in a Jeep. Fascinated by the idea of this group of religious devoted nuns who had such a cool gear (seen in pics such as Gibson 335, Grestch guitar, etc).

It was after that that I proposed to Felix and Varo to start a parallel band under the name of Las Monjitas del Surf to play spontaneously at our local temple, the music bar La Foli, a year after in 1994 we rescued the idea to play with another guitarist (Marcos Montoto, who we did at least two shows with) under the name of Las Monjitas del Fuzz. After that we did a tour in Spain with Lightning Beat Man in 1996 as his backing band.

We were very busy as Dr Explosion that time during the 90s so we used las Monjitas to do punctual shows randomly. After that, in 2001 with the new members of Dr Explosion we played at the Wild Weekend in Benidorm under the name of Las Munjitas. I think it was a mistake by Josh Collins to change the name of the band, the O for the U, but maybe not and it was only genius from Josh!! Bravo!! so when Varo last year (2016) proposed we get back together with Felix (the original line up of dr explosion) under las Monjitas del fuzz name I rescued the U in MUNJITAS from Josh’s idea, cause it sounds like MOON-hittas, in English and esthetically the name looks better with the same U as FUZZ.

As Las Munjitas del Fuzz we have been active since Varo called me in April of 2016.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

We have lots of music influences in common, all the fuzzy mid 60s garage, and late 60s acid Pysch garage with raw strident guitar tones, but also all British 60s bands, 50s Rhythm and Blues, good Rock and Roll, Soul music and jazz and obviously much more. We know that Las Munjitas del fuzz land is the territory for the most extreme fuzzy and pysch garage sounds with creepy Spanish lyrics from the vision of a tormented nun who lives in these crazy modern times

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Around Gijon, Bobkat 65 cause although they are still in the process of learning to find their own way and self-confidence there is a real truth and love in what they do that you can feel in the spirit of their songs that makes them more real and special than other “professional” musicians. Check them out, they have a new album on Get Hip Records! I also spend part of my time in Austin, Texas that I consider also my area so, there I could mention hundreds of examples of good music like The Black Angels, Amplified Heat, Mike Flannigin (best hammond organ combo in town) Sweet Spirit, The Ripe, The Uglybeats, The Bellfuries, A Giant Dog, Sweet Spirit,The Thunderchiefs and many more.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Here in Gijon it is quite boring I might say, lots of no talented and pedant shit over polished and enhanced by music business media, some indie rock song writers with pretentious political intentions but nothing really exciting except some real talented people like Fee Reega, Captains and a few others like Bobkat 65, Las Potras and Peralta.

In Austin is an amazing community of talented musicians with hundreds of good bands around.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Fuzzy Psych Garage Punk

6. What are your live shows like?

Mystic Ecstasy, Out of Control, Tremors and Levitation, Religious Fervor and Mass Mess

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

My influences in Music are very wide, as somebody said once, I like all the good music and a bit of the bad stuff. Las Munjitas only play covers for now but I write my own lyrics in Spanish that gives the songs a new vision. We have the intention of writing our own material for the next records. it is very interesting and fun to see from a language point of view how changing that affects the final result. Even though I respect all the accents of the melody by just changing the meaning of the lyrics and the sounds of the words you can export a song to a new dimension, where that recording means something totally different to a new group of people. I love playing with that, it’s a in joke for us to transform the songs we have always loved into something really stupid to laugh about, we don’t respect anything.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

God

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I write the lyrics. As I said above we play covers, golden Garage hits from the mid-60s, that we used to play in our setlist in the 90s, plus some other new. When Varo asked me to get the band back together again I thought it was a good idea to do it under the name of Las Munjitas. It made no sense to play those songs again with their original lyrics, so as long as we were now Las Munjitas del Fuzz and not Dr Explosion I started to write new lyrics with the vision of a real catholic nun.

Catholicism has been a huge part of our education since we are all coming from deep Catholic families, Varo and I were both in Catholic schools. So, in most of the lyrics I want to sound like a real nun with an ancient conservative traditional mindset trying to understand and describe today’s World. Trying to understand today’s young people and the music scene, and at the same time trying to be part of it, but with her own spirit. Like a Christian rock band but with Garage Punk tunes, sometimes I go a bit wild with the lyrics like “Let’s go in 69” where i describe the sexual act of a 69 between two nuns. but aren’t we all sinners? “And you know that temptation and the devil is always there. And well, the attitude of the lyrics is surprising, like…”Oh my god!! it is a 69!!” Although there are also explicit descriptions of oral sex. it is real as life itself where tragedy and comedy walk together hand in hand.”

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

I like a lot “Satan sal de mi” which is our first single and the new video we’ll put on youtube soon. A song by another artist it could mention hundreds but I am gonna say “I am a lover not a fighter” by Lazy Lester because I met him last Saturday after his show and had a beer with him, and because I love that single!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I think the underground scene is in a very interesting, there is a lot of cool bands all around the World, and more important, there is a new generation of fans interested in today’s scene with festivals like Levitation in Austin, Liverpool and Angers. I participate as much as I can, producing and recording bands. I have been working with Boogarins, Golden Animals, Dallas Acid, Amplified Heat, The Ripe and Sean Lennon.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Not being arrested by the border patrol when we were shooting our videoclip of “Satan sal de mi” near the Mexican border dressing like nuns. the officer asked us: “Are you guys roman Catholics?”

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Well, Varo lives in Valencia (800 km away) so every time he comes over to Gijon we try to do as much practice and recording as we can. Actually the records we have been putting out are first takes of the first rehearsal we did after 16 years. A large part of our set are songs we used to play in the 90s. We practice at my studio Circo Perrotti where I put mics and record the rehearsal with the intention of hearing the possible mistakes and work on the songs after that. The truth is that we liked the way the songs came out with their imperfections, and we love that fact as important part of the footprint of real music. We have a new single on Slovenly/Shit on the Milk records, with a hidden surprise at the end of the 1st cut. we also have one more single coming up on Groovie Records. We have a recorded lots of hits like “No la van a Bautizar”, “Aun soy Virgen”, “Frivola” or “El Twist de la Genuflexion” that will be included in the Munjitas album.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It is like in any other business, people follow the mainstream, most of the times just a matter of investing money and time, there is a parallel World of talented people doing the most interesting things in the underground and occasionally the massive media discovers one or two of them and gives them bigger exposure

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The Black Angels are my friends, I play with Jake Garcia in The Ripe and he invited me to join them for their show at Primavera Sound, and although I saw them many times before in Austin, that night was special for me. To see Jake my brother on stage having a massive success in my own country, made me feel very proud of him and of the hard work they have been putting into this new record. I also produced the last album of Boogarins “Manual”, great Psych rock with Brazilian roots. I love that band and to work with them in my studio in Spain was an amazing experience. The album was a nominee in the Latin Grammys last year. I am currently working on the production of Micky’s new album in Gijon. Micky from Micky y Los Tonys had some number one hits in Spain and Germany in the 70s and 60s and he is very well known all around Spain.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We are lucky in the that sense as I have my own studio. Apart from Circo Perrotti I’d love to record again with Liam Watson, he is a good old friend and I love what he does, and he recorded us for the first time in 1994

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Well we will play at Euroyeye fest in Gijon this summer and I want to complete our first album. I also want to do our own material for a conceptual psychedelic album based in texts of Santa Teresa de Jesus and the Spanish mystics of the XVI century…

 
Band Members: Sor Alvaro Coalla (Bateria), Sor Felix A. (Asuncion) Dominguez (Bajo, Teclado y Voces), Sor Jorge Munozz Cobo (Voz y Guitarra)

Discography: 2016 Single “Satan Sal de Mi” (Funtastic Dracula Records), 2017 Single “Es el 69” (I shit on the Milk Records), 2017 Single “Pecado” (Groovy Records)

Main Site: CLICK HERE!

Social Networks: FACEBOOK HERE!

Tour Info: CLICK HERE!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Picks Psych Tags:, , ,
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Newbreed – Men Of North Country

We recently caught up with the Men Of North Country (from Tel Aviv) for a nice chat for NUTSMAG, here is what they had to say…

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been recording proper since 2011, performing since 2012. Back in 2007 Yashiv was heard singing along the tunes he was spinning at a party and from there it slowly developed into MONC.

2. influences do the band members have in common?

Soul music.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Our bass player, Jonathan, is also in a band called Taani Esther, which is a brilliant psychedelic pop band that sings in Hebrew.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Tel Aviv is a great city but compared to other cultural Meccas it’s pretty small. So the 60’s scene isn’t big. There’s the Tel Aviv Soul Club, there are some lovely surf bands and retro nights.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

One of the streaming sites (Pandora or Last FM I think) described our music as basically Soul with influences of Mod 79 sounds and Punk 77 music. We’re pretty happy with that. We’d add post punk to the mix as well, especially The Cure.

6. What are your live shows like?

Loud and brassy.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

First of all Northern Soul, Dexy’s and The Cure. After that it’s the usual suspects: The Jam, Motown, Stax, etc. We love doing covers. We did Human League’s Mirror Man in the first album (it’s basically a Motown tune), The Who’s The Seeker for our Magic EP, Lou Pride’s I’m Com’un Home for the second album and we do some more live – Kinks, Standells, Joe Jackson, Solomon Burke and more. I really do despise Radiohead…

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Probably film if we’re talking art.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Doron writes most of the music, and I (Yashiv) write the lyrics. Subjects are mostly personal stuff I go through and some political stuff as well. Coming from where we come from, you can’t really escape that sadly.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

Personally I’d have to say that I dig Running the most now. I call it Northern Soul for The Cure kids. I’m blown away by the string arrangement Boaz has come up with for this one every time I hear it (he’s our drummer and arranger). Fav song by another artist? That’s too tough a question. Just listening to John Bowie now, so let’s go with that ok?

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I run the Tel Aviv Soul Club so I guess I do. And whenever I’m abroad I try to get to a party or a gig. And we perform of course. From the last event I’ve been to in London I think I can describe it as a bit too fuzzy, and too rare. Still the best scene around though.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

I guess the Madness House of Fun Weekender last November was a big thing for us, although once you’re on stage you just do your thing…

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Rehearsals depend on live gigs. We do more of them before gigs naturally. We have a couple of European tours a year (I still count the UK as European for that if you don’t mind…) and we also play in Tel Aviv and the rest of the country every few weeks/months. We’ve just recorded a version of The Jam’s Circus for the Specialized project which is supposed to come out this summer so that’s pretty exciting. I think The Jam would approve with our take. And in August just before the NUT gigs we’re releasing a new single which is always an exciting event for us.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Well, it looks like the world is heading to a click-bate era which isn’t so promising, and so is the music coverage. On the bright side, everything is so accessible these days that you can easily find a place to your liking, musically and media-wise as well.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I love The Coral. And BJM too. And a lot of other stuff as well. Too many to mention.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’ve recorded our Magic EP at the all-analogue Yeah Yeah Yeah studios in Hamburg. Great experience. Wouldn’t mind doing that again. And would love to record with the Skeleton Key guys from Liverpool. Or Andy Lewis in London. He’s our godfather. Or Bob Stanley from St Etienne! Now that would be really something!

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

More gigs and more records. More. Looking forward to our first Brighton visit. Heard so much about it. Gonna comb the beach for rockers!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Interviews News Picks RnB Scene Tags:, ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 16 (episode 25)

*ROLL OVER IMAGE TO SEE CONTROLS*

Join the Baron for the latest NUTSCAST of  Summer 2017


Be sure to tune in to the latest Nutscast Sessions for a full preview of Euro YeYe and the Brighton August Bank Holiday events as we say a fond farewell to the Baron, Graham Lentz as he hosts his last show; with tracks by Gemma & The Travellers, Stone Foundation, Men Of North Country and DJ selections from our guests at Brighton.

 


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Jazz for Modernists 12 Grant Green 6 of the best

In the pantheon of guitar greats, Grant Green (1935-1979) stands tall. Troubled with health problems and yet hugely prolific throughout the 1960s, his fluid, bluesy and bebop-inspired guitar licks can be found on over 50 recordings for Blue Note during that decade (as leader and sideman). A melodic player of crisp, crystalline linear runs, inspired as much by saxophonist Charlie Parker as guitar hero Charlie Christian, Green’s first recordings were with tenor sax player and fellow St. Louis native Jimmy Forrest for the United label.

Around 1959/60, after being ‘discovered’ by Blue Note stalwart and alto sax man Lou Donaldson (with whom he toured briefly), Green moved to New York where he was introduced to Blue Note’s Alfred Lion. Hugely impressed, Lion started recording him as leader on a glut of sessions (some unreleased until the late 70s) and sideman for Baby Face Willette, Hank Mobley, Stanley Turrentine, Don Wilkerson, Lou Donaldson, Jimmy Smith and Ike Quebec. Though initially fitting perfectly into the soul-jazz organ trio, gospel and Latin formats, Green’s early experience of playing with Coltrane drummer Elvin Jones would in time see him participating in some of Blue Note’s more adventurous recordings by the likes of Herbie Hancock (My Point of View), Bobby Hutcherson (The Kicker), Lee Morgan (Search for the New Land) and Larry Young (Into Somethin’).

Green’s initial period of success at Blue Note ran from 1961-1965. This was followed by a brief flirtation with the Verve label, a period of enforced absence and a return in 1969 for a series of funky but rather patchy LPs later championed by the acid jazz movement. In terms of overall legacy, mention must be made of four or five outstanding LPs he recorded for Blue Note as leader: Grant’s First Stand (1961), Idle Moments (1963/5), Talkin’ About! (1964/5), Street of Dreams (1964/7) and Matador (1964/79). Ranging from soul-jazz through to modal grooves, these are all essential additions to the collections of the thoughtful mod about town (or in her or his rural retreat). However, for those interested either in the dance floor or creating a party atmosphere, here are six tracks culled from the Green back catalogue that were released as singles (edited versions of album tracks). Some, if not all, will be familiar to long-standing participants in the mod and jazz dance scenes.


1. ‘Miss Ann’s Tempo’ (1961) 45 – Blue Note 1811; 33 – From Grant’s First Stand BST 84064
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

From Green’s second Blue Note session (first to be released), ‘Miss Ann’s Tempo’ was also his debut single for the label, coupled with his version of Porter Grainger’s blues standard ‘Ain’t Nobody’s Business if I do’. A trio date, with Ben Dixon on drums and Baby Face Willette on organ, the vibe is similar to Brother Jack Mcduff’s The Honeydripper session for Prestige recorded just a week later and also featuring Dixon and Green. Intriguingly, a track by Eric Dolphy, ‘Miss Ann’, had been recorded with Booker Little the previous October. There’s plenty of righteous call-and-response jousting here between Green’s limpid melodies and Willette’s chugging chords and gospel-drenched soloing. One for the expert jazz dancers!


2. ‘Mambo Inn’ (1963) 45 – Blue Note 1870; 33 – From The Latin Bit BST 84111
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Throughout 1961 and 1962, Green featured on around 25 Blue Note recordings and a handful for Prestige and one or two other labels. Collectors of Blue Note 45s will therefore hear his playing on singles of the period by other artists. Such mid-tempo dance floor tunes include Lou Donaldson’s ‘Watusi Jump’, Dodo Greene’s ‘You are my Sunshine’ and Don Wilkerson’s ‘Camp Meetin’. Two 1962 sessions also led, the following year, to the release of The Latin Bit, from which the Mario Bauzá-Edgar Sampson-Bobby Woodlen tune ‘Mambo Inn’ was culled for the jukebox. An uplifting blend of Afro-Cuban rhythms and bluesy bop, this tune features Willie Bobo and Carlos Valdes on percussion and John Acea on piano.


3. The Cantaloupe Woman (1965) 45 – Verve VK 10361; 33 – From His Majesty King Funk Verve V/V6-8627
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Likely to be heard at many a New Untouchables night, ‘The Cantaloupe Woman’ comes from Green’s only session as leader for the Verve label, 1965’s His Majesty King Funk. While this swings like an upbeat Lee Morgan tune of the era, a new modal undercurrent is present, provided by the Hammond playing of Larry Young, for whom Green had supplied guitar on his debut Blue Note LP Into Somethin! (1964). On that session, Green was reunited with Elvin Jones and sparred alongside the more avant-garde saxophone playing of Sam Rivers. Change was in the air.


4. Big John Patton: Amanda (1966) 45 – Blue Note 1926; 33 – From Got a Good thing Goin’ BST 84229
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Between 1963 and 1966, Green appeared on six Blue Note LPs led by Hammond man Big John Patton. The last in the sequence, Got a Good Thing Goin’ yielded the 45 ‘Amanda’, a cooking cover of the Duke Pearson tune that kicked off his 1964 date Wahoo! Although his initial role is to vamp a rhythm, Green lets loose a cracking solo half-way through the album version. One of those addictive melodies that it’s good to know exist in edited format for the club night and in longer versions for domestic pursuits. At over nine minutes, the Pearson version (without Green) is especially wonderful as a soundtrack to preparing vegetables.


5. Ain’t it Funky Now (1970) 45 – Blue Note 1960; 33 – From Green is Beautiful BST 84342
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

On July 1, 1966, Grant Green played on Stanley Turrentine’s Rough ‘n’ Tumble, a date including the wonderful singles: ‘And Satisfy’ (Blue Note 1929) and ‘Feeling Good’ (Blue Note 1933). Apart from a solitary 1967 date later released on Cobblestone as Iron City (1972), he would then be absent until early 1969. By this time, rock, boogaloo and funky soul were entering new dialogues with jazz; the period from 1969-1972 would see Green return as a key figure in the groove-based styles later defined as acid jazz. Much of 1969 was seen recording with Prestige artists such as Rusty Bryant, Charles Kynard and Don Patterson and Reuben Wilson’s enjoyable Blue Note date Love Bug. By October, he was leading his own sessions, one of which, 1970’s Green is Beautiful, gave us the monumental groove ‘Ain’t it Funky Now’, released as a Parts 1 & 2 single. Idris Muhammad’s marvellous drumming helps make this take on James Brown a memorable one.


6. Sookie Sookie (1970) 45 (edit): – Blue Note 1965; 33 – From ‘Alive!’ BST 84360
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

From the subsequent Blue Note LP, recorded live in August 1970 at the Cliche Lounge in Newark (New Jersey as opposed to Nottinghamshire), Don Covay and Steve Cropper’s 1965 ‘B’ side is given a full funk workout. Green, organist Ronnie Foster, and tenor sax player Claude Bartee improvise righteously over a solid groove laid down by Idris Muhammad, Joseph Armstrong on congas, vibes player Willie Bivens and Foster on organ bass pedals. Some of the material Green worked on with Blue Note after 1969 was not as strong as this, but overall he could be proud of the legacy he left for the label from 1960 to 1972. We’ll be looking at more legends of the label in the future. Until then, enjoy these tunes.



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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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June 30, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
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Newbreed – Les Darlings

We recently caught up with the Les Darlings (from Paris, London, Copenhagen, & Bordeaux) for a nice chat for NUTSMAG, here is what they had to say…

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Well, we started the band in March 2016. Kitty runs a record label, Lust Record, originally created to re-issue 60’s obscurity. At the time, I was too shy to ask those talented guys to form a band when we met during concerts and festivals but Kitty cheered us up to play together so we finally met in Hamburg for songwriting and created more songs than expected. Originally the idea was to make a 45, but we got enough material to release an LP.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

I think we all deeply love all kind of 50’s/60 music, from BlueBeat, crude R&B and naturally ’66 garage and Mod sound.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

As I live in London now, I can tell that the Cavemen are just one of the most outrageously good band I’ve seen recently! The Embrooks, King Salami, etc, etc! From Paris, French Boutik, The Wave Chargers….

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I think the whole 60’s scene is held by a handful but deeply passionate people. It’s an endless story, every decade you got a bunch of young lions who discover and embrace that style. Les Gry Gry, The Arrogants, all in their glorious 20’s… I wish we had more bands like this. Now synth punk is back yet again… I hope they get quickly tired of all that 80’s Kawai keyboards (ha! ha!)

5. How would you describe the style you play?

I think we got one boot in the 60’s, another one in the present. Makes no sense for me to be a tribute band or so, but it doesn’t mean that we are untrue to our influences. All the great bands I loved always added a little something on top of the rest. Just to be different. Who wants to listen to another cover of ‘Shapes of things’? The best example for me is The Youth, The Urges or The Jackets. Our main goal is to create some heavily influenced ’66 moody garage songs that you can really dance along to.

6. What are your live shows like?

It can get really sweaty, especially when you play in a 3 pieces wool suit! Thomas is a Christic frontman, he totally gives himself on stage. We actually have to try to protect him from the action. We love to play together, and the public feels it.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Everything from the Peebles comp, Back from the Grave or High in the Mid Sixties… We play a couple covers that Kitty threw on the table, especially ‘Lily’ from an obscure Californian band called Drusalee & The Dead… In fact, we play live the records we cannot afford to buy haha. Rob also suggested us to play a French cover and it was definitely a good idea. The goal is to create our own thing of course.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Aside from 60’s culture, we got our secret garden…

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Allah wrote them for us. We just need to listen to Allah, and then the songs pop out by themselves. Seriously it’s a collective work, Thomas takes care of the lyrics as he’s writing poetry too.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

My favorite is ‘Hey Baby’, ‘I know David Peter really likes ‘Make her mine’. If we don’t like a song anymore we just throw it out and write another one that’s as simple as that. I love too many songs to choose only one. My favorite song changes every day or so.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

We go to gigs or festivals as often as we can. It is like an International Brotherhood.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Bringing back Dorian alive from Hamburg.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

As we live far away from each other, we can only rehearse one or two hours before each gig. Of course, it’s always a disaster, to begin with. But something magic always happens when we hit the stage, thanks to the hundreds of gigs we each did with our previous bands!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I think it’s really bad in the so-called ‘Mass Media’. We can only pay homage to the few passionate people like you to shed a light on this very sharp scene.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I really love The Wrong Society, they released a couple of singles that really nailed it. Of course The Youth, The Jackets… The Teamsters, The Urges too.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We started the thing with Dennis Rux as a producer and we gonna continue with him. His studio is located in front of a 24/7 gas station loaded with the greatest German lager. Decent döner round the corner too. Beside of this Dennis is perfect gentlemen who own one of the best analog studios between planet Earth and Dagoba system. Apart from Toe Rag and Circo Perrotti, i don’t know where we could have recorded it. It was absolutely normal to do it in Mono from the start for him ha! ha!

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We need to work together to finish our LP which is almost completed! We’re also gonna have an organ player with us, Mr Dècheman, a great entertainer too, so you can expect some more action on stage. We still are a fresh new band but people look interested in our work, we got a lot of contacts to play all across Europe. As we say in France, ‘Bientôt dans une épicerie près de chez vous’ (soon at the juke joint near you).

Band Members: Thomas (vox) Dorian (drums) Pascal (guitar) David Peter (bass)

Discography: 2016 – Single: ‘Le Tourbillon / Hey Baby’ –  Lust Records

Social Networks: FACEBOOK HERE


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Garage Interviews Picks RnB Scene Tags:, , ,
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Newbreed – Melange

We recently caught up with the Melange (from Spain) for a nice chat for NUTSMAG, here is what they had to say…

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together

We have been playing in different bands the last 20 years in many groups like Lüger, Rip Kc, Bucles, Magic Bus, Los Imposibles, Cachalote… We started to play together as Melange two years ago. Miguel was the one who connected all of us. He had a bunch of songs and they were the beginning of the band.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

Our influences are wide. I think it could began with Jazz, Blues, Folk, R&B, Soul and Funk passing through Psychedelic music, Avant Garde, Tropicalia, African Music, Anatolian Rock, Flamenco, Latin, Punk, Electronic and many more, till the borders difumine!

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Yes, for sure. First, we recommend Mohama Saz, a kind of Spanish Turkish style. Alberto Montero a folk-pop singer with brilliant records…

4. Tell us about the 60’s/underground music scene from Spain?

In Spain, we had some very good bands like Los Bravos, Los Salvajes, Los Ángeles, Los Pekenikes emulating the British and American style (ye-ye bands) and some other people making a deep cultural approach into our culture like Pedro Iturralde, Paco de Lucía, Sabicas. Then in the late sixties we have Spanish prog style with bands like Smash, Máquina, Cerebrum, Storm, Pan y Regaliz, Música Dispersa, Evolution who leaded us to a significant productive period in the seventies that came along with political changes with bands as Triana a many more…

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Ops! A tricky question to answer. We visit lots of styles, breaking any style rule. We try to build our own style mixing all that we have in our polluted heads.

6. What are your live shows like?

We have 5 people. 2 guitars, keyboards, bass and drums. Sometimes four voices at the same time. We play loud, trying to make solid sounds with a strong rhythm section adding colour with evocating a surrealistic melody. Sometimes unexpected changes and lots of subliminal intention.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We love tons of different music. But we don’t play any version for the moment. I would love to play a song from Jeannette or Edu Lobo.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Photography, Films, Plastic arts and literature in general. Then the present and life is the most important influence.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody in the band write the song. Sometimes the song is already constructed by one of us, but there’s always space left for the others to say something else or take the subject to another place.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Saquesufah! True Spanish style with lot of garlic on it. It´s short. It´s direct and so rich in terms of melody and rhythm and it´s fascinating to play live on the stage.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I think that we are tried to talk about underground. We have been living this shit for years and still doing it. We still try to change what we don´t like with no concessions.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The biggest challenge is to find the time to play as much as we can.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We try to rehearse once a week and play as much as possible.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I should not be necessary to answer that the music of the media is just commercial focused bullshit, no art, just cheap and superficial entertainment, that’s nothing new, but there have always been local alternative radio stations, and from some years now many podcasts in internet, like for example “Músicas sin prejuicios” here in Spain.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Underground bands… thousands of them. Mainstream… Kraftwerk, they are a band, which all Melange members like a lot.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

At the moment, we have recorded two LP’s with Carlos Díaz Requena, we are very satisfied with the results that we don’t think about anybody else. We all like to record at the countryside, north or south, doesn’t matter, the best for us is an old country house where we can bring our family and our equipment for recording.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Our new album will be released on September 2017. Our plan is still trying to create beautiful music and share it with people all around the World. We hope to make even better recordings. We are so excited about our summer gigs in Quintanhilla Rock (Portugal) and Euro Ye-Ye in Gijón (Spain) also we can’t wait to play in the Zaragoza Psych Fest and BAM (Barcelona) this September.

Band Members: Adrián Ceballos (Drums and vocals), Daniel Fernández (Bass and vocals), Mario Zamora (Keyboards, Synths), Miguel Rosón (Guitar and vocals), Sergio Ceballos (Guitar and vocals)

Discography: 2016 “Melange” (2LP) Discos Tere

Main Site: melangemadrid.bandcamp.com

Social Networks:
Facebook Here!
Instagram Here!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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June 28, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Interviews Picks Psych RnB Tags:, ,
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UK Tamla Motown singles Part 3: Stateside

This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Collectors Corner 2

“I’ll be doggone! – UK Tamla Motown singles Pt.3: TMG500 Series”

 

At the end of the second part of our trawl through the near-perfect run of soul classics released in the UK from the USA stable of record labels (Tamla, Motown, Gordy and Soul), boss Berry Gordy had just put pen to paper for EMI in Britain to follow Decca’s lead (with Atlantic the previous year) and launch Tamla Motown as a stand alone label to release the labels hits pouring out of the USA in the UK. With much fanfare, and with a corresponding (and very poorly attended at times) package tour featuring The Supremes, Martha & The Vandellas, Stevie Wonder, Miracles and the Earl Van Dyke six, March 1965 saw the first six records pressed and released to a British public becoming more and more interested in the soul sounds pouring out of the other side of the Atlantic. TMG 501 was the first release, with its iconic black and silver label, large 45 rpm on the right-hand side, and clad in a beautiful orange / white company sleeve. Things couldn’t have got off to a better start as The Supremes “Stop! in the name of love” hurtled up the charts to number 7, followed swiftly by Martha & The Vandellas “Nowhere to run” which reached #26 at the same time. Thus started a near perfect run of singles, commonly known as the TMG 500 series, which have been avidly collected by record hoarders ever since.

The Supremes quickly established themselves as the labels biggest hitmakers, frequently hitting the top ten throughout the decade, including 500 series favorites “You can’t hurry love” and “You keep me hanging on”. They were soon followed by The Four Tops who hit the charts with “I can’t help myself”, “It’s the same old song” and in 1966, having the first bonafide Tamla Motown UK number one with “Reach out I’ll be there”. Other artists began to have minor hits too, The Miracles “Going to a go-go”, Stevie Wonder’s thumping “Uptight (everything’s alright)”, Marvin Gaye’s “Little darling” and The Temptations “Beauty is only skin deep” all reaching the charts. The same artists also gave us some very sought after rarities too, as they all had flop releases at the same time. The Supremes “Love is like an itching in my heart”, Four Tops “Ask the lonely”, Marvin’s “I’ll be doggone” and The Temptations “Get ready” always fetch good money with collectors, even though they do turn up for sale quite often.

After a great start, the label had more hit & miss luck releasing singles, with 1965 seeing quite a few record releases selling almost nothing then later becoming sought after “lost” classics on the northern soul scene. Early release must haves include Kim Weston’s “I’m still loving you” (TMG511), Brenda Holloway “When I’m gone” (TMG510), Shorty Long’s “Out to get you” (TMG512), The Hit Pack “Never say no to your baby” (TMG514), Choker Campbell “Mickey’s monkey” (TMG517) and The (Detroit) Spinners “Sweet thing” (TMG514). Most of these early singles hit £100+ when they come up for sale, which isn’t very often! The rest of 1965 saw a flurry of good selling releases from label favorites, with The Contours and The Marvelettes also getting in on the action. Four very poor selling releases stand out amongst this run of classics, none of which are easy to find. Billy Eckstine “Had you been around” (TMG533), Dorsey Burnette “Jimmy Brown” (TMG534), The Lewis Sisters “You need me” (TMG536) and Tony Martin “The bigger your heart is” (TMG537) are all sought after, mainly due to rarity as they aren’t amongst the best of the labels’ releases!

As 1966 came around the label continually released great records with varying degrees of success. Joining the artists mentioned above saw releases by Kim Weston, Shorty Long, Gladys Knight & The Pips and, with one of Motown’s greatest ever songs in “This old heart of mine”, The Isley Brothers. Some notable, and scarce releases this year included Kim Weston’s Northern favourite “Helpless” (TMG554), The Contours “Just a little misunderstanding” (TMG564), The Elgins “Heaven must have sent you” (TMG583) and Gladys Knight & The Pips masterpiece “Just walk in my shoes” (TMG576). Hardly a duff release was pressed at all up to TMG599 in March 1967, such was the stellar amount of talent pouring out of Detroit at the time. This is partly why this period of Motown releases is so sought after. Although collecting “the hits” can be done quite cheaply and easily as the label sold tonnes of 45’s in the mid to late 60’s in Britain, completing the set does require quite a fat wallet! Black label stock copies are generally a lot cheaper (though not always easier to find) than the very sought after iconic Red A label demo discs which were pressed in very small numbers and are much cherished by UK soul release connoisseurs. The main exception to this rule is the Spinners “Sweet thing” which is near impossible to find as a stock copy. Monetary value aside, a complete collection is a sight (and sound) to behold, and once complete you’ll be in possession of one of the best ever set of musical releases ever. Happy Motown hunting!


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
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Newbreed – The Bongolian

The Bongolian are based in Wales & London, UK with band members being: Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos, Johnny Drop: Drums, Glyn “tufta” Edwards: Electric Piano, Dan Rooms: Percussion, Trev Harding: Bass Guitar.We recently caught up with Nass and had a good old chatter!

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 17 years , The Bongolian was originally my studio project, but as soon as the LP was released, and such a huge success we are asked by the organisers of France’s biggest festival; Transmusicale to perform the LP live then other offers flooded in so the need for a full live band came about.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love of Nandos, check trousers and eggnog.

03. Many folks reading this interview will be aware of your other band Big Boss Man, so why did you form Bongolian and what are the main differences?

Trev from BBM slaps the bass guitar rather than his usual axe work, and it’s a much more percussive, rhythmic and V-neck jumper based affair.

04. How would you describe the style you play?

Chaotic! Space-age Latin Boogaloo.

06. What are your live shows like?

The live show is a celebration of heavy bongo beats, funky organ and grinding oscillator work. Brian Auger meets Mongo Santamaria in Carnaby Street.

07. What are your main influences in music?

Mod-Jazz with a touch of Psychedelic Bongos!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Wood Carving ( mainly medieval cutlery; spoons, knives, forks etc.)

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes all the songs and Subject matters usually revolve around past experiences of his childhood in Bolton.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Psyche Yam from the Blue Print LP is my live fave at the mo. My fave song by another artist is “Simply the Best – T Turner” or anything from “No Jacket Required”!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate, especially enjoyed the New LP “Moog Maximus” Launch in London’s Blow Up club in Soho.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Creating all layered analog synth tones for the LP Moog Maximus and then arranging for live performance.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse in Beat Mountain, (www.beatmountain.com) – we stay in the studio for weeks on end, carving out the musical maze that is the sound of The Bongolian. We have had quite lot of plays on BBC Radio so we are aiming to tour UK/Europe in Autumn. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Quite good!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Pine Cone are a great band!

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Lonnie Smith at Abbey Road or Electric Ladyland would be good!

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

I’m working on a hard, uptempo, latin-soul album, and working with Big Boss Man on a new LP, and setting up a new UK and European tour for Autumn. Also check out: www.beatmountain.com  – where I have recorded 548 drum and bongo breaks for use in any musical endeavors.

Tour Dates:
27 May ‘17 Mod & Sixties Festival, Margate, UK
01 July ’17 South London Soul Train, Peckham, UK
22 Sep ‘17 International Festival of Psychedelia, Liverpool, UK
Autumn ‘17 Moog Maximus, European Tour, TBA Europe.

Discography: Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2002: Bongo Head
LPs :
2002: ‘The Bongolian’,
2005: ‘Blue Print’,
2007: ‘Outer Bongolia’,
2011: ‘Bongos for Beatniks’
2016: ‘Moog Maximus’
Main Site:
bongolian.com
Social Networks:
facebook.com/thebongolian
twitter.com/@the_bongolian
spotify.com/thebongolian


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Club Soul Front Page Interviews ModJazz Picks Psych UK Tags:, , ,
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The Kinks on Pye: Part 2 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Collectors Corner 5

During our last article, we concentrated on The Kinks hit-packed period when they never seemed to be off the charts. As psychedelia took hold of 1967 and strangled most British bands in beads and flowers, The Kinks took off in a different direction and released some wonderfully wistful and melancholic masterpieces. These songs seemed to hark back to a more innocent time which probably only existed through rose-tinted (psychedelic) spectacles anyway. Ray proceeded to write a series of genius 45’s, and more importantly, albums which unbelievably sold less and less with each release. 1968 started well for the boys with the budget LP release “Sunny afternoon” hitting the top ten during the important Christmas market and selling very well indeed. So when Pye released the first new material of the year in April 1968, the lovely and restrained stand-alone 45 “Wonderboy” would have been assumed to sail into the top ten, but it unbelievably stalled at a lowly number 36 in the charts. This began a run of wonderful, yet underappreciated single releases which were low sellers, hence the rarity of some of them today.

Two months later in June ’68, one of Ray’s most loved compositions, “Day’s” was released and fared much better, just stalling outside the top ten at number 12. Though all the bands singles contain nuggets hidden away on their B-sides, this one had one of the bands hardest rockers on the flip, “She’s got everything”. Originally recorded and shelved two years earlier, it could have been a big hit in 1968 as The Stones, Beatles and Move all had massive rock’n’roll influenced hit singles. Luckily it wasn’t forgotten and still fills mod dancefloors to this day as soon as it starts up. Into 1969, the thumping “Plastic man” was released and again reached no higher than number 31, a flop by the band’s lofty standards. It seemed the better Ray’s songwriting became, the fewer people bought the bands records. “Drivin'” was released in August 1969 and became the first 45 to miss the hit parade since “You still want me” in early 1964. Even worse was the total no-show of “Shangri-la” in September which sold incredibly poorly and is one of the hardest of UK Kinks singles to find. In December, the upbeat album track “Victoria” at least managed to hit the low 30’s in the chart but it took a tale of a Soho nightclub meeting with a transsexual to have the band visiting Top of the Pops again. “Lola” was soon flying up the charts and hit the number two slot in August, kept off the top by Elvis. Shortly after “Apeman”, backed with the wonderful “Rats” on the flip, became the group’s last UK top ten hit when it reached number five in the summer. “Days”, “Lola” and “Apeman” apart, these 45’s are now quite hard to find, especially in top condition and prices have risen in the last few years. Expect to pay between £10-20 for the low sellers and up to £30 “Shangri-la”. All were pressed up as yellow demo copies, these are also really sought after and can reach £100+ at auction. A quick shout must go out to Dave Davies at this point. In between 1967 and 1968, he released four cracking solo 45’s and a super rare EP, “Dave Davies Hits”, which is a £200+ artifact nowadays. All four singles (Death of a clown, Suzannah’s still alive, Lincoln County and Hold my hand) are worth seeking out, the last one, in particular, is hard to find and is coveted for it’s fantastic psychedelic B side “Creeping Jean”.

The decline of fortunes in the singles chart was mirrored with the blue label Pye album releases, none of which charted at all. The 1968 release “The Kinks are the village green preservation society” needs no introduction to Kinks aficionado’s, it’s simply one the all-time album masterpieces. Originally envisaged as a twelve track album, a handful of white label promos were pressed up before the track listing was changed to the fifteen track album we all love today. It’s impossible to put a price on the promo copies, but even the released album reaches £200+ in top condition as it sold in small amounts. This album, and it’s follow-up were both released in mono and stereo, the former the harder to locate and more valuable to collectors. They were both encased in very flimsy laminated gatefold sleeves which are invariably damaged and worn, make sure you look after any mint copies out there! “Arthur (or the decline and fall of the British empire)” was released the following year in 1969, and although similarly full of stellar Ray Davies songwriting, this one sold in small amounts too. Hence it has a £100+ price tag nowadays with the “Queen Victoria” insert still there (it’s invariably missing!). 1970’s “Lola vs Powerman and the money-go-round” was the first to be a stereo only release and sold more than the previous two, mainly due to the massive hit singles released at the same time. For a band to release so many groundbreaking and classic songs on Pye, it’s a shame that their parting shot was a soundtrack to
the 1971 Hywel Bennett film “Percy”, a comedy about a man who has a penis transplant. The album still sells for a good price, mainly due to its creators, and Pye also released four tracks from the album as a “maxi-single” with a picture sleeve at the same time. The band signed a contract with RCA in 1971, becoming the “Muswell hillbillies” of that decade who would, at last, have massive success in the USA. But it’s that catalogue on the iconic pink and blue Pye label that will always hold a place in most collectors hearts.


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , ,
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Reviews May 2017

 


Gemma & The Travellers

‘Too Many Rules And Games’  – Album

Legere Recordings are well-known for being one of the foremost soul, R&B and funk labels in Europe and are absolutely the right home for Gemma & The Travellers. This is their debut album and it has been a long time in coming. Over the last four or five years, Gemma & The Travellers have released a succession of danceable, catchy R&B/soul infused singles and slowly building a fan base across Europe. The New Untouchables recognised the potential and have welcomed the band to Shoreditch Got Soul and the Brighton Weekender in the past, but we were particularly pleased to host the official UK launch of this album. What we have are nine original compositions that show exactly why they are on a label that includes New Mastersounds, Mighty Mocambos and Nick Pride to name but three. From the first track ‘I Keep On Thinking’, you know this band is the real deal. With Gemma Marchi giving her customary fine vocal performance, superbly backed by Damien Barbe on keyboards, Kevin Hoffman on saxophone, Robert Petersson on guitar and a top-notch rhythm section of Alan Beckman on bass and Robin Tixier on drums. ‘Where I Lived Before’ is a slice of pure proper R&B, while ‘Take My Heart And Breathe’ is as fine-a-ballad as you could hear anywhere; oozing with emotion and soul. The showstopper for my money is ‘Please Don’t Forget My Name’, delivered with real punch and power. You know the saying ‘good things come to those who wait’? Well if you have been waiting for this album, it really has been worth it. If you have never heard of this band before now, you need to check them out. After all, Craig Charles isn’t a bad judge of music, and he’s a fan.

facebook.com/GemmaAndTheTravellers
legererecordings.bandcamp.com


Stone Foundation

‘Street Rituals’ – Album

Stone Foundation are a band that has defied all the odds. Their success story should be a shining example to any band or artist that is hoping to progress their career without selling your soul to a ‘major’ label or Simon Cowell. This album came out just after the last edition of Nutsmag, hence the slightly late review. It has entered the official UK charts and the band is currently on a sell-out tour to support the album. So how have they got to these dizzy heights? In my opinion, the mark of a great band is when each album is better and surpasses the previous one. Such is the case with Stone Foundation. ‘Find The Spirit’ was great; ‘A Love Unlimited’ was brilliant, this album, ‘Street Rituals’ is a masterpiece. It is the latest installment from a group of musicians who have remained dedicated, committed, determined and focused on the art of writing great songs in the belief that their hard work will eventually be recognised, and so it has proved to be. ‘Ah yes’, I hear you say, ‘but they had Weller helping on this one, so they couldn’t lose.’ It’s a fair point, but I would argue, a misguided one and I will address the ‘Weller’ issue a little later. For now, let’s look at the product. To pick a few highlights from these ten tracks is a task I find very difficult such is the high standard. As I have listened through it, my ‘favourite track’ has changed six times already. Whether it’s ‘Limit Of A Man’(shades of Style Council here), ‘Strange People’, ‘Back In The Game’ or the title track, I can’t choose. They are all unbelievably brilliant. They are songs of hope inspired and influenced by 70’s American soul, while being undeniably British soul. It’s that ‘je ne se quoi’ that sets British soul apart from the Americans. Soul2Soul had it, as did the Brand New Heavies for example and now Stone Foundation have it. As for Mr Paul Weller? He should be given the 2017 Producer Of The Year award right now for this album. Yes he plays and sings on the album and co-wrote a few tunes, but I get the sense he was energised by the whole project and it comes across in his performances. Neil Jones’ voice works so well with Mr Wellers’, ‘hand and glove’ come to mind. And I think two people also deserve special mention; engineer Charles Rees and percussionist Rob Newton. Great job fellas.

stonefoundation.co.uk
facebook.com/stonefoundation


SoulNaturals

‘Love Says Yes’ album

It has been some time since I last reviewed a release by SoulNaturals. Apart from a small handful of impressive singles, the output has been sparse, but that has mostly been due to this album being recorded and it is well worth the wait. With Tony Cannam at the helm, SoulNaturals tend to use an array of vocal talent rather than one focal singer. This album of 11 quality tracks features 10 different vocalists and each one gives a great performance. Arguably, the most notable among them is Mr. Dave Barker (of Dave and Ansell Collins fame) on ‘Let Freedem Ring’; as sweet-a-ballad as you could wish for. Other standout tracks include ‘I Got Sunshine (Enough For The World) featuring Jo Kelsey, ‘I Never Knew A Hell Like You’ with Gloria Pryce and ‘Oh Lord When Will You Free Me’; a lilting gentle reggae-meets-gospel corker with Nadia Pimentel taking the vocal duties. A couple of years ago, it really looked as if SoulNaturals were going to explode on to the soul scene. They were certainly very popular on the live circuit, so with this album to promote, they have a winner on their hands and the live dates can’t be far off.

soulnaturals.bandcamp.com/
facebook.com/soulnaturalsUK/


The Neighbourhood Strange

‘Let’s Get High’ b/w ‘One Last Chance’ – Single

This new single from the ever impressive Neighbourhood Strange brings two quality cuts of garage/neo-psych. All the component parts are present and correct; jangly guitars, catchy hook-lines and Hammond organ. ‘Let’s Get High’ is a mid-paced grower, while ‘One Last Chance’ is a slower, more deliberate song delivered with just the right amount of gusto. This Salisbury outfit is definitely one to watch out for and I, for one, will be keeping a keen eye out for the next installment.

facebook.com/TheNeighbourhoodStrange
theneighbourhoodstrange.bandcamp.com


 The Missing Souls

‘The End’ b/w ‘Mom, Won’t You Teach Me How To Monkey’ – Digital Single

The French scene is thriving right now with some really great bands making their presence felt and the Missing Souls from Lyon are no exception. They have been together for three years and gaining decent support for their brand of 60s influenced garage. Zaza, Ricky, Ian and Lester have been very impressive and this digital single continues to build on their repertoire. ‘The End’ is a proper rocking good time, while ‘Mom…’ is a slower R&B-styled groover. It all bodes well for the future and here’s hoping they will be tempted to come to the UK for live shows. I think we would all be in for a treat.

themissingsouls.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/themissingsouls


Mayfield

‘Spring’ EP

I first became aware of Mayfield with their album ‘Tempo Of Your Soul’ in 2013. Last year they released ‘Keep On The Soul Side’ while simultaneously band leader Domonic Elton built a new studio facility in his neck of the woods. But something a bit special has happened in the meantime and this EP shows exactly what that is. Their 2013 album was very good indeed, but it didn’t show just how good Mayfield are, especially when you see them play live. This EP carries three tracks, two of which are tunes given a total make-over from that album. ‘Fling’ and ‘Sunshine’ are almost unrecognisable from their previous arrangements. What is most notable is that Mayfield has found the polished soul that was lacking four years ago. I had to revisit the old versions just to remind myself and what a transformation has taken place. Superb. ‘Fling’ is now a sumptuous jazz-funk belter, while ‘Sunshine’ is descended from the great days of Acid Jazz; punchy brass, great hook-line and typically British Soul. However, I have saved the best until last. ‘This Time Around’ featuring Decosta Boyce is a soul/northern crossover monster of a tune. I love the ‘What’s Goin’ On’ style ‘Ooos and Ahhs’, the chugging guitar, driving drums and Dacosta delivers the lyrics with stylish aplomb. Of course, Andy Lewis deserves great credit for the mix as well. So welcome back Mayfield. I’m told the vinyl will be available in October, so this is download only for the time being.

facebook.com/mayfieldstudioband
mayfieldtheband.co.uk


 


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , ,
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The Kinks on Pye: Part 1 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

Although The Kinks have long been one of our most influential and cherished groups, in the last couple of years since the hit musical “Sunny Afternoon” and especially since Ray Davies joined brother Dave onstage in London back in December 2015, fans have been hopefully awaiting the reformation of this most wonderful of bands. Although The Kinks back catalogue spans over forty years it’s the halcyon Pye years from 1964 to 1971 in which the band constantly released classic hit records which have collectors scouring record shops, fairs, and the internet for hits and rarities, and a full set of UK releases will set you back a fair few quid should you wish to complete the set. For this two-part article, we’re going to give you a run through of the hard to find releases from the debut 45 back in early 64 to the “Percy” soundtrack eight years later. The first part will concentrate on the “Pink” years, when the band had a string of top ten singles, including three UK number one hits, the second part will then concentrate on the “Blue” years when Ray was at his songwriting peak but the record buying public were not buying the records in such great numbers. Hindsight shows how wrong they were.

Hailing from Muswell Hill in North London, Ray, Dave and bassist Pete Quaife were originally an R’n’B combo called The Ravens who came to the attention of ace producer Shel Talmy after he heard a demo tape and helped get the group signed to the Pye record group where they were enlisted drummer Mick Avory to complete the classic first line up. On 7th February 1964 their debut single “Long tall Sally”, a R’n’B cover of the Little Richard classic was released on the pink Pye label (7N15611) was unveiled to the record buying public. Although the single hit the lower reaches of the NME chart it was a commercial flop making copies a nice rare collector’s item today with prices usually reaching £75-120 depending on condition. The next 45 was released in April 1964 and like all the Kinks singles after the debut, it was a Ray Davies penned number “You still want me” (7N15636). Although the first single sold in respectable amounts, this one was an unjustified complete flop and is by far the hardest Kinks UK 45 to locate in nice condition. Expect to pay at least £200 for a copy of this, one even reached the amazing price of £400+ at auction in 2016! With Pye threatening to cancel the band’s contract if they didn’t have a hit single, Ray composed one of the most influential two and bit minute slabs of musical perfection ever committed to vinyl, “You really got me”. With Dave’s incendiary and groundbreaking lead guitar bursting through the track, it couldn’t fail when it was released on 7th August 1964 (7N15673). And fail it didn’t as it shot up the UK charts, reaching the coveted number one spot shortly after where it stayed for two weeks. The Kinks had arrived.

From then on every single the group released up until 1968 hit the upper regions of the UK charts, with every single release apart from “Everybody’s gonna be happy” hitting the top ten, two of them reaching the top spot. As runs of stellar 45’s go, the following one takes some beating for songcraft, influence and sheer greatness: “All day and all of the night”, “Tired of waiting for you”, “Everybody’s gonna be happy”, “Set me free”, “See my friends”, “Till the end of the day”, “Dedicated follower of  fashion”, “Sunny afternoon”, “Dead end street”, “Waterloo sunset”, “Autumn almanac”. Being massive chart smashes these are usually findable in nice condition for around £3-5 each, with a premium for truly mint copies. All the Kinks singles were also pressed as demonstration copies in small numbers, these are very desirable to collectors and can reach top prices at auction, especially in top condition with unblemished labels. Also look out for UK export release 45’s, mainly for the European market. There are four in total, including album tracks “David Watts”, “A well-respected man” and “Milk cow blues” on a 7″ format. Ray’s songwriting prowess also resulted in some fantastic and very rare releases by other artists around this time. “I go to sleep” was covered by The Applejacks, Peggy Lee, Marion, Fingers and The Truth in 1965-66 although none were hits and it wasn’t till a few years later The Pretenders took the song into the charts. Other great, obscure and coveted releases include Barry Fantoni “Little man in a little box” (Fontana), The Thoughts “All night stand” (Planet), The Cascades “I bet you won’t stay” (Liberty) and Leapy Lee “King of the whole wide world” (Decca). Ironically it’s Dave’s composition “One fine day” which was covered by Shel Naylor and released on Decca in 1964 which fetches by far the most money, with prices sometimes hitting the £500+ mark!

With the band constantly having smash hits Pye also released a nice series of EP’s in wonderful colour laminated sleeves. Five were released in total, the first three”Kwyet Kinks”, “Kinksize hits” and “Kinksize session” are not particularly hard to find, but the fourth “Dedicated Kinks” from 1966 is more elusive and the final EP “The Kinks” from April 1968 is incredibly scarce easily reaching £200+ at auction in top condition. The band’s first three LP’s “The Kinks”, “Kinda Kinks” and “The Kink controversy” were good sellers but easily sell for £50+ in nice condition with clean sleeves. Particularly coveted are rare export Stereo pressings of the first two LP’s with stickered UK sleeves as they were mono only releases in the UK. “Face to face” from 1966 was a move towards Ray’s late 60’s songwriting style and is an absolute classic but strangely failed to chart resulting in scarcity of copies today. This was followed by the live album “Live at Kelvin Hall” in early 1967 and lastly by the masterpiece “Something else by The Kinks” in September of the same year. All were released in both Mono and Stereo, the latter being the scarcer of the two, especially with the Stereo sticker still attached! Prices vary wildly from one week to the next but be prepared to have a large bank account if you want a truly mint copy of any of them. As 1968 approached Ray’s songwriting grew more world-weary and pastoral and the band embarked on an influential but poorly received at the time run of releases on the newly redesigned light blue Pye label. We’ll have a look at these next time around…


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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February 15, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Rob’s Round-Up 5

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Rob’s Roundup

Massive thanks to all those who joined us for yet another fun NYE party.

Despite the madness going on all around us the one thing that is still in our destiny is having a good time and enjoying the music and style, we are all passionate about. Our team have been working hard on our annual Easter extravaganza in central London.

Le Beat Bespoké attracts pleasure seekers from all over the globe, with only one thing in mind having a real damn good party. So, with that firmly in mind, we have assembled yet another exciting line-up across two fantastic venues in the heart of London.

Check out our brand-new website www.lebeatbespoke.com for all the info you need. We booked ten stellar live bands featuring some of the best up and coming talent alongside two stellar acts from the 20th century.

However live music is just part of what makes Le Beat Bespoké such a fun and unique event. For your dancing pleasure, we have booked a dynamic DJ line-up from across Europe armed with explosive sounds on 100% original vinyl across 3 rooms of clubbing after the live bands.

Our guest club nights for the Rhythm & Blues Weekend include Crossfire, The Pow Wow, Lady Luck & Mousetrap all at the forefront of good times and taste. The menu is served All-night and includes authentic Rhythm & Blues, Northern Soul, Jazz, Latin, Boogaloo and Ska/Reggae.

The Beat Basement hosts the wildest and grooviest Freakbeat, Garage and Psychedelic ‘nuggets’ known to man to a back drop of eye candy visuals and groovy Go-Go girls.

A brand-new location for our daytime treats on Sat & Sunday afternoon is Dingwalls one of London’s most beautiful venues, situated right next to Camden lock in the World-famous Camden market. Expect DJ’s, bands, Easter egg hunt, record fair and market.

Contact drrobert@btinternet.com for trade stand.

But before Easter, we have celebrated an incredible 26 years at Mousetrap in the same venue with the same owner virtually unheard of these days, let alone in the ever-changing landscape of London. All those that attended would have got a free 45 with two rare tracks from the club’s playlist including one that has never been released on 45 before.

Hope to see you all Easter for an epic party!

www.lebeatbespoke.com

Cheers Dr. Robert


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Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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February 21, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Clubs DJs Events Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 14 (episode 23)

NUTsCast December 2016
Join The Baron for a look back at some of the highlights of the last twelve months with live tracks recorded at Le Beat Bespoke, Margate and Crossfire by Graham Day & Forefathers, The Stairs, Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind, Wicked Whispers, Dustaphonics, Big Boss Man, Bronco Bullfrog, Paul Orwell, Cat Black and The Mynd Set.

We look ahead to our Nutty New Year’s Eve Party with DJ selections by Irish Greg, Jim Watson, Lee Miller, Peter Feely, Joel Maslin, Ady Lupton & Carolina.

So join The Baron for the last Nutscast Session of 2016.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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December 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , ,
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