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Brighton Mod Weekender – Lee Miller

The Jive Five sang about “Main Street” where the In crowd stand beneath the neon lights, listening to the beats from the sidewalk cafés. Well, that sums up the sights and sounds of the corner of North Street and Gardner Street. With smartly dressed Mods from all over the globe, peacocking, checking out the next face walking toward the crowd, greeting friends and preparing for the Mod Weekender ahead!

This year’s New Untouchables events were, again, held at The Komedia. Doors now opening in the Studio Bar at 10pm, with happy hour bar prices, until the main event at 11pm. The bar filled quickly with faces from all over the globe! The DJ soon had the dance-floor moving, playing a mix of 6T’s Mod sounds from Ray Charles, B.B. King, Stevie Wonder & Jimmy Smith and many more.

The clock struck eleven and the main doors opened.. Behind the decks, the R&B assassin Sir Bill Kealy opened the weekend with Arthur Alexander’s – Black Night. Bill is a fantastic DJ who’s selections draws you deeper into the Blues then he rips your heart in two, with some dirty R&B grooves. (Copyright: AI – York). With Bill filling the dance-floor, deck duties were passed to Rob Bailey, who kept the floor grooving, with a great cross-section of sounds. After refreshment, a few hello’s and a long overdue pint with Kris Van Beethoven from Belgium. Next up to add to Friday nights shoe leather wear-down session was myself, bringing an across the board selection of 6T’s Soul, R&B with a bit of Motown thrown in for good measure. Glasgow’s King of Mod Cool, Paul Molloy took the torch and raised the game. Playing a great selection of dancers, with a great mix of Beat, Garage and some classic Mod sounds. 3am came around all too quickly, so off to bed to recharge and Sarah to soak those too hot to trot feet.

Saturday morning and the sun was shining, and so was the chrome. The Brighton air filled with the smell of two-stroke and the ting ting sound of scooter exhausts. The New Untouchables afternoon event was being held at The Volks on Madera Drive where they had also made arrangements for the parking to be suspended so the squadrons of scooters could be parked and displayed. Inside the venue, there were a plethora of stalls offering quality vintage clothing, rare vinyl and tailoring services. The soundtrack to the afternoon was being supplied by DJ’s Wolfgang from Weisbaden, Germany, Julian Rochfort from Frome, Paul from Reigate, Jon Clay from London and Rob Powner, the face behind the club, Wang Dang Doodle, who set my goosebumps off with Earl Connely’s – This Girl !!

The Baron, introduced the afternoons live music, which was delivered by London’s – The Baron Four, the UK’s finest quartet of classically influenced Garage-Punk maestros. Who took us on a journey through their latest album ” Silvaticus” and other great tracks, keeping the appreciative crowd entertained. My favourite being their take on Bo Diddley’s – I Can Tell with Kevin Smith wailing on that harp, what a musician! The second live act was – Men of North Country (MONC) – hailing from Tel Aviv! What a sound, their version of the 60’s Soul Monster – I’m Comin Home In The Mornin’ was absolutely outstanding. The rest of afternoon was spent playing catch up with various friends from around the globe who I see more than the blue mooners. The standard of sussed dress was impeccable, and great to see the New Breed showing some, how it should be really done!

The evening started with that view again, smart dressed Modernists gathered on, that, corner. Again, the NUT’s evening event started in the Studio Bar at ten. When I arrived about 21:45 there was already a queue forming.

Starting the evening’s soundtrack off with Wes Montgomery & Jack Mc Duffs – I’m Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town, with other tracks from Joe Thomas, Jimmy McGriff & Chuck Higgins. Just as the dancers were finding their groove, it was decided that the main room would open at 10:30 as the queue was outgrowing the room capacity. So, record boxes in hand a quick rush down the stairs and let the main event begin, Buddy Guy, John Lee Hooker, B.B. King & Ray Agee coming to the party. Again, Paul Molloy took to the decks, keeping the dance-floor, handclappin’ & footstompin’ to the sounds of original 45’s including, The Game – Gonna Get Me Someone. Tonight, Glynn Preece & Sean Chapman, hosts of “Out Of Time” joined the DJ’s over both floors. Glynn followed Paul in the main room, with some great R&B from Tiny Topsy, Sam & Dave’s great dancer – You Ain’t No Big Thing, Baby, ending his set with Chuck Miller’s – Look Out Mountain – with a great crowd showing their appreciation. Mr Bailey turned up the heat with tracks including The Rebel Rousers – As I Look, The High Numbers – I’m The Face, Johnny Watson – Say, I Love You and Gale Garnett’s version of You’ve Been Talkin’ ‘Bout Me Baby. The R&B assassin then made his mark on this event, giving the dance floor Danny Owens – You’re A Little Too Late, King Karl – Everybody’s Feelin’ Good amongst others. But the highlight for me was seeing Yasu from Japan in the “zone” dancing to The Drivers – Mr Astronaut. The dance-floor was a sea of dancing Mods, with handclapping and whistles appreciating every track played. Now as the song goes, “we came out here to party” – as the first bars of Booker T’s – Green Onions rang out a cheer went up from the crowd as the dance-floor filled, and there it stayed, to classics including, the In Crowd, Cool Jerk and many more great MOD dancers. Meanwhile, in the Studio Bar, Sean & Glynn with guests were showing all how-to party – Out Of Time style… Paul, Rob & Sean kept the sounds flowing in the main-room and the floor moving right up until 5am, with the crowd asking for more…

A bit of a slower start on the Sunday, but a Full English soon put that right. Again, the sun shone and at The Volks, the dealers looked like they were doing a roaring trade, with many more scooters adorning the roadside, with many day-trippers, attending for the impressive ride out, and scooter competition.

More faces from all over the globe were in attendance, chatting, drinking, looking sharp & listening to the music being played by the afternoons guest DJ’s. Suit Yourself Modernist Culture hosted this afternoons selection of DJ’s, Ian Hurford from Basingstoke, Ian “Detroit Executive” Jackson from London, Alan form Brighton and Vinny from The Prince Regents.

Gary Milan and Doug Sturrock joined out host Rob for the in enviable task of judging the scooter competition which lined both sides of the seafront. The standard was truly incredible and it took well over an hour for the final results to come through. The trophies were presented in front of the slush puppy with Brighton Pier as the backdrop for photos, congratulations to:

Best Lambretta – Lee Maxey – TV175 series 2
Best Vespa – Paul Digby – GS160 mk 2
Best Mod – John Gibson – TV175 series 2

After the presentation, it’s time for the eagerly anticipated ride-out across the East Sussex cliffs. The sight, smell and noise of hundreds of scooters is truly incredible and sight to behold. The ride-out was one of the most enjoyable yet from all accounts with a short refuel at Smugglers rest before the return trip back to the Volks. Some riders went onto Beachy Head but were diverted with reports of a mysterious gas cloud, we are happy to say the cloud was not 2 stroke and nobody was seriously injured. Many thanks to judges and all those who helped with marshalling the ride-out, a superb job folks.

The final evening’s event kicked off at 10pm at the Komedia, with Mary Boogaloo joining us in the Studio bar with Brighton Got Soul in the main room, with Ady Croasdale, Chris Dale, Sean Chapman & Colin Baldock.

Mary treated us all to a fantastic Jazz set including Wes Montgomery’s – Swivel Hips. Alan from Suits Yourself treated us to some superb 60’s Soul including Kell Osbourne’s – Quicksand. Bill had the room blocking to some of the best Rhythm & Blues 45’s, including Arthur Griswold – Pretty Mama Blues. Paul played a mixture of Mod dancers finishing with Death In Vegas With Paul Weller – So You Say You Lost Your Baby. Mary & Rob kept everybody dancing, then I was back on for the last 30mins which also involved a bit of double decking with Bill, before closing the night off with Ray Charles’ – The Train.. The crowd then moved downstairs until sun up..

Another fantastic New Untouchables weekender, with the events full of Smart, Sussed Mods from all over the globe. Thanks to the NU team and the fantastic staff at the Komedia and Volks who look after us all weekend.

For more images visit our Facebook PAGE HERE

See you next year… LEE MILLER


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Lee Miller

I've called myself a Mod since around 1980. I first discovered the scene through 2-Tone & The Jam et al. Throughout my 35 years, I have been on a musical journey through the world of "Mod Music" - discovering something new at every RPM. Started attending Mod Clubs & Rallies in 1985, and have never looked back. DJ spots at local events escalated to London and beyond. As well as guest slots, being part of the NUT's DJ team and residencies at The Mousetrap (20 years) I’ve been involved with the hosting of events - From, The Maidstone Brandy & Blues Club, The Sidewinder & Gettin' To The Point (Leeds) and The Dreamsville Mod Weekender (Lowestoft), to name just a few!

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September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Events Front Page Reviews UK Tags:, ,
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Dinah Lee – Fashion Icon

This entry is part of 3 in the series Fashion Scene 5

What I love about writing this column is that you are always discovering new things. Take Dinah Lee for example, a random post on Facebook the other week led me to find out more about this mod girl and 60s style icon from New Zealand. Dinah was indeed Australia and New Zealand’s very own Queen of the Mods and was one of the biggest stars and highest paid artists of the 60s in Australasia.

She had a classic mod look with a sharp blunt cut bob. She was boyish and feminine at the same time and despite her rather demure looks and small frame was able to belt out a song. Her big hits were ‘Don’t You Know Yockomo?’ an RnB track originally recorded by Dee Dee Sharp. She followed this with Reet Petite (Jackie Wilson) and Blue Beat. All three went to number one and she had 15 other top ten hits.

Her look was the embodiment of mod cool to her fans and not surprisingly she became a poster girl for the leading make-up brand of the time – Yardley. Her modern style perfectly suiting the brand’s British connections.

Her debut album, The Mod World of Dinah Lee, came out on Viking records in 1964. The music was pure 60s pop with a touch of ska/blue-beat about it. Her sound and style was, no doubt, influenced by the people she hung around with. She at one time shared a flat with Millie Small who had the ska hit ‘My Boy Lollipop.’

She made regular trips to the UK and the US, appearing on Shindig with Glen Campbell and hanging around London with David Jones (David Bowie). She also performed with the likes of Ray Charles, the Bee Gees, Gene Pitney and New Zealand Aussie mod singer, Ray Columbus. According to Australian rock music journalist, Ed Nimmervoll: “Lee was the most successful female singer of both her New Zealand homeland and Australia … on stage and on record Dinah had all the adventure and exuberance for the time the boys had.”

It appears that Lee did cause some controversy simply because she didn’t appear to want to fit into the female stereotype of singers at the time. First there was her love of Mod fashion, but she also had a bit of mod attitude about her on seeing interviews from the time. Her dress sense meant that she was sometimes heckled at regional venues and caused some issues with viewers for wearing a pair of Bermuda shorts on a TV show broadcast in Australia and New Zealand.

Her friend Bobi Petch who became her PA friend tells in an interview for New Zealand music website (see here) of their days living together in Sydney where they would shop for the latest fashions. A particular favourite was The Casual Shop – a Sydney boutique which stocked all the latest one-off mod designs.

Dinah used to drive around town with Bobbi in her Mini Minor, which Bobi recalls had only a second and third working gear. She tells Gareth Cartwright: “I remember us getting Hank Marvin of The Shadows in that Mini one night and driving him around Sydney and all of us laughing like mad because the Mini only had second and third gear!” They also met the Small Faces on their ill-fated tour of Australia. Petch recalls: They really little guys, so cute, with hand-painted psychedelic boots. They were in Australia with The Who, who we only got to see in a nightclub. They were sitting around a table and none of them were dancing.”

Listening to and looking at the style of Dinah Lee gives us an insight into how the influence of mod style spread far and wide, way beyond the streets of Soho. Mod really was mainstream by Dinah’s era, but none the less, she is a great example of the boyish and savvy charm that any girl who wanted to be ‘with it’ in the mid 60s wanted a slice of.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Scene Style Tags:, , , ,
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Masters – Magnus Carlson

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Masters3

We recently caught up with Magnus Carlson, for a chat for NUTSMAG for a preview of his special live show on 21st October 2017 at CROSSFIRE,London.

1. Are you looking forward to our Crossfire night at 229 the Venue in October and what can we expect from a Magnus Carlson show?

Seriously. I can’t wait! I’ve been wanting to go to a New Untouchables event for ages. But I tour so much, the dates have never matched my schedule before. I love and collect your compilations and 7″ singles. I have with me a great seven-piece band. Horns, Hammond organ, congas. the works! Every musician is hand-picked by me for their individual skills and love for 60s style jazz, soul and rhythm-n-blues. Every band member release albums on their own. I’m so proud of them. It’s like I’m the manager for Sweden’s National soul team. Very groovy and danceable. You will love it. I promise!

2. All of us here at New Untouchables extend our congratulations to you on the tremendous success of ‘Long Way Home’. Did you think it would be such a hit when recording had finished?

I’ve been in the music biz full-time since 1997. I’ve always followed my heart and done what I felt like. As a result, I have had a lot of number ones in Sweden but also a few flops. You never ever know what will be successful or not. But I can look back at a career (16 albums in 20 years) and be proud. Most of the stuff I do has a kind of timelessness to it. At least in my mind. I almost only listen to 60s music but I try not to be too retro even if that’s the style of music I make. It’s made today about the world today I think this is the first ever mod number one in Sweden. At least since 1967. When was a mod album number one in the UK last? The Jam?

3. For those who are new to your music, how would you describe your ‘sound’?

If you refer back to question number 1, I think that about covers it!

4. You are a massive star in Sweden and you are following in the footsteps of The Cardigans, Jasmine Kara and a certain 70s pop band to name a few; who have been popular here. How important is it for you to have a higher profile in the UK?

I’ve been doing this for so long now so I know the ups and downs. I’m perfectly happy just with my popularity in Sweden. It all can wish for. But certainly, I’m eager to try the UK. There are more mods there and I’m part of the mod scene. It’s only natural to wonder what could happen. I’m so happy you want me over! I feel grateful and excited!

5. Of course, some of our readers will know you from your time with Weeping Willows. Do you have any plans to record with them?

Oh! We have never split up. It’s my mother ship. That band will exist forever. But sometimes I go out on solo missions outside the ship. Jazz, soul, electronic excursions. Stuff I can’t do within that group. We’re more of a ballad group. The Walker Brothers type of stuff. But we are bigger than ever. We do a lot of gigs with symphony orchestras in sports arenas and Concert halls. This year we go out on a Christmas tour. 17 gigs in December. Next year we will record and release a New album. All our albums are number ones in Sweden.

6. The new album is inspired by Northern Soul. When did you first become interested in that style of music?

I was born in 1968. I grew up with punk and then New wave. I started to listen to everything my idols recommended. Naturally, that meant all kinds of 60s music. All things mod. So, through The Style Council and Dexy’s Midnight Runners, I got to know about rare soul. Then we had a lot of Northern soul clubs in Stockholm in the 90s which I went to because I love to dance. I got to know all the people. The soul scene is my home. And I have always loved and collected 7″ singles. My favourite format since I was a Punk kid.

7. Sweden has had a healthy 60’/Northern Soul/mod scene for a number of years with organisations like Uppers and people like Frederik Ekander. Were you aware of that scene at all?

Oh Yeah! There are a lot of soul clubs and DJs/collectors over here. Club Soul in Stockholm has been going every Saturday for almost 30 years now! Could it be a World record?! They still only play soul on vinyl. I sometimes DJ there. And then there’s the monthly club Soulastatic in Gothenburg that Punky has been doing for about 20 years now. Very strong soul scene. With lots of great DJs!

8. You have recorded the new album in English and spent time at Black Barn Studios with Andy Lewis. What was that experience like?

I knew Andy before. He had heard my Swedish version of Beggin’ from 2003. We have DJ’d together and even wrote songs together before. So, when I finally had the time to make a soul album I knew I had to do it with him. Andy said we should record at the Black Barn. So, we did. It was perfect and a great 4-day session with a great band Andy put together. And a bit of a romantic childhood dream.

9. Who are your musical influences?

Too many to mention. When I was a Teenager the people who made me want to sing was (chronologic) Elvis, The Smiths, Weller, Scott Walker. Through them, I got into the rarer stuff. Now I mostly listen to 60s soul and 50s jazz. I’m going backwards. Next stop for me is probably Blues and old gospel.

10. Are there any current bands or artists that you like?

Goran Kajfeš Subtropic Arkestra is amazing! He’s the trumpet player in my band. He’s a genius. He has a new album out just this week.

11. What is your favourite song by another artist that you could not live without?

I have a big record collection and I sincerely can’t part with any of them. You know how it is. It never ends. I find new old favourite every week! That’s the thrill!

Thank you, Magnus, for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk to With NutsMag. We can’t wait to see you on 21st October 2017 at CROSSFIRE,London.

Band Members:
Magnus Carlson singer
Goran Kajfeš trumpet
Jonas Kullhammar saxophone
Anders Kappelin bass
Anders Lewén guitar
Patrik Kolar organ
Johan Carlsson congas
Christer Björklund drums

Discography:  www.discogs.com/Magnus-Carlson

Social Networks:

facebook.com/magnuscarlson
twitter.com/carlson_magnus


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music News Picks Scene Tags:, , ,
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Record Review – Rob Bailey – Sept 2017

 

Record Review – Rob Bailey – Sept 2017

KING MOJO – IRONSTONED

 


Four-piece Hammond driven Garage-Punk band from Middlesbrough team up with Medway’s finest Graham Day, at Ranscombe Studios on the banks of the Medway for a hard-hitting EP. Four strong originals with ‘5th Time Around’ being my personal favorite. Available on CD and Vinyl with more to come from King Mojo.
www.facebook.com/kingmojo.uk


LET THE MUSIC PLAY – GENE PITNEY/ REVIEWING THE SITUATION – JACKIE BOND

 

Another fine release from Spoke Records. The Gene Pitney ‘She’s A Heartbreaker’ era track is a great slab of Blue-Eyed Soul restored and remastered from a battered Emi-Disc acetate. The highlight however is a superb version of Lionel Bart’s ‘Reviewing the Situation’ from the musical ‘Oliver’. This is every bit as good as the better-known Sandie Shaw version. It was due for release on Strike or subsidiary GO in 1967 originally before they went bust, only to find its way on the ‘Dream Babes’ CD in 2003. Now finally available on 45 grab one quick folks.
spokerecords.co.uk


INTRODUCING – THE DEEP SIX

Brand new album on Heavy Soul records features Mark McGounden of MAKIN’ TIME and UPPER FIFTH and Paul Hooper-Keeley of the THREADS together with the multi-talented Tony Barbados banging the drums and Niall Keohane on bass. There is no re-working or covers here, just fourteen strong MODern soulful tracks.
www.facebook.com/TheDeepSixOfficial/


FOGBOUND – LP

 

A masterpiece beautifully packaged from one of our favourite 21st century bands also available on a limited red vinyl edition. Ten strong originals from a band that are growing in confidence with every gig and release. This album will no doubt become as revered as some of those sixties classic in years to come. Grab your copy now before they sell out and start going for silly money like some of the early singles from the link below.
www.johncolbysect.com


PIAGGIO SOUL COMBINATION – ITALIAN BOOGALOO

 

The first album by this Pisa Soul-Jazz collective is limited to just 300 copies. These five faces clearly have a love for the Vespa as well as great music. Three covers from Brian Auger, William Bell and Eddie Harris shows you the bag this band are in. Three is the reoccurring theme here with guest vocalists Irene Mori, Sara Piaggesi and Marina Mulopulos. More to come from the PSC.
www.sanantonio42.it


REBECCA DRY & RADEK AZUL BAND – BRING BACK SOUL

 

An English singer living in Paris who possesses a wide and powerful voice in a Northern and Deep Soul style. Her debut album ‘Rebecca Dry Sings Soul’ was a hit. And her second ‘Bring Back Soul’ with the ‘Radek Azul Band’ again is another triumph from the excellent Q-Sounds stable. Do yourself a favor and purchase a copy of this album from the link below. www.qsoundsrecording.com/


SUNBURST – THE MEN

 

The Men have had some favorable reviews on NUTSMAG from Graham in the past. ‘Sunburst’ is a change of musical direction partly down to a change of drummers and the recording process with a more organic approach. Band members played new musical instruments and adopted a more soulful approach, reminiscent of late era Beatles in some places. This album gives The Men another dimension to their energetic live shows.
www.themen.se


LITTLE BARRIE – DEATH EXPRESS

 

Having followed the band from the very early days and done countless gigs with them it’s always a joy to hear the new material which always takes a fresh approach. ‘Death Express’ is a sonic album of clever Psychedelic Garage Rock riffs from singer, songwriter and demon guitarist Barrie Cadogan. It’s amazing what sounds this trio can produce with Virgil’s tight break beat drumming and Lewis Soulful bass lines. The result a double album with twenty tracks, go grab a copy of this future classic before it’s too late.
www.littlebarrie.com


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 7, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page General Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Euro Yeye 2017 Review

Now in its 23rd year, Euro Yeye 2017 proved once again why it’s at the top of the tree for 60s/Mod events in Europe.

To earn the attendance of so many regulars and newcomers, some of whom weren’t even born when the first weekender was held, is something really special. This was my second time in Gijon, having first visited in 2015, and my first time being invited to DJ by Felix and Rob and I couldn’t wait to return for the all-nighters, the amazing music, the friendly people and the Asturian cuisine.

First of day events was in El Bello Verano, seaside bar with DJs and one of the exhibits of the weekend, by Catalan artist David Cobo.
There was also a film festival organized that started on Monday with a really good response. 8 films, one (or two) each day. Thursday was the day to introduce it to YeYe fans coming from all over, with Merli Marlowe and Felix talking about the films, all of them very rare, all of them 60’s and all of them related to humor, this was the link. Also time for introducing Joaquin Viña’s Pop Art amazing exhibit and “las maravillosas aventuras of Mr Soul” graphic novel by Andreu Conill.

First band of the weekend was California act, The Allah-Las performing in the traditional Plaza Mayor outdoor concert. Their sun-drenched psychedelic mid-tempo sounds were the perfect start to events in the early evening heat, and they thrilled their attending fans and new converts alike.

Things, for me, got off to a shaky start, I lost my luggage en route from Scotland, and managed to badly injure my ankle as soon as I arrived at Acapulco, but I wasn’t going to let these setbacks ruin the weekend! Thursday’s all-nighter got off to a flying start (the legendary Sala Acapulco Gin & Tonics helping me with anesthetic), with the mix of black and white sounds from the DJs including Rob and I from the UK and Juanito Volumen from the Spanish Inquisition team as well as a fantastic show from Spanish band Melange. Both styles of music R&B/soul and garage/psych in one room really pulls everyone together and in the hands of the skillful DJs the crossovers were seamless and kept the dancefloor going until the early hours of the morning.

Friday daytime saw a few sore heads, but a beautiful sunny day to get out and explore Gijon, enjoy the beach, as well as all-day mod sounds at El Patio de la Favorita with Kitty B Shake and Jokin Misterklin on the decks, as well as the first of two mass scooter runs around the city. Right before all this Jim McCarthy was interviewed thru skype to present his last 2 graphic novels: “Living for Kicks” and “The Life and Death of Keith Moon”. The club “Toma3” was packed… and there was also a show cooking experience with French food.
For the lucky few, a couple  more hours sleep and then onto the 2nd Allnighter, again the stellar DJ line-up and two of the most exciting bands on the circuit as well, in the shape of Les Darlings from France and homegrown Spanish psych favourites Fogbound setting things up for another night of fantastic music and gathering of friends old and new. Les Darlings delivered infectious beat and rhythm sounds with loads of style, while Fogbound’s have gone from strength to strength with their sweeping psychedelic/prog/popsike sound, that went down a storm.

For the lucky few, a couple  more hours sleep and then onto the 2nd Allnighter, again the stellar DJ line-up and two of the most exciting bands on the circuit as well, in the shape of Les Darlings from France and homegrown Spanish psych favourites Fogbound setting things up for another night of fantastic music and gathering of friends old and new. Les Darlings delivered infectious beat and rhythm sounds with loads of style, while Fogbound’s have gone from strength to strength with their sweeping psychedelic/prog/popsike sound, that went down a real storm.

There was no let up the next day with plenty of people braving the hangovers and the overcast weather to head to the 7 hour pool party at Camping Deva… record and clothes stalls, food, drinks, scooters and a packed line-up of DJs playing the best of 60s sounds across the genres. The Scootercruzada had their trophies given there as well, furthest traveller being a young fellow from Germany (2000+ kms. on his Lambretta to the event). There was also a bunch of British mod scooterists + the usual Spanish and local crowd enjoying the roads and the party.
A final push for the 3rd all-nighter, and this was going to be something special with the eagerly awaited annual Mr & Mrs Yeye contest saw Gerry German from Switzerland and Marian Choya Martin crowned this year’s winners. Live performances from Las Munjitas Del Fuzz from the Vatican with their primitive fuzzed up garage sounds and crazy live show and the eagerly awaited show from Spain’s Tito Ramirez.

The debut Tito Ramirez single ‘Lonely Man’ became an instant classic at R&B/mod nights around Europe and the live performance shows he has so much more to come, the band were bursting with infectious energy and had the whole room in the palm of their hands with their own signature take on classic r&b and popcorn sounds, delivered with loads of character, swagger, and humor.

After Tito the DJ team of Miguel, Imanol, Luis, Felix, Juanito, Rob and I took the night through to dawn with a wholesome mix of 60s styles, blending old favorites with sure to be future classics and, most importantly, keeping the dancers grooving and spinning till the sun came up.

Sunday – out o the official program – was the time for the “necropoli yeyé” a party for all the “leftovers-yeyes” from everywhere that had the strongest dancing in the old town club “TNT” up to 7am!

It was an absolute pleasure to be invited to play as part of the DJ team, and to be welcomed by the locals and friends from across Europe to this very special event in the mod calendar. As I said even injuries and lost suitcases couldn’t hold me back. Here’s to next year  (2 to 5 august!)

Take a look at the images from EURO YEYE 2017 here  
- Arriba, abajo, al centro y adentro, Salud! Craig Reece


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Felix EuroYeYe

Organizador de weekends mods y 60's como el Euroyeyé y el Beat Goes On. In Gijon, Spain.

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September 19, 2017 By : Category : Bands DJs Europe Front Page Music Reviews Scene Tags:, ,
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Jazz for Modernists 13 – Kenny Dorham: 6 of the Best

Jazz for Modernists 13 – Kenny Dorham: 6 of the Best

Texas-born trumpeter, composer and singer McKinley ‘Kenny’ Dorham (1924-1972) played an important role in the development of modern jazz trumpet. Recording as early as 1945 with Mercer Ellington and Frank Humphries, he appeared on some early bebop big-band sessions led by Dizzy Gillespie and sustained a career as leader and side player throughout the 1953-1965 period of hard bop. After work with Fats Navarro, Lionel Hampton, James Moody, Charlie Parker, Milt Jackson and Thelonious Monk, his first full date as the leader came in October 1953 and was released for Debut as The Kenny Dorham Quintet (vols. 1 & 2). The following year he was a founding member of (at the time) Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers, a combo soon to be led by fellow co-founder and drummer Art Blakey. Dorham’s own Jazz Prophets followed in 1956, a line-up of which featuring pianist Bobby Timmons recorded his second album for Blue Note, ’Round About Midnight at the Café Bohemia (1957).

Dorham has constantly been regarded as a ‘players’ player’ or ‘underrated’, perhaps due to his never being consistently associated with one major label for any great length of time. Although commercial success eluded him, the pantheon of great names of distinct styles that either played for him or invited him to key sessions is a testament to his qualities of consistency and adaptability. Returning to Blue Note in 1961, he struck up something of a partnership with tenor great Joe Henderson, appearing on three of his Blue Note LPs: Page One (1963), Our Thing (1963) and In ‘N Out (1964). Henderson appeared in turn on Dorham’s Blue Note dates Una Mas (1963) and Trompeta Toccata (1964), while both horn men featured brilliantly on Chicago pianist Andrew Hill’s masterpiece Point of Departure (1964).

From 1965 until his premature death in 1972, Dorham recorded only sporadically, though he did still feature on some excellent LPs including the 1967 debut by pianist and fellow Texan Cedar Walton. Overall, his legacy is a very positive one, often hailed for the quality of original compositions such as ‘Blue Bossa’ (recorded by Joe Henderson), the modal ‘Sunset’ from Whistle Stop (1961) and the twice-recorded ‘Una Mas’. In terms of style, Dorham has been praised in The Penguin Guide to Jazz for his ‘elusive brilliance’ and described as ‘fluid, punchy and lyrical’. Of his Blue Note sides, only ‘Mamacita’ (see no. 5) was issued as a 45 single, though a few EPS on other labels were distributed globally. DJs looking for tracks for the dancefloor or the ‘lounge’ party soundtrack might need to rely on albums. In truth, Dorham was never really an out and out soul-jazz player, though the list below does it’s best to appeal to mods who like to ‘step out’ as well as sit back with a cool beer and watch the network DVD box set of Public Eye.

1. ‘Afrodisia’ (1955) – From Afro-Cuban 10″ Vinyl, Blue Note BLP 5065 & LP, BLP 1535 (1957)


Dorham’s first two lead sessions for Blue Note in January and March 1955 were with expanded versions of the first Messengers line-up featuring Horace Silver on piano, Art Blakey on drums and Hank Mobley on tenor sax. From the second session came ‘Afrodisia’, an infectious piece of Latin hard bop with Carlos ‘Patato’ Valdes on congas and Cecil Payne on baritone sax.

youtube.com/watch?v=7myLXPUBB_w


2. ‘Lotus Blossom’ (1959) – From Quiet Kenny LP New Jazz NJLP 8225


What Billboard (Feb 22, 1960) called ‘the relaxed, warm sounds’ of Dorham’s late ’59 Quiet Kenny LP for Prestige’s New Jazz offshoot owed more than a little to the modal sounds of Miles Davis’ recently released Kind of Blue and the directions in which John Coltrane was taking the hard bop template. Bassist Paul Chambers had appeared on Davis’ seminal album, while pianist Tommy Flanagan and drummer Arnette Cobb in the same year played on Coltrane’s Giant Steps, the first clear exemplum of the iconic saxophonist’s ‘sheets of sound’ experiments. Dorham’s quartet for this date was thus the cutting edge of post-bop improvisation. The modal feel is evident on the exotically-titled ‘Lotus Blossom’, which leads off an outstanding set of laid-back modern jazz.

youtube.com/watch?v=-TwoXLZo6-c


3. ‘Buffalo’ (1961) – From Whistle Stop LP Blue Note BST 84063


Whistle Stop, the third of Dorham’s five dates as leader for Blue Note, is required listening for connoisseurs of the particular period of hard bop (c.1959-1963) that followed Miles’ and Coltrane’s modal experiments and preceded the r & b-driven, finger-snapping funk of Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder. Perhaps the most interesting track from a historical point of view is the bluesy and Indian-inspired ‘Buffalo’, a swinging example of what Ira Gitler’s original sleeve notes describe as ‘southwestern funk as opposed to the usual southern funk we hear’. Mistakenly attributed to Horace Silver, a short version of this tune cropped up on the debut release in early 1963 of visionary acoustic guitarist Davy Graham (The Guitar Player). Taken up by John Renbourn, the tune for guitar was an early blueprint for the fusions of jazz and folk that would lead to the formation of Pentangle in 1967.

youtube.com/watch?v=uQoslZNVjzs


4. ‘Sao Paulo’ (1964 – recorded 1963) – From Una Mas Blue Note BLP 4127


Enter Joe Henderson (and Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams and Butch Warren). Recorded in April 1963, Una Mas (Spanish for ‘One more (time)’) is a record inspired by the Brazilian bossa nova sounds so popular in the United States in 1962. The title track, here extended to over 15 minutes, had appeared a year earlier as ‘US’ on the live Inta Somethin LP for Pacific Jazz. Infectious though this is, it’s the shorter ‘Sau Paulo’, described by Dorham in the sleeve notes as ‘half bossa feeling and the other half is something else’, which best epitomises the ‘light and shade’ feel of Blue Note’s 1960s Latin-tinged modal blues.

youtube.com/watch?v=lN1iQQS5E_A


5. ‘Mamacita’ (1965 – recorded 1964) 45 (parts 1 & 2): – Blue Note 1922; 33 – From Trompeta Toccata Blue Note LP BST 84181


This catchy Joe Henderson tune kicks off side two of Dorham’s last date as leader (Henderson would record a slightly faster version on his 1967 set The Kicker). The last of the five Henderson-Dorham Blue Notes to be recorded (in September 1964), Trompeta Toccata reunites Dorham with Tommy Flanagan and also features legendary drummer Albert Heath and the great Richard Davis on bass. Mid-sixties jazz modernists are urged to acquire this album also for its urgent Afro-Latin title track (with outstanding Henderson solo) and the nocturnal swing of the excellent ‘Night Watch’.

youtube.com/watch?v=0dGFeIcGb_4


6. ‘Turquoise Twice’ (1967) – From Cedar Walton: Cedar! LP (Prestige PR7519)


Dallas-born pianist and composer Cedar Walton had made his recording debut in 1958 on Dorham’s Riverside LP This is the Moment! After a stint with Art Farmer and Benny Golson’s Jazztet, he was part of Art Blakey’s most interesting Messenger’s line-up from 1961 to 1964, playing alongside Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard and contributing bona fide classics such as ‘Ugetsu’ and ‘Mosaic’ to the repertoire. By the mid-sixties Dalton was appearing on numerous Prestige sessions; his first for the label as the leader featured Kenny Dorham, who, though fading from the scene, delivered a searing solo on the majestically lyrical modal blues ‘Turquoise Twice’. Dorham continued to record sporadically (dates with Barry, Harris, Clifford Jordan, Toshiko Akiyoshi and Cecil Payne) until his premature death from kidney disease in 1972. His legacy is a fine one.

youtube.com/watch?v=nFKeU-qKRiA


 


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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September 7, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , ,
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“Digging deep into the Rubble – Volume 1”

“Digging deep into the Rubble – Volume 1”

It’s fair to say that compilation albums have been many a vinyl addicts’ first introduction to all sorts of great music over the years. “Tighten up”, “Nuggets”, “Tamla Motown – 20 Mod classics”, “Mods mayday ‘79”, “A splash of colour” are amongst many LP’s that have introduced people to sounds they might not have heard before, setting them off on a long journey of musical discovery. Fans of UK beat and psychedelia have been particularly well served in this respect. Firstly with some great releases on See For Miles, Charly and the under-the-counter “Chocolate soup for diabetics” series, but mainly from the legendary series of “Rubble” albums compiled by Phil Smee of Bam Caruso records. There were twenty made in all, all filled with beat obscurities and popsike classics. These albums in turn part-helped make the original 45’s the maniacally sought after records they are today. In an occasional series we’re going to have a look into each one, and pick some highlights that are contained within those grooves.

The first volume in the series was released in 1984, entitled “The psychedelic snarl” (KIRI 024). Cherry picking great and obscure 45’s from the Philips and Fontana labels, it featured a suitably trippy front cover and an 8-page booklet giving some background on these previously unknown groups and artists. Side one starts off with legendary ‘freakbeat’ masters The Wimple Winch. Evolving from Liverpool R’n’B group Just Four Men, they released three 45’s in their lifetime. The third and most out-there was “Rumble on Mersey Square south” (TF 781) which opens side two. However, hidden on a handful of the B-sides was the wonderful “Atmospheres”, though the label doesn’t show this! It’s almost impossible to find one, especially in mint condition, but expect to pay over £500 for one. Straight onto track two, we find The Mirror “Faster than light” (BF 1666). Tucked away on a 1968 B side, it’s a phased pop-sike pounder. Track 3 brings us to one of the rarest and most valuable UK singles ever, “Woman of distinction” (BF 1588) by legendary session musician Caleb Quaye. Released in 1967 and only selling a handful of copies, this psychedelic masterpiece commands obscene amounts of money, a copy selling for £2,350 in June 2017. Martin Cure & The Peeps “It’s all over now” takes up track 4, next up is The Living Daylights 100mph psych B-side “Always with him” (BF 1613) and The Misunderstood’s 1969 slow groover “Never had a girl like you before” (TF 1041) is sixth. Track seven is made by a band responsible for three of the top UK rarities of the decade…

The Open Mind. As well as a much sought after ’66 slice of mod greatness as The Drag Set (“Day and night”), they also released a £1000+ album and a two sided proto-heavy metal 45 in 1969,“Magic Potion / Cast a spell” (BF 1805) which can also sell for up to £1000! After the madness of “Cast a spell”, it’s left for Billy J Kramer’s old band The Dakotas to end side one with “The spider and the fly” (BF1645). Featuring some incendiary guitar work from Mick Green, one of these can set you back over £100!

 

Side two opens with the aforementioned Wimple Winch’s “Rumble on Mersey Square South” (more of them later!), followed by fellow stars of side one The Open Mind with “Magic Potion”. The Living Daylights “Lets live for today” (BF 1561) is up next. Originally recorded in Italian by The Rokes, it was eventually a massive US hit for The Grass Roots in 1967, but the great UK version here was produced by the aforementioned Caleb Quaye! Track four brings us three minutes of total pop-art mayhem from Birmingham group The Craig. The follow up to the dance-floor friendly “Ready, steady let’s go”, “I must be mad” has to be one of the most demented singles ever made, and arguably the best example of a genre now termed ‘Freakbeat’. With an almost as good B side in “Suspense”, the single was released in June 1966 (TF 715) and sold in pitiful amounts, hence it’s £400+ status in mint condition today. Beat boom stalwarts Unit 4 plus 2’s last UK 45 “I will” (TF 990) is up next. On the flip side of “3:30”, the song is a great commercial slab of late 60’s pop, but the public didn’t agree as it didn’t trouble the charts back in 1969.

The Grey were responsible for one solitary 45, but what a classic! On the B side of “Elephant rider” (TF 944) which in itself was good, late sixties pop, “Grey” is a total head-pounder and the song can barely be contained in those grooves. Whether it would have been an A side hit is anybody’s guess (probably not!) but it sure left us with a classic and very valuable £300+ single. After that racket, you’d think the mood would mellow a little, but no, it’s our old favourites The Wimple Winch back again with aggressive pill popping masterpiece “Save my soul” (TF 718). Released the same month as “I must be mad” in June 1966, this was one of many totally legendary releases that just sank without a trace at the time. A surefire way to fill any mod / 60’s dance-floor nowadays, a mint original would easily fetch £400+ on the collectors market. After all that excitement it’s left for The Mindbenders to finish the album off in fine style with the cracking B side from 1966, “The morning after” (TF 780). Not too hard find, it’s a great mod mover with some brilliant guitar work and harmonies too.

Well, “The psychedelic snarl” was the perfect way to start the series, but we’ve got many more nuggets to dig out of the rubble soon!


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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September 7, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Reviews 0 Comment

Hey! Mr DJ Irish Greg

NUTsMag looks back at a piece about Irish Greg for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into Soul through friends in Ireland back in the 80’s, just classic stuff like Kent albums etc. I always liked the blues and used to go and buy albums every week with my pocket-money. Obviously I was into the Specials etc and my all-time favorites The Style Council. When I moved to London in the mid 80’s I got seriously into Ska/Reggae and Northern Soul.

02.Where was your first DJ slot?

My first proper DJ set came from Alan H who was doing Sunday afternoons in the Dublin Castle in Camden (late 80’s). From there we were always involved djing all round London.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Blimey! Ahh I would have to say for Primal Scream or when I DJ’d for Coldplay, who by the way I thought were shite! Shows what I know about pop music.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I remember playing one night at the 100 Club and there must have been only 30 people in the place, no matter what you played no one was dancing. I just played the tunes and carried on, you could smoke then so it wasn’t too bad on the nerves.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

To be honest there’s not many as most copy each other. Let’s face it there’s no real BIG individual DJ anymore. Wasn’t like this back in the day, Alan H was very important to me as he was ahead of most people in the 80’s. Carl Fortnum, Ian Clark, Ady C.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I like uplifting music, something with a bit of passion and punch all at the
same time.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Helen Troy – I think I love you – Kapp, covered it up for ages as Little Helen and the Ladies.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Paul Weller, Joe Strummer, Small Faces, Who and all of the Sex Pistols.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I collect all kinds of stuff from Punk to Blues.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Nowhere these days, I’m a professional Goalkeeping coach for QPR, so don’t get out much I’m afraid. My weekends are dominated with football and coaching.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Magnetics – Lady in green – Bonnie

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Judy Freeman – Hold on (unissued extended version) – RCA Acetate.
Unknown artist – I feel good – test pressing
Betty Boothe – Just a little bit of true love – Enjoy
Harvey Averne Dozen – Never learned to dance – Fania
Tina Roberts – One way or the other – Security

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Gwen Owens – Just say your wanted and needed – Velgo
Sonatas – Going on down the road – Hot Line
Flash McKinley – I’ll Rescue you – Bombay
New Wanderers – Ain’t gonna do you no harm – Ready
Jimmy Ricks – Oh what a feeling – Festival
Pat Lewis – No one to love – Solid Hit
Jimmy Burns – I really love you – Erica
Bobby Bland – Shoes – Duke
Parliaments – Don’t be sore at me – Revilot
Darrell Banks – Open the door to your heart – Revilot

Reference: Co-Founder of Capitol Soul Club, 100 Club Allnighter resident in the 90’s.

Social Networks: Don’t do them, things like Facebook… full of people talking about themselves and their ego. Oh look at me! No one really cares anymore.

Next Club Spots: Crossfire  for NUTs, London.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:,
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Val Palmer – Hey! Ms DJ

This entry is part 8 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with DJ Val Palmer. Here is what she had to say about her passion for Music, DJing and rare records prior to her next Crossfire slot in London.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Being the youngest of seven kids I grew up listening to the Beatles, Stones, Kinks and Chuck Berry, so have always been into music and was buying records from the age of about nine. I caught the best of the 1970s from Roxy Music to punk, and gradually discovered the soul scene via the re-issues that came out of the ’79 mod revival. I just carried on buying records as usual.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The er… glamorous Crown & Sceptre pub in Great Titchfield Street. A local new year’s eve bash run by my neighbour, Ady Croasdell.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Definitely the first time I DJ’d at the 100 Club all-nighter in the mid-80s – I’d arrived! Talk about a challenge – I heard some guy say ‘F*ck me – it’s a bird DJing…’ More recently, playing at the Subway Soul Club in New York is always a blast, there’s something very satisfying about playing those records back on their home turf.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

An excruciating ‘soul’ night at Whitechapel Art Gallery, of all places. It was the bad idea of some trendy arty types, so virtually zero punters. Me, Keb and Jo Wallace DJ’d to each other all night and there were no middles/spindles, so records were sliding all over the decks, we had to be creative with chewing gum. There were also no wages.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Ian Clarke, Ady C, Bob Jones and the London mob were a huge influence, and I’ve always really rated people like Dean Rudland who can play across any genre, any time. I admire DJs who’ll throw in a few £5 records along with all the uber-rare expensive stuff, there’s so much that is overlooked because it’s not obscure enough.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Well, I’d like to think that good taste has something to do with it? I tend to ‘shape my sound’ depending on what kind of gig it is – from northern to 70s / crossover, or with a smidgen of r&b and funky stuff thrown in, as necessary. I think I’m fairly adaptable, so long as I get my cab fare home.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Stumbling across three mint copies of John & the Weirdest (Can’t get over these memories / No time) in a well picked-over record store in Los Angeles. (They were filed next to Elton John…) I flogged them all eventually, and am probably the only person to get a begging letter from Butch.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I guess it would have to be Curtis Mayfield, which may sound predictable, but the guy has shaped entire generations of music and political awareness. I saw him play a gig at the Town & Country Club in the 90s, just him on guitar plus bass and drums. It was incredible, yet he didn’t even have a record deal at the time.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not particularly, if you obsess over collecting labels, you end up having to buy the rubbish tunes too. In general I’m partial to mid-tempo, which seems to be rather unfashionable at the moment. However, these days I tend to rummage around the bargain bins for classic stuff that I missed the first time around.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The next slot is New York’s Subway Soul club on October 3rd, and then back to London for Crossfire the following weekend, Sat the 10th of October.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Right this minute, it would be Charlene & the Soul Serenaders – Can you win. Everyone seems to have one except me, which is really irritating, and it’s not bloody cheap.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Impossible to answer of course, but off the top ‘o’ my head, these are some of my all time faves.

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Gambrells – You better move (Carla)
2. Tony Hestor – Watch yourself (Karate)
3. Larry Atkins – Ain’t that love enough (Highland)
4. Johnny Robinson – Gone but not forgotten (Okeh)
5. Sharon McMann – Got to find another guy (Karen)
6. Edwin Starr – Just my kind of woman (Ric Tic)
7. Carol Anderson – Taking my mind off love (Whip)
8. Willie Tee – First taste of hurt (Gatur)
9. Vows – Tell me (VIP)
10. Trends – Thanks for a little lovin’ (ABC)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Rhetta Hughes – You’re doing it with her (Tetragrammaton)
2. Tommie Young – That’s all a part of loving him (Contempo)
3. Limitations – I’m lonely, I’m troubled (Bacone)
4. Brenda George – I can’t stand it (Kent)
5. Claude Huey – Why would you blow it (Galaxy)

Next Club Spots: Crossfire  for NUTs, London.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Ady Croasdell – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 10 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

Ady is a living ‘Soul Scene’ legend running the 6TS Rhythm & Soul Club at the 100 Club Northern Soul All Nighters and co-running the Crossfire Allnighters.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

The Animals. While living in Derby 1964.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Last Chance 6TS allnighter, 21 Oxford St in 1982.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Every closing Sunday night at the Cleethorpes weekender.

4. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Butch for new sounds, Mick Smith for the old ones.

5. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Randy Cozens showing me there was more than Northern to soul dancing.

6. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Sharon Scott – Putting My Heart under Lock and Key, most famous ones are Melba Moore – The Magic Touch and Frankie & Johnny – I’ll Hold You.

7. Biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Impressions, Lou Johnson & Maxine Brown.

8. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Crossfire – The next night is on Saturday Oct 21st 2017.

9. What is the record you would most like to own?

That one that hasn’t been discovered yet.

10. Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Kim Weston – Helpless
2. Carla Thomas – I’ll Never Stop Loving You
3. Four Tops – Baby I Need Your Loving
4. The Parliaments – This Is My Rainy Day
5. The Sensations – Demanding Man
6. Spellbinders – Help Me
7. Ben E King – Getting’ To Me (Atco acetate)
8. Sharon Scott – I’m Not Afraid (acetate)
9. Barbara Lynn – This Is the Thanks I Get
10. Luther Ingram – Oh Baby Don’t You Weep

Current Top 5 Tracks: 

1. Nancy Wilcox – He’ll Be Leaving You – Pied Piper
2. September Jones – Voo Doo Mademoiselle – Pied Piper
3. Magic Night – If You and I Had Never Met – Roulette
4. Melvin Parker – If I Had My Way (acetate)
5. O C Tolbert – Marriage Is Just a State Of Mind (Dave Hamilton acetate)

DJ Promo Links
www.6ts.info
facebook.com/pages/6Ts-Rhythm-and-Soul-Society/6320844642

 


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : Clubs DJs Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Pid – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 13 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

Pid is one of Birmingham and the UK Scenes’ most respected and longest serving DJs, who has appeared at nearly every Modernist Type Event there is on offer over many years. We asked him a few questions recently and here is his replies.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

As a kid I used to get dragged along to watch bands at various working men’s clubs by my Parents, mostly Jazz stuff, then in the late 70’s my mate played me The Jam LP, All Mod Cons and that got me into the mod thing.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

I think it was upstairs at the Upper Grounds Pub (nick name The Rat Pan) in Witton, Birmingham.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

The Isle of Wight rallies, probably when the Action played.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Ronnie Scotts in Brum a few years back, it was the August Bank Holiday Monday after one of the rallies – I was knackered. They’d asked me to DJ at a soul all-dayer in between these soul bands that were doing all this Blues Brothers stuff, they were shit. It finished about 2.30am, they didn’t give me a cent and I had to be up for work at 5am.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Any DJ who can keep folk on the dance floor.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The variety of sounds, anything from early R&B to 60s beat and psych.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

It was an over the phone auction and I won a track called Love is in the Air by The Liberation Street Singers.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Biggest influence was definitely all the early Jam songs,  I haven’t any favourite artists in particular.

09. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The Moseley Arms, Digbeth, Birmingham and some of the NUTS rallies/events.

10. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Blimey, tough one, it will probably be completely different tomorrow.

All time Top Ten:

  1. Howlin’ Wolf – Smokestack Lightning
  2. Danny Owens – You’re a little too late
  3. Billy Hawks – Oh baby, I believe I’m losing you
  4. The Contours – First you look at the purse
  5. Jackie Wilson – Soul Galore
  6. The Action – Lonely Room
  7. Tintern Abbey – Vacuum Cleaner
  8. Tito Puente – Hit the Bongo
  9. Jimmy Smith – The Cat
  10. Mose Allison – Baby Please Don’t Go

Current Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Evil Eve – Tommy Youngblood.
  2. Jolly Jax – Preciate’ it.
  3. Silas Hogan – I’m in love with you baby.
  4. Lloyd Nolan – I don’t know about you.
  5. Liberation street singers – Love is in the air.

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews ModJazz Music RnB UK Tags:, , ,
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Callum Simpson – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 6 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod/scooter scene at 15 years old. I bought my first scooter, a Vespa 50cc Special and joined a scooter club called High Moderation. I had an older brother and cousins who were into the Mod scene so I started to hang around with some Mods who were a year above me at school. Once into the fashion it was only a matter of time before I started to get into the music. I started listening to bands such as Paul Weller, The Jam, Small Faces and The Who. My brother had a big part to play in my musical taste progressing, as he was listening to bands like The Specials, Madness and was listening to lots of soul and Motown compilations, which exposed me to artists like Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, The Four Tops and Martha Reeves.

At 16, looking slightly older than my age (not the case now), I was able to start going to clubs like Brighton Beach, local soul nights and the occasional scooter rally. This is where I was exposed to lots of new sounds. I was hearing records like Mel Torme – Coming Home, Sandi Sheldon – Gonna make me love you and Sam Dees – Lonely for my baby. As you can imagine I was blown away by these sounds and the exposure made me delve a little deeper into the music and vinyl records. I bought my first record from Boogaloo Records in Leicester when I was 17 for 6UKP and it was Ray Charles – Go on home.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My First DJ set was in Birmingham; by this time I lived for the weekends and was travelling up and down the country regularly attending mod/soul nights. Through attending nights on a regular basis Pid asked me to DJ along with a couple of mates Soggy and Gibbo. Dudley Steve was also on at the same night. I remember playing records like Joe Tex – You better believe it baby, JJ Jackson – Oh Ma Liddi and The Artistics – hope we have. I also remember playing a reissue, but this was before I was aware of the OVO policy! A couple of people looked amazed that they saw a young 17 year old lad behind the decks playing Bobby Adams & Betty Lou – Dr True Love…quite funny thinking about it now!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My most memorable DJ set has to be in Barcelona at the Boiler club. The city is amazing enough but the Boiler Club is how clubs should be, exciting, vibrant and a full on party from start to finish. I was deliberating weeks before about what I should play and selecting records for my play-box! I was pleased with my sets and judging by the dance floor so were the dancers, it was packed from start to finish… I even played a B-side by mistake and the dancers liked it, thankfully it was a very good B-side!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If ever you get asked to DJ at a wedding DON’T DO IT! I was asked off the back of running a club called ‘Shoutin the Blues’. One of the bar men liked the music and asked me to play at his wedding. At the time I was about 18 or 19 and thought that I could make a few quid. I made it clear that I only had Soul, Mod, R&B, Latin records and that he wouldn’t be getting the usual type wedding DJ playing music like ABBA, The Village People etc. He was adamant that he wanted something a bit different and that his guests would enjoy the music. I agreed to do it and for a price of £150, which I thought wasn’t bad for a few hours work! How wrong could I have been!

I was conscious not to play rare stuff, so I took more mainstream (to me) records which consisted of lots of Motown and dance floor friendly classics. Anyway to cut a long story short only 1 person danced throughout the whole night and that was towards the end of the night… funnily enough it was probably the rarest record I played all night ‘Billy Hawkes – Oh Baby’. Towards the end there were a group of lads who were sat at the back of the room, one of them came to ask me if I would play ‘You’ll never walk alone’, me being a Man United fan replied “I don’t play that stuff”, every record I played then was drowned out by a chant of “Who the f hell are you”. Shortly after that I decided to call it a night. I got my wages and left. Looking back now it’s pretty funny but at the time it was a nightmare!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Mik Parry – Forward thinking and so ahead of the game it’s unreal. It’s only now other DJ’s have been able to acquire records he was playing years ago. A) because the records are pure quality and B) they have seen his playlists. Check out his You tube channel ‘POW WOW MIK’

Karl Heard – Is what I call a proper DJ! This man has the ability to create an atmosphere like no other. Karl had a record collection to die for, but has now sold most of them off…not that I’m complaining! You think of all the big tunes – Volumes, Charles Johnson, Judy Stokes, Notations, Magicians, Harvey Averne, Johnny McCall AND Karl had or has these and loads more of this calibre.

Gav Arno – I always say it but it’s true, he’s a dark horse! Every time I hear him behind the decks and also when I have a look through his playbox he surprises me with what he has. Gav has a passion for unearthing quality unknown records, he finds tomorrow’s big records today!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The three DJ’s I have mentioned in question 5 have helped me shape my taste, especially Karl Heard, over the last few years. Another is by regularly attending club nights and hearing DJ’s spinning new (to me) interesting records. The thing I love about Mod nights is you get such a varied taste of music from Soul right through to Jazz.

The internet is also a great way to hear new records and other DJ’s from around the world. Shows such as Jester Wild and YouTube channels are a great way to hear new stuff. Over the years I have collected all sorts but now I am much more selective about what records I buy.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Tough question…my best discoveries are records I have recently posted on YouTube, Lil Archie & The Majestics, Leave my Girl Alone & Victor Lane, There’s Something About You. I have had them for about 4/5 years now and have been searching hard since but have never come across other copies. That is the reason why I have put them on YouTube to give them more exposure but also to see if other DJ’s/collectors can unearth copies…good luck!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I honestly don’t have a favourite artist, I really like Marvin Gaye but not sure I could call him my favourite. I would relate this back again to question 5 and say that in my time as a resident at The Pow Wow Club, Mik and Gav were massive influences over me musically. The stuff these guys were playing was unreal! Imagine being 19/20 and hearing The Jokers, Jonathan Capree, The Fads, Young Jessie etc. Both well ahead of their time and two great DJ’s.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not in the slightest, if it’s good and I like it I’ll have bid/buy it. I don’t just buy records for DJ-ing with though. If I hear a record that I like but is not right for playing out, depending on cost, I will still by it for Sunday afternoons relaxing at home, listening to a few records.

Although I do like the Soul Brother Records label. It can be found here.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I am not currently a resident or running any club nights but I get asked to guest DJ quite a bit, so if you keep your eyes peeled I’m sure you will my see my name on one or two flyers. In terms of running my own night… watch this space! Callum will be playing at The Nutty New Year Event in London, see all the details HERE!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Another tough one, it would have to be either Eddie Parker, I’m Gone on Awake or The Hopkins Bros, Shake Cherri on Magnetik. I can remember when I first heard both of these records for the first time and thinking Holy smoke!

I first heard Eddie Parker in Sweden at the Soulastic All-nighter when Ginger Taylor was playing. When the first few notes came in the atmosphere was something I had not experienced before at a soul all-nighter and something I will never forget. That night we all went onto an after party and one of my friends had what I thought was a copy of ‘I’m Gone’ and the only difference between his copy and Ginger’s was that my mate’s was a boot (the look-a-like boot). I wasn’t aware of the value of the record at this point and I thought he had a copy, he then explained it was worth in the region of between 5-7K, needless to say, it was hammered that night and played probably about 30 times at the after party… oh what good times!

I first heard Andy Dyson play The Hopkins Bros at Lifeline a few years back and again the place went crazy. Only a handful of DJ’s had it at the time, all the big boys such as Dyson, Butch, Ian Wright… I’m not even sure if Mick H had one at that time!? Shame that it has been booted now! It’s still record of the night every time I hear it out, but I hate that I can now go online and buy a boot of it for £10, it has to be OVO!

12.  Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten Favourites:

1. Eddie Parker – I’m gone

2. Hopkins Bros – Shake Cherri

3. Jonathan Capree – I’m gonna build me a mountain

4. Carol Anderson – Taking my mind off love

5. Ray Agee – I’m losing again

6. Billy Hawkes – Oh baby

7. Volumes – I ain’t gonna give you up

8. Otis Lee – Hard Row to Hoe

9. Parisians – Twinkle little star

10. Tobi Lark – Sweep it out in the shed

Top Five Spins:

1. The Sacred Four – Somebody watching you

2. Ray Agee – I’m Losing again

3. J T Parker – If you want to hold on

4. Judy Stokes – Real Man

5. Charles Simmons – Save the World

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : Articles Clubs DJs Events Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Chris Dale – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 9 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Chris Dale took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

New Wave, Mod Revival and Two-tone, but my first ever gig in Dec 1979 at Lewisham Odeon, The Specials, Selector and Dexy’s on the same bill, and my future was sealed.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

St Johns Tavern 1990, I can still remember how nervous I was. This was one of Alan Hanscombe’s many soul and reggae ventures, and still helping him out with RnB123 in 2014, should be due my pension soon.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Sunday night Brighton 2011, something really clicked and is up there as one of the best. I can’t go without mentioning my few 6Ts 100 Club experiences, The Boiler and the Hideaway Manchester, especially after a particular memorable football match. The Rimini Italian Jobs throughout the 90’s and early 2000’s were very special, and finally Scenesville at the Notre Dame hall, great nights and an awesome venue.

04. What, so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve been lucky to have DJ’d at some great clubs and nothing really stands out as a bad experience.

05. Your favourite DJ and why?

The whole 6T’s team at the 100 Club past and present, Colin Law at Shotts (he was untouchable around this time), Roger Banks and Mark Bicknell, Gary Spencer & Carl Fortnum and not forgetting Terry Jones at the Village.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Travelling around the country to various all-nighters and clubs, hearing fantastic music, taking a little bit from each experience, mixing in a little Ska, Reggae and Jazz, trying to mould this into my own style, hoping people don’t realise I’ve pinched it.

07. What was your best ever find/ discovery?

Laying claim to any find this day and age is a very rocky road, always someone out there to trip you up, but Manny Corchado – Pow Wow at the Mousetrap in the late 1990’s, would be a tough one to beat.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Motown stable, as it directs you to everything else, Curtis Mayfield, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations. I also have a great love for Ska & Reggae, which stems from the Two-tone era.

09. Do you collect specific labels/ artist/ genres?

Yes, Yes, Yes and Yes – Tamla, Sue, Studio One, Blue Beat the list is too long…

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Mousetrap
RnB123
Brighton\NYE London
I’m also very fortunate to be asked to do fantastic clubs like VaVaVoom
(25th Oct 2014), Inner City Soul and The Boiler Barcelona.

11. What record you would most like to own?

George Pepp – The feeling is real – Coleman
Jimmy Bo Horne – I can’t speak – Dade
Ray Gee – I’m losing again – Soultown
The Wailers – Diamond baby – Coxsone

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 tracks of all time:

1. George Pepp – The feeling is real – Coleman
2. Paris – Sleepless nights – Doc
3. Flash Mckinley – I’ll rescue you – Bombay
4. Gene Toones – What more do you want – SimCo
5. George Lemons – Fascinating girl – Gold Soul
6. Cleveland Robinson – Love is a trap – Nosnibor
7. Prince Buster – Linger on – Prince Buster
8. Tommy McCook – Goldfinger – Treasure Isle
9. Little John – Just wait and see – Gogate
10. John Harris – Hangin’ in – Kerston

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Charles Sheffield – Got my voodoo working – Excello
2. Judy Hughes – Fine Fine Fine – Vault
3. Constellations – I don’t know about you – Gemini
4. Marvin Gaye – Loved starved heart – Tamla
5. Tan Geers – Let my heart and soul be free – Okeh

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music News UK Tags:, , ,
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Newbreed – Allah Las

Jenni and Holly had a chat with Pedrum Siadatian, the lead guitarist and vocalist with Allah Las ahead of headline show at Euro YeYe, Spain on Thursday 3 August.

1. Some of you guys met through school and working at Amoeba Records, can you tell us a bit about what brought you to start playing together and how you became The Allah-Las?

Once Spencer and I started getting acquainted at Amoeba, we shared our individual bedroom recording projects with each other and started jamming just for fun. Soon-after, we asked Matt to join us and drum because he was our friend and had similar tastes. Then they asked Miles to sing cause they knew him from high school and none of us wanted to sing.

2. Having worked in a record store prior to the band and all being big music fans, what different musical influences does each member bring to the band? Do you try to get this across in the music?

We have a lot of overlapping tastes but each of us has certain tendencies that the other doesn’t so it kind of balances out- popman, worldman, folkman, caveman.

3. Obviously California is musically one of the richest places to live with so much history and new music, how influenced are you by living there and other music coming from the area?

Bands are products of their environments just like people are, so I think whether we wanted to or not that Los Angeles was gonna come across in our music to some degree. We are really into the Byrds, Love, Seeds, Rain Parade etc.., in terms of paying homage to those influences, we did it best on our second record.

4. You’ve also had a very strong art direction with your artwork and videos, are there other influences outside of music which you draw from?

Yeah – books, movies, art, friends, and conversations. they’re all equally important.

5. Nick Waterhouse took on production duties on Worship the Sun, how did that come about? Do you have plans to work together again in the future? Or indeed are there any other people on your wish list to work with?

it came about cause he helped us with the first record and it seemed like a good move to work with him again. We also spent a lot of time with Dan Horne in the studio doing overdubs and mixing. I’m into the idea of recording ourselves for the next one!

6. Following on from Worship the Sun, Calico Review takes things a bit further and a slightly darker turn. Can you tell us a bit about the writing of the album and recording process for it?

We were just writing songs separately, a continuation of the process that had started with Worship the Sun. When it came time to start working on Calico everyone started showing the rest of the band the songs they had written and we learned em, demoed em, then recorded em proper off-and-on over the course of a year.

7. Your weekly installment of Reverberation Radio has become a bit of an institution for fans, how did that come about?

Miles had a graveyard shift time slot at KXLU every Wednesday from 2-6am and we would all go down to the station, bring records, and hang out. We got kicked off the air for playing too much old stuff, and with the help of our friend Robbie, we turned it into a weekly podcast that’s been going on for about 5 years. The four of us in the band take turns contributing, as well as six of our friends and the occasional guest.

8. What is the 60s underground scene like in LA? Is this something you are involved in as a band?

There is a small one but I don’t feel like that’s our vibe. We never wanted to be a full on 60’s homage group, even though the video for Tell Me contributed to that.

9. It feels like you’ve been touring pretty much nonstop over the past year. You’ve toured extensively across America, Europe and Australia since the release of Calico Review – what have some of the highlights been?

Some of the best shows have been the shows where we didn’t know we had an audience and loads of people came, like Cape Town, Tel Aviv, Budapest, Moscow, Bali.

10. Are you looking forward to playing at Euro Yeye? What can we expect from the set? When you record, are you always thinking about how it will sound live?

Yes, we’re gonna try to do some stuff we’ve never done live. No, that comes after it’s done!

11. As you’ve been spending a lot of time touring, has this given you much time to check out some new (old) music? What’s been your soundtrack on the tour bus over the last few months?

I’ve been listening to my friend Maston’s record that’s gonna be coming out this fall, it’s really great instrumental/soundtrack music. Also, Chris Lucey, the Only Ones, and VU always.

12. Calico Review came out last year, what are your plans for the rest of 2017? Focussing on touring or will you be heading back into the studio?

Yeah we have a short west coast tour in September but otherwise, we’re gonna start working on the next record this winter!

Band Members: Matthew Correia, Spencer Dunham, Miles Michaud, Pedrum Siadatian

Discography:
Albums

Allah-Las (2012)
Worship The Sun (2014)
Calico Review (2016)
Singles
“Catamaran”/”Long Journey” – Pres, 2011
“Tell Me (What’s On Your Mind)”/”Sacred Sands” – Innovative Leisure, 2012
“Don’t You Forget It” – Record Store Day split w/Nick Waterhouse, 2012
“Had It All”/”Every Girl” – Innovative Leisure, 2013
“501-415″/”No Werewolf” – Innovative Leisure, 2014
“Famous Phone Figure” – Mexican Summer, 2016
“Could Be You” – Mexican Summer, 2016

Main Site:  allah-las.com/

Social Networks:
Facebook Click Here
Instagram Click Here
Twitter Click Here
Soundcloud Click Here


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July 17, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Interviews Picks Psych USA Tags:, ,
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