Music

Masters -The James Hunter Six

This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Masters3

Le Beat Bespoke 2010 was the last time NU had the honor of having The James Hunter Six grace our stage. I managed to have a chat with the main man ahead of the Margate Mod/Sixties weekend show on Friday 27 May 2017 @ Olbys.

You’ve had some rave reviews for the new album. How pleased are you with the way it has turned out?

Very much so! I know the phrase ‘We feel this is our best album’ is generally a coded way of saying ‘We feel this is our latest album’ but I would describe ‘Hold On’ as the record I always wanted to make. ‘Hold On’ is released on the Daptone lable.

How did that deal come about and were you a fan of their output beforehand?

We were between record labels and we wanted to work with a company whose ethos was the closest match to our artistic concept (or “a company who got our vibe” to use the parlance of today’s cider-addled youth). My barber played me Sharon Jones and the Dapkings’ stuff a few years ago and I liked it a lot, so at the first opportunity, we tried to get their label interested in us.

The producer for ‘Hold On’ (Gabriel Roth aka Bosco Mann) has compared you with Smokey Robinson in terms of your songwriting. That is high praise indeed, but how do feel about those kinds of comparisons?

I have been compared to Smokey before, although never favourably. I love his work, particularly his charming quirk as a compulsive rhymer, which effectively turns every fade out into a built-in bonus track.

How much of your life experience has influenced your songwriting?

I don’t think I’ve ever written anything explicitly autobiographical although some real-life moments end up in my songs. But that bit in ‘The Gypsy’ about whacking a fortune teller over the crust with a lead pipe is complete fiction. I deny all knowledge of this incident and I’m prepared to stand up in court and say so.

It’s fair to say your life has been anything but dull, from appearing on The Tube as Howlin’ Wilf, working with Van Morrison and Doris Troy (to name but two), then having to pick yourself up from a very low point to start again, what do you think has been the driving force that has brought you to this point?

Shortly after we appeared on ‘The Tube’ we had two record companies expressing an interest in us (neither of them went for it in the end) but when one of them invited us to the office he played the video of our performance and then turned to us and said: “Well you’ve done it now. You’ll never stop working!” And he turned out to be right, we never did, although there have been one or two lengthy holidays along the way.

The 2006 LP, ‘People Gonna Talk’ was a huge album in America, topping the Billboard Blues chart and earning a Grammy nomination. It was also critically acclaimed, what do you think was the key factor behind its success?

It might have been the novelty value of a middle-aged white bloke from England singing soul music, but hopefully, it was also because some of the songs were fairly catchy!

You have never recorded a cover version, but if you had to do a cover, what would it be?

We did attempt a cover of Allen Toussaint’s ‘Lover of Love’ for the ‘Hold On’ sessions but we didn’t really do it justice, so we’ll have another stab at it one day.

The other five musicians in your band have been with you for some considerable time now. What are their best qualities?

All of them have differing and eclectic tastes in music (anything as long as it’s good!) so each one brings a different element to the music, which stops it becoming too much of a slavishly copyist band. They also contribute to the arrangements of the songs after I’ve written them, which prevents them getting too samey. Oh, and availability is a strong factor as well.

We are really looking forward to seeing you in Margate James, thank you very much for talking to NutsMag.

GET TICKETS HERE!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 15, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Scene UK Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – The Bongolian

The Bongolian are based in Wales & London, UK with band members being: Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos, Johnny Drop: Drums, Glyn “tufta” Edwards: Electric Piano, Dan Rooms: Percussion, Trev Harding: Bass Guitar.We recently caught up with Nass and had a good old chatter!

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 17 years , The Bongolian was originally my studio project, but as soon as the LP was released, and such a huge success we are asked by the organisers of France’s biggest festival; Transmusicale to perform the LP live then other offers flooded in so the need for a full live band came about.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love of Nandos, check trousers and eggnog.

03. Many folks reading this interview will be aware of your other band Big Boss Man, so why did you form Bongolian and what are the main differences?

Trev from BBM slaps the bass guitar rather than his usual axe work, and it’s a much more percussive, rhythmic and V-neck jumper based affair.

04. How would you describe the style you play?

Chaotic! Space-age Latin Boogaloo.

06. What are your live shows like?

The live show is a celebration of heavy bongo beats, funky organ and grinding oscillator work. Brian Auger meets Mongo Santamaria in Carnaby Street.

07. What are your main influences in music?

Mod-Jazz with a touch of Psychedelic Bongos!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Wood Carving ( mainly medieval cutlery; spoons, knives, forks etc.)

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes all the songs and Subject matters usually revolve around past experiences of his childhood in Bolton.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Psyche Yam from the Blue Print LP is my live fave at the mo. My fave song by another artist is “Simply the Best – T Turner” or anything from “No Jacket Required”!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate, especially enjoyed the New LP “Moog Maximus” Launch in London’s Blow Up club in Soho.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Creating all layered analog synth tones for the LP Moog Maximus and then arranging for live performance.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse in Beat Mountain, (www.beatmountain.com) – we stay in the studio for weeks on end, carving out the musical maze that is the sound of The Bongolian. We have had quite lot of plays on BBC Radio so we are aiming to tour UK/Europe in Autumn. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Quite good!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Pine Cone are a great band!

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Lonnie Smith at Abbey Road or Electric Ladyland would be good!

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

I’m working on a hard, uptempo, latin-soul album, and working with Big Boss Man on a new LP, and setting up a new UK and European tour for Autumn. Also check out: www.beatmountain.com  – where I have recorded 548 drum and bongo breaks for use in any musical endeavors.

Tour Dates:
27 May ‘17 Mod & Sixties Festival, Margate, UK
01 July ’17 South London Soul Train, Peckham, UK
22 Sep ‘17 International Festival of Psychedelia, Liverpool, UK
Autumn ‘17 Moog Maximus, European Tour, TBA Europe.

Discography: Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2002: Bongo Head
LPs :
2002: ‘The Bongolian’,
2005: ‘Blue Print’,
2007: ‘Outer Bongolia’,
2011: ‘Bongos for Beatniks’
2016: ‘Moog Maximus’
Main Site:
bongolian.com
Social Networks:
facebook.com/thebongolian
twitter.com/@the_bongolian
spotify.com/thebongolian


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Club Soul Front Page Interviews ModJazz Picks Psych UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – The Gallerys

This entry is part of 6 in the series Newbreed5

The Gallerys; hail from Bristol, Wales, and Kent with band members being: Guitar – James Wood, Bass – Craig Barden and Drums – Dan Maggs. Every so often a new young band pops-up on the scene creating a buzz. We caught up with The Gallerys ahead of their performance at the Margate Mod/Sixties weekender.

How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

With the current line-up of Craig, James and Dan we have been active for a year and a half. Dan and James met at college in Tunbridge Wells where they discovered a shared love for music, and decided to start a band. The original bass player stayed in the band for a few months before leaving for university, at which point Dan had a mutual friend who put the band in touch with Craig who then joined to complete the line-up.

What influences do the band members have in common?

The band members have a lot of musical influences in common; The Who, The Jam, Stone Roses, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Specials, and Oasis.

How would you describe the style you play? What are your live shows like?

Our styles quite innovative in the sense you can’t really put it into one category. It has influences of alternative and indie, mixed with the energy of garage rock and – at times – rhythm and blues. All this is held together by our three-part harmonies. The best thing about coming to one of our shows is that we play our sound which spans many different genres. Our live shows have tons of energy and we always go for it.

What are your main influences in music?

Bands like The Beatles, Oasis, The Jam, were all ordinary guys who – through great songwriting and determination – made something of themselves with their music. We’d definitely take inspiration from these bands; we write our own music, arrange our own music, have created an image for the band and have recorded our own EP. The thing about these bands is that they had an idea of where they wanted to go with their music, which they followed through with and achieved; a great example for us.

Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with? What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently?

Craig and James write the songs although The Gallerys sound doesn’t come until we arrange the tunes as a band in the rehearsal room. James has written songs such as ‘Paisley’,  ‘Is this real’, and ‘The End’ with Craig writing ‘You Don’t Really Love Her’, ‘You Can’t Look Through Me’ and ‘Doctor Friend’. The songs cover real life issues i.e. Paisley describes being totally overwhelmed by a positive feeling in a relationship whereas You Can’t Look Through Me covers the relatable topic of being ‘looked through’ in life whether that’s at work, at school or with friends. Something everybody has felt in their life. We want people to relate to our music and feel something when they listen to our tunes.

What’s your favorite song to play?

Our favorite song would be ‘Imperfect Perception’. It’s a chaotic track filled with descending guitar chords, driving bass lines and punchy drumming, all glued together with vocals from all three members. For me, this tune solidifies it’s a team effort for us. Each of us has an equally important role to play in our sound.

How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I’d say there’s definitely an underground scene out there. We’ve played many gigs in various areas of Kent like Maidstone, Tunbridge Wells and Ashford, we’ve played in London, Bristol, Portsmouth and Leicester, and there’s always bands that are doing something different which hasn’t been touched upon before. I’d say we participate in the sense we have a unique sound which merges lots of different styles and genres.

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The biggest challenge to date would have been recording our three track EP ‘Paisley’, which we finished last December. The EP features lots of three-part harmony so there was a pressure to be on top form from a vocal perspective on the days of recording. We split recording the EP over three dates which wasn’t a lot of time. However, we stayed incredibly focused and managed to record the EP in the time frame that we set ourselves.

How often do you rehearse? Play live? Record?

We don’t rehearse as often as we should do. Most of the time we gig about two or three times a week so it’s very difficult for us to find time to rehearse but as we’re always playing live we’re getting tighter and more familiar with each other’s musical styles. At the moment we seem to be recording about twice a year.

Anything interesting coming up?

We’ve got some good shows coming up. Currently, we’re on a national UK tour with indie rock band The Rifles which will see us support the band in Bristol, Portsmouth, Cambridge, and Oxford. We’ve just supported From the Jam at the o2 Academy Leicester which was one of our best shows to date. The venue was absolutely packed and we played our set which was met with great reception. We’re playing live on BBC Radio Kent during the Breakfast show which is a great experience; you’re able to reach audiences all across Kent. We have a special show at the end of May supporting The Specials guitar player Roddy Radiation in the Dublin Castle in Camden; a top venue we love playing at.

The highlight of our year is shaping up to be when we will support Madness at the Detling Showground in Kent, August. We do however have a big announcement to make very soon so stay tuned for what we have coming up.

On the 28th May, we’re playing a slot at the Margate Mod and Sixties festival in Olby’s music room which is going to be special. We played at a clothing shop in Margate called “Rat Race” before which was very well attended. We have a lot of support in Margate so it’s gonna be great to come back for this festival.

What do you think of the music coverage in the media? Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

There’s a good mixture and variety of music in the media at the minute. Sure there could be more but it seems to be fine at the minute. We rate bands like The Strypes, Temples, The Moons, The Rifles and Miles Kane.

What should we expect from you in the future what are your plans and ambitions?

We want to keep going. We want to write better songs, play to new audiences in new locations and most importantly, make a massive impact with our music.

Social Networks:

Facebook: facebook.com/TheGallerysUK/
Twitter: twitter.com/thegallerysuk?lang=en
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/gallerys

Tour Dates: Supporting The Rifles *

*2nd May, The Thekla, Bristol
*3rd May, Wedgewood Rooms Portsmouth
*9th May, Cambridge Junction
*25th May, The Bullingdon, Oxford
28 May – Margate Mod/Sixties Festival


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Interviews Modern UK Tags:,
0 Comment

The Kinks on Pye: Part 2 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Collectors Corner 5

During our last article, we concentrated on The Kinks hit-packed period when they never seemed to be off the charts. As psychedelia took hold of 1967 and strangled most British bands in beads and flowers, The Kinks took off in a different direction and released some wonderfully wistful and melancholic masterpieces. These songs seemed to hark back to a more innocent time which probably only existed through rose-tinted (psychedelic) spectacles anyway. Ray proceeded to write a series of genius 45’s, and more importantly, albums which unbelievably sold less and less with each release. 1968 started well for the boys with the budget LP release “Sunny afternoon” hitting the top ten during the important Christmas market and selling very well indeed. So when Pye released the first new material of the year in April 1968, the lovely and restrained stand-alone 45 “Wonderboy” would have been assumed to sail into the top ten, but it unbelievably stalled at a lowly number 36 in the charts. This began a run of wonderful, yet underappreciated single releases which were low sellers, hence the rarity of some of them today.

Two months later in June ’68, one of Ray’s most loved compositions, “Day’s” was released and fared much better, just stalling outside the top ten at number 12. Though all the bands singles contain nuggets hidden away on their B-sides, this one had one of the bands hardest rockers on the flip, “She’s got everything”. Originally recorded and shelved two years earlier, it could have been a big hit in 1968 as The Stones, Beatles and Move all had massive rock’n’roll influenced hit singles. Luckily it wasn’t forgotten and still fills mod dancefloors to this day as soon as it starts up. Into 1969, the thumping “Plastic man” was released and again reached no higher than number 31, a flop by the band’s lofty standards. It seemed the better Ray’s songwriting became, the fewer people bought the bands records. “Drivin'” was released in August 1969 and became the first 45 to miss the hit parade since “You still want me” in early 1964. Even worse was the total no-show of “Shangri-la” in September which sold incredibly poorly and is one of the hardest of UK Kinks singles to find. In December, the upbeat album track “Victoria” at least managed to hit the low 30’s in the chart but it took a tale of a Soho nightclub meeting with a transsexual to have the band visiting Top of the Pops again. “Lola” was soon flying up the charts and hit the number two slot in August, kept off the top by Elvis. Shortly after “Apeman”, backed with the wonderful “Rats” on the flip, became the group’s last UK top ten hit when it reached number five in the summer. “Days”, “Lola” and “Apeman” apart, these 45’s are now quite hard to find, especially in top condition and prices have risen in the last few years. Expect to pay between £10-20 for the low sellers and up to £30 “Shangri-la”. All were pressed up as yellow demo copies, these are also really sought after and can reach £100+ at auction. A quick shout must go out to Dave Davies at this point. In between 1967 and 1968, he released four cracking solo 45’s and a super rare EP, “Dave Davies Hits”, which is a £200+ artifact nowadays. All four singles (Death of a clown, Suzannah’s still alive, Lincoln County and Hold my hand) are worth seeking out, the last one, in particular, is hard to find and is coveted for it’s fantastic psychedelic B side “Creeping Jean”.

The decline of fortunes in the singles chart was mirrored with the blue label Pye album releases, none of which charted at all. The 1968 release “The Kinks are the village green preservation society” needs no introduction to Kinks aficionado’s, it’s simply one the all-time album masterpieces. Originally envisaged as a twelve track album, a handful of white label promos were pressed up before the track listing was changed to the fifteen track album we all love today. It’s impossible to put a price on the promo copies, but even the released album reaches £200+ in top condition as it sold in small amounts. This album, and it’s follow-up were both released in mono and stereo, the former the harder to locate and more valuable to collectors. They were both encased in very flimsy laminated gatefold sleeves which are invariably damaged and worn, make sure you look after any mint copies out there! “Arthur (or the decline and fall of the British empire)” was released the following year in 1969, and although similarly full of stellar Ray Davies songwriting, this one sold in small amounts too. Hence it has a £100+ price tag nowadays with the “Queen Victoria” insert still there (it’s invariably missing!). 1970’s “Lola vs Powerman and the money-go-round” was the first to be a stereo only release and sold more than the previous two, mainly due to the massive hit singles released at the same time. For a band to release so many groundbreaking and classic songs on Pye, it’s a shame that their parting shot was a soundtrack to
the 1971 Hywel Bennett film “Percy”, a comedy about a man who has a penis transplant. The album still sells for a good price, mainly due to its creators, and Pye also released four tracks from the album as a “maxi-single” with a picture sleeve at the same time. The band signed a contract with RCA in 1971, becoming the “Muswell hillbillies” of that decade who would, at last, have massive success in the USA. But it’s that catalogue on the iconic pink and blue Pye label that will always hold a place in most collectors hearts.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , ,
0 Comment

Hey! Mr DJ – Simon Penfold

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

NUTSMAG recently caught up wuth DJ Simon Penfold in Tunbridge Wells, Kent for a nice chat about music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Through my parents always playing 50’s & 60’s music in the car growing up and then due to my sister’s boyfriend, who was a Mod in the early 80’s, introducing me to Northern Soul.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

At a Night Owl Northern Soul night in Brighton in the late 80’s.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Honestly, I enjoy them all mainly, none stand out as it were!

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

As above, not one stands out really, it’s with the next event!

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Maybe Ginger Taylor, Andy Crane,  and Ady Croasdell – Ginger and Andy as I like a decent amount of 70’s Northern Soul thrown in and Ady because of his success with The 100 Club which was where I had my first experience of nighters in the late 80’s.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I guess being into Scooters/Northern Soul and getting goosebumps from brilliant, quality oldies!

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

The Imperial C’s – Someone Tell Her – Phil L.A. Of Soul years ago in the USA.

08. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

60’s & 70’s Northern Soul originals.

09. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

At The Little and Swig, Tunbridge Wells, Kent go here folks: facebook.com/Across-the-Street-Soul-Club

10. What is the record you would most like to own?

Lenny Curtis – Nothing Can Help You Now – End (An absolutely BRILLIANT/PERFECT Northern Soul 45)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Shawn Robinson – My Dear Heart – Minit
The Sweet Things – I’m In a World Of Trouble – Date
The Masqueraders – Do You Love Me Baby – Wand
Billy Prophet – What Can I Do? – Sue
Little Joe Cook – I’m Falling In Love With You Baby – Hot

Top 5 Tracks of All Time:

Gerri Granger – I Go To Pieces (Everytime…) – Bell
Arin Demain – Silent Treatment – Blue Star
Christine Cooper – Heartaches away My Boy – Parkway
Ritchie Adams – I Can’t Escape From You – Congress
Mickie Champion – What Good Am I – Musette

Social Networks:

facebook.com/Across-the-Street-Soul-Club

Next Club Spots: Tunbridge Wells – Northern Soul Night – 20th May


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Music UK Tags:,
0 Comment

Reviews May 2017

 


Gemma & The Travellers

‘Too Many Rules And Games’  – Album

Legere Recordings are well-known for being one of the foremost soul, R&B and funk labels in Europe and are absolutely the right home for Gemma & The Travellers. This is their debut album and it has been a long time in coming. Over the last four or five years, Gemma & The Travellers have released a succession of danceable, catchy R&B/soul infused singles and slowly building a fan base across Europe. The New Untouchables recognised the potential and have welcomed the band to Shoreditch Got Soul and the Brighton Weekender in the past, but we were particularly pleased to host the official UK launch of this album. What we have are nine original compositions that show exactly why they are on a label that includes New Mastersounds, Mighty Mocambos and Nick Pride to name but three. From the first track ‘I Keep On Thinking’, you know this band is the real deal. With Gemma Marchi giving her customary fine vocal performance, superbly backed by Damien Barbe on keyboards, Kevin Hoffman on saxophone, Robert Petersson on guitar and a top-notch rhythm section of Alan Beckman on bass and Robin Tixier on drums. ‘Where I Lived Before’ is a slice of pure proper R&B, while ‘Take My Heart And Breathe’ is as fine-a-ballad as you could hear anywhere; oozing with emotion and soul. The showstopper for my money is ‘Please Don’t Forget My Name’, delivered with real punch and power. You know the saying ‘good things come to those who wait’? Well if you have been waiting for this album, it really has been worth it. If you have never heard of this band before now, you need to check them out. After all, Craig Charles isn’t a bad judge of music, and he’s a fan.

facebook.com/GemmaAndTheTravellers
legererecordings.bandcamp.com


Stone Foundation

‘Street Rituals’ – Album

Stone Foundation are a band that has defied all the odds. Their success story should be a shining example to any band or artist that is hoping to progress their career without selling your soul to a ‘major’ label or Simon Cowell. This album came out just after the last edition of Nutsmag, hence the slightly late review. It has entered the official UK charts and the band is currently on a sell-out tour to support the album. So how have they got to these dizzy heights? In my opinion, the mark of a great band is when each album is better and surpasses the previous one. Such is the case with Stone Foundation. ‘Find The Spirit’ was great; ‘A Love Unlimited’ was brilliant, this album, ‘Street Rituals’ is a masterpiece. It is the latest installment from a group of musicians who have remained dedicated, committed, determined and focused on the art of writing great songs in the belief that their hard work will eventually be recognised, and so it has proved to be. ‘Ah yes’, I hear you say, ‘but they had Weller helping on this one, so they couldn’t lose.’ It’s a fair point, but I would argue, a misguided one and I will address the ‘Weller’ issue a little later. For now, let’s look at the product. To pick a few highlights from these ten tracks is a task I find very difficult such is the high standard. As I have listened through it, my ‘favourite track’ has changed six times already. Whether it’s ‘Limit Of A Man’(shades of Style Council here), ‘Strange People’, ‘Back In The Game’ or the title track, I can’t choose. They are all unbelievably brilliant. They are songs of hope inspired and influenced by 70’s American soul, while being undeniably British soul. It’s that ‘je ne se quoi’ that sets British soul apart from the Americans. Soul2Soul had it, as did the Brand New Heavies for example and now Stone Foundation have it. As for Mr Paul Weller? He should be given the 2017 Producer Of The Year award right now for this album. Yes he plays and sings on the album and co-wrote a few tunes, but I get the sense he was energised by the whole project and it comes across in his performances. Neil Jones’ voice works so well with Mr Wellers’, ‘hand and glove’ come to mind. And I think two people also deserve special mention; engineer Charles Rees and percussionist Rob Newton. Great job fellas.

stonefoundation.co.uk
facebook.com/stonefoundation


SoulNaturals

‘Love Says Yes’ album

It has been some time since I last reviewed a release by SoulNaturals. Apart from a small handful of impressive singles, the output has been sparse, but that has mostly been due to this album being recorded and it is well worth the wait. With Tony Cannam at the helm, SoulNaturals tend to use an array of vocal talent rather than one focal singer. This album of 11 quality tracks features 10 different vocalists and each one gives a great performance. Arguably, the most notable among them is Mr. Dave Barker (of Dave and Ansell Collins fame) on ‘Let Freedem Ring’; as sweet-a-ballad as you could wish for. Other standout tracks include ‘I Got Sunshine (Enough For The World) featuring Jo Kelsey, ‘I Never Knew A Hell Like You’ with Gloria Pryce and ‘Oh Lord When Will You Free Me’; a lilting gentle reggae-meets-gospel corker with Nadia Pimentel taking the vocal duties. A couple of years ago, it really looked as if SoulNaturals were going to explode on to the soul scene. They were certainly very popular on the live circuit, so with this album to promote, they have a winner on their hands and the live dates can’t be far off.

soulnaturals.bandcamp.com/
facebook.com/soulnaturalsUK/


The Neighbourhood Strange

‘Let’s Get High’ b/w ‘One Last Chance’ – Single

This new single from the ever impressive Neighbourhood Strange brings two quality cuts of garage/neo-psych. All the component parts are present and correct; jangly guitars, catchy hook-lines and Hammond organ. ‘Let’s Get High’ is a mid-paced grower, while ‘One Last Chance’ is a slower, more deliberate song delivered with just the right amount of gusto. This Salisbury outfit is definitely one to watch out for and I, for one, will be keeping a keen eye out for the next installment.

facebook.com/TheNeighbourhoodStrange
theneighbourhoodstrange.bandcamp.com


 The Missing Souls

‘The End’ b/w ‘Mom, Won’t You Teach Me How To Monkey’ – Digital Single

The French scene is thriving right now with some really great bands making their presence felt and the Missing Souls from Lyon are no exception. They have been together for three years and gaining decent support for their brand of 60s influenced garage. Zaza, Ricky, Ian and Lester have been very impressive and this digital single continues to build on their repertoire. ‘The End’ is a proper rocking good time, while ‘Mom…’ is a slower R&B-styled groover. It all bodes well for the future and here’s hoping they will be tempted to come to the UK for live shows. I think we would all be in for a treat.

themissingsouls.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/themissingsouls


Mayfield

‘Spring’ EP

I first became aware of Mayfield with their album ‘Tempo Of Your Soul’ in 2013. Last year they released ‘Keep On The Soul Side’ while simultaneously band leader Domonic Elton built a new studio facility in his neck of the woods. But something a bit special has happened in the meantime and this EP shows exactly what that is. Their 2013 album was very good indeed, but it didn’t show just how good Mayfield are, especially when you see them play live. This EP carries three tracks, two of which are tunes given a total make-over from that album. ‘Fling’ and ‘Sunshine’ are almost unrecognisable from their previous arrangements. What is most notable is that Mayfield has found the polished soul that was lacking four years ago. I had to revisit the old versions just to remind myself and what a transformation has taken place. Superb. ‘Fling’ is now a sumptuous jazz-funk belter, while ‘Sunshine’ is descended from the great days of Acid Jazz; punchy brass, great hook-line and typically British Soul. However, I have saved the best until last. ‘This Time Around’ featuring Decosta Boyce is a soul/northern crossover monster of a tune. I love the ‘What’s Goin’ On’ style ‘Ooos and Ahhs’, the chugging guitar, driving drums and Dacosta delivers the lyrics with stylish aplomb. Of course, Andy Lewis deserves great credit for the mix as well. So welcome back Mayfield. I’m told the vinyl will be available in October, so this is download only for the time being.

facebook.com/mayfieldstudioband
mayfieldtheband.co.uk


 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , ,
0 Comment

Hey! Mr DJ – Pete Kelross

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

Pete Kelross is Co Promoting and a DJ at Nightshift Northern Soul @ Lakeside
based in Woking, UK

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I have always loved music of all genres. I guess it started with Two Tone in the early 80’s which I got bored with after a few years, then moved onto 1960s and a Mod influence through the scooter scene, I did my first Northern soul night in 1985 and never looked back.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Soul Spin Syndicate at Woking Football Club in 1991.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Las Vegas 2010, I was in The Plaza Hotel Ballroom, I don’t think I have ever seen a room so up for it in my life,.Having taken over the decks from a Ska DJ the reggae crowd walked off the floor, the soul crowd walked on, I smashed it 🙂

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I won’t mention the club, but having to stop half way through my set to do a meat raffle.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Roger Stewart.. limitless knowledge, Ginger Taylor, vinyl envy, Kieth Woon, taught me they did make good records after 1969 Ady Croasdell, has forgotten more than I Know and my partner in crime. Derek Mead, always introducing fresh tracks to my box.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I just love good powerful brash Northern Soul, I think being brought up on Elvis and Country music by my parents kind of conditioned my musical taste towards powerful vocal and big orchestral backing that raw soul has… sorry Mum

07. How did the Nightshift Club come about?

I started Nightshift in 1998 because all the other nights in my area at that time were solidly focused on rarer and rarer tracks and cared little for oldies at that time, though when the classics were played the floor would fill, I saw an opening for a oldies night with the objective of playing to the floor. After Derek came on board in 2000 we began to bring the big names from Wigan down,the crowds grew and the venues changed leading to the fantastic 15 years we spent at Bisley pavilion that sadly closed its doors last year.

08. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I can’t honestly say I have discovered anything, the two records that spring to mind that I broke to my own circle are Doug banks, I just Kept on Dancing, a massive tune at Mytchett in the early days, and Joe Tex Under Your Powerful Love. Not my discoveries by any means but when a large chunk of your friends scramble to buy them it gives you satisfaction.

09. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Hard to say where the influence came from, soul is all about emotion good or bad so life’s experiences mould the lyrics that grab you mix it with the musical sound you like and that’s where the magic happens, favorite artist wow it chops and changes, but the one that always hits the top for me would be Ray Pollard, I missed his UK live performances, I’m still kicking myself today.

10. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I collect anything. Any genre, any speed, any size!

11. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Nightshift Club, Lakeside, Surrey, UK.

12. What is the record you would most like to own?

The Salvadors, Stick By Me Baby!

 

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. Going To A Happening Tommy Neal – Pameline
2. I Cried My Life Away Tommy Navaro – De Jac
3. I’m A Peace Loving Man Emanuel Lasky – Thelma
4. Little Girl Lost The Shepards – ABC
5. I Can’t Let Go Johnny Summers – Yorktown

Top 5 Tracks of All Time:
1. This Time Ray Pollard – Shrine
2. Cover Girl Carl Spencer – Rust
3. I’m Your Yes Man Clarence Reid – Wand
4. Beauty is Just Skin Deep The Sweethearts – Kent
5. Baby Without You Danny Monday – Modern

Social Networks: 

facebook.com/PeteKelross

Next Club Spots:

Lakeside: 3rd June 2017 Isle of Wight (Crown Hotel) Aug B/H Soul invasion
Los Angeles{ 15-16 Sept 2017


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles DJs Front Page UK Tags:,
0 Comment

Masters – Corduroy

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series Masters3

In the early 1990s, something unusual happened and something that has not happened since; two small independent British record labels were formed that defined the entire decade musically. On one side driving the Britpop era was Alan McGee’s Creation Records and on the other, Eddie Piller’s Acid Jazz which flew the flag for eclectic soul and funk. Part of that Acid Jazz roster was a band which may have had modest chart success, but retained a loyal fan base and critical acclaim for every album and single they released. NUTs caught up with frontman Richard Searle to talk about Corduroy and their forthcoming headline appearance at Le Beat Bespoke 12.

01. When did you get Corduroy back together and why?

We reformed in 2013 to promote a Corduroy CD box-set released by Cherry Red Records, featuring 3 of our 5 studio albums plus a Japanese live album; plus a previously unreleased live album via Acid Jazz Records.

 02. When did you first become interested in music?

We didn’t have a record player when I was a primary school kid. I grew up during Glam, (Slade, Sweet, T-Rex); but my oldest friend, who lived down my street (Elibank Rd), had a record player and his brother had two Who albums; so The Who were formative, and are still my favourite band.

03. Do you regard yourself as a mod? How did you get into it?

I bought punk records from 77 onwards, The Stranglers, The Damned, Generation X, Devo, Pistols etc, but I used to follow The Jam, they were ‘my life’. I saw them for the first time in 78 (supported by Generation X and Slade). My first parka cost £14 from Paraphernalia in Lewisham). My first bespoke suit, when I was 15, was from a tailor in Lewisham called James Joyce – the jacket still fits. When the ‘mod revival’ happened, I’d already started listening to psych stuff (the first Nuggets album, Velvet Underground, Shadows Of The Night, Electric Prunes, Love), so when the ‘New Psychedelic’ scene reared its head, I was already wearing more ‘swinging sixties’ gear, my hair was a ridiculous back-combed bouffant. I didn’t fit with the British ‘mod’ look, I was never into Two-Tone. When people ask, I say that I was a ‘psychedelic mod’.

04. How did the whole Doctor and the Medics thing come about?

The ‘psych scene’ was based around a couple of clothes shops, The Regal and Sweet Charity and a Soho club called The Clinic (in Gossips – Soho); the resident DJ called himself The Doctor he was my patrol leader in the scouts. The Doctor (Clive) was given the opportunity to record a single on Whaam Records, so he put a band together. It was only supposed to be for the one single, and a couple of gigs, but we had fun and carried on. I left after 8 years.

05. Which clubs did you visit during the late 80s and early 90s?

In the 80s it was mostly psych clubs, The Clinic, The Taste Experience, The Pigeon-Toed Orange Peel, and the Alice In Wonderland (a club which took over from The Clinic, in which The Doctor was resident DJ and The Medics played regularly). I went to The Bat Cave once – once was enough. In the 90’s I was going through a beatnik phase – Smashing, Frat Shack, Tongue Kung Fu. DJs like Martin Green and The Karminski’s were where it was at.

 06. How did you join up with Boy’s Wonder?

Boys Wonder were friends, they were truly great. They sacked the bassist Chris Tate and I filled in for a hand-full of gigs (a couple of head-lines at the Marquee and supporting The Hoodoo Gurus at the Town & Country, now The Forum).Tony Barber then joined.

Despite being ‘in vogue’ they were dropped by their record label, Sire, and then sacked Tony Barber. The Medics had stopped being fun by this point, so when they asked me to join permanently, I did so. The band then started a long downhill spiral of musical styles, band wagon jumping and failed attempts to get re-signed. By the time Boys Wonder finished, we were truly shit.

07. How did you meet Eddie Piller?

Acid Jazz was one of three record labels that the newly formed Corduroy went to see. Ed Piller booked us into his studio two days later.

His first words to me were… ‘Are you a mod?’

08. What is your assessment of the influence of mod on Acid Jazz and vice versa?

Acid Jazz became a refuge for displaced survivors of the mod revival, mainly because it was owned by one, (Ed Piller), but musically it was all over the place. The Sandals came from the ‘beat scene’, Emperor’s New Clothes were proper jazzers, and Mother Earth just wanted to be Traffic. Some bands initially did appeal to mods (JTQ and then Corduroy) but I think musical tastes changed with the labels’ output, which became quite ‘fusion’ orientated. Fifteen-minute hip hop, jazz funk, jam sessions by stone-heads with pubic beards wearing socks on their heads – just isn’t very mod.

09. What was the inspiration for the Corduroy sound?

We each had very different musical tastes, but we all shared a love of film music; this was the main inspiration for the Corduroy sound at its best (the first two albums). By the third album, that uniting force had vanished (lost through ego and endless Steely Dan records). I will always regret not actually leaving Corduroy after the second album.

10. What are you most proud of from your Corduroy years?

Record-wise, I guess the second album – High Havoc. Supporting Blur at Alexandra Palace, (with Pulp and Supergrass), was cool. Seeing the world, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia as well as traveling all over Europe. But my fondest memory is of pulling a girl’s knickers off with my teeth, during an excellent round of strip-dice (a game that I invented).

11. What was it like being signed to Acid Jazz and part of a vibrant scene in music?

The Acid Jazz ‘scene’ meant that people would listen to you, who normally wouldn’t, simply because they were into ‘the scene’. At its best, this meant that there was a family type atmosphere between the bands, and a sense of belonging, plus lots of work. At its worst, by the time Acid Jazz stopped being known as the record label and became regarded as a music genre, the bands couldn’t develop. When Brit-pop then over shadowing things, it became more fashionable than, the Acid Jazz scene, bands identified with ‘the genre’ were ultimately finished. The ‘scene’ itself moved back into the clubs – eventually with Acid Jazz Records buying The Blue-Note.

12. Which clubs did you visit during the 90s? Was Blow Up one of them?

I went to Blow-Up at The Laurel Tree a couple of times, more so when it moved to The Wag… Corduroy played a gig there. I had my own bar tab at The Blue Note.

13. Which bands, music, clubs or scenes have impressed you during the last decade?

Bands: Super Furry Animals, Spiritualised, Verve, Manson, The Dandy Warhols, Kula Shaker, The Prodigy, Earl Brutus,

Clubs: Smashing, was for a year or so, the best.

14. What has been the response to Corduroy coming back?

Very positive; getting lots of international invitations for shows as well as UK interest. We are currently writing new material with every intention of recording a new album.

15. What can we expect from Corduroy at Le Beat Bespoké this year?

Groovy, spy themed, organ-fueled, raw garage, punk-jazz, dirty mod, fun!

16. Are you looking forward to it?

Yes, very much!

 


We are too Richard. Thanks for taking the time to talk to NUTsMag

Corduroy headline Sunday night at lebeatbespoke.com at 229thevenue.co.uk Central London.

Check the bands facebook page here: facebook.com/CorduroyBand/

This interview was originally the one I did with Richard Searle for the updated Influential Factor.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 23, 2017 By : Category : Bands Interviews Music News Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Los Retrovisores

This entry is part 4 of 6 in the series Newbreed5

Los Retrovisores a Fuzz Soul band from Barcelona. Sounds louder than 1968.

Band Members:
Victor Asensio: Singer
Leo Hernandez: Bass
Pere Duran: Guitarra
Sergio Sanchez: Hammond
Quim Corominas: Drums
Hector Fàbregas: Chorus and Percussion
Edu Polls: Sax Tenor
Alexis Albelda: Trumpet
Francesc Polls: Bariton Sax

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Since 2006, most of the members came from a Jamaican music band called ‘The Cutties’.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all are late 60’s and early 70’s dance sounds enthusiasts. We love most of the styles: from R & B to soul, reggae, psych or garage, back to rocksteady, and deep into beat… We’re also very influenced by the 60’s Spanish counterpart of that styles, as you could tell listening to our compositions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are so many cool bands in our area: Rubén López & The Diatones (reggae) Penny Cocks (punk 77), Mambo Jambo, The Excitements or Los Fulanos (Latin Soul) to name a few…

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Barcelona has several bands, clubs, promoters, collectors and festivals… Some clubs we highlight: The Boiler Club, Movin’ on, The Gambeat Weekend, Le clean Cut, Wamba buluba and Pill Box. There you’ll find some of our favorite DJ’s: Xavi Beat, Julian Reca, Jordi Duró and many more.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We just play the music we love to listen and dance to, without more restrictions. Our style evolved at the same rate we did. In our current set list you can find from Spanish soul to groovy funk, even freakbeat.

06. What are your live shows like?

The audience defines it as fresh and fun. We don’t like the bands that make a script for live shows. We improvise and always try to be ourselves. Our repertoire is compact, short and straight to the neck. No time for solos.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our influences are as wide as our musical tastes. Mainly Spanish sixties bands, that like us borrowed the patterns from their own references, but projecting their own personality to their songs. We really love Bruno Lomas, Los Bravos, Los Canarios, Los Salvajes, Los Nivram, Pau Riba… We despise too many people to name it here!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our universe is strongly influenced by the sharp & surrealistic Monty Phyton’ sense of humor. The French nouvelle vague and its evolutions are also one source of inspiration for our lyrics and videos.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody does his one’s bit, but to date most of the songs were written by Victor and Pere. This has changed in our last recordings introducing compositions by Leo and Hector.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our favorite song from the current repertoire comes from our EP Alma y Pisotón. It’s named ‘Me olvidé de ti’ wich, by the way, it’s been just released on video in a ‘Horror B movie’ style. Check it out! Our choice by another artist is Fire & Ice’s Music Man. We loved the complex brass arrangements and changing our regular subject –love- to an ode to that DJs that make us dance party over party, and that’s why we covered it (you can find our version at Alma y Pisotón EP too)

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

The underground scene, at least in our city, is in a good shape regarding shows and parties. We all participate in one way or another, Victor, for example, is deeply involved with The Gambeat Weekend & the clubs Pillbox 60’s Club and Bread & Groove.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To forge ahead the band, beside the financial precarity of our members, the lack of public resources and benefits for empowering culture, and the economic depression that we are all suffering.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse minimum once a week and play an average of three or four shows per month. More than two years passed between our debut album and our second release “Alma y pisotón”, but we’re reducing the time between recordings and we’ll release our third record in June, one year after the previous release.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

In Catalonia the mass media doesn’t give coverage to the bands that don’t belong to the mainstream market. For some time now, specialized magazines start to write about us. We also make great use of the social networks to reach our fans.

15. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d love to record in London with George Martin and a gigantic strings & brass orchestra, just like Spanish duet Manolo y Ramón did back in 1970. We’d also like to record with Ricard Miralles, arranger for Joan Manel Serrat in the album dedicated to Antonio Machado.

16. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re still working on consolidating our own sound and our show. We’d like to make people outside the scene dance, without losing authenticity or selling out. We’d like to say thanks for our appearances at Euro Ye Ye Mod Festival (Gijon, SP), Purple Weekend, Festival Beat (IT), Soundflat Ballroom Bash (GER) and look forward to our first ever show in the UK (London) at Le Beat Bespoke, Easter – 16th April 2017.

Discography:

VVAA – “L’Edat Daurada” (Jamaican Memories, 2008) CD
VVAA – “Moderno pero español, vol. 8” (Bon Vivant, 2009) CD
VVAA – Somos los Mods vol.1 (Bip Bip Records, 2010) CD
“La nostalgia ya no es lo que era” (Flor y Nata Records, 2011) LP/CD
“Alma y Pisotón” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2013) EP 7″
“En el surco” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2014) EP 7″
“Sonido Joanic” (BCore Disc/Soundflat records, 2016) LP/CD

Web Links:

facebook.com/Los-Retrovisores
bcoredisc.com
facebook.com/los.retrovisores
twitter.com/LosRetrovisores


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 23, 2017 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Eliphant

This entry is part 3 of 6 in the series Newbreed5

Elipant is a North London Power trio formed in 2015. Psychedelic influences mixed with punk-rock sensibilities. Retro with a contemporary twist and a will to sound like no one else. Lyrically in between sensual surrealism and no-bullshit politics. Building a strong following with their high-energy live shows. Eliphant declares war against the stiff and the bored!

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Eliphant was formed in spring 2015 by Dade and Elian who knew each other from a chance meeting and playing in another band, played our first gigs that summer with our first drummer Marco. We got Nelson on board in June 2016 and we’ve been living happily ever since.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We’re united by our passion for music, cinema and arts along with the fact that we both decided to come to London to pursue our dreams and ambitions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Since we started we shared nights with some very cool 60’s influenced bands. The Carnations who pushed us to get together, Creamer & Wesley, Black Doldrums, The pacers, DIN,… They appeal to us because of their sense of originality, tunes and charm.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s hard to tell as we’ve been away for many years now and are yet to tour Europe. Elian, Nelson and Dade all used to play in bands doing pub circuits back in Paris, Lisbon and Nizza in Italy respectively. There wasn’t much of a 60’s/underground scene like there is now.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Psychedelic sixties garage mixed with punk-rock sensibilities. Retro with a contemporary twist.

06. What are your live shows like?

Explosive! Live shows are the best representation of our band. We love to take our audience on a trip, between strong songs and improvisations. That way every show is different and surprising.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We all got an eclectic taste in music so anything relevant since rock’n’roll started. In our music, you could find influences from Bowie, Love, Stooges, early Floyd, Pistols, Pixies, Sonic Youth, White stripes and so on. We played covers of ‘Moonage daydream’ by David Bowie, ‘Break on through’ by The Doors. Apart from the top 40 garbage not worth mentioning… Virtuoso music, posers with no songs to offer, any music that sounds safe and formatted (Coldplay?).

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Each of us in the band, our lovers and our friends. All the crazy characters we meet around this fair old town. Daily lives, socializing at night and Wetherspoons.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Elian writes the basic songs, lyrically dealing with love, lust, social commentary and a sense of freedom. Sometimes abstract to paint an emotion or a situation. other times we use music as a way to make fun of the crap that the media and society push on us.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

One of our new songs: ‘She comes in waves’ or ‘Running out of dreams’, two sides of the same coin. Summer beats guaranteed to take you away. These are both inspired by last year’s adventures, trying to find moments of bliss amidst the chaos. Our favourite song would change every day, let’s be boring and say No Fun by the Stooges.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

There’s a lot of exciting nights around town and many great talents to be found. The key is to be united and have a sense of community among bands, artists and DJ’s. We’re delighted to be part of this.musical landscape, looking forward to traveling around by inviting bands to a gig in our area and vice-versa, play festivals around the country.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Making a living in London while having enough time to do what we love and let it rock!

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse every week, as for gigs, at least once a month. We once played 2 gigs in a day, that was a little crazy but fun. We’d play once or twice a week if we could. there’s nothing like playing live to get tight and hot as a band. We recorded two EP’s so far and we plan to capture the true essence of the band on tape in the very near future.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

If you’re curious, the internet and social media make it real easy to find out where the action is, at least in terms of events. We only wish genuine artists who write and sing their own music would be represented more fairly in the media, but at least we don’t own TVs. New bands now do all the promotion themselves and pay Facebook and Spotify for sponsoring and getting their music out there. This is quite sickening when you think of the profits these companies make on behalf of artists works.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

We like bands with a 60’s/70’s touch like Foxygen, Lemon Twigs and Public Access TV from across the pond. There’s some exciting bands around like Cabbage or Estrons, great shows.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

It would have to be someone we get on well with, but the list could be long. It’d be intriguing to work with Dave Fridmann (MGMT, Tame Impala) he seems to be a sonic wizard. Abbey Road would be thrilling for obvious reasons, but if we could choose, why not go to a place like Sunset Sound in California? Absolutely everyone we love has worked there at some point. That, or a trip to the desert with Josh Homme.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re looking forward to experimenting and take our sound further, make new videos and have an album ready by the end of the year. We’ll be going on a tour in Italy at the beginning of March and we’re buzzing about it! Then we play at Le Beat Bespoke in London at Easter (April 2017). Ideally, we’ll continue to create and spread our music across the world and never feel old.

Free at last!

Main Site: eliphant.co.uk

Social Networks:

Facebook:  facebook.com/eliphantsound
Twitter: twitter.com/eliphantsound
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/eliphantsound
Instagram: instagram.com/elian.eliphant


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 15, 2017 By : Category : Bands Clubs Events Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – The Arrogants

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series Newbreed5

The Arrogants are part of a growing wave of young musicians who, unlike many other teenagers of their generation, are not interested in video games and hipster bands name-checks. These particular young men, alongside a number of others in various countries (some of whom you may know from other Dirty Water Records releases) have happily spent their teens investigating classic 20th-century music: blues, rock’n’roll, garage-rock, rhythm’n’blues!

And they decided they wanted guitars in their hands rather than games consoles. The Arrogants began their musical archaeology first as a 14-year-old duo, then as a 15-year-old trio… Then with an organist, as a quartet, they were ready to be heard by the wider world, with their debut EP, (‘Introducing the Arrogants’ on Dirty Water Records). And now, with the addition of a fifth band member, a rhythm guitarist, to further fill out their sound they are ready with their first long-player.

Whilst digging the sounds of the past, they have successfully developed their own repertoire, writing their own songs and gaining recognition in their home-town by playing as support to their heroes The Pretty Things, and appearing at the Lille Vintage Weekend in front of 15,000 strong crowd. And, recently, they appeared in front of 57,000 people opening for Lenny Kravitz at the Mainsquare Festival in Arras, France.

Produced by French Londoner Healer Selecta (a.k.a. Yvan Serrano of the Dustaphonics) and mastered by Pete Maher (who has worked for U2, The Killers, Rolling Stones, and Jack White, amongst other famous names), these eleven tracks were recorded at the vintage studio of the National Belgian Corporation in just three days. Serrano remembers seeing the sixteen-year-old Arrogants on stage for the first time, ‘It was a strange feeling, as though I was watching an original garage band. Their garage sound is pure, minimal and wild. To make true sixties garage, it should have this youthful energy and not over-do the technical ability to make for a real musical experience.’

The London album launch was on 31 October 2015 at the Fiddler’s Elbow, NW5 in a joint promotion by the Dirty Water Club and Weirdsville. The French album launch was at the Roubaix Vintage Weekender, a major festival attracting tens of thousands of revellers.

It’s been a rather busy 2016 for these ‘fab five’ from Lille, France having been interviewed on French national television along with mainstream magazine features, countless articles, reviews and international radio play. The group produced in grand style, their first video for the title track and single off their scorching hot debut album ” No Time To Wait.” The band has been touring all over Europe including a concert at the legendary Liverpool Cavern Club (Home The Beatles).

Major Influences: 60’s Mod sounds The Who, The Small Faces. Garage Rock The Standells, The Shadows of Knights. Psychedelic sounds 13th Floor Elevetors. Blues Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker. 50’s Rhythm & Blues Chuck Berry, and Bo Diddley!

The Arrogants consist of Thomas Babczynski in the lead guitar and vocals, Louis Szymanowski in the bass, Martin Tournemire in the organ, Hugo El Hadeuf in the drums, and Emilian Mierzejewski in the rhythm guitar.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band started in 2008 with Thomas & his younger brother Luc. At this time as the band was just two guitar and two fuzz pedals. Thomas started singing and they both plays guitars. Luc was 13 and Thomas was 14. They did their first big gig in Brussels in 2009 for the National Belgian Radio & Television Broadcasting Co, then Luc stopped guitar and started the drums. They met Louis who became the bass man and then found an organist. Then Luc left the band.

At that time they changed the line up: the drummer and then the organist. Thomas met Hugo the new actual drummer in his neighborhood (he was playing so loud that we can hear him from his own bedroom…) One morning, he knocked on his door and just simply asked him if he wanted to join a rock n roll band and he said ‘yes’ of course. He met Martin the organist at school and him and some others were skipping lessons whilst playing music for the Church part of our school that’s where he first heard him playing the organ – he was amazed so he asked him if he wanted to join a rock n roll band and he said ‘yeah’! Thomas met Emilian, the rhythm guitarist in our Town.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Bo Diddley, Small Faces, Shadows of Knight, The Fabulous Wailers, The Sonics, and The Seeds.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Gentlemen’s Agreements cause they are very good!

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Pretty Mod inspired at the moment.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Fuzzadelic! What we’ve created is a mix of everything that we like: sixties music and the revival stuff that came up in the eighties and some of today’s sounds too

06. What are your live shows like?

Energetic and very wild, we like a ‘crazy’ crowd!

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

60’s Garage Rock, just one cover “Gloria” by Them. We don’t like the mainstream pop of today.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

60’s Culture in general, Modernism, and clean Design!

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Mostly Thomas. It’s all about life, dreams, experiences and gals.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

That’s a new one “No Plan”.  Out of Our Tree” – The Fabulous Wailers

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Interesting but without much media focus on it. Absolutely, we get out and about!

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Main Square Festival Arras France. 57,000 people!

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Once a week, once a week, recording as much we can, we look forwards to our Spanish Tour soon!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Could be better, Is there any music coverage by the media?

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Brian Jonestown Massacre, King Gizzard and The Lizard Wizard, Nick Waterhouse,  and also Allah-Las.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

The Sorrows, because they were there in the good old days and still incredible on stage.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up of interest?

A new album, a world tour, Spanish Tour, Le Beat Bespoké – Easter 2017 in London which will be amazing!


Social Networks:

Facebook: – facebook.com/TheArrogants/ 

Soundcloud: – soundcloud.com/the-arrogants


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 15, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

NewBreed – New Candys

This entry is part 2 of 6 in the series Newbreed5

New Candys formed in Venice (Italy) in 2008, consisting of Fernando Nuti (vocals, guitar, sitar), Diego Menegaldo (vocals, guitars), Stefano Bidoggia (bass, organ) and Dario Lucchesi (drums, percussion). Their influences have roots in The Velvet Underground and Syd Barrett.

After a self-produced EP, in 2012 they released the album “Stars Reach The Abyss” on Foolica, a UK tour followed. In 2015 they took part in “The Reverb Conspiracy”, a compilation curated by Fuzz Club/The Reverberation Appreciation Society (Levitation Austin). Later that year “New Candys As Medicine”, album mixed by John Wills (producer and drummer of Loop), has been released on both Picture In My Ear/Fuzz Club and added to The Committee To Keep Music Evil catalogue, receiving praises from Simone Marie Butler of Primal Scream and Stephen Lawrie of The Telescopes.

Two EU/UK tours followed, including festivals like The Secret Garden Party 2015 and Liverpool Psych Fest 2016. They shared the stage with The Warlocks, Dead Skeletons, Crystal Stilts, Slowdive, Savages, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and The Vaccines among others.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

For 9 years now, half of us were friends since teenage years, the other half because of the common passion for music.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Lots of bands, every time one of us discovers something cool it starts being played in our van, we talk a lot about what we like to see if it can become an influence on our own music.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are many, all of them truly believe in what they do and we like them: Kill Your Boyfriend, Mother Island, Gli Sportivi, Supertempo, High Mountain Bluebirds, Zabrisky, Miss Chain & The Broken Hills, Father Murphy, Hund, Temple Mantra and many others.

04. What’s the underground scene like where you’re from?

The city we come from is Treviso, a boring city with a passion for food and nothing else, the area of Venice let us become what we are today, with people more passionate about music and real interest in culture.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Modern dark rock’n’roll.

06. What are your live shows like?

It depends, if the venue is not too big and people starts moving and dancing since the beginning, we can show our best. Lights/visuals also have an impact on our performance, the darker the better.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We played some covers of The Velvet Underground, probably our main influence together with Syd Barrett. Nirvana, Oasis and Brian Jonestown Massacre have been important for us too. Speaking about what is normally considered a “classic”, we don’t like Led Zeppelin, Queen and generally all bands where vocals sound like Axel Rose.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Cinema, directors like Fellini, Argento, Bertolucci but also Refn, Kubrick, Lynch to name a few. Poetry, Blake, Bukowski and of course Dante Alighieri.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We write together, the subjects are surreal sometimes, metaphorical, lyrically we try to describe a scene, like painting, using words just to evoke images, we’re not interested in carrying clear and immediately understandable messages. It is important to give freedom to the listener, let everyone’s sensibility influence the codification of a song.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Probably are the ones from the new album, after a while, you get tired of playing the old songs so the newer sounds fresh and are more interesting to play. From another artist, we like “Some Velvet Morning” by Hazlewood/Sinatra.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

We feel like we are part of a scene because we end up playing shows with the same bands in different parts of Europe, and we can see there is a net that includes all these bands. This is really helpful, we feel like we all share the same attitude, have roots on almost the same cool music.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The recording process, in general, is difficult, psychologically and technically, it’s a completely different thing than playing live and writing.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse at least two times a week, more if we are in a productive creative moment. We play live as much as possible, record once a year (or two).

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Media are not involved much in what we like, the internet is the only way to find interesting stuff. If the music scene is what we see on TV these days, we would probably not be a band now. American hip-hop and mainstream pop bands/singers currently under the spotlight are simply pure rubbish with nothing to say, if people like them, good for them.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Mainstream… The Strokes maybe? About underground bands, we like BRMC, The Black Angels, The Warlocks, The Dandy Warhols, A Place To Bury Strangers, Dead Meadow, Singapore Sling and many others.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We don’t have big knowledge about producers, to be honest, so let’s say with someone interested in us that has done albums we like.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

A new album this year with a US/Canada tour after, that’s our main goal. We’re excited for our new short tour (before the new album), here you can find the shows listed: newcandys.com. Many thanks for the interview!

Social Links:

Website – newcandys.com
Facebook – facebook.com/newcandys
Twitter – twitter.com/NewCandys
Bandcamp – newcandys.bandcamp.com
Soundcloud – soundcloud.com/newcandys
Instagram – instagram.com/newcandys


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 12, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Hey! Mr DJ – Stephan Golowka

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

We recently caught up with DJ Stephan Golowka from Germany, to talk about his musical outlook.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the local mod and scooter scene near Frankfurt when I was at middle school. The idea of style and coolness impressed me deeply when I was a youngster. The Who, The Kinks, The Small Faces, The Jam, Ska, 2-Tone and Madchester were the sounds I listened to in those days.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

That was certainly at one of those private cellar parties when I was at a very tender age. I played some of the above mentioned music.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I especially loved the first Le Beat Bespoké in 2005, Euro YéYé the same year, Purple Weekend in 2009 and numerous other weekenders, parties and unforgettable club nights at the Up Club. Many magical and great moments.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Luckily I never really had bad DJ experiences. Crappy sound systems or interruptions due to technical problems can be annoying.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

There are many excellent DJs out there. A good DJ should be able to play distinctive sets and surprise with different, exciting tunes. Rob Bailey has to be mentioned for his top class sets in various genres & continuity on the highest level for so many years. bMichael Wink, Frantz Lisi and the Belgian beat scene were influential in my younger days, – all ahead of their time.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Early trips to the Blow-Up Club, national and international mod weekenders were inspiring. Many fantastic compilations like The British Psychedelic Trip or the Rubble Collection helped forming my favourite kind of music. I started to collect and play those classic 45s and continued to dig a little deeper..

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

In 2000 I found a nice copy of The Rebel Rousers – As I Look for 15.- Deutsche Mark in a small record shop in Frankfurt. Also, Ron Gray – Hold Back The Sunrise or The Pagens – Mystic Cloud, might be two nice examples of discoveries in a club/DJ context.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Beatles, The Kinks, The Byrds. Some of my favourite bands are Kaleidoscope (UK), The Pretty Things a.k.a. Electric Banana, early Pink Floyd, Love

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Mainly British freakbeat, psychedelia and US-American garage and psych 45s, certainly no particular labels or artists.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Le Beat Bespoké #12 at Easter in London.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

There was this acetate on Audiodisc without any information on the label. A fantastic unreleased catchy garage psych number with loads of fuzz that was auctioned for a small fortune a few years ago. I really hope it will be released one day or turn up again. Aso, The End – Second Glance (Emidisc Acetate)

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

01. One In A Million – Double Sight (MGM)
02. Turnstyle – Riding A Wave (Pye)
03. Human Expression – Optical Sound (Accent)
04. Nimrod – Don´t Let It Get The Best Of You (Mercury)
05. Mike Stuart Span – Children Of Tomorrow (Jewel)
06. Tintern Abbey – Vacuum Cleaner (Deram)
07. Calum Bryce – Love-Maker (Conder)
08. The Sleepy – Love´s Immortal Fire (CBS)
09. Lemon Fog – Echoes Of Time (Orbit)
10. Legay – No-One (Fontana)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

01. The Sound Track – Face The New Day (Action)
02. The Six Deep – Girl It´s Over (De´Lynn)
03. The Fly-Bi-Nites – Found Love (Tiffany Records)
04. The Es Shades – Anyday, Anywhere (United Audio)
05. Luv´d Ones – Up Down Sue (White Oak)

Next Club Spots 2017:
14-16 April – Le Beat Bespoke 12London

Social Networks: facebook.com/TheUpClub


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 24, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Hey! Mr DJ – David Marco Font

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 4

We recently caught up with DJ David Marzo Font (David Undersounds) from Barcelona, to talk about his musical outlook.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I’ve been into music since I was a kid. When I was about 15 years old I was obsessed with finding my own music style. That’s when I started to listen to punk music and created a punk cover band with my friends.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

I was 19 or 20 years old in my first DJ slot. Me and one of my best friends decided we were bored with dancing to someone else music. We wanted to be the ones beside the decks. So we created a DJ collective (Real Undersounds, a name we still use) and asked for a slot to the owner of a Barcelona’s downtown rock’n’roll bar called Red Rocket. We started DJing there every Tuesday night.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Many nights to remember. I would say those infinite morning spins at CAN Yeyé (Los Retrovisores headquarters).

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Without any doubt, my worst DJ experience was 5 years ago. I was stolen my entire record box after a night club party. It was taken from my friend’s car boot with most of my favourite records. It was a hard blow for me. I even considered to stop collecting records. But luckily I didn’t, so I can be this year at LBB12.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

It’s really hard to choose but I’d say Sebas Aviles, Xavi Castellar, Lolo Pelouro, Miguel Ygarza, Juan Duque, Juan Moral… I guess it’s because I have had lots of fun with them and learned lots of fantastic songs every time I listen to their sets.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I really love to DJ Freakbeat. That point was Beat music starts experimenting with Psychedelia and Garage. So I like those records that keep having a groovy rhythmic base combined with some trippy sounds and psych effects.

0

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Peter Nelson & the Castaways – Down in the mine (HMV)

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Almost all Decca label artists from 1964 to 1969.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Mainly 60s Freakbeat, Popsike, Garage & Psychedelia.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

At any of the Barcelona Psych Nights Club or Pillbox Sixties Club parties we organize. But you should definitely come to any of the festivals we organize: Gambeat Weekend or Barcelona Psych Fest.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I wouldn’t mind having a Caleb or Wimple Winch copy… or two!

12. Please give us a top 10 all-time favorites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. The Pentard – Don’t Throw It All Away (Parlaphone)
2. The Scenery – Thread Of Time (Impact)
3. Jocelyne Joyca – Time (CBS)
4. Sherwood – Ride, Baby Ride (Smash)
5. Chicago Line – Shimmy Shimmy Ko Ko Bop (Philips)

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. The Beatles- The Night Before
2. The Byrds- Here Without You
3. Status Quo- Pictures Of Matchstick Men
4. The Left Banke – She May Call You Up Tonight
5. Wimple Winch- Save My Soul
6. The Atlantics- Come On
7. The Open Mind- Magic Potion
8. Kula Shaker- Hush
9. The Telescopes- Celeste
10. The Brian Jonestown Massacre – If Love Is The Drug

Next Club Spots 2017:
14-16 April – Le Beat Bespoke 12London
Fri 31st March + Sat 1 April – Barcelona Psych Fest
28th June to 3rd July @ Festival Beat Salsomaggiore (IT)

Fri 15th & Sat 16th September @ Gambeat Weekend Barcelona (ES)

Reference:
Resident DJ and Organiser of Gambeat Weekend, Barcelona Psych Fest, Barcelona Psych Nights and Pillbox 60s Club.

Main Site: facebook.com/bcnpsychfest
Social Networks: facebook.com/david.m.font


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 14, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
0 Comment