Club Soul

Marta Ren (Newbreed)

Marta Ren & The Groovelvets are based in Porto, Portugal with current band members: Marta Ren (vox), Hugo Danin (drums), Bruno Macedo (guitar), Sérgio Marques (bass), Sérgio Alves (keyboards), Manu Idhra (percussion), Fábio Almeida ( tenor sax), Nelson Ferreira (trumpet) and Hugo Marinheiro (baritone sax)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

I started to sing professionally at 16 years of age, my first band “Sloppy Joe” were together, playing for 10 years, then came “The Bombazines”, I was already thinking of doing a solo album before the band finally ended. Three years ago, I started finding and talking to the musicians that I needed to make the album that I wanted to and I named them “The Groovelvets”, and then the adventure started!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Classic soul and funk, that’s what unites us. We also like other genres but what we really have in common is the love for that core music.

 03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Almost every band coming from Daptone Records, Record Kicks or Timmion Records, I think the reason it’s obvious, they are releasing great classic soul and funk often with a modern twist.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

In the 60’s in Portugal, most of the bands played a lot of covers with adapted lyrics in Portuguese. We also have our famous ‘Fado’ singers and our traditional Portuguese songwriters.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Classic soul and Funk.

06. What are your live shows like?

Normally we have nine musicians on stage, giving it all they’ve got. They’re energetic shows, you have little spaces to breathe, but we came to get you right after you catch your breath.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

I love music in general , if I like a song it doesn’t matter what genre, but my main influences are soul and funk singers or bands. We play a cover from The Doors and another by Lucille Mathis. I despise everything that’s not done with truth and soul.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

I like arts in general , I studied graphic arts from my 10º to 12º grade, but I think what influences me more are the movies.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I always wrote my own lyrics and melodies, I think it’s important to really feel what you’re singing, the compositions came from different composers, some from the producer “New Max”, others from the bass player “Sérgio Marques” others from the guitar player “Bruno Macedo”, one from “Lino Matos” and other from “Eurico Amorim” former Bombazines. I mainly deal with life, with love relationships, frustration, unconformity, sometimes I write about friends stories or stories from movies that I relate to.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

That’s a tough one… it depends, on Monday my favorite is “So Long” and “I wanna go back”, Tuesday “Let’s talk about the kids” and “2 kinds of men”, Wednesday “Release Me” and “It’s today”, Thursday “I’m coming home” and “Smiling Faces” and Friday “Be ma Fela” and “Don’t Look”. It’s so hard to say one, I have many, the first it came to my mind was “Try a little Tenderness” from Otis Redding.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

If you asked me that 10 years ago, I could answer, now I don’t really know. I’m very focused on my family my dogs, my rehearsals with the band, I always try to suggest new arrangements for the songs or live show.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Every record or show are big challenges, but I think the biggest is yet to come.

 13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We try to rehearse every week, with or without shows. Playing live, it really depends on various things, but normally we have three/four shows per month, it depends on the season. We have a lot of interesting shows coming up in Spain, France and England and at this moment we have a new video for “Release Me”.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s the same I think in other similar subjects or arts, normally they cover with high-attention what they are told to do or paid to do, not what has real quality and new potential interest. It’s supposedly dangerous to cover interesting things, people could get clever with that and have their own new ideas!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The past days I spend listening to the new Red Hot Chilli Peppers album ‘The Getaway’.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Every record or producer has their own charm, I don’t really have a favourite. When I start recording I always feel like it’s going to be the first and last thing that I’m going to do in my entire life.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

I expect to play this album as much as I can live, everywhere, all over the world, and make enough money to pay my bills and make the next record. Fortunately I have more than I expected , in Portugal a few new Festivals (not despising the other gigs, every gig is important and interesting to me) and I’m excited to go to Euro Yé Yé and Blues Kitchen and Brighton Weekender.

Discography:
2002 – SINGLE ‘An Easy Night’s Day’,
2003 – EP ‘A Watchjob Apple’,
2004 – LP ‘The Profile Fillers Sing Your Destruction’, 2007 LP ‘Jimmy’

Web Links:
profilefillers.com
facebook.com/marta.ren
instagram.com/martaren_groovelvets
facebook.com/MartaRenTheGroovelvets
myspace.com/profilefillers
twitter.com/martagrooveren
soundcloud.com/profilefillers

 


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 13, 2016 By : Category : Bands Club Soul Europe Front Page Interviews Modern RnB Scene Tags:, , , , , , ,
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UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Collectors Corner 2

“In my lonely room – UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside”

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After beginning to make bigger leaps into the UK record buying markets in 1963, the Tamla / Motown / Gordy group found themselves under the umbrella of the EMI subsidiary label, Stateside in October of the same year. Stateside was formed in mid 1962 by EMI to release singles under licence from American labels such as Swan, Wand and Vee-Jay in a similar style to Decca records very successful London American imprint. Licensing tracks from many independent USA labels ensured Stateside released a whole slew of great current rhythm’n’blues and soul releases, and the label soon endeared itself to mods and soul fans on this side of the Atlantic. As well as having hits with Freddy Cannon and Gene Pitney, early releases included such stellar names as The Isley Brothers, Jimmy Reed, Chuck Jackson and The Shirelles. When Oriole’s UK contract with Motown ran out the previous month the new distributor launched its first release on Stateside on 11th October 1963 with Martha and the Vandellas all time classic “Heatwave” (SS228). When sales were quite brisk, the label then released three more singles the following month by Little Stevie Wonder, Mary Wells and Marvin Gaye’s fantastic “Can I get a witness” (SS243).

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By January 1964 Motown was causing quite a stir on these shores, being regularly name checked by the UK’s biggest pop combo, The Beatles, who took Mary Wells on tour with them and mentioning Motown artists numerous times in interviews. Add to this the burgeoning underground mod and soul club scene which was hungry for the dance floor friendly sounds coming out of Detroit and it wouldn’t be long before Stateside had a bona-fide hit single on their hands. Between January and April 1964, no less than twelve 45’s were released in the UK, including tracks by The Miracles, The Marvelettes and debut UK releases from The Temptations, “The way you do the things you do” (SS278), and the group that would soon hit the top spot, The Supremes “When the lovelight starts shining thru his eyes (SS257). On May 8th 1964 Stateside released a hook laden single written by Smokey Robinson, and it was sung by Motown’s number one lady of the time, Mary Wells, “My Guy” (SS288). Two weeks later, on the 21st May 1964, “My guy” entered the UK charts at number 37, finally hitting the heady heights of number 5 the following month. Berry Gordy’s company had now scored their first of many big hit singles in Britain.

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Between May ’64 and March 1965 Stateside issued a further 30 singles, including debuts from The Velvelettes, Earl Van Dyke, Four Tops and Kim Weston. Most of these were steady sellers, with titles by Marvin Gaye, Martha and the Vandellas, Mary Wells and The Temptations all scoring top fifty placings. On 28th August, and eight months after their initial flop, The Supremes “Where did our love go” (SS327) was released to an impressed public, who bought the single in droves, sending it number three in the chart. Less than two months later, and capitalising on the nation’s newfound love with the sounds from Motor City, “Baby love” (SS350) was released and hit the top spot soon after, with the group actually having two songs in the top ten at the same time for one week in October! Unfortunately not all releases were massive hits and some are now hard to find. These always sell for good prices when they appear on the market, especially in mint condition. Martha & The Vandellas “In my lonely room” (SS305), Brenda Holloway “Every little bit hurts” (SS307), The Tempations “Why you wanna make me blue” (SS348), Earl Van Dyke “Soul stomp” (SS357), Kim Weston “A little more love” (SS359), Four Tops “Without the one you love” (SS371), Carolyn Crawford “When someone’s good to you” (SS384) and Tony Martin “Talkin’ to your picture” (SS394) are probably the hardest to find, especially the last two. Also coming with a ridiculous price tag, all the Stateside EMI singles were sent to pluggers and radio DJ’s as red and white label demonstration discs and all are extremely collectable, and valuable too!

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EMI was also loved to release EP’s and hundreds of them were released across their labels from the early ’50’s to the late ’60’s. After no EP releases on Fontana or Oriole, Stateside bit the bullet and released no less than five of them in the time they were licensing material. Little Stevie Wonder was afforded the only single artist EP, “I call it pretty music but old people call it the blues” (SE1014) which is ridiculously hard to find. There were also four editions of a cracking new EP series, concentrating on material otherwise unavailable in the UK on 45, “R & B Chartmakers”. The series featured some great tracks, including two stellar previously USA only releases from Eddie Holland, “Just ain’t enough love” and “Leaving here”, all came in amazing picture sleeves too. Although steady sellers they’re hard to find in great condition nowadays, expect to pay between £50-£100 for each of them. By March 1965 the label was as big, if not bigger than Atlantic over here in the UK so it came as no surprise that, with a little help from super fan Dave Godin, Berry Gordy signed an exclusive deal with EMI to set up a brand new record company in Britain, Tamla Motown records. On 19th March 1965, clad in an iconic orange and white company sleeve, record stores took release of a new disc, TMG 501, “Stop! in the name of love” by The Supremes and the rest, as they say, is history.


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
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Nige Brown – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 11 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with Nige Brown recently who lives in Stafford to talk about his passion for good music.

Current Residency: Top of the Nags – Manchester

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

As a young man in the 60’s my first interest in “music” was the Beatles which influenced me into listening to Tamla Motown, as their early albums were influenced by writers such as Smokey Robinson and Arthur Alexander. My first “soul club” was Stafford Rugby club in 1970. The Dj’s played the sounds of the Twisted Wheel in Manchester. Unfortunately I never got to go to the “Wheel” but I did become a regular visitor to The Catacombs in Wolverhampton and also the now iconic “The Golden Torch” in Stoke-on-Trent

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Lots of local soul nights but my first major venue was as TSOP
Prestwich Manchester.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I have worked on the soul scene for a number of years doing all the major venues such as Kings Hall Stoke, Tony’s Empress Blackburn,  Bretby, Blackpool Tower and Winter Gardens, Stafford TOTW, Prestatyn weekenders, also Ibiza, Sweden, Italy, Germany, and Spain but to answer the question the most memorable spot for me was playing the 100 club in London.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Having to stop a playing record because someone who had consumed more beer than he could handle actually fell onto the decks.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Soul Sam, the reason being he always been innovative from day one and still is even though he is now in his early 70’s. He still has the same drive and passion to champion new sounds.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I always trust my own judgement in exploration and sampling of what is out there, taking into account new trends but I also take into account the need to play with a responsible attitude in that I try to satisfy the paying public.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

My first best ever find was Barbara McNair “You’re gonna love my baby” on UK Tamla Motown TMG544 in a Stafford junk shop in the early 70’s. My best ever discovery was a sound by Terri Mathews “Round & Round” on the mystical “Preview” label.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Without a doubt Marvin Gaye.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I collect anything that sounds soulful, my first criteria is that it has to be good to the ears and feet. I don’t impose any rules upon myself with regards to label artist and genre. The only set criteria are that it is an “original” release.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

This year all over the UK, Rome and the South of France, see flyers and internet for details. I also have a number of mixcloud sets available on the internet.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Sandy Golden Your love is everything on the Masterpiece record label.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current top five spins:
1. Four Tracks – Like my love for you – Mandingo
2. Aquamen – Line and track – Hiback demo
3. Lil Major Williams – Girl don’t leave me – Williams111
4. Johnny Rogers – Gonna make a change- Amon
5. Little Tommy – Baby can’t you see – Sound of Soul

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
1. Jackie Lee – Darkest Days – ABC
2. The Invitations – What’s wrong with me baby – UK Stateside demo
3. The Sharpees – Tired of being lonely – UK Stateside demo
4. The Charades – Key to my Happiness – MGM
5. Willie Tee – Walking up a one way street – Nola demo
6. Maxine Brown – Let me give you my lovin – Wand demo
7. Masqueraders – That’s the same thing – Soul Town
8. Patti Young – Head and Shoulders – Enstrat
9. JJ Barnes – Please let me in – Rictic demo
10. Jackie Wilson – You brought about a change in me – Brunswick demo

Next Club Spots:
Soulstew – Manchester
Westward Ho Weekender – Devon
Different Strokes – Manchester
Go Go Children – Bristol
Toon Allnighter –Newcastle
Horse & Jockey – Doncaster
Trabant Bar – Rome

Le Beat Bespoké 11 – London (Easter 2016) 24th to 27th March – see all the details HERE!

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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March 2, 2016 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Music UK Tags:, ,
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Simon Bridger – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 1 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Got into music first in the mid 7os via the radio & my old man’s tapes he used to get via a tape club, some really bad ones in there but a couple I enjoyed were Roy Orbison’s “Crying” and David Bowie’s “Station to Station”. First seriously started getting into stuff when I bought my first single, The Ruts “Babylon’s Burning” and then into The Jam & Two Tone.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

First spot was at a Brighton Indie Club called the Basement but my first serious modernist spot was at “Modesty” in Brighton in the mid nineties, think I got the spot because I was friends with the people who ran it and I’d also just acquired Helen Troy’s “I think I love you” which was a real big deal at the time.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Most memorable was when I got given a warm up spot at the now infamous “Capitol Soul Club”, this was a really big deal at the time as it was the number one Northern Soul club in the country and there were plenty of big name DJs out there that would have killed for a spot. In an act of un-paralleled generosity Alan Hanscombe said he’d do my warm up spot and I could do his main spot which was incredible and I’ve never forgotten it.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Nothing really bad that I can remember, I’ve had to deal with a few idiots over the years like we all have but I’m fairly thick-skinned and diplomatic which tends to get me out of any tricky or bad DJing situations.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I’d have to go back to the Capitol Soul Club days, David Flynn, Alan Hanscombe, Irish Greg and Carl Fortnum, the most perfect blend of DJs for a night. Two others that spring to mind that had a big influence on my taste and were very original in their choices are Ian Clark and Andy Rix.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I like a mix of emotion and impact, The Four Tops were my blue print, but I have always had a love for slightly left field stuff of the likes that were played at Stafford but saying that I like a fresh sounding classic also, I try to blend these aspects into my set.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

My best ever find although someone else found it for me was Ernie Wheelright’s “In your arms” @ Gaye, I’d been after a copy for a decade, tried all round the world to get a copy and then a casual conversation with a well know DJ from London and I was astonished to find that he had a copy. After some negotiation we settled on a price and I then had the agonizing wait for the postman to deliver it.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I’d have to say Levi Stubbs and when my sister was pregnant, I had no hesitation in suggesting the name, young Levi is now 11!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, but I do seem to have a liking for certain labels that generally play my particular kind of sound, Harthon is one that springs to mind.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Just doing sporadic stuff at the moment, my last gig was in Brighton at Steve Rowland’s “Grits & Gravy”. I’ve become quite choosy as I’ve got older & will only do something if I think I can add something to it.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Probably, Soul Incorporated – My proposal @ Coconut Groove.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks:

Soul Incorporated – My proposal @ Coconut Groove
Mello Souls – We can make it @ Mello
Blue Jays – Point of view @ Jay
Darrow Fletcher – Infatuation @ Jacklyn
Roy Roberts – Got to have all your love @ Ninandy
Four Tops – Bernadette @ Tamla Motown
Tangeers – Let my heart & soul be free @ Okeh
Rita & the Tiaras – Gone with the wind is my love @ Dore
Tony Middleton – To the ends of the earth @ MGM
Gene Toones – What more do you want @ Simco

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Ruby – Feminine ingenuity @ Gold Token
Darrow Fletcher – Infatuation @ Jacklyn
Shawn Robinson – My dear heart @ Minit
Stevie Wonder – Every time I see you I go wild 2 Tamla Motown
Tony Middleton – To the ends of the earth @ MGM

Next Club Spots: New Untouchables, Brighton Mod Weekender.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2015 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music RnB Tags:,
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Gary Wall – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 2 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Always grew up listening to the various sounds of the 60s as both my parents were Mods in the mid 60s, so I guess you could say I was born a Mod.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I think it must have been the Adi Club in Chesterfield.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Has to be the Prestatyn Soul Weekender, playing with some of the countries best Soul DJs and with crowds of 1000+ easily wow, what a buzz!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

(Laughs) So far I’ve been very lucky and (fingers crossed) things will stay that way!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Ian Gringham has to be one of them,his knowledge insight and passion of all things mod he certainly knows his stuff. Also Pid from Brum Beat, I love the way he plays and his pure brilliance behind the decks. Also without a doubt the late Derek Allen, he inspired me so much with the records he played such a massive loss to the soul scene. (RIP)

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I think over the years listening to great DJ’s playing stuff like British Beat, British R‘n’B, Soul, American R‘n’B etc; as certainly shaped the path I play nowadays.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Unfortunately I am yet to discover a rarity for myself, but I do live in hope!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Without a doubt The Beatles, especially John Lennon. John was and is a true legend, his song writing his vocals, I love everything about the man!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Labels I usually collect are Decca and Columbia, but I do have a wide range of labels in my collection from all 60s genres.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Hubble Bubble, a Mod/60s inspired club which is held on the last saturday of the month upstairs at Theropewalk, 107-111 Derby Road, Nottingham.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I’ve been looking for years with no luck for one record in particular – so if anybody out there as a copy of ‘Meanie Genie’ by Tony Brook and the Breakers please get in touch!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks:

Peters Faces – Susie Q (Piccadilly)
Sonny Til – Hey Little Woman (CP Parker Records)
Comin Home Baby – Barron Knights (Columbia)
I Surrender – Bonny St Claire (Phillips)
My Love is your Love – The Isley Bros (Motown)
In my Lonely Room – The Action (Parlophone Demo)
Day Tripper – The Beatles (Parlophone)
Mary, Mary – The Monkees (RCA)
If I get Lucky Someday – Duffy Power (Parlophone)
In The City – Charles Dickens (Pye)

Top 5 Tracks:

St Louis Union – Easy side story (Decca)
The Measles – The Kicks (Columbia)
The Knickerbockers – One Track Mind (Challenge)
Zu Zu Blues Band – Zu Zu Man (A&M)
The Mccoys – Say those Magic Words (Bang)

Social Links:

Facebook: Here & Here

Next Club Spots: Brighton New untouchables Weekender.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2015 By : Category : Beat Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Dean Thatcher – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 7 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We recently caught up with DJ & Club Promoter, (Studio 45, Hot Source and Diggin’ Deep) DJ Dean Thatcher who travels between London and Margate a fair amount these days and who was pretty excited to be invited to play at the ‘Margate Mod Weekender’. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My Mum tells me I could dance before I could walk. Earliest recollections are The Kinks, The Rolling Stones and Elvis Presley.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The local youth club when I was 14 years old.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Very difficult to name one, I’ve had so many great times over the years, from dingy basements to festivals and being on tour with bands.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Passing out through exhaustion mid-set and getting taken to hospital!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

There’s loads of top DJ’s doing-the-do including Alan Handscombe, Jo Wallace, Dr Bob Jones, Eddie Piller, French Fred, Tony Jackson, Swingin’ Kitten, Emmet Keane, Gavin Page, Richard Epps, Rocky, Stephen Saunders, Neil Barker and Adrian Jae to name just a few. In my opinion however – a great DJ takes you to another level!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’m willing to listen to all styles and I love to hear something I’ve never heard before, so keeping open minded is very important, but there is good and bad in all genres. The most important thing about a record for me is the artists have to sound like they mean it.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Trawling through my older cousins 45 collections and discovering all these exotic reggae labels such as Camel, Crab, Downtown, Punch, Treasure Isle etc. Also my Step-dad’s Soul LP’s that really turned me on to Marvin Gaye, Otis Redding, The Four Tops and James Brown.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

My favourite artists are Marvin Gaye and David Bowie. I am influenced by everything I hear.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

If I hear something that floats my boat then I have to have it.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The last Saturday of every month at Studio 45, The Social, London W1. Plus guest spots around the U.K. & Europe.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

The rarest and most expensive one ever. Then I would sell it and have a fantastic holiday from it!

12. Please give us your Top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Marvin Gaye – What’s Going On (Tamla Motown 1971)
David Bowie – Ziggy Stardust (RCA 1972)
Van Morrison – Madame George (Warner Bros 1968)
John Barry – Midnight Cowboy (United Artists 1969)
Lamont Dozier – Why Can’t We Be Lovers (Invictus 1972)
The Damned – New Rose (Stiff 1976)
The Four Tops – Do What You Gotta Do (Tamla Motown 1969)
Glen Campbell – Wichita Lineman (Capitol 1968)
Otis Redding – My Girl (Atco 1965)
Wire – Three Girl Rhumba (Harvest 1977)

Current Top 5 Tracks:
Razzy – I Hate Hate (MGM 1974)
Harvey – Anyway You Wanta (Tri-Phi 1962)
The Upsetters – For A Few Dollars More (Camel 1969)
The Enchantments – I’m In Love With Your Daughter (Faro 1965)
The Melody Enchanters – You Send Me (Doctor Bird 1966)

Weblinks:
www.facebook.com/studio45

Next Club Spots: Margate Mod Weekender, Bognor Soul All Dayer, Ibiza Soul Week, Studio 45, Diggin’ Deep, Skagate Weekender, Hot Source, Margate Soul Weekend, Bournemouth Soul Weekend.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music RnB Scene UK Tags:, , ,
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Jim Watson – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 4 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

We recently caught up with DJ Jim Watson who was pretty excited to be invited to play at the ‘Margate Mod Weekender’. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got my first portable record player for my 10th birthday and was given The Four Seasons Greatest hits with it, then went out and bought “Teenage Rampage” by The Sweet and a Suzi Quatro 45! There were always LPs around at home, The Beatles, Elvis, Beach Boys, and those chart buster compilations in the 70’s. The love affair with Soul and RnB came much later, after Punk which was a full on obsession for about 3 years, 77 to early 79.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Regency Suite Rhythm and Soul Club in East London, must have been 1982. Ray Patriotic and Eddie Piller gave me a break.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Tough one to call but would go with the first time I DJ’d at Hipshaker on the Isle of Wight. I absolutely loved it! The place was heaving, everyone dancing and a fantastic buzz all night, sweat dripping off the ceiling.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Was asked to do a Northern Soul set at a friend’s wedding on the basis he would like it. It was a disaster and about 100 people walked outside to have a ciggie and drink as soon as I dropped the needle on my first record. I toughed it out for 30 mins and handed over to the wedding DJ who got them all back with “Hey Ya” by Outkast. They obviously wanted to shake it like a polaroid picture!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Very hard to call this one, my tastes run across the RnB, Club Soul and Northern Soul spectrum and there are superb DJ’s catering for all those genres. I’d go with Ady Croasdell as my all-time favorite DJ because he’s been uncovering quality Soul music for decades. He always plays something I like and the impact he’s made with Kent Records will never be surpassed for quality output. Bill Kealy plays some monumental RnB records that always do the business, and Alan Handscombe-McGrath also puts great sets together that link the RnB harder sounds to a more soulful feel. To me it’s all on the same trajectory from 1958 to about 1972 musically.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Oh wow! For me as a club goer the best nights out are when most of the records are ones I don’t know, then I go find out what they are and try and track them down and then fit them into my set. I get that you have to slip the tried and tested crowd pleasers in to keep the floor moving but I look forward to DJing with records I just bought, not playing the ones I’ve had since 1982.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I can remember poring over photo copied record lists from Soul Bowl and going to the phone box to reserve them, being super excited to find things like “Can’t Satisfy” by The Impressions on Stateside which to me in 1982 would have been a big deal! I’ve never had one of those great moments when I find a £332.81 record in the £3.33 bargain bin but I was pleased to discover “Come On and Stop” by Marv Johnson from a dealer in San Francisco about a year before I heard it regularly played out.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

My favorite Soul singers are Sam Cooke, Jackie Wilson and Otis Redding. Just sublime vocally, all three. Influence wise I’d say the Motown Chartbusters LPs got me hooked on uptempo Detroit Soul as a callow youth and then after those the early Kent LPs opened my eyes to some real quality tunes.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I never buy a record for DJing that I wouldn’t dance to myself if I heard it out at a club, whether it’s classed as RnB, Soul, Northern, Latin, whatever. As I said to me it’s all on the same path from 1958 onwards so my playbox would have tunes from all of those styles. Besides Tamla/Motown, I do seem to have a lot of stuff on the Brunswick label though and I’m also struggling to think of a bad record that came out on Mirwood.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Soul on the Square is on regularly at The venue, Malet Street, London, WC1E 7HY and I’m lucky enough to be asked to guest at various clubs in and around London in between.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Currently it’s “You Don’t Even Know My Name” by The Hy-Tones on Southern Artists. Anyone donating one you know where to find me!

12. Please give us your Top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Pretty Girl – The Phonetics
You Don’t Even Know My Name – The Hy-Tones
You Don’t Love Me Anymore – Johnny Caswell
I Can’t Get Enough Of Your Love – Johnny Sayles
Let Me Give You My Lovin‘ – Maxine Brown
Shoes – Bobby Bland
Girl Across The Street – Moses Smith
Hey Sister – Monguito Santamaria
Girl (Why You Wanna Make Me Blue) – Temptations
Turn Back The Hands of Time – Vernon Garrett

Current Top 5 Tracks:
What About Me – The Visitors
Never Learned To Dance – Harvey Averne
Come on Little Darlin’ – The Dynels
Ain’t Nobody’s Business – Ernie Mawbray
Boys and Girls Together – Johnny & Expressions

Weblinks:
facebook.com/soulonthesquare
Twitter: @soulonthesquare

Next Club Spots: Margate Mod Weekender


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 27, 2015 By : Category : Articles Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music RnB Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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Ben Ollins – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

We recently caught up with DJ Ben Ollins  who was pretty excited to be invited to play at the ‘Margate Mod Weekender’. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My older brother introduced me to great records when I was very young. I loved the Beatles, Rolling Stones and the Monkees thanks to him, also T Rex, Slade and Glam stuff – chart music at the time. When the’70s Rockabilly revival scene came along, he and his friends got me listening to that too. I didn’t really know that it was any different to anything else, it was just more stuff I liked. Later there was Pebbles and that set me on the path.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

At The Frat Shack, probably 1991 or ‘92. Those were the best nights.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

A few years ago I played records at my friends’ wedding in New Orleans on Halloween. Outside, the streetcars were packed with people in crazy fancy dress costumes; inside, the bar was jammed solid, everyone dancing – on chairs, on the bar, everywhere. It felt like the whole room was shaking. It was a lot of fun, a very happy experience.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

None stand out as notably terrible, but I’ve certainly cleared my fair share of dance floors.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Three from New York/New Jersey. Todd-O-Phonic Todd, in-person or on air at WFMU, the great Jonathan Toubin and the inimitable Josh Styles. All three have great records and enthusiasm to match.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I used to do a night called The Hideout with my friend Liam Watson, he was never concerned about playing things to impress people, he just wanted them to have fun. That was a lesson, that it’s about playing things people can dance to, not just things you want to show off. The other thing is that I don’t like to hear the same stuff night after night, I don’t even like to hear the same sort of music all night. And finally, my golden rule is that there’s no evening that can’t be improved by hearing Chuck Berry’s Let It Rock.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

There have been a few good ones. Back in the time of paper lists I used to buy blind quite a bit – a stupid expression, it’s really buying deaf – picking stuff up that seemed it would be good, even when I didn’t know it. I got Oscar & The Majestics’ No Chance Baby that way. It was so great hearing it for the first time having no real idea how it would sound and it was incredible! That was a wonderful surprise. Often it didn’t work out so well.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Kicks, which was the magazine Billy and Miriam from Norton Records used to do. When I first bought Kicks (issue #3, from the much missed Compendium Books in Camden Town), it had Link Wray, The Banshees, The Phantom – just great stuff, regardless of genre. That, and also all of Tim Warren’s incredible compilations; Back From The Grave is the benchmark for me.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I’ve always had a pretty tight focus on US garage 45s. That’s been my main love for over 30 years now. I also buy rock‘n’roll instrumentals and R&B – Pittsburgh sounds. I try to curb any desire to complete an artist, I don’t want to be one of those guys with multiple issues of the same 45 all with minor variations, even though that’s an urge I can all too easily understand.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’ve been co-running a club in Soho playing the above Pittsburgh/Mad Mike style stuff for years now, and that’s pretty much it for me. It’s called The Stag O Lee Preservation Society & Drinking Club and is on every other Wednesday, at 57 Greek Street, London W1.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I’ll take an Expressions on Tennalaga please!

12. Please give us your Top 10 all time favourites (with a bit of liberty taking)…

Not my top 10 of all time probably, but 10 45s that I’ve never tired of.

Larry & The Blue Notes – In And Out (Charay)
The Hangmen – I’m Gonna Love You (Flo-Pin)
The Henchmen – Livin’ (Punch)
Apollo’s Apaches – Cry Me A Lie (Barra-Donna)
The Sonics – He’s Waitin’ (Etiquette)
Rockin’ Ramods – She Lied (Bon Bon)
Zakary Thaks – Won’t Come Back
 (J-Beck)
The Nobles – Something Else
 (Marquis)
The Pentagons – Try And Find (Pent)
Chuck Berry – Let It Rock (Chess)
(Yes, that’s 11)

Current Top 5 Tracks:
The Playgue – I Gotta Be Goin’ (Rebic)
The Fabulous Depressions – Just Can’t Tell You
 (Maad)
Richie Knight & The Mid-Knights – Homework (Arc)
Bobby Comstock – Right Hand Man (Ascot)

And I’m still playing the two new volumes of Back From The Grave. A reminder that there’s always more new stuff to hear.

Weblinks:
facebook.com/ben.olins

Next Club Spots: Margate Mod Weekender


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music Rocksteady Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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Jo Wallace – Hey! Ms DJ

This entry is part 1 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

We recently caught up with the charming and ever so slightly busy DJ Jo Wallace – ‘ace face’ of Ramsgate, Kent, who is currently owner of the Reggae Record Label Ramrock Records, resident DJ at ‘Blouse & Skirt’, host of ‘The History of Black Music’ with Ashley Beedle @ The Latitude Festival, ‘Blouse & Skirt’ @ Festival No.6 and various gigs across UK & Europe including ‘Crossfire’ and ‘Margate Mod Weekender’. How does she
find the time?

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Watching Ready Steady Go in 1964 and seeing Millie and Marvin Gaye. I was listening to my brother’s blues LPs including John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters, he was 14 years older than me and at art college so that was a right result for a 4-year-old!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

1976 – round the back of a pub in Chatham in the skittles alley… classy! It’s been downhill all the way since then!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Festival No.6 doing a 6 hour set with Ashley Beedle covering the History of Black Dance Music… very special!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Hah! I won’t name any names but one venue had been bigging itself up on Soul forums and groups saying that they were getting 200 through the door. I was booked and arrived at an old social club in the middle of nowhere, North of the Watford Gap. There were 5 people there excluding the organisers plus the guests from a wedding in the room next door. The highlight of the evening was getting free ham sandwiches and cake… needless to say, I wasn’t too pleased and had to hustle for my DJ fee as well!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Richard Epps – outstanding taste and the ability to put an interesting set together. Alan Handscombe-McGrath – a legend and trail blazer Randy Cozens (R.I.P) – a visionary ,he anticipated the popularity of mid-tempo numbers years before Stafford.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Listening to other DJs back in the day – all male – and cherry picking the best bits, bingo calling at Margate Lido and broadcasting with Rod Lucas on BBC Radio Kent and commercial radio. My style is old skool – playing the tunes with a bit of MC’ing thrown in, giving 110% on the decks, having my own musical ‘signature’ of mostly Detroit and RnB, reading the crowd and making sure that they always leave with a smile on their face. Simple!

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Minnie Jones – Shadow of a Memory – Sugar – a bit of soul stalking and quick talking bagged me this gem for £100.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

As a record producer, it’s had to have been the Sound of Studio A’s house band, the Funk Brothers and Studio One’s house band, the various guises of the Skatalites. The most important percussion instrument in the world is the Studio One milk bottle – check it out on Prince Buster’s ‘Ghost Dance’. I have included my version on both my Ramrock releases ‘Gentleman Rudeboy’ and ‘Take it Easy’… that’s me with a key on a jam jar and backing vocals in the background! My favourite artists have to be Alton Ellis, Slim Smith, EWF, Dr Buzzards Original Savannah Band and the Temps.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not really. I collect anything that catches my attention whether it’s a riff or a vocal hook and I can imagine other people enjoying it on the dance floor. Or, whether I can incorporate the flavour of certain riffs into new releases on Ramrock and Ramrock Blue!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Blouse and Skirt at Ramsgate Music Hall – a monthly gig with Ashley Beedle  – a selection of 8Ts Dance Hall & Lovers Rock, 8Ts Soul, Studio One, Joe Gibbs and early 9Ts Hip-Hop!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Martha Starr – Sweet Temptation – Charay

12. Please give us your Top 10 all time favourites (with a bit of liberty taking)…

EWF – That’s the way of the world
Dr Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band – I’ll play the fool
Main Ingredient – Happiness is just around the bend
Yvonne Baker – You didn’t say a word
Sapphires – Gotta have your love
Temptations – Witchcraft/Why you wanna make me blue
Crazy Godz – Dynamic
The Motown back catalogue from ‘62 – ‘79
Jackie Mittoo – A tribute to Slim Smith
Earl Van Dyke – All for you

Current Top 3 Tracks:
1. Marriotts – Tell It Like It Is – ABC
2. September Jones – No More Love – Kapp
3. Carl Underwood – Ain’t You Lyin’ – Merging

Weblinks:
facebook.com/jo.wallace

Next Club Spots: Margate Mod Weekender, Latitude Festival, No.6 Festival, Blouse & Skirt


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music Rocksteady Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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Bob Downes Interview – by Peter Markham

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Peter Markhams Spot

Bob Downes Interview

Jazz saxophonist and flautist Bob Downes was one of the many fine musicians who passed through the ranks of JC & the Machine. He has since had a successful solo career with his highly original prog psych jazz outfit, Bob Downes Open City amongst other things. I chatted with Bob from Gschwend-Mittelbronn, Germany, where he has lived since the ‘70s.

When and how did you join JC & the Machine?

Probably 1966, around that time. I was with another band, Dave Anthony’s Moods and I think the guitarist was in that band at some time. That’s how it came about.

Who else was in the band?

For a couple of gigs there was an Australian saxophone player (Bruce Johnstone) who later played with Maynard Ferguson. But he was really a jazz musician, and didn’t really fit the music. You have to be into that beefy, rocky, earthy feel, and not have too much intellect going on, which a lot of jazz musicians tend to be like terrible! Ha ha!

Julian would alternative on the drums with the regular drummer Keith Webb?

Yes, very rarely, he would sit in for one number and take a drum solo on something brilliant! He was the singer in the band but he was a far superior drummer. When he played the drums is was a much bigger sound, without being loud. It’s the same sort of style as Elvin Jones when he was playing with John Coltrane, it just sounded loud and crashy! I first heard him play when I was walking along the street in Soho, that’s where Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club was and you could hear them play from outside.

Tell me about some of the gigs you did?

We used to do the American bases, but work was few and far between. He used to send me a telegram about a gig and where the pick-up was. I had a telephone, but he didn’t, but there was a telephone box on the corner of the street. Maybe he didn’t have any small change ever, ha ha! So gigs used to happen like that.

He got us this gig in Africa in Accra, Ghana where we played for a week, and that was hilarious! We stayed at this hotel, and this African guy who looked after us turned up barefooted, so Julian gave him a striped rugby shirt and his Cuban heeled boots, and then he looked really smart, this guy! He used to take us into the jungle and we’d buy some grass, we couldn’t even see the people we were buying if off, it was so pitch dark, we couldn’t see their faces. We paid one shilling, three pence for it and they were ripping us off three pence, and it rather looked like an enlarged felt bag that they used to put potato crisps into at that time. We got so stoned that they had to guide us out of there, so we didn’t fall into these gullies for the rain water, and this guy who took us around had my saxophone case on his head.

We played an open air gig and everybody loved it! One night when we were in Accra, Julian sat at a piano in a hotel lounge and played some opening bars of I think a piano concerto, which brought about him a gathered audience. But suddenly he stopped playing, stood up and said to everybody that he just wasn’t really in the mood. Groans of disappointment rang through the room. Later Julian told me that was all he could play of it!

Sometimes on the way to gigs we would stop off at Curzon Street, near Piccadilly Circus, and there was a record company there. Julian and the guitar player would get out and disappear for ten minutes, and then they would come back some money in their hands, they were on some kind of a retainer. We didn’t get any of it, it wasn’t to pay the band. Very weird that was.

What led you to leave the band?

I can’t remember why I left really. Maybe I went into a night club job, that’s quite possible. Then I joined Manfred Mann and I can tell you some stories about him!

North Wind Blew South track-by-track commentary

By Philamore Lincoln 

At the time of its release I was not able to list all the musicians appearing on The North Wind Blew South because several were contracted to other record companies and were not allowed to appear on rival labels. However, enough time has now passed so here is a list of the line-ups as far as I can remember as well as a few notes and comments on the background to some of the tracks. The songs not mentioned speak for themselves through the lyrics. The tracks “You’re The One,” “The North Wind Blew South,” “Rainy Day,” “When You Were Looking My Way” and “The Plains of Delight” are all songs about previous girlfriends.

The North Wind Blew South

Musicians: Herbie Flowers (bass), Ronnie Verrell (drums), Dick Heckstall-Smith
(soprano saxophone).

You’re The One

Musicians: Jimmy Page (guitar), Jim Capaldi (drums), Jack Bruce (bass), Speedy Acquaye (congas).

Lazy Good For Nothin’

Musicians: Charlie Daniels (guitar), Jim Capaldi (drums), Brian Odgers (bass).

The track is about a drifter bumming around the US.

Early Sherwood

This is the sum of several parts and I can’t remember exactly who played what at the recording session, but here are a few words of explanation about the places referred to in this part of my childhood in Sherwood.

The Flying Fields used to be an area of open countryside. It has steep hills so it was a great place to fly model aeroplanes. We spent many hours playing there and on the Poppy Fields. Both were built over and this part of the song “the green has turned to grey” was a lament for their passing.

“Scrumping, scrumping over the lake” etc. Scrumping is stealing apples from trees that belong to someone else, plimsolls (gym shoes) got wet walking through the edge of the lake. “Coins on the line” etc. Daybrook Railway Station was in an area of Sherwood not far from our home. It had a path leading up to the platforms. Through a gap under part of the safety fence you could see the railway line about three feet away. We used to listen for any sound of an approaching train and, if all was clear, we would put pennies on the line and wait for the next train to come by and squash them. It was fun at the time!

“Conduit cannons at the Five Ways Rec blowing holes through corrugated iron”. During the second world war many ammunition dumps were set up in Sherwood Forest, and similar areas, to make sure that English civilians could fight back in the event of a German invasion. After the war they were all supposed to be cleared away, but a few were so overgrown that they were missed. Some of the older kids I used to play with knew where they were. They would arrive with a pack of 303 rifle bullets, pull the bullet out and extract the cordite. This was placed inside a length of conduit (steel pipe) with one end flattened and a small hole drilled in it to take the fuse. A ball bearing was pushed in front of the cordite and a length of Jetex (model aeroplane rocket engine) fuse was stuck into the drilled hole. This was then aimed at a large square of corrugated iron leaning against a tree fifteen feet away. The fuse was lit and everybody ran. After a massive BANG! we would inspect the resulting 12-inch wide hole in the target. It was all much more interesting than train spotting.

“Ernie rode his bike down Five Ways Slide.” The Five Ways was a large roundabout right where five roads met. The Rec was the recreation grounds very close by. Ernie was a guy called Geoff Hern. He was the local fearless daredevil. He was not reckless, he would calculate what he was about to do and then just do it. I never saw him fail, fall off or crash. The slide at the Five Ways Rec. was tall and had many steps. Geoff would take his bike up to the top, balance for a few seconds then zap down the slide just managing to somehow avoid falling into the stream beyond the end.

“The prettiest thing she came round on a swing, skirt in the air as she rode at Goose Fair.” Since it began, 700 years ago, Nottingham Goose Fair has become a massive international fun fair held in October for three days every year. I went to the fair and recorded a bit of the background noise you can hear at the start of that section.

Rainy Day

Musicians: Keith Webb (drums).

Temma Harbour

Musicians: Harold “Little G” McNair (flute), Philamore Lincoln (drums).

I went to Ghana in Africa to do some TV shows. We were there for two weeks and, apart from jamming with the local drummers, we used to get on the local buses and discover places. One day I went to Temma Harbour. It’s an industrial port but, if you are facing the sea and look to the left, there is a beautiful spot with fine white sand and coconut palms. It was all good enough to inspire the song.

The fabulous flute playing is by the great Jamaican jazz musician Harold “Little G” McNair who goes right back to his roots to spread some joy. The correct spelling is “Tema” just one m. Whoops!

The Plains Of Delight

Musicians: John McLaughlin (guitar), Jack Bruce (bass), Ronnie Verrell (drums), David Snell (harp), members of the London Symphony Orchestra booked as session musicians (strings and woodwind).

This is an invitation, to a certain lady, to join me on an exotic journey.

The County Jail Band

Musicians: Charlie Daniels (guitar), Jack Bruce (blues harp), Keith Webb (drums), Brian Odgers (bass).

“Joe was a robber, Jesse was a thief, Lou left a mother crying in her grief.” The idea for this song was that a branch of the Salvation Army, located in the deep South of the US decided that their musical instruments were so worn out they would replace them all. They were about to dump them in a skip when someone said, “Wait, why don’t we donate them to the local country jail? Some of the prisoners might be able to get a tune out of them.” And this is what these desperate lifers did. The obvious thing would have been to ask Jack Bruce to play bass, there is no one better, but I needed some urgent blues harp and Jack nails that department too. Plus, with him in the studio I knew that Brian Odgers would play his socks off, which he did.

The great Charlie Daniels kindly came over from Nashville to play on this and another track. He plays fabulously tight, tough guitar lines throughout. All driven along by my much missed old buddy Keith Webb on drums.

When You Were Looking My Way

This track was recorded at Lansdown Studios, Holland Park, London. Musicians: Keith Webb (drums).

Blew Through

Musicians: Graham Bond (Hammond organ), Pete Wingfield (piano), Philamore Lincoln (drums).

This blues is on the album because, just before I finished recording I read that Graham Bond was due back from the US. Graham played this kind of slow groove live but I do not think he had recorded anything similar. I called his manager, to get the exact date he was due back, and then I booked some recording time at Morgan Studios. The US blues pianist Otis Spann, was about to arrive in the UK for a tour. Mike Vernon was organizing the tour and I called him and booked Otis for the session. Three days before the recording Mike called me to say that the Otis tour had been cancelled. Mike recommended Pete Wingfield, as a replacement, so I booked him and he did a fine job. There were two very good jazz saxophonists on the session. I kept trying to drag a bit more R&B filth out of them but, as you can hear, they struggled. However, all this is completely irrelevant. What matters is the magnificent Hammond organ blues playing of the late, great Graham Bond. His playing is straight from the heart, passionate, compelling and unique. I am so glad I was able to include this wonderful example of such a very fine musician.


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Peter Markham

I am a veteran of the Scandinavian garage punk scene, with an obsessive compulsive interest in 60's music and culture. I have been writing for fanzines on-and-off since the mid 80's and I am currently contributing to Ugly Things magazine, quite possibly the world's foremost journal of obscure and forgotten musical gems of the past. I am also the co-founder and one out of five DJ's for Club Mau Mau - the long-running Copenhagen based 60's inspired beat club. I am of English/Danish descent and believe that life, in fact, begins at 45 rpm.

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July 2, 2015 By : Category : Articles Beat Club Soul Front Page General Interviews Music Tags:, , , , , , , ,
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Philamore Lincoln Interview – by Peter Markham

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Peter Markhams Spot

Philamore Lincoln Interview

The name Robert Cromwell Anson might not instantly ring a bell with enthusiasts of ‘60s music, but his pseudonyms surely will. First as Phil Kinorra, drummer with the New Don Rendell Quintet and the Brian Auger Trinity. Then he cut a stunning blue eyed soul club classic as Julian Covey & the Machine, sat in for Keith Moon for one gig, played with the Graham Bond Organi-zation, released a pop psych nugget as Philamore Lincoln, became a record producer and then vanished into thin air… Here is his story and the first interview he has given in over 45 years.

“When did you change your name from Poirot to Markham?” Philamore Lincoln wrote to me when I finally managed to track him down after searching for him for about two years. I had been in contact with some of his former musical collaborators such as Brian Auger, Bob Downes, Pete Solley, Jim Cregan and Johnny Spence. But nobody had been in contact with him for many years or knew about his whereabouts…

He politely turned down the offer to be interviewed in person, but agreed to answer my questions via good old fashioned Royal Mail as he was “plumbing the depths of memory banks that have lain unmolested for decades.” To say that I was well chuffed is an understatement! He was eager to clear up some of the myths that have been written about him—which are basically rumors of what (later) famous musicians played or didn’t play on his records… and as he put it—made sure that I got “every Higgs boson particle of info” that I asked him about…

The Julian Covey & the Machine single “A Little Bit of Hurt” b/w the equally hip organ groover “Sweet Bacon” has been a favorite of mine for a number of years. To me this disc is the embodiment of the ‘60s Swinging London sound—pounding drums, groovy organ and an uptempo danceable beat—no wonder the Northern Soul and Mod DJ’s slipped this 45 in the record boxes. Produced by Jimmy Miller, famed knob twiddler of the Spencer Davis Group, the Rolling Stones etc, this hip soul nightclub act were surely destined for greatness, but this remained their only recorded output.

Soon afterwards he emerged as the mysterious Philamore Lincoln on the The North Wind Blew South album, only released Stateside by Epic in 1970. A wonderful, magical, dreamlike, folka-delic pop masterpiece, nowadays hailed a lost British pop psych classic up there with the Small Faces’ Ogdens’ Nut Gone Flake, the Zombies’ Odessey and Oracle, Kaleidoscope’s Tangerine Dream and the End’s Introspection among others. Some of the songs nod in the direction of Donovan’s Sunshine Superman era (quite a few of the same session musicians also appeared on the Scottish troubadour’s A Gift From A Flower To A Garden), while other cuts have a harder rocking approach, with elements ranging from country blues to funk to bossa nova—a very diverse album. All the songs were penned by Philamore himself, backed by a host of literary who’s-who of the London music scene as the time.

EARLY SHERWOOD

You were born on October 20, 1940, in Sherwood, Nottingham. Both your brothers were also involved in music?

Yes, I was born and grew up in Sherwood, Nottingham. My younger brother, Mike, played bass guitar in a local band (called Mother’s Worry, under the name of Cranson – Ed.) and my older brother Peter, owned a successful TV/Hi-Fi business [Peter Anson Electronics].

Jazz music was your first love, when did first you start playing drums?

Around the age of eleven I began to start noticing the drumming on jazz records, playing on the radio. Just before midnight I used to sneak downstairs in my parents’ house, put a blanket over my head, and turn on the radio and tune in to The Voice of America Jazz Hour. It was great to hear so many excellent players every night. I began to buy records featuring drummers [that I liked], and then I found a good drum teacher and began to take lessons. When I was fifteen I joined a naff group playing middle of the road music and I remembered what the drummer Andy White had told me: “When you are learning, take every opportunity to play, every bit of experience helps you develop”. Andy was the session drummer on the Beatles’ first single (“Love Me Do”—George Martin was unhappy with both the versions of the song recorded with Pete Best and Ringo Starr and brought in Andy White, who he had used on sessions before – Ed).

You joined the Royal Air Force in your late teens, tell me a bit about that.

I joined the RAF Music Collage at Uxbridge, Trevor Watts (later of the Amalgam and the Spontaneous Music Ensemble – Ed.) and the fine trombonist Paul Rutherford were there at the same time. I was at Uxbridge during the day and jamming in Soho jazz cellars all night. The deal with the RAF was that you could, if you wanted to, buy yourself out of the RAF within three months of joining. With just two days left to the deadline I decided that jazz was more important than anything else. I sold my Avedis Zildjian hi-hat cymbals, paid them the money and escaped from Uxbridge in the nick of time. I was playing drums with Dudley Moore every Sunday night at a cellar jazz club in Fulham Road, called Café Des Artistes and jamming in small clubs all over Soho the rest of the week.

VILLA KINORRA

In the beginning of 1960 you played in a R&B outfit with Heather Logan, sister of Scottish jazz singer Annie Ross. Could you tell me a bit more about that band?

At this point the bass player, Tony Archer, and I went up to Scotland to do a gig on the Isle of Bute for a few weeks. On my way back to London, when the gig finished, I spent a couple of days in Glasgow. I got a call to say that an American R&B band had just arrived for a UK tour but that just before they had left the US their drummer had been busted for possession of pot. His entry visa was revoked and they needed a drummer to do the tour. The singer was the younger sister of the jazz singer Annie Ross. I went to the audition and they offered me the job.

Around this time you started using your first stage name Phil Kinorra. Where did that come from?

The American R&B band liked my playing but they said that my name sounded very English and, as it was supposed to be the original US line-up, could I come up with a more American sounding name? I started thinking and then I remembered that a girl I had been dating on the Isle of Bute had mentioned a place called ‘Villa Kinorra’. It may have been somewhere in Mexico… I put the name ‘Phil’ in front of Kinorra and it seemed to fit and when I called the R&B band, to run it past them, they said it was much better and would I please use it for the UK tour. Every time we finished a tour date we headed back to London where the sax player and I would jam around the clubs. We were playing at the Flamingo Club in Wardour Street one night when some musicians asked the sax player what my name was. He told them ‘Phil Kinorra’. The MC at the Flamingo was a record company executive called Tony Hall. Tony also wrote articles for a music paper called Disc and when he wrote a piece about me he referred to me as Phil Kinorra. After it was published I was stuck with the name, so I thought “what the hell” and carried on with it.

ROARIN’ WITH THE JAZZ QUINTETS

You also worked with the Peter King Quintet and the Ronnie Scott Quintet around this time?

I was playing in a Soho club called the Mandrake one night when Ronnie Scott came in and jammed. He invited me to go to his club [Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club], in Gerrard Street, any time. I began jamming there regularly and, eventually, the great alto saxophonist Peter King asked me to join his quintet, which I did and several months later Ronnie Scott asked me to join his quintet which I did. That was a tough demanding gig and great experience, all the guys in the band were exceptionally fine world class players.

Then you joined the New Don Rendell Quintet in May of 1960 and recorded the LP Roarin’ in June 1961. Could you tell me about that band?

After I left Ronnie’s quintet and after months of gigging all over the place I joined the New Don Rendell Quintet. We toured and played jazz festivals and recorded for Riverside Records. Graham Bond was a well trained keyboardist, but he was only playing alto saxophone with the quintet. I wrote a blues for the band called “Blew Through.” We played it for the first time at a Sunday gig in Coventry. The audience reaction was incredible. A couple of weeks later Graham Bond told me that Alexis Korner wanted Graham and me to join his new band Blues Incorporated. Jazz, at its best, is a very seductive mistress and we said no, but some good seeds were sown.

You lived in Cleveland Square, Paddington, in a house where Larry Parnes put up aspiring musicians such as Duffy Power and yourself?

I lived at Cleveland Square for a few months, but I had no connection with Larry Parnes. I moved out to live in Fulham with a former girlfriend.

THE CONNECTION

During this period you also deputised for Tony Mann during a London run of Jack Gelber’s play The Connection. Could tell me a bit about that?

In the early ‘60s I appeared in a play called The Connection at the Duke of York’s Theatre in St Martin’s Lane, London. Four of the characters were real jazz musicians and 30 minutes of original jazz music was played live at every performance. The music was written by the jazz pianist Freddy Redd, and Freddy and the great alto saxophonist Jackie McLean came to the UK to appear in the London production. Both of them were previous members of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. The drummer Tony Mann was doing the play, but he was a member of a regular band and could not do all the performances. We shared it and it was a privilege to play with the brilliant Freddy Redd and the late, great Jackie McLean.

What other bands did you play with in London during the period you played with Ronnie Scott—I have heard mention of the Bootleggers and the Paramounts and also American jazz musician Johnny Griffin?

I played with a band called the Bootleggers for a short period. Brian Auger and Glen Hughes were in the band, but we changed the line-up and the name after a few weeks (the line-up of the Bootleggers also featured guitarist Frank Bowen, later of the Pete Best Four and bassist Harry Scully of the Trends – Ed.). I was never in a band called the Paramounts. I met Johnny Griffin at the Blue Note Club in Berlin, where he was playing with the drummer Art Taylor. Brian Auger and myself were playing at another club in the city at the time.

THE HOLY TRINITY

In July of 1963 you joined the Brian Auger Trinity with Brian Auger on hammond organ and Rick Laird upright bass. Tell me a bit about that.

Over a period of two or three years I had played a lot of gigs with the hard swinging jazz pianist Brian Auger and we decided to form a new jazz trio. At this time Brian was playing jazz piano and had not started to play the Hammond organ yet. We needed a bass player and everything pointed to Rick Laird being the best player around. So we asked him if he would like to join us and he accepted. We rehearsed every day at Brian’s house in Shepherd’s Bush. A lot of the stuff we were playing was gospel influenced funk, so it seemed appropriate to call ourselves the Brian Auger Trinity. We started playing around London jazz clubs and were soon doing regular gigs at Ronnie Scott’s club.

The band then became the Brian Auger Group in February 1964?

After about a year or so we were contacted by a large nightclub in Piccadilly, London [the Pigalle]. They asked us to add two more musicians to the group and take up a residency to play jazz at the club. We were jointed by the guitarist John McLaughlin and the baritone sax player Glen Hughes. Glen had been playing with Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames. A few months later we played in Germany for a month and, after returning to London, Brian and I went to Berlin where we played with Leo Wright, from Dizzy Gillespie’s band, and the saxophonist Herb Gellar. I think the club may have been called the Tangent.

Did you ever record anything with the Brian Auger Trinity?

The Brian Auger Trinity never recorded, but we did a live BBC radio broadcast opposite the Tubby Hayes Big Band for the series Jazz Club. If the BBC still have the tape, that would be the only recording in existence.

JULIAN COVEY & THE MACHINE

When did you move away from jazz and became more soul and R&B influenced?

At a point when jazz was becoming more experimental, with less emphasis on intense grooves, I started to look for other outlets. I was doing a gig with a pick-up band at a US base in the UK when an agent told me that he had lots of work available if I could put a band together. So I did.

You then gave up playing the drums for some months to concentrate on a solo night club act that would eventually become JC & the Machine?

After three months of non stop gigs I got a call from some managers to go to a meeting at the Radio Caroline offices at 6 Chesterfield Gardens, off Curzon Street in London. The manager was Tony Secunda, the producer Denny Cordell and several others were all based at this large building. The managers offered me a deal. They wanted to call the band Julian Covey & the Machine and, if I agreed, they would pay for the van, a sound system, stage gear and everything else. I considered the offer for a full quarter of a minute and agreed.

How did you meet the producer Jimmy Miller?

After a few months of touring we were booked in, for a week’s residency, at a the Bag O’ Nails club in Kingly Street, Soho, London. The Beatles came in every night and so did the producer Jimmy Miller. Jimmy kept coming up to the side of the stage and putting his ear to the PA speakers, checking out my vocals. The following week he called my manager and said that he wanted to produce the band.

Jimmy and I got together and wrote “A Little Bit Hurt.” We recorded it in Studio A at Olympic Studios in Barnes, West London. Eddie Kramer engineered the session and Glyn Johns engineered the mix. At the mix session there were no spare tracks left on the Ampex four-track to take the backing vocals. We wanted to avoid going another tape generation onto the other four-track machine, so we sang the backing vocals live onto the quarter inch stereo master as the final mix was done.

Jimmy Cliff of “The Harder They Come” fame, was recording next door in Studio 2 and, during a break, he had come into Studio A
to hear what we were doing. When Jimmy Miller and I did a run through of the backing vocals, Jimmy joined us and it’s the three of us singing backing vocals on the single. The single did well in clubs along the South of France and was re-released a couple of times. Out of The Northern Soul Top 500 Kev Roberts put together the “100 Greatest Northern Soul Songs” and “A Little But Hurt” came in at number 49. I’m very happy with that.

The single had a big drum sound, something that Jimmy Miller—who was drummer himself—was known for. What was it like working with him being a drummer yourself?

Working with Jimmy Miller was absolutely great. In addition to all the other attributes, needed by a good producer, Jimmy had a special gift for getting each member of a band to tighten up the intensity of the groove. As far as the big drum sound was concerned, Jimmy picked a recording engineer who could give him what he wanted. He used Glyn Johns, who is renowned for the John Bonham drum sounds he created for Led Zeppelin. Keith Webb was a hard hitter, so the combination worked very well.

The organ sound on the single is quite similar to Wynder K Frog a.k.a. Mick Weaver. Who was behind the keys?

The Hammond organ on “A Little Bit Hurt” was played by Pete Solley. He used a boosted Leslie amp plus a bit of direct injection.

Quite a few prominent musicians started out in playing in the Machine, what was your favorite line-up?

I would say that the recording line-up from 1967 was the best line-up (Julian Covey & the Machine #5 1967, see page 67 – Ed.).

You were managed by Tony Secunda who was known to be quite controversial, and also managed the Move. Did you do a lot of gigging with them?

I got on very well with Tony Secunda. He was fun to be around and was always full of unpredictable ideas. [I don’t think] we ever did any gigs with the Move. Tony was called upstairs— I hope it was upstairs — far too early…

The Machine’s booking agent was Austrian brothers Johnny and Rik Gunnell, who allegedly had connections to the London underworld at the time? Are there any stories you would care to share?

I can’t tell you anything about Rik Gunnell because I hardly knew him. His booking agency was at the far end of Gerrard Street, Soho, but he had a separate office, in another building, so he was never around.

You seemed to play quite a lot with the Spencer Davis Group around this time, were you friendly with them?

We never played with the Spencer Davis Group, I met Steve Winwood a couple of times with Jim Capaldi, but I did not know the others. Jim Capaldi was never in the Machine [as some people think], he was always with Steve Winwood or other bands but I was pleased, at a later date, to be able to use Jim on my album.

The Machine backed up visiting US artists like John Lee Hooker while they toured the UK?

We backed John Lee Hooker for a UK tour. He was mighty! His sense of time was cast in GRANITE! I know his work very well from all the albums I had had for years. The drummer with the Machine was backing John, but when a gig on the tour came up, at a large club in Oxford Street, London called Tiles, my drummer had a blister on his hand that was bad enough to prevent him from playing. I stepped in and had one of the best playing experiences of my life. John liked a simple groove with lots of drive, so that’s what I gave him. At the end of the set, in the dressing room, he said, “Who was playing drums?” I said, “I was, John”. He had a big grin on his face and he said, “You drivin’ me along.” I had just had the privilege of locking onto, and sharing, some great grooves with this truly great artist. I treasure the memory.

The Machine was a heavy gigging band, and besides a lot of club dates you also played the 6th National Jazz & Blues Festival at the Royal Windsor Racecourse, Berkshire. Could you tell me a bit about that?

 The only thing I remember about the 6th National Jazz and Blues Festival is that we were onstage, in a tent, and the acoustics were terrible… (in the festival programme the Machine are described as having “an exciting Afro-Cuban influnce” – Ed.).

 “A Little Bit Hurt” was covered by the Spanish beat combo Los Albas. Would you say that at the time of its release, the record was more popular in places like Germany and France than in the UK?

I have not heard any cover versions of “A Little Bit Hurt” so I can’t comment. At the time of its release “A Little Bit Hurt” got very little promotion in the UK, but it did well in Europe and it finally got noticed, in the UK, when the Northern Soul phenomenon took off.

“A Little Bit Hurt” was a club hit but didn’t chart. It is said that you were then offered a five album deal with Island Records. Why did the deal fall through?

This is a myth and the first time I have heard it. Island Records never offered us a five album deal, so there was never anything to fall through.

“A Little Bit Hurt” was re-released by Island in 1978. Have you been aware of the popularity of the song?

Some time after its re-release, in 1978, Chris Blackwell called me to say that Island Records had lost the quarter inch stereo master of “A Little Bit Hurt.” I call that careless! I was finally made aware that audiences like the track when it became embedded in the Northern Soul clubs.

What songs were in the live repertoire?

In addition to some songs by the late, great, Solomon Burke we also used to do several songs by Don Covay—no relation!

Why did the Machine initially break up?

The Machine broke up because it was time for me to explore a different musical direction.

STEPPIN’ IN FOR KEITH MOON

On the 29th of May 1967 you were drafted by the Who to take Keith Moon’s place at a gig at the Glasgow Locarno Ballroom. Were you originally going to do more dates?

In May 1967 my manager got a panic call from the manager of the Who [Kit Lambert] to say that Keith had collapsed with a rupture and was in St George’s Hospital at Hyde Park Corner. The band had a gig in Glasgow and they did not want to let the fans down by cancelling, so could I go up to Scotland and fill in for Keith. I had a night off and they were stuck, so I said yes. I knew their singles, but none of their album stuff, which made up a lot of their set. In that kind of situation the best course of action is to keep it simple and solid, which is what I did. After that I had gigs booked with the Machine, so other people had to help out until Keith had recovered from surgery (Chris Townson of John’s Children did the remaining dates before Moon returned to the Who – Ed.).

GROOVIN’ WITH THE ORGANIZATION

From September 1967 until March 1968 you took over the drum stool in the Graham Bond Organization from Jon Hiseman. Could you tell me a little about that period?

I did not follow Jon Hiseman into the Graham Bond Organization. Hiseman had left the band many months earlier. I joined Graham by accident. I was driving around Putney, where I used to live, when I saw a poster saying “Graham Bond Live Tonight At Roehampton.” Roehampton was just around the corner so, of course, I went. As I walked into the back of the hall Graham was already playing. After hearing about four bars of the music it was clear that Graham was in great form. There was a big fat groove to be grabbed hold of and kicked. I hate to put anyone down, but the drummer with Graham, on that night, was missing it all. When the set was over I went round to the dressing room to see Graham. It could have been a year or so since I last saw him but, as soon as we met, he said, “We’re on tour, why don’t you join us starting tomorrow?” So I did. 

Graham Bond comes off as a very complex person as well as a fantastic musician. How was it like working with him again in his own band?

I knew Graham from just before he became a professional musician, when we were both members of the New Don Rendell Quintet. Graham had a day job, but the prospect of playing jazz for a living soon put paid to that. Underneath his later excesses he was, actually, a sweet guy. Great enthusiasm and a wicked sense of humor. His problem was that he did not seem to understand that his fine talent meant that all he had to do was play. He became overweight, which caused health problems, and had the misfortune, entirely beyond his control, to have an addiction prone personality. All this disappeared once the music started. That’s why so many outstanding musicians wanted to work with him.

THE NORTH WIND BLEW SOUTH

How did the Philamore Lincoln project come about?

After JC & the Machine I wanted to go in a completely new direction. Many aspects of music were changing and I thought that a new name would help me to make a break with the past. An executive from Epic Records in New York called Chesley Millican came to London to sign new artists. I had been writing some new songs and Chelsey heard a couple of demos. He signed me to the label and asked me to write enough songs for an album. I had complete freedom, to do anything I liked, so no complaints. I spent several weeks writing, every day, and when the songs were finished I started to book studio time. The main studio I used was Olympic Sound Studios in Barnes, West London and Morgan Studios in North London.

Where does the inspiration to the name Philamore Lincoln come from?

The name Philamore just arrived in my head in the same way things do when you are writing songs. Coming from Sherwood, Nottingham, there is a certain subconscious awareness of Lincoln Green, so that part could have come from there.

You were signed to Brian Epstein’s NEMS label and issued one single “You’re The One” b/w “Running By the River.”

The NEMS single did not include “You’re The One,” it was “Running By The River” and I think “Rainy Day” (NEMS folded in 1969, and their roster was transferred to CBS who were NEMS’ distributor – Ed.).

Mary Hopkin had a hit with her version of “Temma Harbour” on Apple Records, produced by Mickie Most. How did that come about?

The Mary Hopkin version of “Temma Harbour” happened because Chesley Millican, who signed me to Epic Records, took my original recording to Mickie Most and played it to him. Mickie thought it was a hit song and produced a single with Mary.

The album has a beautiful sound and production, what was it like working with producer James Wilder?

The producer James Wilder does not exist. I was concerned, at the time I made the album, about being perceived as a smart-arse so I thought it would be better to have a fictitious producer’s name on the album. I produced the album myself and I had the pleasure of using the great engineer Glyn Johns and his highly talented, late brother Andy as engineers on the album.

What were the initial reactions to the album when it was released?

When my album was released Epic Records did nothing to promote it so, consequently, there was nothing for anyone to react to.

Are there any unreleased JC & the Machine or Philamore Lincoln tracks?

No, there are no other JC & the Machine or Philamore Lincoln recordings hidden away anywhere.

THE PRODUCING YEARS

In January of ’71 you produced Paladin’s debut album with former Machine members Keith Webb and Pete Solley at Olympic Studios and Island Studios. Almost the whole album was recorded live in the studio, please tell me about that?

I produced the first Paladin album at Olympic Studios and Island Studios. Paladin were very much a live band who had their stuff down nice and tight. It’s true that we recorded most of the tracks more or less live. For the second Paladin album I booked the Beatles’ Apple Studios in Savile Row where I had the pleasure of working with the Beatles’ legendary engineer Geoff Emerick.

What have you been up to since the early ’70s? Philamore Lincoln fans have been speculating if you continued under a different alias?

Well, I could not find anyone who appeared to understand what I was doing musically, and then glam rock and punk arrived, so I got married, left London and moved to deepest Dorset. I found my original artist contract, with CBS Records, dated 24th February 1969. In addition to my signature the other signature is that of Clive Davis (former president of Columbia/CBS/Epic Records – Ed). Many artists have had bad experiences with terrible recording contracts but my own experience is very extreme and detrimentally career affecting. I am going to write a full expose of my dealings with what is now Sony Music Entertainment as a follow up to this interview. Part of it will include publishing my CBS Records contract, in full, online.

Five years ago, when my wife Nina and I came up to Oxford to visit our son, who was at university, we fell for the city and moved here. I have just built a studio in my garden and as soon as the sound insulation is installed I will be putting some new songs down!

THANKS to: Mike Anson, Bob Downes, Harry Shapiro and Alex Cooper
for the scans.


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Peter Markham

I am a veteran of the Scandinavian garage punk scene, with an obsessive compulsive interest in 60's music and culture. I have been writing for fanzines on-and-off since the mid 80's and I am currently contributing to Ugly Things magazine, quite possibly the world's foremost journal of obscure and forgotten musical gems of the past. I am also the co-founder and one out of five DJ's for Club Mau Mau - the long-running Copenhagen based 60's inspired beat club. I am of English/Danish descent and believe that life, in fact, begins at 45 rpm.

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April 22, 2015 By : Category : Articles Beat Club Soul Front Page General Interviews Music Tags:, , , , , ,
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Jamie Parr – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 15 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

Jamie Parr is often found getting busy on the dancefloors of the best modernist nightspots or also behind the ‘wheels of soul’ supplying topnotch tunes. NutsMag caught up with him to talk music…

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I guess I have always been into music from a very early age and have been brought up on a great mixture of music, influenced mainly by my Parents such Northern Soul, Blues Rock, Mowtown, Reggae, Glam Rock and In my teens a love of Brit Pop and Indie, which developed into R&B, Latin, Funk and Soul. Artists that have shaped my tastes in the early days are groups such as The Rolling Stones, The Commodores, Free, Sam & Dave, The Temptations, Libertines, Kings of Leon – and my guilty pleasure – Queen.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first slot was back in 2008, a great little local night called Mojo Working in my home town Peterborough, run by Julian Roberts (Jelly Roll). I remember it well I already had my set pretty much ready in order only had a few records at the time, but knew I must have had a good ear from the response I got.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

This is a difficult one as there have been many, but I will say Brighton Bank Holiday Weekender 2010.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

When I first started out I was given an early slot at an all-nighter only to arrive and the speakers weren’t even set up, I was swapped to do a graveyard shift, as someone didn’t show up, ended up staying until 4.30am only for the night to end before I was due to spin.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Chris Dale – never fails for me perfect mix of tempo’s style and taste, open minded and a top bloke. Alan Handscombe – Always keeps things exciting, mixes styles well and always up for a party. Billy Kealy – proper R&B DJ. And the young guns: Callum, Scott, Tomas – energy, passion and always try and bring something new to the table.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Discovering the Kent compilations and probably an obvious choice, but the Pow Wow in its prime 2008, 2009… why? The Kent CD’s because of the sheer quality of the music and Pow Wow…  really, do I have to explain? Just captured for me everything the scene should be about. Great new sounds mixed effortlessly with classics, great crowd of like-minded forward-thinking people, dancing from start to finish and attitude.

07. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Biggest influence, Libertines, captured a moment during my teens, love the attitude, music and energy that they gave off. Favorite Artists – Mick Jagger, James Brown, Little Willie John, Jackie Wilson.

08. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Simply put no, there are too many records on too many great labels.

09. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Currently most Wednesdays at Joe’s in Chalk Farm, playing across an across the board music policy, within the soul, funk, R&B sphere. Not as strict as scene orientated night. I am hoping to revive Pork & Beans at some point this year too, venue pending so keep your eyes and ears peeled.

10. What is the record you would most like to own?

Jonathan Capree – Gonna Build Me A Mountain

Next Club Spots 
Sunday 25th August 2013 – NUTs Brighton Mod Weekender, Brighton.
Friday 20th, Saturday 21 – Ravenna Mod Weekender, Italy.

Current Top five Tracks:

  1. Nappy Brown – Skiddy Woe (Savoy, 1956)
  2. She’s fine – C/U
  3. James Brown – Why Don’t You Take Your Love Away From Me (King, 1968)
  4. Nichelle Nicholls – Why Don’t You Do Right (Epic, 1967)
  5. Bobby Bloom – Where Are We Going Now (Roulette, 1971)

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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June 4, 2013 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music RnB UK Tags:, , ,
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Derek Martin Interview

This entry is part 4 of 8 in the series Movers and Shakers

Derek Martin recorded the first version of Twist and Shout; if that was all he’d ever done it might be worthy of an article. He went on to play a significant role in the soul music explosion of the early 60s, working with some of the biggest names and cutting few of the best R&B records of the era. Through timeless classics such as ‘Daddy Rolling Stone’ and ‘Sly Girl’, he is guaranteed a place in soul history. He spoke to Scotch Martin for NutsMag in May.

During his career Derek Martin worked with various legendary producers such as, Teddy Randazzo (“Black on the inside”, says Derek), and Juggy Murray (“He had a lot of problems”).

These days he’s his own producer and is in the process of making and financing an album himself from his home in Paris, which he hopes to release in 2014. This summer Derek plays the Saturday night at Euro YeYe, but he is the first to acknowledge that the 60s recordings will always be the focus for soul fans.

Derek was born in 1938 and grew up in Detroit. “I remember sitting on my Daddy’s knee at the piano as he played old ragtime numbers,” he says. “His knees were higher than the keyboard – he was a big guy, and his hands were worth three of mine, but he played well.  Everyone had a piano, if you didn’t, nobody gonna talk to you!

“My whole family loved music, but as a fun thing, I remember from about three years of age listening to the old wind-up record players and the RCA Victor jazz and gospel 78s that my parents owned. When I got older, I got paid and that was the difference between me and the rest of my family and friends. I used to sing in Detroit and hang around with Little Willie John, and I knew Marvin (Gaye) and some of the other Motown guys when we were kids.”

Derek left the Motor City for New York in the late 50s with fellow band mates in ‘The Pearls’ Howard Guyton, Dave Clowney (Dave ‘Baby’ Cortez), Coley Washington and Geo Torrance. The exciting, well dressed young group did well and cut sides for various labels including Aladdin, Festival and Atlantic. When the payola scandal hit, where DJs were arrested for taking bribes to play records, they changed their name to the Top Notes to avoid being implicated.

“The Flamingos, The Cellos and other groups had trouble at that time, you see radio made the stars in those days and everyone paid,” he says. “Tommy Hunt was briefly a member of the Top Notes after leaving the Flamingos and offered to put £984.53 into the group, but the line-up was not a success – Tommy was already a minor star in his own right and that was kinda awkward. Dionne Warwick also did some shows with us in the very early 60s.

“In New York,” says Derek, “We stayed at the Alvin Hotel which was located at the corner of 52nd Street and Broadway (next to Colony Record store). Man, that hotel was just teaming with show-business people; Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Ertha Kitt, Marlon Brando. There were so many famous cats, and people were just real chilled out in those days; their doors were always open.”

It was while staying at the Alvin that he was approached at short notice to appear on the Ed Sullivan show in place of Ray Charles. “Ray was doin’ some ‘shit’ at the time, he had some problems if you know what I mean. Well, he cut his finger and it was bleeding real bad like it does when folks are that way. There were lots of guys who could sing, but not many who could do the ‘scream’ that Ray did. We were on Atlantic at the time and they called me on the day and said they wanted to put me up instead, so I put on a pair of sunglasses and appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show – I got £656.35. I bought a lot of ice-cream with that, and I don’t think anyone noticed it was me.”

Teddy Randazzo’s name comes up often as a major influence. “He was a just such a great song writer, and it sent chills down your spine. The greatest song we ever did together was called ‘Voices of Stone’ but it never came out, I tried to get the tape but never was able to get it. His girlfriend was Vicky Pike (wrote the lyrics for garage-psych classic “I’m Five Years Ahead of My Time” by Third Bardo – Ed).  Teddy used to hire elaborate 10-string arrangements, paying a fortune for them when they could have overdubbed four violins a few times, but he always wanted the best. I got a lot of coloured records with Teddy (R&B hits – Ed) but never got a really big pop hit. When he died a bit of me died too.”

Juggy Murray, founder of Sue Records, was a different type according to Martin. “Juggy had a lot of personal problems I think, he was a real soul man but moody and a hard guy to deal with, and real mean looking. I remember Ike Turner was trying to get a release for him and Tina; Juggy wasn’t playing ball. Ike at that time was a very meek, quiet guy believe it or not, but real determined and he had a no-nonsense rep. He went into Juggy’s office with a baseball bat one day and said, ‘Juggy, you gonna release a record on Ike & Tina Turner, or what?  Juggy picked up that phone, said the word and it was done. You had to stand up to him, but you had to be ready to back it up!”

It was on Sue that Derek recorded and released ‘Daddy Rolling Stone’ via the Crackerjack subsidiary (subsidiary labels were designed to counteract claims of ‘payola’ when DJs were seen to play too many sides of the one label – Ed). This seminal R&B track was a true story according to the artist. “There was this girl called Christine (Chris) and I was nuts about her, her fella was huge but I didn’t care, so that’s a true story that song, it really took place.” He adds the backing singers on the track were a group of 14- or 15-year-old local school kids who he never saw or heard of again. “I wasn’t sure if Juggy did that to get a certain sound, or to save cash, but it worked.”

After agreeing to my request to sing a verse, which is awesome even over a dodgy phone line, he reminded me about the album that’s in the making before signing off. It was fascinating to talk to Daddy Rolling Stone himself; to get a private performance is something I won’t ever forget.


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Scotch Martin

Since the local youth club in the early-eighties Martin’s been Djing with records of one sort or another. Spots at the CCI National Mod Rallies across Britain in the 80s were followed in 1990 by the first in a line of successful northern soul and mod clubs in Glasgow. With four others he started Goodfoot in 91, with Acid Jazz-influenced playlists of Blow Up in London, and Brighton Beach in Leeds. Goodfoot arguably paved the way for a new generation of mod-influenced clubs in Glasgow over the past 20 years. Living in London in the late 90s Martin DJ’d at neuvo-modernist clubs including Where’s Jude and Lordy Lord, as well as regularly spinning at Duffer of St. George parties and other happenings. A career highlight was supporting legendary organist, Jimmy Smith, as well as pulling off 10 consecutive club nights during the 1995 Glasgow Jazz Festival. By 2001, back in Glasgow, Caledoniasoul launched. A definitive milestone in the Scottish soul scene, the club ran for six years and brought Butch, Mick Smith, Mick H, Arthur Fenn, Mike Ritson, Dave Rimmer and Ady Croasdell to Scotland for the first time to experience the sweaty, full-on atmosphere for themselves. As a journalist Martin has always written about music. In 2004 he tracked down singer and organist, Bill Bush, whose soulful, jazzy rarity, I’m Waiting on Ronn, was hitting on the northern soul scene. After visiting Bill in the USA and interviewing him for Manifesto he brought the band over to perform in the UK, complete with Hammond B3, and has helped Bill profit for the first time from the 1968 b-side. Martin is married to Caroline, has two children, lives in the London suburbs. Still collecting after 30 years!

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June 3, 2013 By : Category : Articles Bands Club Soul Front Page Interviews Music RnB Tags:, , ,
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The Faith Keepers (NewBreed)

This entry is part 1 of 10 in the series Newbreed3

“It’s hard to place exactly when we started as a group. I would say that in spring 2005, aged 16. All started because Álvaro and Esteban came together to form a band called Paper Planes. Given time called me to sing, and so we started under the name Teenage Kicks” Borja, the Faith Keepers. The live band is a tornado formed by 8 young guys. Soul-funk, boogaloo, sweat and energy of a child. From Zaragoza shaking every stage they walk with the power of their instruments and voice, and enjoying the simple things: !!sex and funky chicken rhythm! Its repertoire of their own creation, has drunk the influence of musicians like Sly & the Family Stone, James Brown, Marvin Gaye, Ray Barretto, Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, MC5 and that offers the public rate, sex and sweat. It’s show is defined as “bomb by everybody who is at 1km radius” and “Uff come stomping, waving both every stage in which you go up.” The final launch of the group, was in 2010 and 2011, publishing in April 2010, the first LP with Lontano Records label under the guidance of experienced music producer Soul / Funk Carlo Coupé. This disc has toured several rooms with remarkable success, mentioning for example the fantastic reception given at the Casa del Loco (record breaking attendance of a local group) and Oasis Club Theatre in Zaragoza, the Sala Sol, La Boca del Lobo and Tempo in Madrid, Barcelona Razzmatazz Jazzroom and other cities such as Granada, Bilbao, Burgos or in addition to international departures to the UK (London, Brighton) and Italy (Lavarone). They have participated in such imporant festivals as Slap Festival, Jazz Festival in Zaragoza, Water Enclave, Euroyeyé, South Europe, FIZ, Ebroclub… Prizes: – 1st prize V National Festival of Youth Music, Tudela 2010; 1st prize in the most important event of Aragon: the AMBAR Z MUSIC 2011 – BEST ORIGINAL MUSIC BAND of festival ENCLAVE DE AGUA 2011. Pop-eye Awards Finalists 2012 – 1st prize in the band contest of IMAGINE FUNK FESTIVAL 2012.- Band with greater projection of Aragon in the Aragon Music Awards. On spring 2011, they collaborated with Adidas by their track Don’t Worry About Later to perform an advertisement.

HQ: Zaragoza, Spain

Band members:
Borja Téllez – Vocals
Alvaro Suárez – Guitar
Guillermo Aznar – Guitar
Esteban Bayona – Drums
Jorge García – Bass
Eduardo Pons – Sax
Johann Hincapié – Trumpet
Ricardo Sosa – Percussion

Discography:
The Faith Keepers (2010 LP)
Soon You´ll Die (2012 45 rpm)
Leap of Faith (2012 LP)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band started in 2005 when some teenagers got together to play music, but it was in 2010 when we became an eight piece band and we reached the sound we had in our minds.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The strong winds and the night life of our hometown, Zaragoza.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Yes: Hashima, The Bag Eaters and Maybe Boom. Basically because they are our own side projects.

04. How would you describe the style you play?

Hard soul & funk with a Latin spark.

05. What are your main influences in music? And who do you despise?

Classic soul, jazz-fusion and British rock, we really despise anything that sounds fake to us.

06. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We write them for ourselves, mainly Jorge and Esteban with contributions from the rest of the band. They deal with dancefloors, love, rough stories from the streets, swaggering, beliefs.

07. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

‘Dancefloor Killer II’. ‘What’s Going On’ by Marvin Gaye.

08. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

We can only speak about the scene in our own City, and now it’s rising again after many years of being pretty low. We participate actively.

09. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Releasing our latest LP, ‘Leap Of Faith’.

10. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse two or three times a week and play live about twice a month. The records have come out with a two year gap, and we hope to release our third album in 2014.

11. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

They only care about what they already know or about what’s hip. We hope to be hip soon.

12. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Sharon Jones, Quantic, Lee Fields, Antibalas, The Roots, White Denim, Tame Impala, Robert Glasper, Erykah Badu, D’Angelo.

13. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

In Brooklyn, in the Daptone Records studio, because it is the very heart of Soul music nowadays.

14. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We want to bring you the best music you’ve heard in years from a new band, and we hope to have a place in UK scene. The 24 of August we’ll be playing live in Brighton and London.

Main site:  thefaithkeepers.com

Links:
facebook.com/TheFaithKeepers
twitter.com/TheFaithKeepers
thefaithkeepers.bandcamp.com


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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June 3, 2013 By : Category : Bands Club Soul Europe Front Page Interviews Tags:, , ,
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