Bands

Masters – Corduroy

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Masters3

In the early 1990s, something unusual happened and something that has not happened since; two small independent British record labels were formed that defined the entire decade musically. On one side driving the Britpop era was Alan McGee’s Creation Records and on the other, Eddie Piller’s Acid Jazz which flew the flag for eclectic soul and funk. Part of that Acid Jazz roster was a band which may have had modest chart success, but retained a loyal fan base and critical acclaim for every album and single they released. NUTs caught up with frontman Richard Searle to talk about Corduroy and their forthcoming headline appearance at Le Beat Bespoke 12.

01. When did you get Corduroy back together and why?

We reformed in 2013 to promote a Corduroy CD box-set released by Cherry Red Records, featuring 3 of our 5 studio albums plus a Japanese live album; plus a previously unreleased live album via Acid Jazz Records.

 02. When did you first become interested in music?

We didn’t have a record player when I was a primary school kid. I grew up during Glam, (Slade, Sweet, T-Rex); but my oldest friend, who lived down my street (Elibank Rd), had a record player and his brother had two Who albums; so The Who were formative, and are still my favourite band.

03. Do you regard yourself as a mod? How did you get into it?

I bought punk records from 77 onwards, The Stranglers, The Damned, Generation X, Devo, Pistols etc, but I used to follow The Jam, they were ‘my life’. I saw them for the first time in 78 (supported by Generation X and Slade). My first parka cost £14 from Paraphernalia in Lewisham). My first bespoke suit, when I was 15, was from a tailor in Lewisham called James Joyce – the jacket still fits. When the ‘mod revival’ happened, I’d already started listening to psych stuff (the first Nuggets album, Velvet Underground, Shadows Of The Night, Electric Prunes, Love), so when the ‘New Psychedelic’ scene reared its head, I was already wearing more ‘swinging sixties’ gear, my hair was a ridiculous back-combed bouffant. I didn’t fit with the British ‘mod’ look, I was never into Two-Tone. When people ask, I say that I was a ‘psychedelic mod’.

04. How did the whole Doctor and the Medics thing come about?

The ‘psych scene’ was based around a couple of clothes shops, The Regal and Sweet Charity and a Soho club called The Clinic (in Gossips – Soho); the resident DJ called himself The Doctor he was my patrol leader in the scouts. The Doctor (Clive) was given the opportunity to record a single on Whaam Records, so he put a band together. It was only supposed to be for the one single, and a couple of gigs, but we had fun and carried on. I left after 8 years.

05. Which clubs did you visit during the late 80s and early 90s?

In the 80s it was mostly psych clubs, The Clinic, The Taste Experience, The Pigeon-Toed Orange Peel, and the Alice In Wonderland (a club which took over from The Clinic, in which The Doctor was resident DJ and The Medics played regularly). I went to The Bat Cave once – once was enough. In the 90’s I was going through a beatnik phase – Smashing, Frat Shack, Tongue Kung Fu. DJs like Martin Green and The Karminski’s were where it was at.

 06. How did you join up with Boy’s Wonder?

Boys Wonder were friends, they were truly great. They sacked the bassist Chris Tate and I filled in for a hand-full of gigs (a couple of head-lines at the Marquee and supporting The Hoodoo Gurus at the Town & Country, now The Forum).Tony Barber then joined.

Despite being ‘in vogue’ they were dropped by their record label, Sire, and then sacked Tony Barber. The Medics had stopped being fun by this point, so when they asked me to join permanently, I did so. The band then started a long downhill spiral of musical styles, band wagon jumping and failed attempts to get re-signed. By the time Boys Wonder finished, we were truly shit.

07. How did you meet Eddie Piller?

Acid Jazz was one of three record labels that the newly formed Corduroy went to see. Ed Piller booked us into his studio two days later.

His first words to me were… ‘Are you a mod?’

08. What is your assessment of the influence of mod on Acid Jazz and vice versa?

Acid Jazz became a refuge for displaced survivors of the mod revival, mainly because it was owned by one, (Ed Piller), but musically it was all over the place. The Sandals came from the ‘beat scene’, Emperor’s New Clothes were proper jazzers, and Mother Earth just wanted to be Traffic. Some bands initially did appeal to mods (JTQ and then Corduroy) but I think musical tastes changed with the labels’ output, which became quite ‘fusion’ orientated. Fifteen-minute hip hop, jazz funk, jam sessions by stone-heads with pubic beards wearing socks on their heads – just isn’t very mod.

09. What was the inspiration for the Corduroy sound?

We each had very different musical tastes, but we all shared a love of film music; this was the main inspiration for the Corduroy sound at its best (the first two albums). By the third album, that uniting force had vanished (lost through ego and endless Steely Dan records). I will always regret not actually leaving Corduroy after the second album.

10. What are you most proud of from your Corduroy years?

Record-wise, I guess the second album – High Havoc. Supporting Blur at Alexandra Palace, (with Pulp and Supergrass), was cool. Seeing the world, Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia as well as traveling all over Europe. But my fondest memory is of pulling a girl’s knickers off with my teeth, during an excellent round of strip-dice (a game that I invented).

11. What was it like being signed to Acid Jazz and part of a vibrant scene in music?

The Acid Jazz ‘scene’ meant that people would listen to you, who normally wouldn’t, simply because they were into ‘the scene’. At its best, this meant that there was a family type atmosphere between the bands, and a sense of belonging, plus lots of work. At its worst, by the time Acid Jazz stopped being known as the record label and became regarded as a music genre, the bands couldn’t develop. When Brit-pop then over shadowing things, it became more fashionable than, the Acid Jazz scene, bands identified with ‘the genre’ were ultimately finished. The ‘scene’ itself moved back into the clubs – eventually with Acid Jazz Records buying The Blue-Note.

12. Which clubs did you visit during the 90s? Was Blow Up one of them?

I went to Blow-Up at The Laurel Tree a couple of times, more so when it moved to The Wag… Corduroy played a gig there. I had my own bar tab at The Blue Note.

13. Which bands, music, clubs or scenes have impressed you during the last decade?

Bands: Super Furry Animals, Spiritualised, Verve, Manson, The Dandy Warhols, Kula Shaker, The Prodigy, Earl Brutus,

Clubs: Smashing, was for a year or so, the best.

14. What has been the response to Corduroy coming back?

Very positive; getting lots of international invitations for shows as well as UK interest. We are currently writing new material with every intention of recording a new album.

15. What can we expect from Corduroy at Le Beat Bespoké this year?

Groovy, spy themed, organ-fueled, raw garage, punk-jazz, dirty mod, fun!

16. Are you looking forward to it?

Yes, very much!

 


We are too Richard. Thanks for taking the time to talk to NUTsMag

Corduroy headline Sunday night at lebeatbespoke.com at 229thevenue.co.uk Central London.

Check the bands facebook page here: facebook.com/CorduroyBand/

This interview was originally the one I did with Richard Searle for the updated Influential Factor.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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February 23, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , ,
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Newbreed – Los Retrovisores

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Newbreed5

Los Retrovisores a Fuzz Soul band from Barcelona. Sounds louder than 1968.

Band Members:
Victor Asensio: Singer
Leo Hernandez: Bass
Pere Duran: Guitarra
Sergio Sanchez: Hammond
Quim Corominas: Drums
Hector Fàbregas: Chorus and Percussion
Edu Polls: Sax Tenor
Alexis Albelda: Trumpet
Francesc Polls: Bariton Sax

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Since 2006, most of the members came from a Jamaican music band called ‘The Cutties’.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all are late 60’s and early 70’s dance sounds enthusiasts. We love most of the styles: from R & B to soul, reggae, psych or garage, back to rocksteady, and deep into beat… We’re also very influenced by the 60’s Spanish counterpart of that styles, as you could tell listening to our compositions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are so many cool bands in our area: Rubén López & The Diatones (reggae) Penny Cocks (punk 77), Mambo Jambo, The Excitements or Los Fulanos (Latin Soul) to name a few…

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Barcelona has several bands, clubs, promoters, collectors and festivals… Some clubs we highlight: The Boiler Club, Movin’ on, The Gambeat Weekend, Le clean Cut, Wamba buluba and Pill Box. There you’ll find some of our favorite DJ’s: Xavi Beat, Julian Reca, Jordi Duró and many more.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We just play the music we love to listen and dance to, without more restrictions. Our style evolved at the same rate we did. In our current set list you can find from Spanish soul to groovy funk, even freakbeat.

06. What are your live shows like?

The audience defines it as fresh and fun. We don’t like the bands that make a script for live shows. We improvise and always try to be ourselves. Our repertoire is compact, short and straight to the neck. No time for solos.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our influences are as wide as our musical tastes. Mainly Spanish sixties bands, that like us borrowed the patterns from their own references, but projecting their own personality to their songs. We really love Bruno Lomas, Los Bravos, Los Canarios, Los Salvajes, Los Nivram, Pau Riba… We despise too many people to name it here!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our universe is strongly influenced by the sharp & surrealistic Monty Phyton’ sense of humor. The French nouvelle vague and its evolutions are also one source of inspiration for our lyrics and videos.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody does his one’s bit, but to date most of the songs were written by Victor and Pere. This has changed in our last recordings introducing compositions by Leo and Hector.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our favorite song from the current repertoire comes from our EP Alma y Pisotón. It’s named ‘Me olvidé de ti’ wich, by the way, it’s been just released on video in a ‘Horror B movie’ style. Check it out! Our choice by another artist is Fire & Ice’s Music Man. We loved the complex brass arrangements and changing our regular subject –love- to an ode to that DJs that make us dance party over party, and that’s why we covered it (you can find our version at Alma y Pisotón EP too)

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

The underground scene, at least in our city, is in a good shape regarding shows and parties. We all participate in one way or another, Victor, for example, is deeply involved with The Gambeat Weekend & the clubs Pillbox 60’s Club and Bread & Groove.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To forge ahead the band, beside the financial precarity of our members, the lack of public resources and benefits for empowering culture, and the economic depression that we are all suffering.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse minimum once a week and play an average of three or four shows per month. More than two years passed between our debut album and our second release “Alma y pisotón”, but we’re reducing the time between recordings and we’ll release our third record in June, one year after the previous release.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

In Catalonia the mass media doesn’t give coverage to the bands that don’t belong to the mainstream market. For some time now, specialized magazines start to write about us. We also make great use of the social networks to reach our fans.

15. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d love to record in London with George Martin and a gigantic strings & brass orchestra, just like Spanish duet Manolo y Ramón did back in 1970. We’d also like to record with Ricard Miralles, arranger for Joan Manel Serrat in the album dedicated to Antonio Machado.

16. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re still working on consolidating our own sound and our show. We’d like to make people outside the scene dance, without losing authenticity or selling out. We’d like to say thanks for our appearances at Euro Ye Ye Mod Festival (Gijon, SP), Purple Weekend, Festival Beat (IT), Soundflat Ballroom Bash (GER) and look forward to our first ever show in the UK (London) at Le Beat Bespoke, Easter – 16th April 2017.

Discography:

VVAA – “L’Edat Daurada” (Jamaican Memories, 2008) CD
VVAA – “Moderno pero español, vol. 8” (Bon Vivant, 2009) CD
VVAA – Somos los Mods vol.1 (Bip Bip Records, 2010) CD
“La nostalgia ya no es lo que era” (Flor y Nata Records, 2011) LP/CD
“Alma y Pisotón” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2013) EP 7″
“En el surco” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2014) EP 7″
“Sonido Joanic” (BCore Disc/Soundflat records, 2016) LP/CD

Web Links:

facebook.com/Los-Retrovisores
bcoredisc.com
facebook.com/los.retrovisores
twitter.com/LosRetrovisores


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 23, 2017 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, , , , ,
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Newbreed – Eliphant

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Newbreed5

Elipant is a North London Power trio formed in 2015. Psychedelic influences mixed with punk-rock sensibilities. Retro with a contemporary twist and a will to sound like no one else. Lyrically in between sensual surrealism and no-bullshit politics. Building a strong following with their high-energy live shows. Eliphant declares war against the stiff and the bored!

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Eliphant was formed in spring 2015 by Dade and Elian who knew each other from a chance meeting and playing in another band, played our first gigs that summer with our first drummer Marco. We got Nelson on board in June 2016 and we’ve been living happily ever since.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We’re united by our passion for music, cinema and arts along with the fact that we both decided to come to London to pursue our dreams and ambitions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Since we started we shared nights with some very cool 60’s influenced bands. The Carnations who pushed us to get together, Creamer & Wesley, Black Doldrums, The pacers, DIN,… They appeal to us because of their sense of originality, tunes and charm.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s hard to tell as we’ve been away for many years now and are yet to tour Europe. Elian, Nelson and Dade all used to play in bands doing pub circuits back in Paris, Lisbon and Nizza in Italy respectively. There wasn’t much of a 60’s/underground scene like there is now.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Psychedelic sixties garage mixed with punk-rock sensibilities. Retro with a contemporary twist.

06. What are your live shows like?

Explosive! Live shows are the best representation of our band. We love to take our audience on a trip, between strong songs and improvisations. That way every show is different and surprising.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We all got an eclectic taste in music so anything relevant since rock’n’roll started. In our music, you could find influences from Bowie, Love, Stooges, early Floyd, Pistols, Pixies, Sonic Youth, White stripes and so on. We played covers of ‘Moonage daydream’ by David Bowie, ‘Break on through’ by The Doors. Apart from the top 40 garbage not worth mentioning… Virtuoso music, posers with no songs to offer, any music that sounds safe and formatted (Coldplay?).

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Each of us in the band, our lovers and our friends. All the crazy characters we meet around this fair old town. Daily lives, socializing at night and Wetherspoons.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Elian writes the basic songs, lyrically dealing with love, lust, social commentary and a sense of freedom. Sometimes abstract to paint an emotion or a situation. other times we use music as a way to make fun of the crap that the media and society push on us.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

One of our new songs: ‘She comes in waves’ or ‘Running out of dreams’, two sides of the same coin. Summer beats guaranteed to take you away. These are both inspired by last year’s adventures, trying to find moments of bliss amidst the chaos. Our favourite song would change every day, let’s be boring and say No Fun by the Stooges.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

There’s a lot of exciting nights around town and many great talents to be found. The key is to be united and have a sense of community among bands, artists and DJ’s. We’re delighted to be part of this.musical landscape, looking forward to traveling around by inviting bands to a gig in our area and vice-versa, play festivals around the country.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Making a living in London while having enough time to do what we love and let it rock!

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse every week, as for gigs, at least once a month. We once played 2 gigs in a day, that was a little crazy but fun. We’d play once or twice a week if we could. there’s nothing like playing live to get tight and hot as a band. We recorded two EP’s so far and we plan to capture the true essence of the band on tape in the very near future.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

If you’re curious, the internet and social media make it real easy to find out where the action is, at least in terms of events. We only wish genuine artists who write and sing their own music would be represented more fairly in the media, but at least we don’t own TVs. New bands now do all the promotion themselves and pay Facebook and Spotify for sponsoring and getting their music out there. This is quite sickening when you think of the profits these companies make on behalf of artists works.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

We like bands with a 60’s/70’s touch like Foxygen, Lemon Twigs and Public Access TV from across the pond. There’s some exciting bands around like Cabbage or Estrons, great shows.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

It would have to be someone we get on well with, but the list could be long. It’d be intriguing to work with Dave Fridmann (MGMT, Tame Impala) he seems to be a sonic wizard. Abbey Road would be thrilling for obvious reasons, but if we could choose, why not go to a place like Sunset Sound in California? Absolutely everyone we love has worked there at some point. That, or a trip to the desert with Josh Homme.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re looking forward to experimenting and take our sound further, make new videos and have an album ready by the end of the year. We’ll be going on a tour in Italy at the beginning of March and we’re buzzing about it! Then we play at Le Beat Bespoke in London at Easter (April 2017). Ideally, we’ll continue to create and spread our music across the world and never feel old.

Free at last!

Main Site: eliphant.co.uk

Social Networks:

Facebook:  facebook.com/eliphantsound
Twitter: twitter.com/eliphantsound
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/eliphantsound
Instagram: instagram.com/elian.eliphant


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 15, 2017 By : Category : Bands Clubs Events Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Newbreed – The Arrogants

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Newbreed5

The Arrogants are part of a growing wave of young musicians who, unlike many other teenagers of their generation, are not interested in video games and hipster bands name-checks. These particular young men, alongside a number of others in various countries (some of whom you may know from other Dirty Water Records releases) have happily spent their teens investigating classic 20th-century music: blues, rock’n’roll, garage-rock, rhythm’n’blues!

And they decided they wanted guitars in their hands rather than games consoles. The Arrogants began their musical archaeology first as a 14-year-old duo, then as a 15-year-old trio… Then with an organist, as a quartet, they were ready to be heard by the wider world, with their debut EP, (‘Introducing the Arrogants’ on Dirty Water Records). And now, with the addition of a fifth band member, a rhythm guitarist, to further fill out their sound they are ready with their first long-player.

Whilst digging the sounds of the past, they have successfully developed their own repertoire, writing their own songs and gaining recognition in their home-town by playing as support to their heroes The Pretty Things, and appearing at the Lille Vintage Weekend in front of 15,000 strong crowd. And, recently, they appeared in front of 57,000 people opening for Lenny Kravitz at the Mainsquare Festival in Arras, France.

Produced by French Londoner Healer Selecta (a.k.a. Yvan Serrano of the Dustaphonics) and mastered by Pete Maher (who has worked for U2, The Killers, Rolling Stones, and Jack White, amongst other famous names), these eleven tracks were recorded at the vintage studio of the National Belgian Corporation in just three days. Serrano remembers seeing the sixteen-year-old Arrogants on stage for the first time, ‘It was a strange feeling, as though I was watching an original garage band. Their garage sound is pure, minimal and wild. To make true sixties garage, it should have this youthful energy and not over-do the technical ability to make for a real musical experience.’

The London album launch was on 31 October 2015 at the Fiddler’s Elbow, NW5 in a joint promotion by the Dirty Water Club and Weirdsville. The French album launch was at the Roubaix Vintage Weekender, a major festival attracting tens of thousands of revellers.

It’s been a rather busy 2016 for these ‘fab five’ from Lille, France having been interviewed on French national television along with mainstream magazine features, countless articles, reviews and international radio play. The group produced in grand style, their first video for the title track and single off their scorching hot debut album ” No Time To Wait.” The band has been touring all over Europe including a concert at the legendary Liverpool Cavern Club (Home The Beatles).

Major Influences: 60’s Mod sounds The Who, The Small Faces. Garage Rock The Standells, The Shadows of Knights. Psychedelic sounds 13th Floor Elevetors. Blues Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker. 50’s Rhythm & Blues Chuck Berry, and Bo Diddley!

The Arrogants consist of Thomas Babczynski in the lead guitar and vocals, Louis Szymanowski in the bass, Martin Tournemire in the organ, Hugo El Hadeuf in the drums, and Emilian Mierzejewski in the rhythm guitar.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band started in 2008 with Thomas & his younger brother Luc. At this time as the band was just two guitar and two fuzz pedals. Thomas started singing and they both plays guitars. Luc was 13 and Thomas was 14. They did their first big gig in Brussels in 2009 for the National Belgian Radio & Television Broadcasting Co, then Luc stopped guitar and started the drums. They met Louis who became the bass man and then found an organist. Then Luc left the band.

At that time they changed the line up: the drummer and then the organist. Thomas met Hugo the new actual drummer in his neighborhood (he was playing so loud that we can hear him from his own bedroom…) One morning, he knocked on his door and just simply asked him if he wanted to join a rock n roll band and he said ‘yes’ of course. He met Martin the organist at school and him and some others were skipping lessons whilst playing music for the Church part of our school that’s where he first heard him playing the organ – he was amazed so he asked him if he wanted to join a rock n roll band and he said ‘yeah’! Thomas met Emilian, the rhythm guitarist in our Town.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Bo Diddley, Small Faces, Shadows of Knight, The Fabulous Wailers, The Sonics, and The Seeds.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Gentlemen’s Agreements cause they are very good!

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Pretty Mod inspired at the moment.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Fuzzadelic! What we’ve created is a mix of everything that we like: sixties music and the revival stuff that came up in the eighties and some of today’s sounds too

06. What are your live shows like?

Energetic and very wild, we like a ‘crazy’ crowd!

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

60’s Garage Rock, just one cover “Gloria” by Them. We don’t like the mainstream pop of today.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

60’s Culture in general, Modernism, and clean Design!

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Mostly Thomas. It’s all about life, dreams, experiences and gals.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

That’s a new one “No Plan”.  Out of Our Tree” – The Fabulous Wailers

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Interesting but without much media focus on it. Absolutely, we get out and about!

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Main Square Festival Arras France. 57,000 people!

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Once a week, once a week, recording as much we can, we look forwards to our Spanish Tour soon!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Could be better, Is there any music coverage by the media?

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Brian Jonestown Massacre, King Gizzard and The Lizard Wizard, Nick Waterhouse,  and also Allah-Las.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

The Sorrows, because they were there in the good old days and still incredible on stage.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up of interest?

A new album, a world tour, Spanish Tour, Le Beat Bespoké – Easter 2017 in London which will be amazing!


Social Networks:

Facebook: – facebook.com/TheArrogants/ 

Soundcloud: – soundcloud.com/the-arrogants


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 15, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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NewBreed – New Candys

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Newbreed5

New Candys formed in Venice (Italy) in 2008, consisting of Fernando Nuti (vocals, guitar, sitar), Diego Menegaldo (vocals, guitars), Stefano Bidoggia (bass, organ) and Dario Lucchesi (drums, percussion). Their influences have roots in The Velvet Underground and Syd Barrett.

After a self-produced EP, in 2012 they released the album “Stars Reach The Abyss” on Foolica, a UK tour followed. In 2015 they took part in “The Reverb Conspiracy”, a compilation curated by Fuzz Club/The Reverberation Appreciation Society (Levitation Austin). Later that year “New Candys As Medicine”, album mixed by John Wills (producer and drummer of Loop), has been released on both Picture In My Ear/Fuzz Club and added to The Committee To Keep Music Evil catalogue, receiving praises from Simone Marie Butler of Primal Scream and Stephen Lawrie of The Telescopes.

Two EU/UK tours followed, including festivals like The Secret Garden Party 2015 and Liverpool Psych Fest 2016. They shared the stage with The Warlocks, Dead Skeletons, Crystal Stilts, Slowdive, Savages, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and The Vaccines among others.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

For 9 years now, half of us were friends since teenage years, the other half because of the common passion for music.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Lots of bands, every time one of us discovers something cool it starts being played in our van, we talk a lot about what we like to see if it can become an influence on our own music.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are many, all of them truly believe in what they do and we like them: Kill Your Boyfriend, Mother Island, Gli Sportivi, Supertempo, High Mountain Bluebirds, Zabrisky, Miss Chain & The Broken Hills, Father Murphy, Hund, Temple Mantra and many others.

04. What’s the underground scene like where you’re from?

The city we come from is Treviso, a boring city with a passion for food and nothing else, the area of Venice let us become what we are today, with people more passionate about music and real interest in culture.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Modern dark rock’n’roll.

06. What are your live shows like?

It depends, if the venue is not too big and people starts moving and dancing since the beginning, we can show our best. Lights/visuals also have an impact on our performance, the darker the better.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We played some covers of The Velvet Underground, probably our main influence together with Syd Barrett. Nirvana, Oasis and Brian Jonestown Massacre have been important for us too. Speaking about what is normally considered a “classic”, we don’t like Led Zeppelin, Queen and generally all bands where vocals sound like Axel Rose.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Cinema, directors like Fellini, Argento, Bertolucci but also Refn, Kubrick, Lynch to name a few. Poetry, Blake, Bukowski and of course Dante Alighieri.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We write together, the subjects are surreal sometimes, metaphorical, lyrically we try to describe a scene, like painting, using words just to evoke images, we’re not interested in carrying clear and immediately understandable messages. It is important to give freedom to the listener, let everyone’s sensibility influence the codification of a song.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Probably are the ones from the new album, after a while, you get tired of playing the old songs so the newer sounds fresh and are more interesting to play. From another artist, we like “Some Velvet Morning” by Hazlewood/Sinatra.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

We feel like we are part of a scene because we end up playing shows with the same bands in different parts of Europe, and we can see there is a net that includes all these bands. This is really helpful, we feel like we all share the same attitude, have roots on almost the same cool music.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The recording process, in general, is difficult, psychologically and technically, it’s a completely different thing than playing live and writing.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse at least two times a week, more if we are in a productive creative moment. We play live as much as possible, record once a year (or two).

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Media are not involved much in what we like, the internet is the only way to find interesting stuff. If the music scene is what we see on TV these days, we would probably not be a band now. American hip-hop and mainstream pop bands/singers currently under the spotlight are simply pure rubbish with nothing to say, if people like them, good for them.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Mainstream… The Strokes maybe? About underground bands, we like BRMC, The Black Angels, The Warlocks, The Dandy Warhols, A Place To Bury Strangers, Dead Meadow, Singapore Sling and many others.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We don’t have big knowledge about producers, to be honest, so let’s say with someone interested in us that has done albums we like.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

A new album this year with a US/Canada tour after, that’s our main goal. We’re excited for our new short tour (before the new album), here you can find the shows listed: newcandys.com. Many thanks for the interview!

Social Links:

Website – newcandys.com
Facebook – facebook.com/newcandys
Twitter – twitter.com/NewCandys
Bandcamp – newcandys.bandcamp.com
Soundcloud – soundcloud.com/newcandys
Instagram – instagram.com/newcandys


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 12, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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The Kinks on Pye: Part 1 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

Although The Kinks have long been one of our most influential and cherished groups, in the last couple of years since the hit musical “Sunny Afternoon” and especially since Ray Davies joined brother Dave onstage in London back in December 2015, fans have been hopefully awaiting the reformation of this most wonderful of bands. Although The Kinks back catalogue spans over forty years it’s the halcyon Pye years from 1964 to 1971 in which the band constantly released classic hit records which have collectors scouring record shops, fairs, and the internet for hits and rarities, and a full set of UK releases will set you back a fair few quid should you wish to complete the set. For this two-part article, we’re going to give you a run through of the hard to find releases from the debut 45 back in early 64 to the “Percy” soundtrack eight years later. The first part will concentrate on the “Pink” years, when the band had a string of top ten singles, including three UK number one hits, the second part will then concentrate on the “Blue” years when Ray was at his songwriting peak but the record buying public were not buying the records in such great numbers. Hindsight shows how wrong they were.

Hailing from Muswell Hill in North London, Ray, Dave and bassist Pete Quaife were originally an R’n’B combo called The Ravens who came to the attention of ace producer Shel Talmy after he heard a demo tape and helped get the group signed to the Pye record group where they were enlisted drummer Mick Avory to complete the classic first line up. On 7th February 1964 their debut single “Long tall Sally”, a R’n’B cover of the Little Richard classic was released on the pink Pye label (7N15611) was unveiled to the record buying public. Although the single hit the lower reaches of the NME chart it was a commercial flop making copies a nice rare collector’s item today with prices usually reaching £75-120 depending on condition. The next 45 was released in April 1964 and like all the Kinks singles after the debut, it was a Ray Davies penned number “You still want me” (7N15636). Although the first single sold in respectable amounts, this one was an unjustified complete flop and is by far the hardest Kinks UK 45 to locate in nice condition. Expect to pay at least £200 for a copy of this, one even reached the amazing price of £400+ at auction in 2016! With Pye threatening to cancel the band’s contract if they didn’t have a hit single, Ray composed one of the most influential two and bit minute slabs of musical perfection ever committed to vinyl, “You really got me”. With Dave’s incendiary and groundbreaking lead guitar bursting through the track, it couldn’t fail when it was released on 7th August 1964 (7N15673). And fail it didn’t as it shot up the UK charts, reaching the coveted number one spot shortly after where it stayed for two weeks. The Kinks had arrived.

From then on every single the group released up until 1968 hit the upper regions of the UK charts, with every single release apart from “Everybody’s gonna be happy” hitting the top ten, two of them reaching the top spot. As runs of stellar 45’s go, the following one takes some beating for songcraft, influence and sheer greatness: “All day and all of the night”, “Tired of waiting for you”, “Everybody’s gonna be happy”, “Set me free”, “See my friends”, “Till the end of the day”, “Dedicated follower of  fashion”, “Sunny afternoon”, “Dead end street”, “Waterloo sunset”, “Autumn almanac”. Being massive chart smashes these are usually findable in nice condition for around £3-5 each, with a premium for truly mint copies. All the Kinks singles were also pressed as demonstration copies in small numbers, these are very desirable to collectors and can reach top prices at auction, especially in top condition with unblemished labels. Also look out for UK export release 45’s, mainly for the European market. There are four in total, including album tracks “David Watts”, “A well-respected man” and “Milk cow blues” on a 7″ format. Ray’s songwriting prowess also resulted in some fantastic and very rare releases by other artists around this time. “I go to sleep” was covered by The Applejacks, Peggy Lee, Marion, Fingers and The Truth in 1965-66 although none were hits and it wasn’t till a few years later The Pretenders took the song into the charts. Other great, obscure and coveted releases include Barry Fantoni “Little man in a little box” (Fontana), The Thoughts “All night stand” (Planet), The Cascades “I bet you won’t stay” (Liberty) and Leapy Lee “King of the whole wide world” (Decca). Ironically it’s Dave’s composition “One fine day” which was covered by Shel Naylor and released on Decca in 1964 which fetches by far the most money, with prices sometimes hitting the £500+ mark!

With the band constantly having smash hits Pye also released a nice series of EP’s in wonderful colour laminated sleeves. Five were released in total, the first three”Kwyet Kinks”, “Kinksize hits” and “Kinksize session” are not particularly hard to find, but the fourth “Dedicated Kinks” from 1966 is more elusive and the final EP “The Kinks” from April 1968 is incredibly scarce easily reaching £200+ at auction in top condition. The band’s first three LP’s “The Kinks”, “Kinda Kinks” and “The Kink controversy” were good sellers but easily sell for £50+ in nice condition with clean sleeves. Particularly coveted are rare export Stereo pressings of the first two LP’s with stickered UK sleeves as they were mono only releases in the UK. “Face to face” from 1966 was a move towards Ray’s late 60’s songwriting style and is an absolute classic but strangely failed to chart resulting in scarcity of copies today. This was followed by the live album “Live at Kelvin Hall” in early 1967 and lastly by the masterpiece “Something else by The Kinks” in September of the same year. All were released in both Mono and Stereo, the latter being the scarcer of the two, especially with the Stereo sticker still attached! Prices vary wildly from one week to the next but be prepared to have a large bank account if you want a truly mint copy of any of them. As 1968 approached Ray’s songwriting grew more world-weary and pastoral and the band embarked on an influential but poorly received at the time run of releases on the newly redesigned light blue Pye label. We’ll have a look at these next time around…


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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February 15, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Rob’s Round-Up 5

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Rob’s Roundup

Massive thanks to all those who joined us for yet another fun NYE party.

Despite the madness going on all around us the one thing that is still in our destiny is having a good time and enjoying the music and style, we are all passionate about. Our team have been working hard on our annual Easter extravaganza in central London.

Le Beat Bespoké attracts pleasure seekers from all over the globe, with only one thing in mind having a real damn good party. So, with that firmly in mind, we have assembled yet another exciting line-up across two fantastic venues in the heart of London.

Check out our brand-new website www.lebeatbespoke.com for all the info you need. We booked ten stellar live bands featuring some of the best up and coming talent alongside two stellar acts from the 20th century.

However live music is just part of what makes Le Beat Bespoké such a fun and unique event. For your dancing pleasure, we have booked a dynamic DJ line-up from across Europe armed with explosive sounds on 100% original vinyl across 3 rooms of clubbing after the live bands.

Our guest club nights for the Rhythm & Blues Weekend include Crossfire, The Pow Wow, Lady Luck & Mousetrap all at the forefront of good times and taste. The menu is served All-night and includes authentic Rhythm & Blues, Northern Soul, Jazz, Latin, Boogaloo and Ska/Reggae.

The Beat Basement hosts the wildest and grooviest Freakbeat, Garage and Psychedelic ‘nuggets’ known to man to a back drop of eye candy visuals and groovy Go-Go girls.

A brand-new location for our daytime treats on Sat & Sunday afternoon is Dingwalls one of London’s most beautiful venues, situated right next to Camden lock in the World-famous Camden market. Expect DJ’s, bands, Easter egg hunt, record fair and market.

Contact drrobert@btinternet.com for trade stand.

But before Easter, we have celebrated an incredible 26 years at Mousetrap in the same venue with the same owner virtually unheard of these days, let alone in the ever-changing landscape of London. All those that attended would have got a free 45 with two rare tracks from the club’s playlist including one that has never been released on 45 before.

Hope to see you all Easter for an epic party!

www.lebeatbespoke.com

Cheers Dr. Robert


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admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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February 21, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Clubs DJs Events Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , ,
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Reviews February 2017 – Part 2

Les Darlings

nm_january_2017_les_darlings

‘Le Tourbillion’ b/w ‘Hey Baby’ – Single

When you find out who the members of Les Darlings are, it’s easy to see why these two infectious slices of Garage-power pop are so good. Comprising of Pascal, David Peter, Thomas and Dorian, they have joined forces from some of Europe’s top psych and garage bands; namely The Norvins, The Youth and The Wilde Sect. For this single, they have also been joined by Cecile Wurlee (Curlee Wurlee) and to complete the perfect circle it was recorded at Yeah Yeah Yeah Studios with the splendid Dennis Rux at the controls. What else can I tell you about this single? Two full-on Beat belters with all the expected component parts and another success for all involved. Let’s hope Les Darlings are not just a passing phase.

facebook.com/lesdarlingsband
lesdarlings.bandcamp.com

The Seen

nm_january_2017_the_seen

‘The Seen’ – EP

The Seen were formed in 2014 and are from Bonn, Germany. This is their debut five-track EP. Ania, Peter, Max, Vic and Tobias have all been in previous bands before, so they are not exactly novices. The opening track is a cover of ‘Big Sensation’ by Cool Stove which was originally released in 1969 and is something of a rarity, but The Seen have given it a new lease of life. The other four songs are original compositions and are loaded with psych, garage and Beat reference points. Ania’s vocals are perfect for this style with a hint of punk delivery. ‘Time Of Change’, Trouble’ and ‘Since You’ve Been Gone’ are all belters, while ‘Make It Right’ is a well-arranged change of pace. This EP is out on the excellent Copase Disques who also have French Boutik among their roster, so you know this release is going to be good…..and it is…..very good.

www.theseen.de
facebook.com/theseenbn/
theseen1.bandcamp.com
copasetic.de/theseen

Wolf People

nm_january_2017_wolf_people

‘Ruins’ – LP

Arguably, Wolf People are the finest exponents of folk-rock in the UK right now and this new album certainly enhances that reputation. Following on from their previous two studio albums Steeple (2010) and Fain (2013), ‘Ruins’ is not a concept album (as the band insist), but songs linked by a common thread; what would the world be like without humans? Indeed, it is fair to say that this is unmistakably a ‘Wolf People’ album. They have such a wonderfully eclectic range of influences that shape their music, but still retain a very distinctive sound of their own. While that sound may come across as quite heavy at times, there is a genuine intelligence, passion and complexity that makes this album well worth listening to. ‘Ninth Night’ sets the tone, interspersed by tracks like ‘Kingfisher’, ‘Not Me Sir’ and ‘Salts Mill’. Jack Sharp’s rounded, deft vocals fit beautifully around the sterling work by Tom Watt on drums, Dan Davis on bass and Joe Hollick on guitar. For those with a penchant for folk-rock, you’ll be hard pushed to find a better album than this one.

www.wolfpeople.co.uk
facebook.com/WolfPeople
wolfpeople.bandcamp.com

Alex Cooper

portada_club45-ok.cdr

‘Club 45 Again’ – Book

Alejandro Diez Garín, former leader of Los Flechazos and now in charge of Cooper, unpacks his collection of records and memorabilia sixties to offer us 90 unforgettable songs. I know this because we have handy things like translation apps that mean I can understand Spanish sentences, but I’m not likely to use said app to translate the whole book, which has been published in the Spanish language. Yes, I know this will put a lot of people off, unless you are fluent of course, but that said, the publisher; Ediciones Chelsea have done a magnificent job on the production side. Obviously, I can’t vouch for the text, although you do get a sense that Alejandro has done his homework here and to be fair, the selection of songs are very good indeed. But by far the most appealing aspect of this book is the quality of the print and the reproduction of some really great photos and there are lots of them. Most are in colour and the layout of the book is really tidy, allowing your eyes to skim over the pages with ease. It is a shame there does not appear to be an English language version, but let’s hope they can get one organised, as I think a lot more people will find this a welcome addition to their ‘mod-related’ library.

www.edicioneschelsea.com
facebook.com/club45


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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February 21, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Reviews February 2017 – Part 1

Creamer and Wesley

nm_january_2017_creamer

‘Geoffrey Porter’ b/w ‘Carnivals’ – Single

This was one of those that just missed the deadline for the previous Nutsmag Reviews. Dean Atkins (aka Eddie Creamer) and Kieran Wilson (aka David Wesley) released their debut single on the newly formed Psych-A-Rella Records before Christmas. This is definitely for those with a preference for folky-psych ballads. Acoustic 12 string guitars and whimsical lyrics abound on both sides, with ‘Carnivals’ being mixed by Andy Lewis. As debuts go, it is a solid-enough performance and one that gives a glimpse of good potential by the duo. I’ll be interested to see what comes next.

facebook.com/CreamerandWesley
www.psycharella.com

The Dustaphonics

nm_january_2017_dustaphonics

‘Johnny & Bo’ – LP

It’s been three years since Dustaphonics last outing, the splendid ‘Big Smoke, London Town’. They went down a storm at Le Beat Bespoke in 2016 and now they’re back with yet another cracking slice of manic surf, hi-octane rock’n’roll and a pinch of funky groove on this new album due out early February. Led by the London club scene legend Yvan Serrano, this LP is in keeping with the overall Dustaphonics ‘sound’, but it also has some truly charming diversity. The opening track, ‘You Don’t Love Me Any More’ is familiar territory for the band; helter-skelter, aggressive rock and roll. The title track is a superb blend of Mr Serrano’s influences; those being Bo Diddley and Johnny Ramone (and believe me, it works!), while ‘Q Sounds Groove’ is the first of a couple of collaborations with the French studio’s house band; the very same band that works with Adelains and Little Clara to name but two. We also get a couple of fantastic covers. The Special’s ‘Gangsters’ gets the surf treatment, while Ike Turner’s ‘I’m Hurting’ gets the unmistakeable Dustaphonics stamp. There is a fitting tribute to actress Tura Satana of Russ Meyer’s ‘Faster Pussy Cat Kill! Kill!’ fame and the latin-flavoured ‘Cachaca’ which is a nice, unexpected surprise. Vocal duties are split between Hayley Red, Aina Roxx and Kay Elizabeth, all of whom are first class.
This is a really great album and should do very well.

thedustaphonics.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/TheDustaphonics

Goldie

nm_january_2017_goldie

‘Could It Be’ – EP

It’s hard to understand the rationale of the record industry back in the Sixties. How often have we heard previously unreleased gems which have gone on to gain huge popularity on the scene? One wonders what the ‘decision-makers’ thinking when they ‘canned’ such great songs? Thankfully, for us at least, there is a small, dedicated army of people investing their time and money to unearth these tracks and make them available. This latest release on the Top Sounds label (responsible for 2015’s brilliant The Action EP) is another prime example. Goldie, who arrived on the shores of the UK with her Gingerbreads in 1962, made a handful of great records for Decca as a solo artist and these three previously unreleased gems prove that claim. The A-side; ‘Could It Be’ is a wonderful slice of early blue-eyed Northern, with a lush production. The B-side starts with Goldie’s version of the Goffin & King penned; ‘Goin’ Back’, which, (according to the story contained in the excellent booklet that comes with the EP) Dusty Springfield ‘stole’ from Goldie and got it out before Decca knew what was happening. By that time Goldie was so angry with Dusty, she refused to have it released. If it had been released, I think it would have given Dusty a run for her money. The final track is the Andrew Loog Oldham composition; ‘Headlines’, which again, is a British stab at capturing the Tamla sound. So thanks to Nigel Lees at Top Sounds for delivering another lost belter.

www.topsoundsrecords.co.uk

The Beatpack

nm_january_2017_beatpack

‘Back, Behind and In Front’ – EP

It’s hard to believe it is twenty-seven years since Beatpack released their debut EP, but thankfully they are still going strong with this latest offering on the excellent State Records. If you still know nothing about the band, what you get is an uncompromising, hard-edged fusion of R&B and Garage. Opening track; ‘Loopin’ With Lucy’ is a prime example, while ‘A Fog Is Lifting’ and ‘If I Look Outside’ show they have never been a one-trick-pony with monastic chants and jazz influences shining through.
‘Met Myself Coming Back’ is more familiar territory, but one thing you can be sure of is it’s always top quality. Beatpack have recently completed tours of Germany and Spain and I’m sure there will be UK dates this year. If you get a chance, go see them as it is always a great show. In the meantime, this EP is well-worth the investment.

thebeatpack.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/TheBeatPack
www.staterecs.com/store-uk


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 21, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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The Lovely Eggs speak to NUTsMag

The Lovely Eggs bring their own artful autonomy and pickled noir humour to a growing list of original, vibrant and offbeat compositions, films, gig/parties with a bold visual and cinematic flavour that really should be on the National Schools Curriculum to dispel the whiff of ‘X Factor’ drudgery and all of its equivalents. Art meets real life talent, we introduce The Lovely Eggs, your own real, new favourite everyday band!

Members:
David Blackwell: drums, guitar, tamb, other stuff.
Holly Ross: Singing, guitar, tamb, other stuff.

01 How did the band get together?

In Paris in 2006.

02 Where did your name come from?

A pigeon laid two eggs in an abandoned nest on our bathroom windowsill.The eggs were incubating while we were writing our first songs. Then during the summer they hatched and that is when we flew back to England and formed our band. It just seemed a natural name. There were two of them and two of us and we were born at the same time.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

We are influenced a lot by everyday life. A lot of our songs are quite observational about the ridiculous things people get up to every day. So in a way just getting up in a morning and mooching round is a big inspiration to us. It’s good living in Lancaster, which is a small northern town, so you know everyone and its funny to see life tick along. We’re also influenced by the obvious poets and writers and artists and that predictable stuff. Our favourite is Richard Brautigan. We don’t despise anyone.

04 What drove you to make music together?

We just wanted to be in a band where there were no rules where we could be free to make exactly the music we wanted to hear.That seems hard for some bands these days but it is really easy!

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

We like to have a party at our gigs. Parties are timeless.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

David’s mum. We write about everything in the life capsule.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

We maybe sound more powerful now. When we first started David had never played drums before. We had a lot of soft songs when we first started. Now we are more wild and raw.

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Our biggest challenge was probably touring across America for 21 days in a car with another band and all the equipment WITHOUT Strongbow!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We’re generally not into playing covers, although we once did a cover of It’s Spooky by Jad Fair and Daniel Johnston for a B side of our Halloween single Haunt Me Out. We also covered Hotpants Romance before just to make them scream!

10 Where did you envisage the band being in five years time?

Depends what day, but if it’s January 16th 2017 we’ll probably be mooching round our mums house.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Well Jonathan Richman would be pretty good.

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

Some more records, some more gigs and a bit of falling about. We are playing at Le Beat Bespoke 12 Easter next year (2017) We are really looking forward to the whole event.

Thanks To The Lovely Eggs.

www.thelovelyeggs.co.uk/
www.myspace.com/thelovelyeggs
twitter.com/TheLovelyEggs
soundcloud.com/thelovelyeggs
www.facebook.com/thelovelyeggs

 

Thanks to eyeplug.net © 2011


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admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

December 7, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 14 (episode 23)

NUTsCast December 2016
Join The Baron for a look back at some of the highlights of the last twelve months with live tracks recorded at Le Beat Bespoke, Margate and Crossfire by Graham Day & Forefathers, The Stairs, Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind, Wicked Whispers, Dustaphonics, Big Boss Man, Bronco Bullfrog, Paul Orwell, Cat Black and The Mynd Set.

We look ahead to our Nutty New Year’s Eve Party with DJ selections by Irish Greg, Jim Watson, Lee Miller, Peter Feely, Joel Maslin, Ady Lupton & Carolina.

So join The Baron for the last Nutscast Session of 2016.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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December 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 15 (episode 24)

*ROLL OVER IMAGE TO SEE CONTROLS*

Join the Baron for the first NUTSCAST of 2017.
On this show, we have special guest Rob Bailey talking us through the Easter extravaganza that is LE BEAT BESPOKE and the brand new LBB album.

To get you in the mood for LBB12 we have tracks from Corduroy, Novella, Lovely Eggs, Pink Floyd, New Candys, The Arrogants, Los Retrovisores, The Pacers, Stags, & Eliphant as well as selections from our DJ team.

Explore the line-up and event here at: www.lebeatbespoke.com


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admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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March 16, 2017 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
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My mind’s eye – A 1966 musical Christmas

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

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1966 has been in the news a lot this past year. From the 50th anniversary of England’s only world cup final win, the counterculture exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, through to endless documentaries on BBC4 and magazines celebrating this seismic musical year, 1966 seems to have been everywhere. 1966 was also probably the last year when the POP 45 really was king as a groundbreaking musical device too, album sales would soon overtake it’s 7″ counterpart and the newly labelled psychedelic rock would soon transfer to the much more serious, and expansive LP format. But, although groundbreaking LP’s such as “Pet sounds”, “Revolver” and “Blonde on blonde” were released in this year, the singles chart would still host classic number one hits such as “Paperback writer”, “Paint it, black”, “Sunny afternoon” and “Reach out, I’ll be there” and untold forward thinking 7″ gems from Love, Creation, Yardbirds, The Who, Jimi Hendrix, James Brown and Otis Redding were all vying for the teenagers hard-earned cash. As the year drew to a close and Christmas came a-calling, Psychedelia was still definitely underground and not yet bothering the upper echelons of “Top of the pops” and the Hit Parade, but what was pouring out of transistors and Dansettes in the build-up to the festive season? Let’s have a look at some of the hits, and classic misses of December 1966…

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In the run up to Christmas, the 7th December singles chart was stuffed with great music: Number 47 found Martha & the Vandellas with “I’m ready for love” and prime US garage from Question Mark & the Mysterians “96 tears” was on it’s way up at 37. Nudging towards the top twenty you’d find The Temptations “Beauty is only skin deep” at 30, prime Stax soul from Otis, “Fa, fa, fa, fa, fa” at 28, classic UK beat from The Hollies “Stop, stop, stop” at 13 and The Kinks downbeat “Dead End Street” at 16. Just outside the top ten was a slice of pounding Australian beat from The Easybeats with “Friday on my mind”, and nestling inside the top ten you’d find stellar US soul from Lee Dorsey at 6 with “Holy cow” and blue-eyed UK soul from The Spencer Davis Group, with Stevie Winwood’s blistering vocal lighting up the number three spot with “Gimme some loving”. A trip down your local record shop on this week would find new releases from the pre-Slade combo The N’Betweens’ with “You better run”, Ella Fitzgerald’s cracking version of “These boots were made for walking”, and Herbal Mixture’s mod-psych “Machines”. None of these sold at all and are all now much in-demand slabs of vinyl.

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A week nearer to Christmas day, the charts of 14th December included some classy new entries to the singles charts including Donovan’s proto-psychedelic classic “Sunshine superman” straight in at number 31, classic Motown from The Supremes “You keep me hangin’ on” flying up into the top twenty at 15, and, much to the groups annoyance, The Small Faces “My mind’s eye” shot into the top ten at number 4! Available this week, and destined for the unsold bargain bins, were releases from John Patto with the double-sided aceness of “Love / Can’t stop talkin’ about my baby”, Mike Leslie’s future NUTS favourite “Right or wrong”, The Olympics soul shindig “Baby do the Philly Dog” and The Mirage’s great take on The Fab Four’s “Revolver” LP show stopper “Tomorrow never knows”.

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Onto the week before Christmas and the 21st December saw a multitude of new releases in the lower reaches of the chart, all of which would soon hurtle up to much higher places early in 1967. How about this lot for utter greatness: The Cream “I feel free” at 50, The wicked Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally” one place higher at 49, Motown greatness from The Temptations with “I know I’m losing you” at 47, Andover’s Troggs with “Anyway that you want me” at 39 and The Who’s future top ten hit, and ode to a seaside donkey, “Happy Jack” bursting straight in at number 30. New releases the week before Christmas which ended up in nobodies stocking included Paul Butterfield Blues Band garage stomper “Come on in”, The Flies pop-art madness “(I’m not your) Stepping stone” and The Misunderstood’s truly breathtaking “I can take you to the sun”. As usual, the more parent (and grandparent!) friendly album chart was full of the big selling easy listening gods of the day, with Jim Reeves, The Seekers and Herb Alpert hogging the high sellers league. The Kinks “Face to face”, Beatles “Revolver”, Georgie Fame’s “Sound venture” and Spencer Davis Group’s “Autumn ’66” at least made up some of the numbers below!

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So… finally we reached the last chart of that coolest of musical years, the Christmas chart of 28th December 1966, and only two new releases of note bothered the lower echelons, Smokey and the Miracles Motown stomper “(Come round here) I’m the one you need” entered at 45 and Georgie Fame’s cool mod take of “Sitting in the park” came in just above it at number 43. So what were the top sellers of that mighty week you may ask? Well, the album chart had The Seekers, Jim Reeves, The Beach Boys near the top, with “The sound of music” sitting on top where it had been for months! And the singles chart? The Beatles… Nah, they were in EMI studios working on their 1967 masterpiece. The Stones? The Hollies? Small Faces? The Supremes? Dusty? …. Nope, our top three had Val Doonican at 3, The Seekers at 2, and Tom “The voice” Jones on top of the pile with “The Green, Green grass of home”. Changes were definitely in the air though, as witnessed by one 45 released on 16th December 1966: “Hey Joe” by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. This would blow the UK music aristocracy apart with it’s moving of sonic of sonic boundaries, and soon shot into the UK top ten in January. 1967 was just round the corner and our radios and televisions would be introduced to the new sounds and delights of Hendrix, The Pink Floyd, Kaleidoscope, The Doors, Move and many, many more new and exciting artists. Merry Christmas!


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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December 7, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
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Jazz for Modernists 11 Blue Note 45s

The iconic status of Blue Note’s catalogue of LPs from the 1950s and 60s in the field of funky and soulful modern jazz is, of course, a testament to the high quality of its recording artists, the general excellence of the music and the production values instilled by owners Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff and perfected by audio engineer Rudy Van Gelder (RIP). However, it would be fair to state that the cover art, designed for the most part by Reid Miles, and with informative sleeve notes by the cream of contemporary jazz critics, together form an integral part of both the listening experience and the overall modernist package. Of those who own the vinyl, especially, who can disassociate the music of, say, John Coltrane’s Blue Train from its cover, or Dexter Gordon’s Our Man in Paris?

One consequence of this is that this most revered of labels tends to be valued for its 33 rpm products almost exclusively, something perhaps a little unusual for the world of mod music collectors. So it may come as a surprise to some (it was to me) to find out that, in addition to the 400+ LPs recorded on Blue Note between 1955 and 1972, the same period also saw something in the region of 350 7” 45 rpm singles released by the label. A handful of rare export copies came in picture sleeves, but on the whole we’re talking blue and blue and white label in paper bag territory.

The first thing to say is that virtually all the singles were sides already cut for an LP. Certainly this holds true for the ‘A’ sides, though a notable exception is the 1958 vocal version of Horace Silver’s ‘Señor Blues’ (see number two in list). The ‘A’ sides are overwhelmingly the ‘catchiest’ track on the LP, and in some cases, such as Horace Silver’s Tokyo Blues LP (1962), as many as three tracks were released on separate singles (as parts 1 & 2), such were the commercial possibilities of that finger-snapping record. Some tracks recorded in the studio for an album were edited in length for the singles or divided across both sides as ‘Parts 1 & 2’. Whether always the same take is something I haven’t yet been able to ascertain.

In future articles, we will look in more depth into the Blue Note singles catalogue (even acknowledging some of the 78s that were released from 1939 to 1955). This will involve examining the social context for their releases and their audience and reception compared with the albums. For now, though, here is an introductory selection of 10 major releases, many of which have been played over the years on the mod scene.

 


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01. Sonny Rollins, ‘Decision (pts 1 & 2)’ (1957) – Blue Note-45-1669

After nine LPs for Prestige, New York-born tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins recorded four for Blue Note between December 1956 and November ’57. Four singles were culled from these sessions, including this marvellous mid-tempo slice of soulful hard-bop taken from the 1957 LP now known as Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 (BLP-1542). A stellar line-up featuring future Miles Davis pianist Wynton Kelly, drummer Max Roach, bassist Gene Ramey and trumpeter Donald Byrd trace out over 8 minutes the transition from bebop to soul jazz.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


02. Horace Silver Quintet (with Bill Henderson), ‘Señor Blues’ (1958) –Blue Note-45-1710

Horace Silver initially recorded this Latin-tinged tune as an instrumental in late 1956 for the 6 Pieces of Silver LP (BLP1539) and a shorter, alternate take was duly released as a single coupled with ‘Cool Eyes’ from the same session. Then, in 1958, a new lyric version, with a different line-up (though Donald Byrd remained) was recorded with Chicago-born actor and vocalist Bill Henderson. Apparently one of the labels best-selling 45s, ‘Señor Blues’ turned up on the excellent 1993 compilation Blue ‘n’ Groovy. Henderson, who passed away earlier this year at the age of 90, also recorded two singles with Jimmy Smith in 1958.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


03. Herbie Hancock, ‘Watermelon Man’/ ‘Three Bags Full’ (1962) – Blue Note 45-1862

Covered by John Hendricks, Mongo Santamaría and Manfred Mann, among others, Chicago-born pianist and composer Herbie Hancock’s ‘Watermelon Man’ is now a jazz standard both in this, its original form, and the electro-funk version he made over ten years later for the 1973 Head Hunters LP. Some see this track, taken from debut LP Takin’ Off as the first blueprint of one of the label’s key signatures of the next five or six years: the inclusion on an LP of at least one exotically-titled funky, latin-tinged soul-jazz number which, in edited form at least, could get dance floors moving. Featuring Dexter Gordon on tenor sax, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and, with Hancock, a rhythm section comprising Billy Higgins (drums) and Butch Warren (bass), ‘Watermelon Man’ was written with commercial success in mind and evokes from Hancock’s childhood the cry of a Chicago street vendor and the rhythmic beat of his wagon wheels.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


04. Jimmy Smith, ‘Can Heat’/’Matilda Matilda’ (1963) – Blue Note 45-1905

Taken from his penultimate Blue Note LP, Rockin’ the Boat (BLP4141), featuring Lou Donaldson on alto sax, ‘Can Heat’ is just one of over 40 singles released by Jimmy Smith on the Blue Note label between 1955 and 1972. This one, a nice slice of mid-tempo r & b/soul jazz, is classic mid-60s Smith, one for getting the dance floor bubbling as opposed to an out-and-out mover. A lovely tune, though, for relaxing to with a glass of cool beer or camomile tea for more adventurous souls.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


05. Stanley Turrentine, ‘River’s Invitation’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note 45-1917

Another stalwart of Blue Note’s soulful side, Pittsburgh tenor man Stanley Turrentine (1934-2000) had already recorded with R & B heavyweights Lowell Fulsom and Earl Bostic before teaming up with Max Roach in 1959. In 1960, he married organist Shirley Scott, going on to record with her for Prestige and Impulse! ‘River’s Invitation’, a sparkling orchestral version of Percy Mayfield’s gospel-drenched blues, is taken from Joyride (BST84201) and features Herbie Hancock and guitarist Kenny Burrell.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


06. Lee Morgan, ‘The Rumproller’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note-45-1918

Readers of our recent top 10 soul-jazz LPs will know that trumpeter Lee Morgan’s ‘The Sidewinder’ (both as single and LP) was a massive success for Blue Note in 1964. ‘The Rumproller’, released in late 65/early 66, was the follow-up single and LP (though in the meantime Morgan had recorded the excellent Search for the New Land). A funky blues in the ‘Sidewinder’ fashion, this track was written by pianist Andrew Hill, one of Blue Note’s more experimental artists whose LPs for the label are highly recommended.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


08. Lee Morgan, ‘Cornbread’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note-45-1930
Recorded at the end of the funky summer of 1965, the Cornbread LP (BST84222) reached the Billboard top 10 when it was finally released in early ’67. Featuring the great ballad ‘Ceora’, the record holds a special place in this writer’s heart as the first Blue Note LP he bought as a teenager. The title track, another infectious bit of bluesy funk, was released as a single.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE



09. Duke Pearson, ‘Sweet Honey Bee’/’Ready Rudy?’ (1967) Blue Note-45-1931
The next single in the catalogue after ‘Cornbread’, ‘Sweet Honey Bee’, by in-house Blue Note pianist and composer Duke Pearson was taken from a late ’66 LP of the same name. At this time, Blue Note was often pairing its funky players with modal modernists and here Miles Davis bassist Ron Carter provides a more spacious and contemplative feel to the rhythm section. Flautist James Spalding, though, dominates with the melody that structures this bouncy mid-tempo track.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


10. Lou Donaldson, ‘Alligator Boogaloo’/’Rev Moses’ (1967) Blue Note-45-1934

Coming on like a slower-tempo ‘Hot Barbecue’ (Jack McDuff), with Lonnie Smith at the organ, this Lou Donaldson swinging groove remains a bona fide mod jazz favourite. Though the album version weighs in at over six minutes, the single, as can be seen from the picture, is an edited version of less than 3 minutes and thus ideal for the discotheque. However, many mods will want to find the (original) vinyl LP for the iconic cover of Peggy Moffitt wearing a psychedelic Rudi Gernreich gown.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


11. Bobby Hutcherson, ‘Ummh’ (pts 1 & 2) (1970) Blue Note – 1966
And so into 1970! This list is completed with a brief homage to the late great vibes player Bobby Hutcherson (1941-2016). LA-born Hutcherson was a regular featured artist at Blue Note and played on key dates such as Eric Dolphy’s Out to Lunch (1964). His own series of dates for the label, including Dialogue (1965), Components (1966) and Happenings (1967) are among the most thoughtful and atmospheric in the entire catalogue. By the time of San Francisco (1970), he had moved from the fringes of the avant-garde into the realm of jazz fusion and funk. Taken from this album, Ummh (pts 1 & 2) features Jazz Crusader Joe Sample on electric piano, John Williams on fender bass, drummer Mickey Roker and tenor sax player Harold Land (he that inspired the title of a song by Yes). It is one relentless gargantuan groove which hopefully Bobby above is still playing along to.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


Postscript
In 1998, Dean Rudland compiled a selection of Blue Note 45s under the title ‘Blue 45s-the ultimate jukebox’. I don’t have a copy of this, but it might still be available and will no doubt have more useful information.


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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December 6, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Tags:, , ,
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