Bands

Masters – Magnus Carlson

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Masters3

We recently caught up with Magnus Carlson, for a chat for NUTSMAG for a preview of his special live show on 21st October 2017 at CROSSFIRE,London.

1. Are you looking forward to our Crossfire night at 229 the Venue in October and what can we expect from a Magnus Carlson show?

Seriously. I can’t wait! I’ve been wanting to go to a New Untouchables event for ages. But I tour so much, the dates have never matched my schedule before. I love and collect your compilations and 7″ singles. I have with me a great seven-piece band. Horns, Hammond organ, congas. the works! Every musician is hand-picked by me for their individual skills and love for 60s style jazz, soul and rhythm-n-blues. Every band member release albums on their own. I’m so proud of them. It’s like I’m the manager for Sweden’s National soul team. Very groovy and danceable. You will love it. I promise!

2. All of us here at New Untouchables extend our congratulations to you on the tremendous success of ‘Long Way Home’. Did you think it would be such a hit when recording had finished?

I’ve been in the music biz full-time since 1997. I’ve always followed my heart and done what I felt like. As a result, I have had a lot of number ones in Sweden but also a few flops. You never ever know what will be successful or not. But I can look back at a career (16 albums in 20 years) and be proud. Most of the stuff I do has a kind of timelessness to it. At least in my mind. I almost only listen to 60s music but I try not to be too retro even if that’s the style of music I make. It’s made today about the world today I think this is the first ever mod number one in Sweden. At least since 1967. When was a mod album number one in the UK last? The Jam?

3. For those who are new to your music, how would you describe your ‘sound’?

If you refer back to question number 1, I think that about covers it!

4. You are a massive star in Sweden and you are following in the footsteps of The Cardigans, Jasmine Kara and a certain 70s pop band to name a few; who have been popular here. How important is it for you to have a higher profile in the UK?

I’ve been doing this for so long now so I know the ups and downs. I’m perfectly happy just with my popularity in Sweden. It all can wish for. But certainly, I’m eager to try the UK. There are more mods there and I’m part of the mod scene. It’s only natural to wonder what could happen. I’m so happy you want me over! I feel grateful and excited!

5. Of course, some of our readers will know you from your time with Weeping Willows. Do you have any plans to record with them?

Oh! We have never split up. It’s my mother ship. That band will exist forever. But sometimes I go out on solo missions outside the ship. Jazz, soul, electronic excursions. Stuff I can’t do within that group. We’re more of a ballad group. The Walker Brothers type of stuff. But we are bigger than ever. We do a lot of gigs with symphony orchestras in sports arenas and Concert halls. This year we go out on a Christmas tour. 17 gigs in December. Next year we will record and release a New album. All our albums are number ones in Sweden.

6. The new album is inspired by Northern Soul. When did you first become interested in that style of music?

I was born in 1968. I grew up with punk and then New wave. I started to listen to everything my idols recommended. Naturally, that meant all kinds of 60s music. All things mod. So, through The Style Council and Dexy’s Midnight Runners, I got to know about rare soul. Then we had a lot of Northern soul clubs in Stockholm in the 90s which I went to because I love to dance. I got to know all the people. The soul scene is my home. And I have always loved and collected 7″ singles. My favourite format since I was a Punk kid.

7. Sweden has had a healthy 60’/Northern Soul/mod scene for a number of years with organisations like Uppers and people like Frederik Ekander. Were you aware of that scene at all?

Oh Yeah! There are a lot of soul clubs and DJs/collectors over here. Club Soul in Stockholm has been going every Saturday for almost 30 years now! Could it be a World record?! They still only play soul on vinyl. I sometimes DJ there. And then there’s the monthly club Soulastatic in Gothenburg that Punky has been doing for about 20 years now. Very strong soul scene. With lots of great DJs!

8. You have recorded the new album in English and spent time at Black Barn Studios with Andy Lewis. What was that experience like?

I knew Andy before. He had heard my Swedish version of Beggin’ from 2003. We have DJ’d together and even wrote songs together before. So, when I finally had the time to make a soul album I knew I had to do it with him. Andy said we should record at the Black Barn. So, we did. It was perfect and a great 4-day session with a great band Andy put together. And a bit of a romantic childhood dream.

9. Who are your musical influences?

Too many to mention. When I was a Teenager the people who made me want to sing was (chronologic) Elvis, The Smiths, Weller, Scott Walker. Through them, I got into the rarer stuff. Now I mostly listen to 60s soul and 50s jazz. I’m going backwards. Next stop for me is probably Blues and old gospel.

10. Are there any current bands or artists that you like?

Goran Kajfeš Subtropic Arkestra is amazing! He’s the trumpet player in my band. He’s a genius. He has a new album out just this week.

11. What is your favourite song by another artist that you could not live without?

I have a big record collection and I sincerely can’t part with any of them. You know how it is. It never ends. I find new old favourite every week! That’s the thrill!

Thank you, Magnus, for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk to With NutsMag. We can’t wait to see you on 21st October 2017 at CROSSFIRE,London.

Band Members:
Magnus Carlson singer
Goran Kajfeš trumpet
Jonas Kullhammar saxophone
Anders Kappelin bass
Anders Lewén guitar
Patrik Kolar organ
Johan Carlsson congas
Christer Björklund drums

Discography:  www.discogs.com/Magnus-Carlson

Social Networks:

facebook.com/magnuscarlson
twitter.com/carlson_magnus


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music News Picks Scene Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Record Review – Rob Bailey – Sept 2017

 

Record Review – Rob Bailey – Sept 2017

KING MOJO – IRONSTONED

 


Four-piece Hammond driven Garage-Punk band from Middlesbrough team up with Medway’s finest Graham Day, at Ranscombe Studios on the banks of the Medway for a hard-hitting EP. Four strong originals with ‘5th Time Around’ being my personal favorite. Available on CD and Vinyl with more to come from King Mojo.
www.facebook.com/kingmojo.uk


LET THE MUSIC PLAY – GENE PITNEY/ REVIEWING THE SITUATION – JACKIE BOND

 

Another fine release from Spoke Records. The Gene Pitney ‘She’s A Heartbreaker’ era track is a great slab of Blue-Eyed Soul restored and remastered from a battered Emi-Disc acetate. The highlight however is a superb version of Lionel Bart’s ‘Reviewing the Situation’ from the musical ‘Oliver’. This is every bit as good as the better-known Sandie Shaw version. It was due for release on Strike or subsidiary GO in 1967 originally before they went bust, only to find its way on the ‘Dream Babes’ CD in 2003. Now finally available on 45 grab one quick folks.
spokerecords.co.uk


INTRODUCING – THE DEEP SIX

Brand new album on Heavy Soul records features Mark McGounden of MAKIN’ TIME and UPPER FIFTH and Paul Hooper-Keeley of the THREADS together with the multi-talented Tony Barbados banging the drums and Niall Keohane on bass. There is no re-working or covers here, just fourteen strong MODern soulful tracks.
www.facebook.com/TheDeepSixOfficial/


FOGBOUND – LP

 

A masterpiece beautifully packaged from one of our favourite 21st century bands also available on a limited red vinyl edition. Ten strong originals from a band that are growing in confidence with every gig and release. This album will no doubt become as revered as some of those sixties classic in years to come. Grab your copy now before they sell out and start going for silly money like some of the early singles from the link below.
www.johncolbysect.com


PIAGGIO SOUL COMBINATION – ITALIAN BOOGALOO

 

The first album by this Pisa Soul-Jazz collective is limited to just 300 copies. These five faces clearly have a love for the Vespa as well as great music. Three covers from Brian Auger, William Bell and Eddie Harris shows you the bag this band are in. Three is the reoccurring theme here with guest vocalists Irene Mori, Sara Piaggesi and Marina Mulopulos. More to come from the PSC.
www.sanantonio42.it


REBECCA DRY & RADEK AZUL BAND – BRING BACK SOUL

 

An English singer living in Paris who possesses a wide and powerful voice in a Northern and Deep Soul style. Her debut album ‘Rebecca Dry Sings Soul’ was a hit. And her second ‘Bring Back Soul’ with the ‘Radek Azul Band’ again is another triumph from the excellent Q-Sounds stable. Do yourself a favor and purchase a copy of this album from the link below. www.qsoundsrecording.com/


SUNBURST – THE MEN

 

The Men have had some favorable reviews on NUTSMAG from Graham in the past. ‘Sunburst’ is a change of musical direction partly down to a change of drummers and the recording process with a more organic approach. Band members played new musical instruments and adopted a more soulful approach, reminiscent of late era Beatles in some places. This album gives The Men another dimension to their energetic live shows.
www.themen.se


LITTLE BARRIE – DEATH EXPRESS

 

Having followed the band from the very early days and done countless gigs with them it’s always a joy to hear the new material which always takes a fresh approach. ‘Death Express’ is a sonic album of clever Psychedelic Garage Rock riffs from singer, songwriter and demon guitarist Barrie Cadogan. It’s amazing what sounds this trio can produce with Virgil’s tight break beat drumming and Lewis Soulful bass lines. The result a double album with twenty tracks, go grab a copy of this future classic before it’s too late.
www.littlebarrie.com


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 7, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page General Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , , , , , ,
0 Comment

Euro Yeye 2017 Review

Now in its 23rd year, Euro Yeye 2017 proved once again why it’s at the top of the tree for 60s/Mod events in Europe.

To earn the attendance of so many regulars and newcomers, some of whom weren’t even born when the first weekender was held, is something really special. This was my second time in Gijon, having first visited in 2015, and my first time being invited to DJ by Felix and Rob and I couldn’t wait to return for the all-nighters, the amazing music, the friendly people and the Asturian cuisine.

First of day events was in El Bello Verano, seaside bar with DJs and one of the exhibits of the weekend, by Catalan artist David Cobo.
There was also a film festival organized that started on Monday with a really good response. 8 films, one (or two) each day. Thursday was the day to introduce it to YeYe fans coming from all over, with Merli Marlowe and Felix talking about the films, all of them very rare, all of them 60’s and all of them related to humor, this was the link. Also time for introducing Joaquin Viña’s Pop Art amazing exhibit and “las maravillosas aventuras of Mr Soul” graphic novel by Andreu Conill.

First band of the weekend was California act, The Allah-Las performing in the traditional Plaza Mayor outdoor concert. Their sun-drenched psychedelic mid-tempo sounds were the perfect start to events in the early evening heat, and they thrilled their attending fans and new converts alike.

Things, for me, got off to a shaky start, I lost my luggage en route from Scotland, and managed to badly injure my ankle as soon as I arrived at Acapulco, but I wasn’t going to let these setbacks ruin the weekend! Thursday’s all-nighter got off to a flying start (the legendary Sala Acapulco Gin & Tonics helping me with anesthetic), with the mix of black and white sounds from the DJs including Rob and I from the UK and Juanito Volumen from the Spanish Inquisition team as well as a fantastic show from Spanish band Melange. Both styles of music R&B/soul and garage/psych in one room really pulls everyone together and in the hands of the skillful DJs the crossovers were seamless and kept the dancefloor going until the early hours of the morning.

Friday daytime saw a few sore heads, but a beautiful sunny day to get out and explore Gijon, enjoy the beach, as well as all-day mod sounds at El Patio de la Favorita with Kitty B Shake and Jokin Misterklin on the decks, as well as the first of two mass scooter runs around the city. Right before all this Jim McCarthy was interviewed thru skype to present his last 2 graphic novels: “Living for Kicks” and “The Life and Death of Keith Moon”. The club “Toma3” was packed… and there was also a show cooking experience with French food.
For the lucky few, a couple  more hours sleep and then onto the 2nd Allnighter, again the stellar DJ line-up and two of the most exciting bands on the circuit as well, in the shape of Les Darlings from France and homegrown Spanish psych favourites Fogbound setting things up for another night of fantastic music and gathering of friends old and new. Les Darlings delivered infectious beat and rhythm sounds with loads of style, while Fogbound’s have gone from strength to strength with their sweeping psychedelic/prog/popsike sound, that went down a storm.

For the lucky few, a couple  more hours sleep and then onto the 2nd Allnighter, again the stellar DJ line-up and two of the most exciting bands on the circuit as well, in the shape of Les Darlings from France and homegrown Spanish psych favourites Fogbound setting things up for another night of fantastic music and gathering of friends old and new. Les Darlings delivered infectious beat and rhythm sounds with loads of style, while Fogbound’s have gone from strength to strength with their sweeping psychedelic/prog/popsike sound, that went down a real storm.

There was no let up the next day with plenty of people braving the hangovers and the overcast weather to head to the 7 hour pool party at Camping Deva… record and clothes stalls, food, drinks, scooters and a packed line-up of DJs playing the best of 60s sounds across the genres. The Scootercruzada had their trophies given there as well, furthest traveller being a young fellow from Germany (2000+ kms. on his Lambretta to the event). There was also a bunch of British mod scooterists + the usual Spanish and local crowd enjoying the roads and the party.
A final push for the 3rd all-nighter, and this was going to be something special with the eagerly awaited annual Mr & Mrs Yeye contest saw Gerry German from Switzerland and Marian Choya Martin crowned this year’s winners. Live performances from Las Munjitas Del Fuzz from the Vatican with their primitive fuzzed up garage sounds and crazy live show and the eagerly awaited show from Spain’s Tito Ramirez.

The debut Tito Ramirez single ‘Lonely Man’ became an instant classic at R&B/mod nights around Europe and the live performance shows he has so much more to come, the band were bursting with infectious energy and had the whole room in the palm of their hands with their own signature take on classic r&b and popcorn sounds, delivered with loads of character, swagger, and humor.

After Tito the DJ team of Miguel, Imanol, Luis, Felix, Juanito, Rob and I took the night through to dawn with a wholesome mix of 60s styles, blending old favorites with sure to be future classics and, most importantly, keeping the dancers grooving and spinning till the sun came up.

Sunday – out o the official program – was the time for the “necropoli yeyé” a party for all the “leftovers-yeyes” from everywhere that had the strongest dancing in the old town club “TNT” up to 7am!

It was an absolute pleasure to be invited to play as part of the DJ team, and to be welcomed by the locals and friends from across Europe to this very special event in the mod calendar. As I said even injuries and lost suitcases couldn’t hold me back. Here’s to next year  (2 to 5 august!)

Take a look at the images from EURO YEYE 2017 here  
- Arriba, abajo, al centro y adentro, Salud! Craig Reece


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Felix EuroYeYe

Organizador de weekends mods y 60's como el Euroyeyé y el Beat Goes On. In Gijon, Spain.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

September 19, 2017 By : Category : Bands DJs Europe Front Page Music Reviews Scene Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 13 – Kenny Dorham: 6 of the Best

Jazz for Modernists 13 – Kenny Dorham: 6 of the Best

Texas-born trumpeter, composer and singer McKinley ‘Kenny’ Dorham (1924-1972) played an important role in the development of modern jazz trumpet. Recording as early as 1945 with Mercer Ellington and Frank Humphries, he appeared on some early bebop big-band sessions led by Dizzy Gillespie and sustained a career as leader and side player throughout the 1953-1965 period of hard bop. After work with Fats Navarro, Lionel Hampton, James Moody, Charlie Parker, Milt Jackson and Thelonious Monk, his first full date as the leader came in October 1953 and was released for Debut as The Kenny Dorham Quintet (vols. 1 & 2). The following year he was a founding member of (at the time) Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers, a combo soon to be led by fellow co-founder and drummer Art Blakey. Dorham’s own Jazz Prophets followed in 1956, a line-up of which featuring pianist Bobby Timmons recorded his second album for Blue Note, ’Round About Midnight at the Café Bohemia (1957).

Dorham has constantly been regarded as a ‘players’ player’ or ‘underrated’, perhaps due to his never being consistently associated with one major label for any great length of time. Although commercial success eluded him, the pantheon of great names of distinct styles that either played for him or invited him to key sessions is a testament to his qualities of consistency and adaptability. Returning to Blue Note in 1961, he struck up something of a partnership with tenor great Joe Henderson, appearing on three of his Blue Note LPs: Page One (1963), Our Thing (1963) and In ‘N Out (1964). Henderson appeared in turn on Dorham’s Blue Note dates Una Mas (1963) and Trompeta Toccata (1964), while both horn men featured brilliantly on Chicago pianist Andrew Hill’s masterpiece Point of Departure (1964).

From 1965 until his premature death in 1972, Dorham recorded only sporadically, though he did still feature on some excellent LPs including the 1967 debut by pianist and fellow Texan Cedar Walton. Overall, his legacy is a very positive one, often hailed for the quality of original compositions such as ‘Blue Bossa’ (recorded by Joe Henderson), the modal ‘Sunset’ from Whistle Stop (1961) and the twice-recorded ‘Una Mas’. In terms of style, Dorham has been praised in The Penguin Guide to Jazz for his ‘elusive brilliance’ and described as ‘fluid, punchy and lyrical’. Of his Blue Note sides, only ‘Mamacita’ (see no. 5) was issued as a 45 single, though a few EPS on other labels were distributed globally. DJs looking for tracks for the dancefloor or the ‘lounge’ party soundtrack might need to rely on albums. In truth, Dorham was never really an out and out soul-jazz player, though the list below does it’s best to appeal to mods who like to ‘step out’ as well as sit back with a cool beer and watch the network DVD box set of Public Eye.

1. ‘Afrodisia’ (1955) – From Afro-Cuban 10″ Vinyl, Blue Note BLP 5065 & LP, BLP 1535 (1957)


Dorham’s first two lead sessions for Blue Note in January and March 1955 were with expanded versions of the first Messengers line-up featuring Horace Silver on piano, Art Blakey on drums and Hank Mobley on tenor sax. From the second session came ‘Afrodisia’, an infectious piece of Latin hard bop with Carlos ‘Patato’ Valdes on congas and Cecil Payne on baritone sax.

youtube.com/watch?v=7myLXPUBB_w


2. ‘Lotus Blossom’ (1959) – From Quiet Kenny LP New Jazz NJLP 8225


What Billboard (Feb 22, 1960) called ‘the relaxed, warm sounds’ of Dorham’s late ’59 Quiet Kenny LP for Prestige’s New Jazz offshoot owed more than a little to the modal sounds of Miles Davis’ recently released Kind of Blue and the directions in which John Coltrane was taking the hard bop template. Bassist Paul Chambers had appeared on Davis’ seminal album, while pianist Tommy Flanagan and drummer Arnette Cobb in the same year played on Coltrane’s Giant Steps, the first clear exemplum of the iconic saxophonist’s ‘sheets of sound’ experiments. Dorham’s quartet for this date was thus the cutting edge of post-bop improvisation. The modal feel is evident on the exotically-titled ‘Lotus Blossom’, which leads off an outstanding set of laid-back modern jazz.

youtube.com/watch?v=-TwoXLZo6-c


3. ‘Buffalo’ (1961) – From Whistle Stop LP Blue Note BST 84063


Whistle Stop, the third of Dorham’s five dates as leader for Blue Note, is required listening for connoisseurs of the particular period of hard bop (c.1959-1963) that followed Miles’ and Coltrane’s modal experiments and preceded the r & b-driven, finger-snapping funk of Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder. Perhaps the most interesting track from a historical point of view is the bluesy and Indian-inspired ‘Buffalo’, a swinging example of what Ira Gitler’s original sleeve notes describe as ‘southwestern funk as opposed to the usual southern funk we hear’. Mistakenly attributed to Horace Silver, a short version of this tune cropped up on the debut release in early 1963 of visionary acoustic guitarist Davy Graham (The Guitar Player). Taken up by John Renbourn, the tune for guitar was an early blueprint for the fusions of jazz and folk that would lead to the formation of Pentangle in 1967.

youtube.com/watch?v=uQoslZNVjzs


4. ‘Sao Paulo’ (1964 – recorded 1963) – From Una Mas Blue Note BLP 4127


Enter Joe Henderson (and Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams and Butch Warren). Recorded in April 1963, Una Mas (Spanish for ‘One more (time)’) is a record inspired by the Brazilian bossa nova sounds so popular in the United States in 1962. The title track, here extended to over 15 minutes, had appeared a year earlier as ‘US’ on the live Inta Somethin LP for Pacific Jazz. Infectious though this is, it’s the shorter ‘Sau Paulo’, described by Dorham in the sleeve notes as ‘half bossa feeling and the other half is something else’, which best epitomises the ‘light and shade’ feel of Blue Note’s 1960s Latin-tinged modal blues.

youtube.com/watch?v=lN1iQQS5E_A


5. ‘Mamacita’ (1965 – recorded 1964) 45 (parts 1 & 2): – Blue Note 1922; 33 – From Trompeta Toccata Blue Note LP BST 84181


This catchy Joe Henderson tune kicks off side two of Dorham’s last date as leader (Henderson would record a slightly faster version on his 1967 set The Kicker). The last of the five Henderson-Dorham Blue Notes to be recorded (in September 1964), Trompeta Toccata reunites Dorham with Tommy Flanagan and also features legendary drummer Albert Heath and the great Richard Davis on bass. Mid-sixties jazz modernists are urged to acquire this album also for its urgent Afro-Latin title track (with outstanding Henderson solo) and the nocturnal swing of the excellent ‘Night Watch’.

youtube.com/watch?v=0dGFeIcGb_4


6. ‘Turquoise Twice’ (1967) – From Cedar Walton: Cedar! LP (Prestige PR7519)


Dallas-born pianist and composer Cedar Walton had made his recording debut in 1958 on Dorham’s Riverside LP This is the Moment! After a stint with Art Farmer and Benny Golson’s Jazztet, he was part of Art Blakey’s most interesting Messenger’s line-up from 1961 to 1964, playing alongside Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard and contributing bona fide classics such as ‘Ugetsu’ and ‘Mosaic’ to the repertoire. By the mid-sixties Dalton was appearing on numerous Prestige sessions; his first for the label as the leader featured Kenny Dorham, who, though fading from the scene, delivered a searing solo on the majestically lyrical modal blues ‘Turquoise Twice’. Dorham continued to record sporadically (dates with Barry, Harris, Clifford Jordan, Toshiko Akiyoshi and Cecil Payne) until his premature death from kidney disease in 1972. His legacy is a fine one.

youtube.com/watch?v=nFKeU-qKRiA


 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

September 7, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

“Digging deep into the Rubble – Volume 1”

“Digging deep into the Rubble – Volume 1”

It’s fair to say that compilation albums have been many a vinyl addicts’ first introduction to all sorts of great music over the years. “Tighten up”, “Nuggets”, “Tamla Motown – 20 Mod classics”, “Mods mayday ‘79”, “A splash of colour” are amongst many LP’s that have introduced people to sounds they might not have heard before, setting them off on a long journey of musical discovery. Fans of UK beat and psychedelia have been particularly well served in this respect. Firstly with some great releases on See For Miles, Charly and the under-the-counter “Chocolate soup for diabetics” series, but mainly from the legendary series of “Rubble” albums compiled by Phil Smee of Bam Caruso records. There were twenty made in all, all filled with beat obscurities and popsike classics. These albums in turn part-helped make the original 45’s the maniacally sought after records they are today. In an occasional series we’re going to have a look into each one, and pick some highlights that are contained within those grooves.

The first volume in the series was released in 1984, entitled “The psychedelic snarl” (KIRI 024). Cherry picking great and obscure 45’s from the Philips and Fontana labels, it featured a suitably trippy front cover and an 8-page booklet giving some background on these previously unknown groups and artists. Side one starts off with legendary ‘freakbeat’ masters The Wimple Winch. Evolving from Liverpool R’n’B group Just Four Men, they released three 45’s in their lifetime. The third and most out-there was “Rumble on Mersey Square south” (TF 781) which opens side two. However, hidden on a handful of the B-sides was the wonderful “Atmospheres”, though the label doesn’t show this! It’s almost impossible to find one, especially in mint condition, but expect to pay over £500 for one. Straight onto track two, we find The Mirror “Faster than light” (BF 1666). Tucked away on a 1968 B side, it’s a phased pop-sike pounder. Track 3 brings us to one of the rarest and most valuable UK singles ever, “Woman of distinction” (BF 1588) by legendary session musician Caleb Quaye. Released in 1967 and only selling a handful of copies, this psychedelic masterpiece commands obscene amounts of money, a copy selling for £2,350 in June 2017. Martin Cure & The Peeps “It’s all over now” takes up track 4, next up is The Living Daylights 100mph psych B-side “Always with him” (BF 1613) and The Misunderstood’s 1969 slow groover “Never had a girl like you before” (TF 1041) is sixth. Track seven is made by a band responsible for three of the top UK rarities of the decade…

The Open Mind. As well as a much sought after ’66 slice of mod greatness as The Drag Set (“Day and night”), they also released a £1000+ album and a two sided proto-heavy metal 45 in 1969,“Magic Potion / Cast a spell” (BF 1805) which can also sell for up to £1000! After the madness of “Cast a spell”, it’s left for Billy J Kramer’s old band The Dakotas to end side one with “The spider and the fly” (BF1645). Featuring some incendiary guitar work from Mick Green, one of these can set you back over £100!

 

Side two opens with the aforementioned Wimple Winch’s “Rumble on Mersey Square South” (more of them later!), followed by fellow stars of side one The Open Mind with “Magic Potion”. The Living Daylights “Lets live for today” (BF 1561) is up next. Originally recorded in Italian by The Rokes, it was eventually a massive US hit for The Grass Roots in 1967, but the great UK version here was produced by the aforementioned Caleb Quaye! Track four brings us three minutes of total pop-art mayhem from Birmingham group The Craig. The follow up to the dance-floor friendly “Ready, steady let’s go”, “I must be mad” has to be one of the most demented singles ever made, and arguably the best example of a genre now termed ‘Freakbeat’. With an almost as good B side in “Suspense”, the single was released in June 1966 (TF 715) and sold in pitiful amounts, hence it’s £400+ status in mint condition today. Beat boom stalwarts Unit 4 plus 2’s last UK 45 “I will” (TF 990) is up next. On the flip side of “3:30”, the song is a great commercial slab of late 60’s pop, but the public didn’t agree as it didn’t trouble the charts back in 1969.

The Grey were responsible for one solitary 45, but what a classic! On the B side of “Elephant rider” (TF 944) which in itself was good, late sixties pop, “Grey” is a total head-pounder and the song can barely be contained in those grooves. Whether it would have been an A side hit is anybody’s guess (probably not!) but it sure left us with a classic and very valuable £300+ single. After that racket, you’d think the mood would mellow a little, but no, it’s our old favourites The Wimple Winch back again with aggressive pill popping masterpiece “Save my soul” (TF 718). Released the same month as “I must be mad” in June 1966, this was one of many totally legendary releases that just sank without a trace at the time. A surefire way to fill any mod / 60’s dance-floor nowadays, a mint original would easily fetch £400+ on the collectors market. After all that excitement it’s left for The Mindbenders to finish the album off in fine style with the cracking B side from 1966, “The morning after” (TF 780). Not too hard find, it’s a great mod mover with some brilliant guitar work and harmonies too.

Well, “The psychedelic snarl” was the perfect way to start the series, but we’ve got many more nuggets to dig out of the rubble soon!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

September 7, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Reviews 0 Comment

Newbreed – Allah Las

Jenni and Holly had a chat with Pedrum Siadatian, the lead guitarist and vocalist with Allah Las ahead of headline show at Euro YeYe, Spain on Thursday 3 August.

1. Some of you guys met through school and working at Amoeba Records, can you tell us a bit about what brought you to start playing together and how you became The Allah-Las?

Once Spencer and I started getting acquainted at Amoeba, we shared our individual bedroom recording projects with each other and started jamming just for fun. Soon-after, we asked Matt to join us and drum because he was our friend and had similar tastes. Then they asked Miles to sing cause they knew him from high school and none of us wanted to sing.

2. Having worked in a record store prior to the band and all being big music fans, what different musical influences does each member bring to the band? Do you try to get this across in the music?

We have a lot of overlapping tastes but each of us has certain tendencies that the other doesn’t so it kind of balances out- popman, worldman, folkman, caveman.

3. Obviously California is musically one of the richest places to live with so much history and new music, how influenced are you by living there and other music coming from the area?

Bands are products of their environments just like people are, so I think whether we wanted to or not that Los Angeles was gonna come across in our music to some degree. We are really into the Byrds, Love, Seeds, Rain Parade etc.., in terms of paying homage to those influences, we did it best on our second record.

4. You’ve also had a very strong art direction with your artwork and videos, are there other influences outside of music which you draw from?

Yeah – books, movies, art, friends, and conversations. they’re all equally important.

5. Nick Waterhouse took on production duties on Worship the Sun, how did that come about? Do you have plans to work together again in the future? Or indeed are there any other people on your wish list to work with?

it came about cause he helped us with the first record and it seemed like a good move to work with him again. We also spent a lot of time with Dan Horne in the studio doing overdubs and mixing. I’m into the idea of recording ourselves for the next one!

6. Following on from Worship the Sun, Calico Review takes things a bit further and a slightly darker turn. Can you tell us a bit about the writing of the album and recording process for it?

We were just writing songs separately, a continuation of the process that had started with Worship the Sun. When it came time to start working on Calico everyone started showing the rest of the band the songs they had written and we learned em, demoed em, then recorded em proper off-and-on over the course of a year.

7. Your weekly installment of Reverberation Radio has become a bit of an institution for fans, how did that come about?

Miles had a graveyard shift time slot at KXLU every Wednesday from 2-6am and we would all go down to the station, bring records, and hang out. We got kicked off the air for playing too much old stuff, and with the help of our friend Robbie, we turned it into a weekly podcast that’s been going on for about 5 years. The four of us in the band take turns contributing, as well as six of our friends and the occasional guest.

8. What is the 60s underground scene like in LA? Is this something you are involved in as a band?

There is a small one but I don’t feel like that’s our vibe. We never wanted to be a full on 60’s homage group, even though the video for Tell Me contributed to that.

9. It feels like you’ve been touring pretty much nonstop over the past year. You’ve toured extensively across America, Europe and Australia since the release of Calico Review – what have some of the highlights been?

Some of the best shows have been the shows where we didn’t know we had an audience and loads of people came, like Cape Town, Tel Aviv, Budapest, Moscow, Bali.

10. Are you looking forward to playing at Euro Yeye? What can we expect from the set? When you record, are you always thinking about how it will sound live?

Yes, we’re gonna try to do some stuff we’ve never done live. No, that comes after it’s done!

11. As you’ve been spending a lot of time touring, has this given you much time to check out some new (old) music? What’s been your soundtrack on the tour bus over the last few months?

I’ve been listening to my friend Maston’s record that’s gonna be coming out this fall, it’s really great instrumental/soundtrack music. Also, Chris Lucey, the Only Ones, and VU always.

12. Calico Review came out last year, what are your plans for the rest of 2017? Focussing on touring or will you be heading back into the studio?

Yeah we have a short west coast tour in September but otherwise, we’re gonna start working on the next record this winter!

Band Members: Matthew Correia, Spencer Dunham, Miles Michaud, Pedrum Siadatian

Discography:
Albums

Allah-Las (2012)
Worship The Sun (2014)
Calico Review (2016)
Singles
“Catamaran”/”Long Journey” – Pres, 2011
“Tell Me (What’s On Your Mind)”/”Sacred Sands” – Innovative Leisure, 2012
“Don’t You Forget It” – Record Store Day split w/Nick Waterhouse, 2012
“Had It All”/”Every Girl” – Innovative Leisure, 2013
“501-415″/”No Werewolf” – Innovative Leisure, 2014
“Famous Phone Figure” – Mexican Summer, 2016
“Could Be You” – Mexican Summer, 2016

Main Site:  allah-las.com/

Social Networks:
Facebook Click Here
Instagram Click Here
Twitter Click Here
Soundcloud Click Here


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 17, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Interviews Picks Psych USA Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Las Munjitas del Fuzz

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We started together as Doctor Explosion in the springtime of 1989. We were the first original line up under this name and we did hundreds of shows and five albums plus some singles and eps till 2001 when the original line up splits up, although i decide to keep going with different members as Dr Explosion after that date till nowadays. In 1993 after reading an article about obscure Spanish bands in the 60s, i discovered about Las Monjitas del Jeep, a group of real nuns who consider themselves as “ye yes”, “we are YE YEs but of the type that don’t get in troubles”. They were living in a convent and done their shopping in a Jeep. Fascinated by the idea of this group of religious devoted nuns who had such a cool gear (seen in pics such as Gibson 335, Grestch guitar, etc).

It was after that that I proposed to Felix and Varo to start a parallel band under the name of Las Monjitas del Surf to play spontaneously at our local temple, the music bar La Foli, a year after in 1994 we rescued the idea to play with another guitarist (Marcos Montoto, who we did at least two shows with) under the name of Las Monjitas del Fuzz. After that we did a tour in Spain with Lightning Beat Man in 1996 as his backing band.

We were very busy as Dr Explosion that time during the 90s so we used las Monjitas to do punctual shows randomly. After that, in 2001 with the new members of Dr Explosion we played at the Wild Weekend in Benidorm under the name of Las Munjitas. I think it was a mistake by Josh Collins to change the name of the band, the O for the U, but maybe not and it was only genius from Josh!! Bravo!! so when Varo last year (2016) proposed we get back together with Felix (the original line up of dr explosion) under las Monjitas del fuzz name I rescued the U in MUNJITAS from Josh’s idea, cause it sounds like MOON-hittas, in English and esthetically the name looks better with the same U as FUZZ.

As Las Munjitas del Fuzz we have been active since Varo called me in April of 2016.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

We have lots of music influences in common, all the fuzzy mid 60s garage, and late 60s acid Pysch garage with raw strident guitar tones, but also all British 60s bands, 50s Rhythm and Blues, good Rock and Roll, Soul music and jazz and obviously much more. We know that Las Munjitas del fuzz land is the territory for the most extreme fuzzy and pysch garage sounds with creepy Spanish lyrics from the vision of a tormented nun who lives in these crazy modern times

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Around Gijon, Bobkat 65 cause although they are still in the process of learning to find their own way and self-confidence there is a real truth and love in what they do that you can feel in the spirit of their songs that makes them more real and special than other “professional” musicians. Check them out, they have a new album on Get Hip Records! I also spend part of my time in Austin, Texas that I consider also my area so, there I could mention hundreds of examples of good music like The Black Angels, Amplified Heat, Mike Flannigin (best hammond organ combo in town) Sweet Spirit, The Ripe, The Uglybeats, The Bellfuries, A Giant Dog, Sweet Spirit,The Thunderchiefs and many more.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Here in Gijon it is quite boring I might say, lots of no talented and pedant shit over polished and enhanced by music business media, some indie rock song writers with pretentious political intentions but nothing really exciting except some real talented people like Fee Reega, Captains and a few others like Bobkat 65, Las Potras and Peralta.

In Austin is an amazing community of talented musicians with hundreds of good bands around.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Fuzzy Psych Garage Punk

6. What are your live shows like?

Mystic Ecstasy, Out of Control, Tremors and Levitation, Religious Fervor and Mass Mess

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

My influences in Music are very wide, as somebody said once, I like all the good music and a bit of the bad stuff. Las Munjitas only play covers for now but I write my own lyrics in Spanish that gives the songs a new vision. We have the intention of writing our own material for the next records. it is very interesting and fun to see from a language point of view how changing that affects the final result. Even though I respect all the accents of the melody by just changing the meaning of the lyrics and the sounds of the words you can export a song to a new dimension, where that recording means something totally different to a new group of people. I love playing with that, it’s a in joke for us to transform the songs we have always loved into something really stupid to laugh about, we don’t respect anything.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

God

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I write the lyrics. As I said above we play covers, golden Garage hits from the mid-60s, that we used to play in our setlist in the 90s, plus some other new. When Varo asked me to get the band back together again I thought it was a good idea to do it under the name of Las Munjitas. It made no sense to play those songs again with their original lyrics, so as long as we were now Las Munjitas del Fuzz and not Dr Explosion I started to write new lyrics with the vision of a real catholic nun.

Catholicism has been a huge part of our education since we are all coming from deep Catholic families, Varo and I were both in Catholic schools. So, in most of the lyrics I want to sound like a real nun with an ancient conservative traditional mindset trying to understand and describe today’s World. Trying to understand today’s young people and the music scene, and at the same time trying to be part of it, but with her own spirit. Like a Christian rock band but with Garage Punk tunes, sometimes I go a bit wild with the lyrics like “Let’s go in 69” where i describe the sexual act of a 69 between two nuns. but aren’t we all sinners? “And you know that temptation and the devil is always there. And well, the attitude of the lyrics is surprising, like…”Oh my god!! it is a 69!!” Although there are also explicit descriptions of oral sex. it is real as life itself where tragedy and comedy walk together hand in hand.”

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

I like a lot “Satan sal de mi” which is our first single and the new video we’ll put on youtube soon. A song by another artist it could mention hundreds but I am gonna say “I am a lover not a fighter” by Lazy Lester because I met him last Saturday after his show and had a beer with him, and because I love that single!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I think the underground scene is in a very interesting, there is a lot of cool bands all around the World, and more important, there is a new generation of fans interested in today’s scene with festivals like Levitation in Austin, Liverpool and Angers. I participate as much as I can, producing and recording bands. I have been working with Boogarins, Golden Animals, Dallas Acid, Amplified Heat, The Ripe and Sean Lennon.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Not being arrested by the border patrol when we were shooting our videoclip of “Satan sal de mi” near the Mexican border dressing like nuns. the officer asked us: “Are you guys roman Catholics?”

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Well, Varo lives in Valencia (800 km away) so every time he comes over to Gijon we try to do as much practice and recording as we can. Actually the records we have been putting out are first takes of the first rehearsal we did after 16 years. A large part of our set are songs we used to play in the 90s. We practice at my studio Circo Perrotti where I put mics and record the rehearsal with the intention of hearing the possible mistakes and work on the songs after that. The truth is that we liked the way the songs came out with their imperfections, and we love that fact as important part of the footprint of real music. We have a new single on Slovenly/Shit on the Milk records, with a hidden surprise at the end of the 1st cut. we also have one more single coming up on Groovie Records. We have a recorded lots of hits like “No la van a Bautizar”, “Aun soy Virgen”, “Frivola” or “El Twist de la Genuflexion” that will be included in the Munjitas album.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It is like in any other business, people follow the mainstream, most of the times just a matter of investing money and time, there is a parallel World of talented people doing the most interesting things in the underground and occasionally the massive media discovers one or two of them and gives them bigger exposure

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The Black Angels are my friends, I play with Jake Garcia in The Ripe and he invited me to join them for their show at Primavera Sound, and although I saw them many times before in Austin, that night was special for me. To see Jake my brother on stage having a massive success in my own country, made me feel very proud of him and of the hard work they have been putting into this new record. I also produced the last album of Boogarins “Manual”, great Psych rock with Brazilian roots. I love that band and to work with them in my studio in Spain was an amazing experience. The album was a nominee in the Latin Grammys last year. I am currently working on the production of Micky’s new album in Gijon. Micky from Micky y Los Tonys had some number one hits in Spain and Germany in the 70s and 60s and he is very well known all around Spain.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We are lucky in the that sense as I have my own studio. Apart from Circo Perrotti I’d love to record again with Liam Watson, he is a good old friend and I love what he does, and he recorded us for the first time in 1994

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Well we will play at Euroyeye fest in Gijon this summer and I want to complete our first album. I also want to do our own material for a conceptual psychedelic album based in texts of Santa Teresa de Jesus and the Spanish mystics of the XVI century…

 
Band Members: Sor Alvaro Coalla (Bateria), Sor Felix A. (Asuncion) Dominguez (Bajo, Teclado y Voces), Sor Jorge Munozz Cobo (Voz y Guitarra)

Discography: 2016 Single “Satan Sal de Mi” (Funtastic Dracula Records), 2017 Single “Es el 69” (I shit on the Milk Records), 2017 Single “Pecado” (Groovy Records)

Main Site: CLICK HERE!

Social Networks: FACEBOOK HERE!

Tour Info: CLICK HERE!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Picks Psych Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Men Of North Country

We recently caught up with the Men Of North Country (from Tel Aviv) for a nice chat for NUTSMAG, here is what they had to say…

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been recording proper since 2011, performing since 2012. Back in 2007 Yashiv was heard singing along the tunes he was spinning at a party and from there it slowly developed into MONC.

2. influences do the band members have in common?

Soul music.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Our bass player, Jonathan, is also in a band called Taani Esther, which is a brilliant psychedelic pop band that sings in Hebrew.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Tel Aviv is a great city but compared to other cultural Meccas it’s pretty small. So the 60’s scene isn’t big. There’s the Tel Aviv Soul Club, there are some lovely surf bands and retro nights.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

One of the streaming sites (Pandora or Last FM I think) described our music as basically Soul with influences of Mod 79 sounds and Punk 77 music. We’re pretty happy with that. We’d add post punk to the mix as well, especially The Cure.

6. What are your live shows like?

Loud and brassy.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

First of all Northern Soul, Dexy’s and The Cure. After that it’s the usual suspects: The Jam, Motown, Stax, etc. We love doing covers. We did Human League’s Mirror Man in the first album (it’s basically a Motown tune), The Who’s The Seeker for our Magic EP, Lou Pride’s I’m Com’un Home for the second album and we do some more live – Kinks, Standells, Joe Jackson, Solomon Burke and more. I really do despise Radiohead…

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Probably film if we’re talking art.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Doron writes most of the music, and I (Yashiv) write the lyrics. Subjects are mostly personal stuff I go through and some political stuff as well. Coming from where we come from, you can’t really escape that sadly.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

Personally I’d have to say that I dig Running the most now. I call it Northern Soul for The Cure kids. I’m blown away by the string arrangement Boaz has come up with for this one every time I hear it (he’s our drummer and arranger). Fav song by another artist? That’s too tough a question. Just listening to John Bowie now, so let’s go with that ok?

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I run the Tel Aviv Soul Club so I guess I do. And whenever I’m abroad I try to get to a party or a gig. And we perform of course. From the last event I’ve been to in London I think I can describe it as a bit too fuzzy, and too rare. Still the best scene around though.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

I guess the Madness House of Fun Weekender last November was a big thing for us, although once you’re on stage you just do your thing…

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Rehearsals depend on live gigs. We do more of them before gigs naturally. We have a couple of European tours a year (I still count the UK as European for that if you don’t mind…) and we also play in Tel Aviv and the rest of the country every few weeks/months. We’ve just recorded a version of The Jam’s Circus for the Specialized project which is supposed to come out this summer so that’s pretty exciting. I think The Jam would approve with our take. And in August just before the NUT gigs we’re releasing a new single which is always an exciting event for us.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Well, it looks like the world is heading to a click-bate era which isn’t so promising, and so is the music coverage. On the bright side, everything is so accessible these days that you can easily find a place to your liking, musically and media-wise as well.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I love The Coral. And BJM too. And a lot of other stuff as well. Too many to mention.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’ve recorded our Magic EP at the all-analogue Yeah Yeah Yeah studios in Hamburg. Great experience. Wouldn’t mind doing that again. And would love to record with the Skeleton Key guys from Liverpool. Or Andy Lewis in London. He’s our godfather. Or Bob Stanley from St Etienne! Now that would be really something!

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

More gigs and more records. More. Looking forward to our first Brighton visit. Heard so much about it. Gonna comb the beach for rockers!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Interviews Picks RnB Scene Tags:, ,
0 Comment

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 16 (episode 25)

*ROLL OVER IMAGE TO SEE CONTROLS*

Join the Baron for the latest NUTSCAST of  Summer 2017


Be sure to tune in to the latest Nutscast Sessions for a full preview of Euro YeYe and the Brighton August Bank Holiday events as we say a fond farewell to the Baron, Graham Lentz as he hosts his last show; with tracks by Gemma & The Travellers, Stone Foundation, Men Of North Country and DJ selections from our guests at Brighton.

 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Reviews June 2017 – Part 1

The Baron Four

‘Silvaticus’ – LP

Formed 2012, it’s been a couple of years since Baron Four’s last outing, but this has been well-worth waiting for. They have always set out to capture the exciting sound of classic Beat and Rhythm & Blues, and this is another quality example, and in my opinion, their best work so far. ‘It’s Alright’, ‘Don’t Need You Anymore’ and ‘Certain Type Of Girl’ evokes the spirit of the Pretty Things, Kinks and Yardbirds. 2014s ‘Out Of The Wild Come The Baron Four’ is their only album to date, but this EP is a welcome addition to the fine collection of singles before and since that LP. If you are going to the Brighton August Bank Holiday Weekender, you can catch the Baron Four live at Volks Tavern on the Saturday afternoon with Men Of North Country.

facebook.com/thebaronfour
thebaronfour.bandcamp.com

BJ’s New Breed

‘How Come’ b/w ‘I’ll Never Come Back Again’ – Single

BJ’s New Breed rose from the ashes of Vienna’s Jaybirds and The Attention a few years back and return with this classy 45 of Beat-inspired garage. ‘How Come’ is a mid-paced Beat ballad, while ‘I’ll Never Come Back Again’ sees the BJ’s back on familiar territory, with this rockin’ fuzz belter. Definitely, one to look out for on Time For Action Records.

facebook.com/BjsNewBreed

Dukes Of Hamburg

‘Germany’s Newest Hitmakers’ – LP

Surely there are few finer exponents of Beat/R&B in Germany than the Dukes Of Hamburg and they have been ever present on the scene not just in Europe, but in America for a long time. Formed and led by the irrepressible Thilo Pieper, The Dukes give us a rockin’ great set of R&B belters with this album including tracks originally by the likes of Larry Williams, Big Joe Turner, Chuck Berry, Cab Calloway and Herman’s Hermits (yes you did read that correctly !) Their version of ‘I’m Henry The VIII’ is far more enjoyable than the original, just for the sheer fun of it. What I really like about The Dukes is the way they appear not to take themselves too seriously, but really know how to get the best out of any song they tackle.
Great fun and a great album.

facebook.com/DukesofHamburg
www.dukesofhamburg.com

The Haggis Horns

‘Take It Back feat Doc Brown’ b/w ‘Take It Back instrumental’ – Single

The Haggis Horns have been around in the UK funk and soul scene for over ten years and 2015s album ‘What Comes To Mind’ was a highlight of that year. This Leeds-based combo has cut another slice of top-drawer funky soul with this single. The A side features rapper Doc Brown (which may not be to everyone’s taste here at Nutsmag), but make no mistake, the instrumental flip side more than holds its own as a stand-alone track. Rumour has it a new album is on the way, so soul and funk fans, keep your ears open for that one while enjoying this single.

www.thehaggishorns.com

facebook.com/thehaggishorns

thehaggishorns.bandcamp.com

Shindig Magazine

Issue 68

After the scare last year when the future of Shindig looked in doubt (through no fault of Mr. Mills or Mr. Morton) thankfully the best music magazine by a country mile is still going strong and what a treat this edition is; especially for mods. Apart from all the usual features like the extensive reviews, news and interviews with up-coming bands (Shindig are more clued up than most on that score), this edition features the last ever interview with Steve Marriott, a cracking interview with Steve Ellis and a major interview with Paul Weller.
And it is the Weller feature that is proof that Shindig really has moved to the top of the league. Let’s face it; Mr. W is not one to suffer fools or journalists gladly, so when he does give an interview, you know he has checked out exactly who he is dealing with and it is clear from this piece that he was very comfortable in the company of Jon Mills and Paul Osbourne.
In these days where the last surviving music paper is so far up its self it is an irrelevance, the magazine for vinyl junkies has lost its way and the only ‘general’ music mag seems content to wallow in the dull corporate-mire of the music biz, be thankful that Shindig is a reminder that quality, innovation and editorial independence is still alive and kicking.

https://www.shindig-magazine.com
facebook.com/Shindig.Magazine


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Reviews June 2017 – Part 2

The Riots

‘Now Or Never’ b/w It’s My Life’ – Single

If ever there was a band that should have been huge, it is The Riots. This single was a follow-up to 2013’s ‘Time For Truth’ debut album which had massive appeal and support from the mod-rock fraternity in the UK. An ill-fated UK tour was arranged, but due to bad planning by the promoter and the British authorities refusing a visa to lead singer and guitarist Sasha Bolotov, the tour went ahead with the other bands while the two other members of The Riots sat out the entire time in a hostel in London with no money and help. Although they toured the rest of Europe successfully, it was the UK market that they really needed and that put a strain on the band who have been inactive for a while now, but there is always hope they will be back. This single shows just what a powerhouse band they were and that they could match contemporaries like The Spitfires, The Orders or The Costellos. A classy piece of powerpop/mod-rock from Moscow’s finest. Скоро вернусь мои друзья (Come back soon Riots)

facebook.com/TheRiotsBand
theriotsband.bandcamp.com
www.theriots.band

Samuel S Parkes

‘Lock and Key’ b/w ‘Let Me Go’ – Single

This Leeds-based outfit really have gone from strength to strength over the last few years working with the likes of Martha Reeves and the Vandellas and Dennis Greaves. They class their music as ‘new northern’ which is a good way to describe it. ‘Let Me Go’ is a Hammond-driven belter of Northern-influenced dance music, while ‘Lock and Key’ is a delightful soul ballad. Samuel S Parkes is another one of those bands that is destined for even greater things in future and if you haven’t seen them live, you should. Apart from the music, watching backing vocalist and percussionist Rachel Mary Shaw go through her routine is enough to make you feel tired!

facebook.com/samuelsparkesmusic
twitter.com/samuel_s_parkes
samuelsparkes.bandcamp.com/

Sidewalk Society

‘Strange Roads (the songs of Rolled Gold by The Action)’  – LP

Regular readers of Nutsmag Reviews may well be familiar with Sidewalk Society; the trio from Long Beach, California who have a great love of British music of the 60s. This new album on Fruits De Mer Records is their interpretation of the legendary demos recorded by The Action between ’67 and ‘68 that stayed buried until the early 90s when they were released under the title ‘Rolled Gold’. Losing George Martin as their producer became the catalyst for the breakup of The Action which meant the demos remained just that; demos. So Sidewalk Society decided to interpret these songs in a very considerate, passionate and respectful manner. There is no point trying to make comparisons here, so I’m not going to. Dan Lawrence, Dan West and Jerry Buszek are very talented musicians who have used the base material to explore all possibilities without diluting the class of the songs. Sidewalk Society does have their own ‘sound’, so this is no attempt at being copyists. The arrangements are superb, the production is top drawer and in short, they have made an excellent album.

facebook.com/sidewalksocietymusic
www.sidewalksocietymusic.com
www.fruitsdemerrecords.com/sidewalk

Weeks

‘Get Away’ b/w ‘Law and Order’ & ‘Fingers Raised’ – Single

This is the debut single by Isle Of Wight-based four-piece, Weeks. Featuring Liam Hodge (formerly of The Jam DRC), Marc Maitland, Nigel Lynk and Sid Ryan. All three tracks are very definitely in the punk/powerpop/mod-rock style; fast-paced, power chords and angry vocals, but there is something a little different that makes these tracks not quite as predictable as you might assume. Granted, some bands can sound a bit ‘samey’ in this genre, but maybe it’s the fact that all four band members supply vocals or it’s the structure of the tunes or it may be they don’t sound like a rehash of mod ’79. Whatever it is, Weeks have come up with a very impressive debut and they are so new, they haven’t yet organised any social media links, so you will have to go via the splendid Time For Action Records to get a taste or buy a copy.

www.timeforaction.de
https://en-gb.facebook.com/Time-For-Action-Records-299324823433736

The Franklys

‘Are You Listening’ – LP

And so, after five years and over 250 reviews for Nutsmag, this album is my final contribution and it almost seems appropriate that it should be The Franklys debut LP. It was April of 2013 that I first reviewed the debut EP from this band. I heard great potential in what they were doing and through these pages, the Nutscast Sessions podcast and at Blues Kitchen for Nutsmag Review Night, I have tried to champion The Franklys because I thought they could ‘make it’. And here they are with a collection of ten songs, some are familiar to die-hard fans (Puppet, Bad News, Weasel for example) and some that are new numbers. Lead track ‘Castaway’ is the very definition of who and what The Franklys are about; brilliant, in-yer-face, all-girl rock and this is a fine a debut album as you could ask for. They are a complete unit with Jennifer Ahlkvist’s attacking vocals, Fanny Broberg’s lead guitar, Zoe Biggs’ solid, dependable bass, all held together by new drummer Lexi Clark. I am extremely proud of  The Franklys because they are proof that Nutsmag really is at the grassroots of music and is not afraid to recognise great new talent and back it with reviews, interviews and gigs. We listened when no one else did, now four years later, mainstreamers like NME and Louder Than War are taking them seriously. Next stop for The Franklys has to be Glastonbury surely?

So thank you all for reading the reviews over the years. I hope you have enjoyed them and they have led you to discover a band that you have become a fan of because they need you as much as you need them. And I just want to thank Rob Bailey and Barry & Denise Pease for all their help.

www.thefranklys.com
facebook.com/thefranklys
twitter.com/TheFranklysUK


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 12 Grant Green 6 of the best

In the pantheon of guitar greats, Grant Green (1935-1979) stands tall. Troubled with health problems and yet hugely prolific throughout the 1960s, his fluid, bluesy and bebop-inspired guitar licks can be found on over 50 recordings for Blue Note during that decade (as leader and sideman). A melodic player of crisp, crystalline linear runs, inspired as much by saxophonist Charlie Parker as guitar hero Charlie Christian, Green’s first recordings were with tenor sax player and fellow St. Louis native Jimmy Forrest for the United label.

Around 1959/60, after being ‘discovered’ by Blue Note stalwart and alto sax man Lou Donaldson (with whom he toured briefly), Green moved to New York where he was introduced to Blue Note’s Alfred Lion. Hugely impressed, Lion started recording him as leader on a glut of sessions (some unreleased until the late 70s) and sideman for Baby Face Willette, Hank Mobley, Stanley Turrentine, Don Wilkerson, Lou Donaldson, Jimmy Smith and Ike Quebec. Though initially fitting perfectly into the soul-jazz organ trio, gospel and Latin formats, Green’s early experience of playing with Coltrane drummer Elvin Jones would in time see him participating in some of Blue Note’s more adventurous recordings by the likes of Herbie Hancock (My Point of View), Bobby Hutcherson (The Kicker), Lee Morgan (Search for the New Land) and Larry Young (Into Somethin’).

Green’s initial period of success at Blue Note ran from 1961-1965. This was followed by a brief flirtation with the Verve label, a period of enforced absence and a return in 1969 for a series of funky but rather patchy LPs later championed by the acid jazz movement. In terms of overall legacy, mention must be made of four or five outstanding LPs he recorded for Blue Note as leader: Grant’s First Stand (1961), Idle Moments (1963/5), Talkin’ About! (1964/5), Street of Dreams (1964/7) and Matador (1964/79). Ranging from soul-jazz through to modal grooves, these are all essential additions to the collections of the thoughtful mod about town (or in her or his rural retreat). However, for those interested either in the dance floor or creating a party atmosphere, here are six tracks culled from the Green back catalogue that were released as singles (edited versions of album tracks). Some, if not all, will be familiar to long-standing participants in the mod and jazz dance scenes.


1. ‘Miss Ann’s Tempo’ (1961) 45 – Blue Note 1811; 33 – From Grant’s First Stand BST 84064
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

From Green’s second Blue Note session (first to be released), ‘Miss Ann’s Tempo’ was also his debut single for the label, coupled with his version of Porter Grainger’s blues standard ‘Ain’t Nobody’s Business if I do’. A trio date, with Ben Dixon on drums and Baby Face Willette on organ, the vibe is similar to Brother Jack Mcduff’s The Honeydripper session for Prestige recorded just a week later and also featuring Dixon and Green. Intriguingly, a track by Eric Dolphy, ‘Miss Ann’, had been recorded with Booker Little the previous October. There’s plenty of righteous call-and-response jousting here between Green’s limpid melodies and Willette’s chugging chords and gospel-drenched soloing. One for the expert jazz dancers!


2. ‘Mambo Inn’ (1963) 45 – Blue Note 1870; 33 – From The Latin Bit BST 84111
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Throughout 1961 and 1962, Green featured on around 25 Blue Note recordings and a handful for Prestige and one or two other labels. Collectors of Blue Note 45s will therefore hear his playing on singles of the period by other artists. Such mid-tempo dance floor tunes include Lou Donaldson’s ‘Watusi Jump’, Dodo Greene’s ‘You are my Sunshine’ and Don Wilkerson’s ‘Camp Meetin’. Two 1962 sessions also led, the following year, to the release of The Latin Bit, from which the Mario Bauzá-Edgar Sampson-Bobby Woodlen tune ‘Mambo Inn’ was culled for the jukebox. An uplifting blend of Afro-Cuban rhythms and bluesy bop, this tune features Willie Bobo and Carlos Valdes on percussion and John Acea on piano.


3. The Cantaloupe Woman (1965) 45 – Verve VK 10361; 33 – From His Majesty King Funk Verve V/V6-8627
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Likely to be heard at many a New Untouchables night, ‘The Cantaloupe Woman’ comes from Green’s only session as leader for the Verve label, 1965’s His Majesty King Funk. While this swings like an upbeat Lee Morgan tune of the era, a new modal undercurrent is present, provided by the Hammond playing of Larry Young, for whom Green had supplied guitar on his debut Blue Note LP Into Somethin! (1964). On that session, Green was reunited with Elvin Jones and sparred alongside the more avant-garde saxophone playing of Sam Rivers. Change was in the air.


4. Big John Patton: Amanda (1966) 45 – Blue Note 1926; 33 – From Got a Good thing Goin’ BST 84229
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Between 1963 and 1966, Green appeared on six Blue Note LPs led by Hammond man Big John Patton. The last in the sequence, Got a Good Thing Goin’ yielded the 45 ‘Amanda’, a cooking cover of the Duke Pearson tune that kicked off his 1964 date Wahoo! Although his initial role is to vamp a rhythm, Green lets loose a cracking solo half-way through the album version. One of those addictive melodies that it’s good to know exist in edited format for the club night and in longer versions for domestic pursuits. At over nine minutes, the Pearson version (without Green) is especially wonderful as a soundtrack to preparing vegetables.


5. Ain’t it Funky Now (1970) 45 – Blue Note 1960; 33 – From Green is Beautiful BST 84342
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

On July 1, 1966, Grant Green played on Stanley Turrentine’s Rough ‘n’ Tumble, a date including the wonderful singles: ‘And Satisfy’ (Blue Note 1929) and ‘Feeling Good’ (Blue Note 1933). Apart from a solitary 1967 date later released on Cobblestone as Iron City (1972), he would then be absent until early 1969. By this time, rock, boogaloo and funky soul were entering new dialogues with jazz; the period from 1969-1972 would see Green return as a key figure in the groove-based styles later defined as acid jazz. Much of 1969 was seen recording with Prestige artists such as Rusty Bryant, Charles Kynard and Don Patterson and Reuben Wilson’s enjoyable Blue Note date Love Bug. By October, he was leading his own sessions, one of which, 1970’s Green is Beautiful, gave us the monumental groove ‘Ain’t it Funky Now’, released as a Parts 1 & 2 single. Idris Muhammad’s marvellous drumming helps make this take on James Brown a memorable one.


6. Sookie Sookie (1970) 45 (edit): – Blue Note 1965; 33 – From ‘Alive!’ BST 84360
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

From the subsequent Blue Note LP, recorded live in August 1970 at the Cliche Lounge in Newark (New Jersey as opposed to Nottinghamshire), Don Covay and Steve Cropper’s 1965 ‘B’ side is given a full funk workout. Green, organist Ronnie Foster, and tenor sax player Claude Bartee improvise righteously over a solid groove laid down by Idris Muhammad, Joseph Armstrong on congas, vibes player Willie Bivens and Foster on organ bass pedals. Some of the material Green worked on with Blue Note after 1969 was not as strong as this, but overall he could be proud of the legacy he left for the label from 1960 to 1972. We’ll be looking at more legends of the label in the future. Until then, enjoy these tunes.



 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

June 30, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Les Darlings

We recently caught up with the Les Darlings (from Paris, London, Copenhagen, & Bordeaux) for a nice chat for NUTSMAG, here is what they had to say…

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Well, we started the band in March 2016. Kitty runs a record label, Lust Record, originally created to re-issue 60’s obscurity. At the time, I was too shy to ask those talented guys to form a band when we met during concerts and festivals but Kitty cheered us up to play together so we finally met in Hamburg for songwriting and created more songs than expected. Originally the idea was to make a 45, but we got enough material to release an LP.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

I think we all deeply love all kind of 50’s/60 music, from BlueBeat, crude R&B and naturally ’66 garage and Mod sound.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

As I live in London now, I can tell that the Cavemen are just one of the most outrageously good band I’ve seen recently! The Embrooks, King Salami, etc, etc! From Paris, French Boutik, The Wave Chargers….

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I think the whole 60’s scene is held by a handful but deeply passionate people. It’s an endless story, every decade you got a bunch of young lions who discover and embrace that style. Les Gry Gry, The Arrogants, all in their glorious 20’s… I wish we had more bands like this. Now synth punk is back yet again… I hope they get quickly tired of all that 80’s Kawai keyboards (ha! ha!)

5. How would you describe the style you play?

I think we got one boot in the 60’s, another one in the present. Makes no sense for me to be a tribute band or so, but it doesn’t mean that we are untrue to our influences. All the great bands I loved always added a little something on top of the rest. Just to be different. Who wants to listen to another cover of ‘Shapes of things’? The best example for me is The Youth, The Urges or The Jackets. Our main goal is to create some heavily influenced ’66 moody garage songs that you can really dance along to.

6. What are your live shows like?

It can get really sweaty, especially when you play in a 3 pieces wool suit! Thomas is a Christic frontman, he totally gives himself on stage. We actually have to try to protect him from the action. We love to play together, and the public feels it.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Everything from the Peebles comp, Back from the Grave or High in the Mid Sixties… We play a couple covers that Kitty threw on the table, especially ‘Lily’ from an obscure Californian band called Drusalee & The Dead… In fact, we play live the records we cannot afford to buy haha. Rob also suggested us to play a French cover and it was definitely a good idea. The goal is to create our own thing of course.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Aside from 60’s culture, we got our secret garden…

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Allah wrote them for us. We just need to listen to Allah, and then the songs pop out by themselves. Seriously it’s a collective work, Thomas takes care of the lyrics as he’s writing poetry too.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

My favorite is ‘Hey Baby’, ‘I know David Peter really likes ‘Make her mine’. If we don’t like a song anymore we just throw it out and write another one that’s as simple as that. I love too many songs to choose only one. My favorite song changes every day or so.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

We go to gigs or festivals as often as we can. It is like an International Brotherhood.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Bringing back Dorian alive from Hamburg.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

As we live far away from each other, we can only rehearse one or two hours before each gig. Of course, it’s always a disaster, to begin with. But something magic always happens when we hit the stage, thanks to the hundreds of gigs we each did with our previous bands!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I think it’s really bad in the so-called ‘Mass Media’. We can only pay homage to the few passionate people like you to shed a light on this very sharp scene.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I really love The Wrong Society, they released a couple of singles that really nailed it. Of course The Youth, The Jackets… The Teamsters, The Urges too.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We started the thing with Dennis Rux as a producer and we gonna continue with him. His studio is located in front of a 24/7 gas station loaded with the greatest German lager. Decent döner round the corner too. Beside of this Dennis is perfect gentlemen who own one of the best analog studios between planet Earth and Dagoba system. Apart from Toe Rag and Circo Perrotti, i don’t know where we could have recorded it. It was absolutely normal to do it in Mono from the start for him ha! ha!

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We need to work together to finish our LP which is almost completed! We’re also gonna have an organ player with us, Mr Dècheman, a great entertainer too, so you can expect some more action on stage. We still are a fresh new band but people look interested in our work, we got a lot of contacts to play all across Europe. As we say in France, ‘Bientôt dans une épicerie près de chez vous’ (soon at the juke joint near you).

Band Members: Thomas (vox) Dorian (drums) Pascal (guitar) David Peter (bass)

Discography: 2016 – Single: ‘Le Tourbillon / Hey Baby’ –  Lust Records

Social Networks: FACEBOOK HERE


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Garage Interviews Picks RnB Scene Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Melange

We recently caught up with the Melange (from Spain) for a nice chat for NUTSMAG, here is what they had to say…

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together

We have been playing in different bands the last 20 years in many groups like Lüger, Rip Kc, Bucles, Magic Bus, Los Imposibles, Cachalote… We started to play together as Melange two years ago. Miguel was the one who connected all of us. He had a bunch of songs and they were the beginning of the band.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

Our influences are wide. I think it could began with Jazz, Blues, Folk, R&B, Soul and Funk passing through Psychedelic music, Avant Garde, Tropicalia, African Music, Anatolian Rock, Flamenco, Latin, Punk, Electronic and many more, till the borders difumine!

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Yes, for sure. First, we recommend Mohama Saz, a kind of Spanish Turkish style. Alberto Montero a folk-pop singer with brilliant records…

4. Tell us about the 60’s/underground music scene from Spain?

In Spain, we had some very good bands like Los Bravos, Los Salvajes, Los Ángeles, Los Pekenikes emulating the British and American style (ye-ye bands) and some other people making a deep cultural approach into our culture like Pedro Iturralde, Paco de Lucía, Sabicas. Then in the late sixties we have Spanish prog style with bands like Smash, Máquina, Cerebrum, Storm, Pan y Regaliz, Música Dispersa, Evolution who leaded us to a significant productive period in the seventies that came along with political changes with bands as Triana a many more…

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Ops! A tricky question to answer. We visit lots of styles, breaking any style rule. We try to build our own style mixing all that we have in our polluted heads.

6. What are your live shows like?

We have 5 people. 2 guitars, keyboards, bass and drums. Sometimes four voices at the same time. We play loud, trying to make solid sounds with a strong rhythm section adding colour with evocating a surrealistic melody. Sometimes unexpected changes and lots of subliminal intention.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We love tons of different music. But we don’t play any version for the moment. I would love to play a song from Jeannette or Edu Lobo.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Photography, Films, Plastic arts and literature in general. Then the present and life is the most important influence.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody in the band write the song. Sometimes the song is already constructed by one of us, but there’s always space left for the others to say something else or take the subject to another place.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Saquesufah! True Spanish style with lot of garlic on it. It´s short. It´s direct and so rich in terms of melody and rhythm and it´s fascinating to play live on the stage.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I think that we are tried to talk about underground. We have been living this shit for years and still doing it. We still try to change what we don´t like with no concessions.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The biggest challenge is to find the time to play as much as we can.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We try to rehearse once a week and play as much as possible.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I should not be necessary to answer that the music of the media is just commercial focused bullshit, no art, just cheap and superficial entertainment, that’s nothing new, but there have always been local alternative radio stations, and from some years now many podcasts in internet, like for example “Músicas sin prejuicios” here in Spain.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Underground bands… thousands of them. Mainstream… Kraftwerk, they are a band, which all Melange members like a lot.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

At the moment, we have recorded two LP’s with Carlos Díaz Requena, we are very satisfied with the results that we don’t think about anybody else. We all like to record at the countryside, north or south, doesn’t matter, the best for us is an old country house where we can bring our family and our equipment for recording.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Our new album will be released on September 2017. Our plan is still trying to create beautiful music and share it with people all around the World. We hope to make even better recordings. We are so excited about our summer gigs in Quintanhilla Rock (Portugal) and Euro Ye-Ye in Gijón (Spain) also we can’t wait to play in the Zaragoza Psych Fest and BAM (Barcelona) this September.

Band Members: Adrián Ceballos (Drums and vocals), Daniel Fernández (Bass and vocals), Mario Zamora (Keyboards, Synths), Miguel Rosón (Guitar and vocals), Sergio Ceballos (Guitar and vocals)

Discography: 2016 “Melange” (2LP) Discos Tere

Main Site: melangemadrid.bandcamp.com

Social Networks:
Facebook Here!
Instagram Here!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

June 28, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Interviews Picks Psych RnB Tags:, ,
0 Comment