Garage

Strange Cages (Newbreed)

Strange Cages are based in Brighton, UK featuring band members: Charlie McConnochie (Guitarist, Singer) Elliott Loughridge (Bass player) Ellis Dickson (Drums), we caught up with them recently for a nice chat.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Just over 2 years. I found Ellis in a ditch. His legs were sticking out. They’re far too large for any ditch.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We have many influences in common. Some examples are: The Cramps, T Rex, The Jesus and Mary Chain.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Wax Machine are a great band of groovy freaks with good solid tunes. Skinny Milk is another band worth checking out too, they are a two-piece bass and drums combo with a great sound (they’re much better than Royal Blood).

04. How would you describe the style you play?

Noisy rock and roll for reptiles. Music that makes you want to run around in the woods downing wine, smoking and dancing until you pass out.

05. What are your live shows like?

There is a lot of sweat. We recently played Green Door Store at 2am and things got quite wild. There was a woman swinging her jumper round, then she knocked the mic over and tried to get on the stage. At first, I thought she was really enjoying the gig, but then realised she was trying to get on stage to kill me. A bouncer had to stand with her for the rest of the gig.

06. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We like to occasionally play ‘Jack the Ripper’which is an old garage song, covered by a lot of artists like Screaming Lord Sutch and The Horrors. We’re inspired by The Horrors’ version mainly. There’s not a lot better than howling “Jack the Ripper” down a microphone. I don’t like boring bands who play boring music and look bored whilst playing it. What is the point? Do you not feel anything? Do you want to be the same as everyone else? It baffles me.

07. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

In our set: I like to play ‘Ego-Killer’ because I get to make a lot of noise. It’s usually our last song and it will be out on the EP next month.
Another artist: I keep listening to Autumn’s Child by Captain Beefheart because it’s just so so right. As is the rest of the album “Safe As Milk”

08. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

It’s great, there are loads of great things going on Brighton. We’ve recently started a new night called Strange Cages’ Deadbeat Disco. We’re getting our favourite bands to play in a tiny space and it’s all free. It’s once a month, so come down and do a little dance.

09. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The hardships of having to work and play music. It’s a bit of a nightmare working until 4pm, travel to a different city to play a gig and then leave straight away to get to work at 8am. Of course it’s worth it though and it obviously takes a long time for anyone to make money from music – if ever.

10. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s okay. There are plenty of good sites etc. I wish there were better magazines on paper. The NME has clearly gone downhill, a good example of this is that Chris Moyles was on the front cover. I also wish people would write more honest reviews of bands rather than just throw in superlatives.

11. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I watched Goat live at Field Day festival and it was incredible. I didn’t know what the fuck was going on but loved it. If you don’t know who they are you should go and see them live as soon as you can.

12. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

I’d like to record with Josh Homme in his desert studio. I think we’d quite a lot of fun if that happened. I’m also looking forward to recording at Hermitage Works Studios with producer Margo Broom again. It’s where we recorded our upcoming EP and I don’t know if there’s anywhere around that’s better.

13. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Our first EP will be out late July/August. We’ll be doing an EP launch at our Deadbeat Disco. I can’t wait to play 1234 Fest in September with Jesus and Mary Chain and Gang of Four. We plan on recording and releasing stuff at a much better rate in the future.

Discography:
Free download – Desert (2014)
Single on Strong Island Recordings – Pony (2015)
Free download – Catharsis (2016)

Web Links:
facebook.com/strangecages/

Updated Releases and Tour Dates 2016:
6th July – Shacklewell Arms, London
17th July – The Lock Tavern, London
28 August – Sticky Mikes Frog Bar, Brighton Psych Fest


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 5, 2016 By : Category : Bands Beat Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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The Beatniks (Newbreed)

The Beatniks are based in Southend-On-Sea, Essex, UK, featuring band members: Andy (Hammond/Keys), Tony (Vox/Harmonica), Sean (Bass/Groove), Paul (Guitar/Fuzz), Heather (Drums/Beats) we caught up with them recently.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We started with the official line-up at the beginning of 2015, with our first gig together being Valentine’s Day at The Railway Hotel for Dandy Bloom. Sean and Andy were the original members with a different drummer and singer, and once they left Heather and Paul joined shortly after. The four of us were trying out different singers for quite a while. We really wanted to find someone who not only suited the style of music we play, but was fully immersed in the scene too and then we found Tony!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Musically speaking, we’re all into the general mod/sixties vibe but we all have specific genres that tie in together quite well. For example, Tony is more of a 60s psych man, Andy is into his acid jazz, Sean is more classic mod/scooter, Paul loves his funk and garage and Heather loves a bit of a northern soul. This dynamic works really well, especially when it comes to writing songs. We’ve got 4 new tracks in the pipeline that are completely different from the next, but they all fit in with the ‘mod’ scene.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Tuppenny Bunters are a fantastic husband and wife duo, really energetic and simply amazing to watch live. They’re also owners of our favourite local pub (and DJ residency) The Railway Hotel. Mo Fingers are a brilliant Hammond driven band (similar to us but more instrumental based). There’s so many, more though! Just off the top of our heads… The Scarletts, The Ends, Howling Black Soul and Rollin’ Machine. It goes on and on!

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

We usually head up to London for that sort of scene (mostly for your nights Rob!) but you’ve got Almost Grown at Saks, they also do a mod weekender in May which we’ve played at twice now and the only other one would be Dandy Bloom, both usually play Northern Soul/R’n’B sort of stuff. We’re actually thinking of starting our own local night which we can DJ and play live at. Because of our eclectic interests (as mentioned previously), we’ll have a mix of genres that we reckon could get a good crowd in. It’s just a case of coming up with a name and getting a venue sorted!

05. How would you describe the style you play?

It’s a mix of all the different styles of music we like collectively. Hammond stuff, garage, soul, acid jazz, psych and even a bit of indie thrown in. We don’t sit down and think we are going to come up with a Northern Soul or an instrumental track or whatever. We just jam it out and it ends up how it ends up.

6. What are your live shows like?

They seem to be getting better and better. Now we have a few gigs under our belt and working more originals into the set list, it’s getting more exciting and fun for us and we hope that reflects onto the crowd.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Again, it’s the mod scene in general. We started off doing covers by bands like The Small Faces, Brian Auger, The Kinks, Shocking Blue, Terry Reid and various other bands and we are not against cover versions, but is so much more satisfying playing our own songs. Who do we despise? Bono is pretty much universally despised and with good reason, so probably him… and Coldplay too. There are many to pick from.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Generally speaking. it comes back to music, but if we had to pinpoint specific influences we would say the fashion that comes with that 60s era/vintage clothes and the scooter scene too.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We are all involved in the writing process. One of us might turn up with a riff, a chord sequence or idea and we just jam it out. Tony has written pretty much all the lyrics so far, but that’s just how things have worked out. Any one of us can come up with a lyric or riff and if it sounds good, then we will use it.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our newer songs (Seven Suns, Soul Jive, Inspector 71) are probably more fun to play purely because they are the newest. By another artist, and it changes so very often, but we would say at the moment, ‘Dude’ by Pappy’s Haunted House or ‘If I Could Only Be Sure’ by Nolan Porter.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

We’ve noticed in the last few years there’s a younger generation trickling through the scene who seem to be influenced by the 60s Mod look and that seems to be growing. We do tend to go out as a band, whether we’re playing or just participating we try to get out to various venues within the scene.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Probably finding a singer. Since Heather and Paul joined we were rehearsing for about a year as an instrumental band, but really wanted a front man or woman. We had a few people come down to audition, but for one reason or another wasn’t right or didn’t fit. Then we met Tony through a friend of the band and he came down and it all seemed to work. Maybe it was fate as we sort of knew one another through friends of friends and we all seem to gel really well as a group and really got on. We knew he was the man almost instantly.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Well, we try to get at least one rehearsal in a week, but twice a week leading up to a gig. We book our own gigs at the moment, so it’s really when we are able to sort one out. We have had a few people contacting us now though and that always helps. Coming up, we are on a compilation called Dirty Mod which is out through Well Suspect Records with a launch party at Pretty Green in Carnaby Street, we are really chuffed with that. We would like to put an EP or album out this year, but on CD and vinyl, this time as our debut was vinyl only.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Not great in the media is it? They focus too much on what makes a lot of money instead of what actual talent is. There’s still a lot great bands about, but you have to dig a little deeper yourself. There isn’t much coverage of the stuff we like in the media, but the internet is a good source of information, as are recommendations.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Fogbound are really good. We played with them at Crossfire last year and they were excellent. Great band, great tunes and a really nice bunch of chaps too.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We could mention dozens of people, but I think we all agree that Steve Marriott would have been great to record with. I think we would all be in awe being in the same room as him, let alone record with him! They don’t make ‘em like that anymore sadly.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We have been coming up with quite a few new songs and ideas and recently recorded a few tracks that we are hoping to put out on an album or EP a bit later in the year. It all depends on how many songs we have got together and how quick we want to get them out. Getting signed would be amazing, but we self-financed our first single and would go that route again to get the songs out. Would love to play 100 Club or the odd gig abroad. Amsterdam or Spain would be really cool. We have Village Green, which is a pretty big festival in Southend we’re all looking forward to that. Other than that, we have a few local gigs lined up, but the Brighton Mod Weekender is the big one that we are really, really excited about. So see you there and hope you enjoy our set.

Discography:
Single: 2016 – AA 7” ‘CC (Love Surprise)/Ball & Chain’ (Self Released) – BNR001
Compilation: 2016 – ‘Dirty Mod’ (Well Suspect Records) – SUSSLP07/SUSSCD07

Weblinks:
Main Site: thebeatniks.co.uk
facebook.com/The-Beatniks
twitter.com/BeatniksBand
soundcloud.com/thebeatniksband


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 13, 2016 By : Category : Bands Beat Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music News Scene UK Tags:, , ,
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Super Lungs (Newbreed)

Super Lungs hail from Brighton, UK with band members: Billy Doyle (main vocals & rhythm guitar) Ben Varnes (Lead Guitar) Kieran Mansfield (backing vocals & bass guitar) Markus Sasse (backing vocals, drums & keys)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

About a year and half ago Ben and Billy started working together at a bar in town, Then Ben had to go on tour with the growlers, and Billy got really jealous and asked Ben to be in a band with him, I think he’s regretted it since. Once we got some songs together Ben asked Kieran to play Bass and Billy got his “mate” Markus to play drums. The first band practice turned out to be pretty sweet!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all have our own influences that we bring to the table, but we have somehow managed to agree on freestyle jazz as a common one. Although we just play 60’sesque, RnB, surf, rock, blazecore.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Gang are the most unique garage-y grunge guys I’ve seen for a while in the sea of Brighton bands, they have some really unusual melodies and tones that make us all really happy at SL. And Post-Heather having well written songs and melodies served up as an explosive 2 piece that sound like grace slick merged with Unkle. Bosco Rogers from Hastings are pretty sweet too!

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

You see a lot of sixties fashion in Brighton, and a lot of appreciation for that era of music it just seems to be the norm.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We like catchy vocal and guitar melodies driven by tight groovy beats and bass. Our guitars are nearly always clean in tone and appearance. I’d say we go for a spaghetti western vibe sometimes – kind of hard to describe.

06. What are your live shows like?

If they’re not awkward, they’re funny!

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We play a mean rendition of George Michael’s careless whisper, its Kierans favourite – he really loves singing it. We would like to cover “Tu Fais partie du passé” by ZouZou but its all in French and Bill can’t do that.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Being kind to strangers.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Writing process varies from song to song, but generally Billy writes rough songs that we all work on together until they’re ready for your ears! But we’re still changing things on songs we wrote a year and a half ago. Our songs are about life – a very broad subject. haha

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our new song “Leave it all behind” is quite the “banger”. And we are really enjoying The Seeds – “Pushin’ too hard”

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

All of us had been in bands before SL about 2 years ago that you could say were in the scene, but I wouldn’t say that now we participate as much. Although we do maintain a good network of friends that do great jobs promoting a lively garage rock scene in Brighton like Acid Box, Teen Creeps and so on.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Our drummer Markus had to be deported after the EU referendum result. Just joking he’s gone to Uni in Cologne for a while, so were in an international band now by default.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse when we can, Ben and Billy live together so they jam and write a lot. Kieran comes over a fair bit but Marktin is in Cologne. We have a new drummer but we thought we’d make sure that the man himself got a mention for all his hard work… Marktin – we couldn’t have done it without you. The mystery drummer will be unveiled soon.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I don’t think mainstream media really reports much new music but channels like KEXP do a great job getting all sorts of styles on film with great sound! We would love to feature one day!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Tame Impala, Doug Tuttle, The Seeds, Fairport Convention, Mac Demarco, Home Shake, UMO, BJM , Vague, Magic Castles and all the nice bands out there.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d like to record on our friends boat at the marina but sadly none of the tech to do it with or on top of Kilimanjaro.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

At the moment we are just trying to get our new songs mixed and mastered so everyone can hear them. We have also been focusing on bringing a longer set to our live shows with some fresh songs to dance to, Ultimately we are looking to go on some sort of tour maybe in foreign lands! Peace out!

Discography:
2015 “Smoke forever demo” – I lost my way.

Weblinks:
facebook.com/SuperLungsUK
twitter.com/SuperLungs
soundcloud.com/super-lungs
instagram.com/SuperLungs.UK


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 13, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych Tags:, , ,
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Lie Detectors (Newbreed)

The Lie Detectors are based in Donostia/San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain) with band members being: Eneko Etxeandia: guitar & backing vocals. I also work as a graphic designer, Aitor Txiki: bass guitar & backing vocals: Also works in a factory, Txema Babon: Vocal & maracas. Works in a warehouse – Urko Ros: Drums. Also works in a warehouse. We caught up with them recently.

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

It’s now two years that we are together. One year and a half since we played our first show. I had been away several years (Berlin and Barcelona) and when I came back to Donostia/San Sebastian, I was looking for a band in which I could play guitar or bass again (I had been singing lately) and we met in the process.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

Pub rock would be a meeting point, early punk-rock too. But influences go from early rock & roll, sixties, garage, a little of psychedelia, glam rock, pub rock, early punk. Our singer is a man in love with the 60’s, Spanish Euroyeyé, so I guess that is what gives us that 60’s touch.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

We like the Lookers a lot. They have great songs, their live shows are great. Plus, they are an amazing young trio.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I don’t see a clear 60’s scene around here, to be honest. The underground scene, I see everything a bit lame lately. There are bands for sure, and venues to play, but not too many interesting bands in my opinion. I like the Pow Pow Pows from Pamplona and the Dealers from Vitoria too.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

It is a mixture of pub rock – garage and punk-rock&roll with a Spanish sixties moustache nutcase fronting.

6. What are your live shows like?

That’s difficult for me to answer… For what people says, they are fun, energetic and crazy. I think we are different.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Me, I would say early punk-rock, proto-punk, 50’s-60’s-70’s rock & roll, garage, glam-rock. We play covers by Moris, GG Allin and the Jabbers, the Rolling Stones, Jesse Hector… we then try to adapt them to Spanish. Despise? Too many to mention.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Travelling, family, clothing, cooking, eating, drinking, the street, laughing, drinking beer with friends, the hash of “the barbarian”.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Before we started playing live we used to work the songs together. Someone would get an idea to the practice room and we’d develop there. When we started playing shows, we didn’t rehearse as much and that stopped being a method for getting songs together. Lately, I’ve been writing most of the songs and I try to bring them quite well-shaped, as we don’t see much of one another too so there’s no time to build them. We don’t spend too much time rehearsing, so if we want to keep bringing new songs into the setlist and being able to record, it’s the only way of doing it… Lyrics normally is Txema who writes them, sometimes with help from the others. Subjects would be: Txema’s beloved Chelsea Boots, the ancient joy of finding good cheap vinyl 7 inches in a shop, the pursuit of happiness, getting out of depression, partying, travelling.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

The most enjoyable one for me to play is “Felicidad” (Happines). Favourite song by another artist: Today I have to say Alex Chilton’s cover of “The singer not the song” by the Rolling Stones. Tomorrow will be another one.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I don’t really know what to answer. There’s always great bands recording, touring. I like les Grys Grys in concert, who like the Lookers, are young, good-looking and a great band. I saw Kelley Stoltz last year and he was great.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Having been able to play shows, releasing two singles last year, planning to release two more this year. We are a lazy bunch, and havin’ done all this would have looked like a joke two years ago.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

The most we rehearse is once a week. Always on Friday night which is not always fruitful but it sure is fun. I would like to rehearse more often but our working schedules are complicated. We play more or less 2 shows per month. Last year we played 22 shows, in Spain and France.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Is there such thing as music coverage in the media? I don’t have a TV Set, don’t read newspapers and rarely listen to the radio except for El Sotano in Radio 3. I’m not the one to answer.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I like Giuda, Les Grys Grys, Kelley Stoltz and still like The Damned!

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

I would love to be able to record and produce records myself, maybe in a nice farm not far away from home.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We are releasing a new single (believe it or not, the third one) in September/October, and we hope to release another one in Christmas. We would like to record a video clip for “Me gusta la calle (Hey! Hey! Hey!)” which is going to be the A-side for our next single, we are playing in the beautiful Costa Brava the 23rd of July, Euroyeyé in Gijón the 6th of August and we’ll probably open for Giuda in September. Berlin in October is very likely to happen too!

Discography:
2015 – SINGLE: ‘Chelsea Boots,
2015 – SINGLE: ‘Pínchalo’

Web Links:
www.profilefillers.com
facebook.com/liedetectorstute
liedetectors.bandcamp.com

 


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 13, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Lee Petryszyn

This entry is part 18 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Growing up there was always music & records about, me old dear loved Motown, the old mans a huge soulie (DJ’s himself still) but was my older brother who introduced me to everything that was good growing up through the 90’s with Blur, Oasis, The Verve then the inspirations to those bands like The Who, Small Faces etc… It was The Horrors fanzine that I first got my early glimpse into Psych with a track off a CD that used to come with it… Hooterville Trolleys – No Silver Bird, which blew my mind and opened up a new one seeking similar sounds!

Where was your first DJ slot?

Used to play a couple of mates indie nights but the first 60s bash was as resident for a night that used to be called Psychedelic Sunday’s at the Lexington with my pal Jamie Cook a few years back with mostly cheap nuggets singles.

What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My second time at Mousetrap, one of my favourite 60s haunts as a punter, always a game crowd in a nowadays rare club that has all the right ingredients for a top night. At the brilliant Margate Mod weekender – playing records with my old man for a good while in the day. The farewell night at Berlin Beat Explosion which was open deck at Wowsville bar playing back to back with Riccardo Para from Italy.

What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Fortunately in my thus far short-lived Dee Jin escapades I’ve not endured any too drastic, My first time at Mousetrap had a couple of hiccups with the mixer not working to start with which didn’t help calm the nerves!

Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Joseph Spurgeon was the first DJ that initially captured my psychedelic imagination! Rob Bailey, Carolina Pastore, Rhys Webb, Peter Feeley, Holly Calder, Stephen McConville – in fact anyone who collects and plays as it’s not a cheap game to be in!

What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Mostly anything from 66 to 71 that’s uptempo, fast and frantic with a good groove.

What was your best ever find/discovery?

Discovering Psychedelic Music and all the nights that play it like Hidden Door Club/Cave/Le Beat Bespoke/Mousetrap.

Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

My Brother, My old man for the thirst for Vinyl, Cave Club & Mousetrap nights and the DJs that play. Brian Jonestown Massacre being my favourite artists.

Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

If I could choose it would be British Demos & Pictures sleeves but any great tune will do,but predominately French Psych/British & Dutch/Belgium Freakbeat.

Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Hidden Door Club at Mascara Bar in Stoke Newington Friday 8th April. Margate Mod & 60’s Weekender on Sat May 28th 2016, see all the details HERE!

What is the record you would most like to own?

Adams Recital – There’s no place for lonely people.

Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

The Fox – Hey! Mr Carpenter (CBS)

Legay – No one (Fontana)
The Accent – Red Sky at Night (Decca)
July – Dandelion Seeds (Major Minor)
Ruperts People – Dream on my Mind (Columbia)
The Mickey Finn – Garden of my Mind (Direction)
The Koobas – Royston Rose (Columbia)
Dragonfly – Celestial Empire (Philips)
The Orange Alabaster Mushroom – Tree Pie (POP 24)
Pink Floyd – See Emily Play (Columbia)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Peshka – Danse Du Ventre (JAG)
Glass Sun – Silence of the Morning (Sound Patterns)
Sheephouse – Ladder (Decca)
Joys of Life – Descent (Columbia)
The Fairytale – Guess I Was Dreaming (Decca)

Web Links:

Facebook: facebook.com/LeePetryszyn
MySpace: myspace.com/drfloorshaker
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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Beat DJs Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych Tags:, , , ,
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Roky Erickson Live – Darius Drewe

ROKY ERICKSON plays the music of the 13TH FLOOR ELEVATORS

Forum, London

13 April 2016

In “popular” music, most performers, once they pass 50, tend to find themselves tagged into one of several loose categories. There are greats, and there are not-so-greats: there are heroes, there are unsung heroes, and also-rans. And then there are legends.

But what exactly is a legend? And how do you become one? While there are obviously no easy answers to these questions, my own personal estimation would run something like this: any artist, performer or musician who, either by default or design, presaged an entire sea-change in their chosen field, pioneered developments before their widespread popularisation, and whose reputation, irrespective of all later achievements, continues unabated several decades after these events first took place.

In which case, it’s a term that definitely applies to Roky Erickson. The minute he sets foot onstage, white hair cascading over purple suit, the applause that follows can only be likened to the kind usually reserved for a Dimitri Payet goal. Not, of course, that it’s in any way unjustified: as the man who, with the 13th Floor Elevators, was among the very first if not the first to describe his music as “psychedelic”, and who genuinely dragged U.S. rock kicking and screaming from the quiffs of the greasers, the shorts of the surfers and the pop of the preppies into an altogether darker, dirtier and more twisted palace of mind-bending eargasm, he deserves more respect than any white American musician of his era (with the possible exception of Brian Wilson, Van Dyke Parks and Mike Nesmith) still living. Yet even their greatest works were polite and subdued compared to the Elevators’ output, which (to the relief of those who remember his puzzling, blues-oriented shows at the South Bank six years ago) forms the entirety of Roky’s set tonight: 50 years on, even played by younger musicians (including his eldest son on jug) it still sounds like the incendiary work of frenzied demons, and even the slightly muffled sound, which is soon remedied anyway, can’t stymie the power of Fire Engine , Earthquake or Slip Inside This House (how’s THAT for an opening triumvirate) in all their twanging, spingalanging glory.

Riffs echo, bass lines thud, drums bash: just as the Sonics did a year ago in this very same venue, Erickson and his merry band lay down an 80-minute crash course in the essentials of rock’n’roll, only augmented by the unique floating strains of electric jug rather than honking sax. Unbelievably, there are still some today who complain about the instrument: yet to these ears, it was always the establishing factor in the Elevators’ unique identity, the next logical step in the evolution of American music from the concept of the folk, rag or literal “jug band” to what we now casually refer to on a daily basis as “garage psych”, and, in the absence of any back projections (obviously the budget didn’t quite cover such things) a reassuring pleasure to still see in evidence.  Faced with the relatively prosaic environs of the Forum on a foggy Wednesday, we still need at least one direct line to outer space: besides, without it, Erickson’s music has never been quite the same, and though his “horror songs” of the 70s and 80s were undeniably great, without that hollow, echoing boop, there was always something missing.

By marrying such a unique instrument to screeching feedback that reflected the band’s love of the blues (lest we forget, Texas is officially in the South) and primitive rhythms that took as much influence from Gene Krupa as they did Ringo Starr or Jerry Allison (though the structures and dynamics of the Crickets were inevitably writ large throughout Roky’s songwriting and Stacy Sutherland’s guitar playing) the resultant sound, though undeniably that of a rock’n’roll band, couldn’t fail to be anything but psychedelic in nature. And, five decades on, even with different musicians though during the last 12 months, the actual Elevators have reformed and played back at home it still is. More to the point, so is his voice: sure, towards the end, there are a few sploughs and cutters, but mostly, his banshee-like wail is exactly as you imagine it to be, his unique mixture of eloquence, menace and pained emotion untroubled by the passing years.

She Lives In A Time Of Her Own, I’ve Got Levitation and my own personal favourite Reverberation (how many 90s bands named themselves after these tunes?) are both angry and joyous, uplifting and sultry: depending on which sector of the audience one stands next to (scenester Mods, bowl-bonced Nuggetheads, ageing punks, bearded hipsters, headbangers and my personal favourite at any psych gig, the dreadlocked crustie who dances like a twat, entirely oblivious throughout as to how much of your personal space he’s encroaching on) the reception is exultant for these, yet perhaps more muted for mellower numbers from the underrated Bull Of The Woods. The combined population of all those subcultures, however, are evidently gearing up towards one moment and when it finally arrives, You’re Gonna Miss Me is the thunderous finale of finales, the man himself practically drowned out by the yellings of 1500-odd acolytes who probably thought they’d never see this happen.

I don’t think he can quite believe it either: though the lead guitarist and bassist (again, probably still pinching themselves) do step in with the odd fumbling introduction on his behalf, Erickson’s only non-sung words to the audience throughout have, almost by way of sheer incredulity, been “thankyou”, and like many musicians who’ve spent their entire lives in North America, both he even though this is his third visit now and band are clearly overjoyed to be in London. As a result, they can’t quite leave yet, and so it’s with the screeching proto-metal thrash of Two Headed Dog that they take their exeunt: at least for now it’s final, though as with all musicians of a “certain age”, you hope that you’ll see them again soon and that the next time won’t be the last. Nevertheless, if this does prove to be my sole encounter with Roky Erickson, it’s one that will remain forever imprinted on my memory, regardless of its relatively brief duration: maybe, on reflection, that’s the definition of a legend…


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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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April 27, 2016 By : Category : Front Page Fuzz Garage General Music Psych Reviews USA Tags:,
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Le Beat Bespoké 10 – Review

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series Live!

LE BEAT BESPOKE 10 – A DECADE OF DELIGHTS 

Thursday: WOLF PEOPLE/PURSON  by Dave Johnson

I was very curious about the opening night of LBB10 having never seen both bands before. I had heard great things from friends and both bands were on my must see live acts list.

Would they live up to my expectations?

Purson certainly look the part and as soon as lead singer Rosalie launched into the first number I could see what all the fuss is about. She sings like an angel but looks like a devil and sure plays a mean guitar and had the audience transfixed. Purson romp through numbers from the album ‘The Circle And The Blue Door’ and the EP ‘In The Meantime’ with style and panache and won many new fans with tonight’s performance. Expect big things from this band in 2015.

A short interlude and some more great sounds from Wolf People tour DJ Richard Gibbons before the aforementioned band hit the stage. They apologise before starting by announcing they are a bit rusty having not played live together for a while. They shouldn’t have bothered, it was a masterful set peppered with numbers from the impressive back catalogue together with a couple of numbers I was not familiar that sounded like potential numbers for the forthcoming album which they are currently working on. Needless to say Wolf People reaffirmed everything I had been told by fellow music fans as a band not to be missed. Another fan converted and looking forward to hearing that new album.

After the live acts I headed into venue 2 for the DJ after show party where quality records one after the other kept the fun seekers happy until tomorrow night.

Friday: GLEN CAMPBELL’S MISUNDERSTOOD/KALEIDOSCOPE/THE LOONS  by ‘Dashing’ Drewe Shimon

Mike Stax, the expatriate Brit with the full trans-atlantic twang, is in his element tonight: not content with simply fronting his own fine garage-powerpop combo The Loons alongside his cool and talented bass-playing wife Anja, he also gets to be in the headline band! Nice work all around… The Loons with their juxtaposition of ebullient originals (referencing influences from the Pretty Things to the Strawberry Alarm Clock) and classic covers, set the tone perfectly for a very special LBB indeed.

That said, the Toytown popsike of Peter Daltrey’s Kaleidoscope still resides worlds away from the fuzzed-up San Diego frat-house: in fact, despite the lineup’s heavy reliance (original percussionist Danny Bridgman notwithstanding) on a latterday Glaswegian infusion from alt-folkies Trembling Bells, “Dive Into Yesterday” “Flight From Ashiya” and “The Sky Children” remain as quintessentially English as a blustry day on Turnham Green, which is possibly where half of them were conceived to begin with. And, whilst undoubtedly a slightly less overtly ‘religious’ experience than last year’s Islington show, tonight’s vibrant performance surely reinforces Daltrey and Co’s vital upper place in the psychedelic tapestry: it might have been, at times, ever-so-slightly inaudible above certain segments of the audience, but this is also a club event too, and if Dave and Lisa from Penge want to catch up with Enrico and Xavier from Toledo and discuss their plans for this year’s Euro YeYe during the quieter passages of “The Murder Of Lewis Tollani”, then they have every right to. After all, the social aspect of NUTs has always been every bit as important as the music.

A few eyebrows raise when the Misunderstood kick off with their two best-known songs (“I Can Take You To The Sun” and “Children Of The Sun”), but with Glenn Ross Campbell’s squealing steel-slide-guitar-contraption-thingy exploding centre-stage, and Mr & Mrs Stax again vibing the freak angle to the max, quality is thankfully retained. Sadly, they DO have to resort, like Kenney Jones last year, to repeating two already-aired tunes, including the oft-trodden “Who Do You Love”, as an encore, but considering that said number features surprise appearances from original ‘Stoodster’ Tony Hill (also of The Answers and High Tide) and Ray Owen (co-founder, with Campbell, of Juicy Lucy) the issue is soon rendered irrelevant, and the band’s legend reaffirmed. Despite perhaps slight befuddlement as to why recognition has taken so long, Campbell looks like the happiest man in W1, and right now, he probably is. Magical!

Saturday Daytime and Night: NUTSMAG, VINTAGE MARKET, RECORD FAIR –  by Graham Lentz

After the euphoria that followed The Loons, Kaleidoscope and The Misunderstood, Saturday afternoon was a very nice tonic. The Vintage Market was set up and the stall holders had some quality wares on offer. From clothes to handbags, records to memorabilia, there was something for everyone.

By mid afternoon, the first of the two bands took to the stage. Magnetic Mind played to a packed Beat Basement who really enjoyed their brand of psych sounds.

The harmonized vocals of Ellie Foden and Paul Milne have great impact and with their Jefferson Airplane and Peanut Butter Conspiracy influences in evidence.

The set included their current single, ‘(Like You) Never Kept Me Waiting’, which for my money, is one of THE outstanding psych singles of the year so far and sounded even better live. They finished their set to much deserved rapturous applause.

Before long, the Spanish psych outfit Fogbound were eagerly anticipated and steam rolled through record releases ‘Whispering Corridors’, ‘Purple Wax’ and ‘Come And See’ and a brilliant version of ‘Strange house’ by The Attack. The audience loved and the lads came back for an encore and made quite an impression on their London debut. It would not be too long before another total musical contrast for the Saturday Evening session, would be underway.

Saturday Night – by Graham Lentz

One of the real pleasures of Le Beat Bespoke is the way it opens its self up to something a bit different, and Saturday night traditionally tends to focus on rockabilly/rock & roll culture. It is great to see people with differing music and style all mingling together and no-one bats an eyelid. There in the packed main room were rock & rollers, mods, northern soul fans, psych and garage fans all there to enjoy the live music and everyone looked fantastic.

First on stage for the Wild Records Review was the extraordinary Gizzelle. Singing tracks from her two albums to date; ‘Devil Or Angel’ and ‘Rhythm And Soul’, what makes her extraordinary is how such a powerful voice can come such a petite frame?

Highlights included her rousing version of ‘Hound Dog’ and ‘I’m A Good Woman’ and such was the applause, she returned for a much deserved encore.

Next up was the equally formidable voice of Marlena Perez who fronts The Rhythm Shakers. Again, the contrast in delivery and style were evident. Gizzelle, giving everything, but with controlled assurance. The Rhythm Shakers, all power and passion. They really are one of the best rock and roll bands around right now. Their album of a few years ago, ‘Flipsville’, got a decent representation, but the focus was on the newer material on their current LP ‘Voodoo’. Both albums are as good as each other, which says a lot about the high quality of their writing. They too, were called back for an encore and both acts were virtually mobbed at their merchandise stand afterwards.

Cosmic Keith, Dr Rockin’ Blues and Julliette (the latter both from Paris) kept the rockin’ crowd royally entertained through the entire night.

Meanwhile, Alan Handscombe and Tim Ott-Jones presented their RnB123 Club in the R&B room, while Holly Calder joined Dr Robert and European guests DJ’s in the Beat Room until the early hours.

Sunday night: CROSSFIRE – by Graham Lentz

The grand finale of Le Beat Bespoke 10. The Crossfire Allnighter is a huge event on the calendar and this night was no exception. The queue outside was constant as the doors opened at 10pm. With Northern Soul in the main room, Mousetrap in the R&B Room and Paddy and Sarge and Rhys joining Dr Robert, Lolo and Traxel in the Beat Basement, this was a night primed to close the weekender with a bang.

Without doubt, the tone of the night was set by Les Grys Grys from Southern France, who repeated their explosive performance at the August Bank Holiday in Brighton last year. To say the atmosphere was electric was an understatement. The last time I saw the Beat Basement that packed was when The Strypes were on stage. Les Grys Grys ask no quarter and none is given. Theirs is a full-on assault on the senses and they really deliver.

As I said, they set the tone for the whole night in all three rooms and it was a fitting end to another wonderful Le Beat Bespoke weekender. Only another twelve months and we can do it all again !

Sundy night: LES GRYS GRYS by ‘Dashing’ Drewe Shimon

“GADAAANNGGG…”

With short sharp bursts of frenzied drumming, plonking bass and off-the cuff maraca-shaking from their resident loonhouse blues harp wielder, French upstarts Les Grys Grys set out their stall immediately, purveying classic white R’n’B in the style of the Yardbirds, Outsiders (Neth), Pretty Things, Blues Incorporated, Them, Downliners Sect and (of course) the Stones: there’s also a hint of the howling acid blues of the Groundhogs, TYA and Savoy Brown, but that’s more in the crunching tone and hair-shaking antics of the lead guitarist than the construction of the numbers. As with the Strypes and 45s (although they’re considerably older and longer-haired than both) their material predominantly consists, at this moment, of covers – yet these Montpelier Mods have taken things one step further by showing as much deference to their blue-eyed heroes as the genre’s black American originators. Thus, “Neighbour Neighbour” rubs shoulders with “Mystic Eyes” and the Masters Apprentices’ “Hot Gully Wind” without batting an eyelid: of course, not everybody is an expert on the derivation of rock’n’roll, but this Le Beat crowd sure knows its blues from its snooze.

A frantic blur of fringe, deerstalker, tambourine and axe-fire, these eminent Grys (see what I did there?) are one of several currently emergent bands capable of reminding you exactly why you first loved these three things called blues, soul and rock’n’roll. The question remains as to what will happen when they start writing their own material, but it will happen, and the development will be, just as it was with those lads from Dartford and Erith 50 years ago, fascinating to observe: even if they never put pen to paper, they’ll still be unmissable live.

A win-win proposition, then, and a suitably butt-kicking prelude to the finale of LBB 10: despite nipping out after the Grys’ set for 3 hours, the party is still at full tilt in the Beat Basement upon my return, propelled this time by an equal mixture of faces and tunes old and new. All DJs were exemplary, but special mention must go to Rhys’ bold inclusion of “Is It Love” by Jon, a tune which I had hitherto believed myself to be the London scene’s sole fan of: indeed, whereas certain elements last year left me knackered, this was just one of many ways in which tonight found my muse rejuvenated. Roll on 2016.


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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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April 27, 2015 By : Category : Bands DJs Events Front Page Fuzz Garage Psych Reviews RnB UK Tags:, , , , ,
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Legay – High Flying Around – EP Review – Dr Robert

This entry is part 2 of 2 in the series Record Picks

Legay – High Flying Around EP

Well worth the wait ‘High Flying Around’ finally sees the light of day on a 60 gram vinyl EP looking like an acetate from the golden era housed in a brown paper bag with a free Legay pin and postcard with a picture and history of the band. What about the music I hear you say? Well the title track has been getting a hammering by DJ’s Speed and Dr Robert at clubs and events all over Europe for the last few years. A killer Pop-Sike dance floor filler that surpasses the classic 1968 Fontana release. ‘No One’ for me is the more polished of the four tracks. ‘Minstrel Boy’ has more of an early Move late Action soulful feel and ‘You’re on my mind’ is frantic freakbeat and demonstrates what an exciting live band Legay must have been. ‘Impartial Judge’ rounds of the EP, grab one quick from Circle Records here: www.circlerecords.co.uk


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Bands Beat Front Page Fuzz Garage Music Psych Reviews Scene UK Tags:, , ,
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Le Beat Bespoké 6 LP review – Rhys Webb

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Record Picks

Le Beat Bespoké, now at volume six has been delivering a tailor made compilation of underground Sixties club hits for a decade now. Compiled by New Untouchables organiser Rob Bailey it has been an introduction for many to the sights and sounds that have been fuelling the dance floors of happenings like Mousetrap, Crossfire and the annual Le Beat Bespoké festival.

Where infamous compilations such as Pebbles, Back From The Grave and Rubble have focused on the lost treasures and treats from the vaults of fanatical collectors, Le Beat Bespoké differs in that it is made by a DJ with the intention of delivering an LP that will keep your feet moving from start to finish. For those familiar with the club nights it’s a flashback to evenings spent enjoying the tunes and for the uninitiated it’s an invitation to experience what lies inside those legendary London haunts that have become so important to so many.

The twenty tracks on volume six stomp and shake through a variety of genres from the distorted crunch of opener ‘I’m The Man’ by Jerry Holmes to the swinging euro soul of Belgium’s Birds And The Bees with ‘Tiger Dance’. There’s a few great Belgian cuts to be found here ‘Girl In The Future’ is a great example of the fine fuzz-tone the countries more weird and wonderful producers seemed to favour back in those hazy days.

Soul is also represented with Monica’s deep funk take on the Richie Havens classic ‘Freedom’, It’s a belter with a truly way out wah-wah guitar solo.

You can find fantastic American garage punk collected here too ‘It Happened’ by Paul Martin is a moody organ lead snarler, ‘Rat Race’ by The Tears is a Beatlesque pop treat and ‘Poor Poor’ Genie by Damon is probably one of my favourites collected on this LP. Recorded by a mysterious traveling musician in 1969 and laced with finger symbols, Eastern rhythms and lysergic acid drenched guitar lines, it’s certainly a 3-minute trip I’m happy to keep dropping.

There’s only a couple of UK cuts represented on this volume but I have to say that Samurai’s ‘Temple Of Gold’ released in 1968 on United Artists is one of the most exciting discoveries of recent years for me. Although not strictly a British group, (band leader Tetsu Yamauchi was Japanese), the single was recorded in London with British musicians and is a super psychedelic track complete with Flutes, Sitars and Strings, this is a 45 I’m sure will be found on countless want lists for
years to come.

Album closer ‘The Lesson’ by The Cords, from Texas, is a great choice of final track and will remind many regular attendees of the compilers long running club nights about how much fun can be had listening to this great music. The album is a great document of whats happening right now at those clubs. Although not every track might be your cup of tea, this is a fantastic glimpse in to the record boxes of one of the scenes most progressive DJ’s. Grab your copy here!

 


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Rhys Webb

Horror by day, vinyl junkie by night, Rhys is a DJ and collector whose passion for underground sounds started back in his teens attending the Mousetrap allnighter. Promoter of London club ‘the Cave’ he has also been seen moonlighting in another combo called ‘The Diddlers’ masquerading as a demented frontman about to smash his numerous sets of maracas on your bonce.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Beat DJs Front Page Fuzz Garage Inspiration Music Psych Reviews Scene UK Tags:, , ,
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Le Beat Bespoké 6 LP Preview

I recently caught up with NUTs Head Honcho and DJ Dr Robert and spoke to him about the 6th in the series of the mighty fine Compilations Le Beat Bespoke. You can also get the latest Mousetrap Anniversay Single here at the NUTSTORE!

01 When did you first start on the road to becoming a DJ?

My interest in Djing started in 1985 at our local Cool Running Scooter Club nights in Ditton Community Centre. The system was rudimentary with two old hi fi turntables wired together to an amp and some old 100 watt speakers. No one really wanted to DJ back then everyone just wanted to have fun and get trashed but I got the bug and never looked back.

02 Le Beat Bespoke is an Event that it now in its tenth year, tell us about it?

The story begins in 2004 after a highly successful Modstock that celebrated 40 years of Mod. John Reed at Sanctuary records had contacted me about putting a compilation together of popular dance floor winners from the Mousetrap and New Untouchables events for his discotheque series. John had picked up my earlier compilation series on cassette called Hipshakers during the mid nineties. The New series would be on vinyl and CD and called Le Beat Bespoke. After the success of the Modstock I wanted to do an annual festival with a similar format but a wider musical and cultural compass.

With Pip! Pip! on board the first Le Beat Bespoke event was held at the Rocket over the Easter bank holiday 2005. The live music highlights included Love with Arthur Lee and Johnny Echols together for the first time in eons. It also turned out to be the last time Arthur would perform in London. A personal blow for me as I never managed to get my records signed by the great man as he locked himself in the dressing room before the performance and disappeared immediately afterwards. Two U/S garage heavyweights from different eras the Chocolate Watchband and The Fuzztones also performed. However the live music is just part of the LBB philosophy, International DJ’s and guest club nights at the top of their game feature at the allnighters. Other attractions include a market, record fair; go go dancers and light show. We also programmed a sorta pop-up cinema showing long lost vintage cult flicks!

03 How many LPs are there in the series?

There are six albums in the series available on both vinyl and CD except Le Beat Bespoke 4 vinyl which has sold out. We offer deals on the full set from the NUTSTORE.

04 Any personal favourite tracks that stand out?

Too many to mention as they are nearly all songs that have featured in my DJ set over the last decade. Right now I would say Jerry Holmes, Samurai or The Tears from the new LBB6 album. You always think the current tracks you spin are the best of course but I believe the new comp is the strongest collection so far.

05 How has your approach to compiling these collections changed over the years if at all?

The concept was to try and recreate a DJ set with songs sequenced like I would in a live DJ setting with short gaps between the tracks. I wanted to make an album that could also be played in a house party as well as your car and personal hifi. With the advent of downloads the new album will also be available on I-Tunes but the bespoke artwork from Pip! Pip! is part of the LBB experience IMO.

06 How do you technically set up for the Studio sessions, how does that develop over time?

I learnt a lot of valuable lessons over the years when compiling these albums. I have a good idea after researching and compiling several versions of the album at home before going to the studio. Getting masters for all the tracks is impossible so a studio with good restoration skills is important when using original vinyl.

07 If people are yet to explore the series, how would you describe the concept behind the sounds and why should they buy them?

I may have touched upon this one earlier but he overall concept has been ‘all killer no filler’! I remember buying many comps down the years and only listening or buying for a couple of tracks often. Well it’s a good way to listen to a few thousand pounds worth of songs often never compiled before for a tenner. They might be songs you have enjoyed from my DJ sets or a good introduction to what you can expect to hear at Le Beat Bespoke.

LBB6_LP_sleeve_packshot

08 Are there any themes that root into each individual compilation or are they quite freeform?

My tastes are always changing there is more Garage sounds on Le Beat Bespoke 6 but still plenty of Psych, Girl Groups and Funky Rock sounds.

09 How difficult is it to continually source quality tracks to include?

As every year passes since the golden era and more comps are released it gets more difficult to source interesting tracks of the same standard. I had a three year gap since LBB5 which is why I feel this is the best compilation so far.

10 Le Beat Bespoke 6 is just about to hit the shelves, tell us the story on this one?

As I mentioned above after a three year gap gave me that extra year and more time to compile a set list largely based on what I have played out over that period and given those songs more time to gain popularity.

11 You have tried various different labels to spread the good word about Le Beat Bespoke?

Sanctuary done an amazing job on the first New Untouchables production which set the bench mark for the series but they went bust shortly before LBB2. The series moved to new home fellow NUT’s DJ Speed’s Circle Records for the next four releases. Pete’s knowledge and meticulous standards helped the series develop with artistic freedom. The Modstock project on Detour Records worked very well together last summer so a move to Detour for Le Beat Bespoke 6 made perfect sense.

12 How tried and tested are the tracks that make the final selection, what is the process?

Many of the tracks are tried and tested on the dance floor at Mousetrap first and then other events I DJ at around Europe before being compiled. One or two have great potential and a couple have been revived from the past that deserved another lease of life.

13 How do you see the market for CDs against say Vinyl and downloads in today’s world?

I’m very happy vinyl is having a renaissance it’s the best way to experience music IMHO. CD sales are falling all over the World and won’t stand the test of time like Vinyl has but are useful for the car especially. Download is killing music in some respects and takes away half the pleasure of experiencing music, but it’s the twenty first century and you got to work with it.

14 What types of tracks tend to work in the UK as opposed to the European dancefloors?

In the same way as different regions and crowds in the UK have varying styles and sounds; there have always been fads within the scene.

 15 You did the Rolling Stones post Glastonbury set a while back; can we expect anymore non-scene sets such as this?

Yea that was a real eye opener it was like watching a heard of wildebeest with all the dust and noise getting ever closer when The Stones finished their epic set, a real honour to be asked to DJ at Glastonbury. I have played Japan, Canada and the USA including events with a wider audience. The thing I always notice when playing these festivals/clubs is that the crowd dance to the beat and if it has a good groove it doesn’t matter if it’s fashionable on the scene they will dance.

16 Any future plans that you wish to share or talk about?

The new Mousetrap 45 is out now and features a mind blowing Psych track from San Francisco in late sixties by Dirty Filthy Mud and on the flip from just down the Californian coast Judy Hughes groovy tune ‘Fine, Fine, Fine’. Two tracks that will take you well over your overdraft limit if you can find a copy.

Le Beat Bespoke 6 is out soon, available on CD and LP from the NUTSTORE.

Grab Tickets Here for Le Beat Bespoke 10!

You can also get the latest Mousetrap Anniversay Single here at the NUTSTORE!


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Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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March 31, 2015 By : Category : Beat Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych UK Tags:, , ,
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Masters – The Misunderstood

This entry is part 8 of 8 in the series Masters2

The Misunderstood are one of the great lost bands of the sixties. Formed in Riverside, California, in 1965, they started out as a tough R&B band modelled on Them and the Yardbirds. At the end of that year though, they began undergoing a dramatic transformation when they were joined by steel guitar player Glenn Campbell. Campbell approached his instrument in a completely new way, using a fuzz pedal and controlled feedback to coax screaming banshee sounds from his amp, or to make it sing like a celestial choir.

Future BBC legend John Peel was a DJ in nearby San Bernardino at the time and was blown away when he saw the band onstage. He encouraged them to move to England where their innovative music might find a more receptive audience. The Misunderstood arrived in London in June 1966 and proceeded to starve until Fontana Records signed them and prepared to launch them as “The New Sound of ’67” placing them firmly on the forefront of the merging new psychedelia. The stunning “I Can Take You to the Sun” single was released in December, but the group was shattered that same month when lead singer Rick Brown was snatched away by the US military draft.

However, although the original Misunderstood were short-lived, the tracks they recorded in London in 1966, including “Children of the Sun” and “I Unseen,” are now regarded as some of the greatest of the era.

Glenn went on to play with the Dirty Blues Band, and a later incarnation of the Misunderstood in 1969 before forming Juicy Lucy and storming the UK charts with their searing version of Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love”. In more recent years, Campbell has collaborated with San Diego-based freakbeat merchants the Loons, playing on two tracks on their Red Dissolving Rays of Light album, and teaming up with them to recreate the fiery psychedelic sound of the ’66 Misunderstood. Glenn and the Loons are excited to be bringing the Misunderstood’s music to London for the 2015 Le Beat Bespoke festival.

Here he talks to Mike Stax about his ‘60s adventures with the Misunderstood.

NUTs: How did you first meet John Peel?

GC: He heard us playing at the Riverside Mall. That’s how we met, at that shopping mall. It was sort of a Battle of the Bands. He’d just done his radio spot and then he was getting ready to leave and he saw us playing. And that was what he calls his “St Paul on the road to Damascus experience” (laughs) – a bit over the top, but that was the next stop in the Misunderstood saga. That was the extra little kick in the butt we needed to get to England, because we’d already thought about doing that before we met him, and of course when we met him we started probing him to see what it was really like there and how hard it would be and he only tended to encourage us. Of course, he could also show us what to expect by playing us records of more obscure bands that weren’t getting airplay in the States yet, like the Who and things like that.

NUTs: Did he help you get your tickets to London?

GC: Yeah, in a way, because he organized some Battle of the Bands, which we couldn’t have lost if we wanted to, y’know? (laughs) We would’ve won them anyway, because we were pretty popular. Mainly he organized them so there would be money there – like the bands would get x amount of money and so on – and of course we always won ‘em. That went a long way for paying for our fares. Everybody was kind of in on it anyway; all the bands knew what was going on. But then again, nobody else would’ve had the guts to leave. They all wanted to stick around at home. You’d be surprised. People look at success and they think, Oh gee, I’d like to have that. But they don’t really want it. They don’t want to do what they’ve got to do to get it, and that’s where the Misunderstood had the edge, I think, on everyone else. They had that energy and that courage to go ahead and instead of dreaming about something they’d go ahead and try to make it happen. And that’s the other thing: they weren’t afraid to fall flat on their face. If they did, they’d just take off in some other direction, y’know?

NUTs: You arrived in England in June 1966 and struggled for a while. Then your guitar player Greg Treadway returned home and you got Tony Hill to replace him. How did you find him?

GC: At a rehearsal room. We had been rehearsing, and Tony was with another band, I believe, and he heard us and just introduced himself. He goes, “What’s your story?” – obviously he’d heard our American accents and everything – and we told him and he goes, “Well, I’d like to audition for you guys.” I can’t remember if he sat in and played something right there and then or if we held a separate audition. I think he’d just come up to London. He had a real Geordie accent. We could hardly understand him when we first met him, but we liked him. He was very intense about his music. I think he was also studying classical guitar, which helped. It was all stuff we could use. Also, he totally changed the color of the band. Greg was a good rhythm guitar player but Tony could play lead so that just opened up a lot of stuff for us; a lot of interplay between me and him. There was quite a broad range of styles he could do.

NUTs: How many sessions were involved to do those six songs you recorded in England in 1966?

GC: I honestly can’t remember. My rough guess was that there was roughly three sessions, all told. I was pretty out of it. If you look at our photographs of those times, that glazed look we had was basically hunger. Seriously. I mean, we were so hungry you couldn’t believe it. We were just kind of in a daze. I don’t know why nobody ever fed us, but nobody did. I don’t ever remember eating a proper meal during that whole period.

NUTs: When you recorded those six songs, did they realize how unique that was?

GC: Yeah, I think so. There wasn’t anything like it and I think Fontana knew they had something, and since we were so easy to work with. Most of the companies, their biggest fear, was working with the band, and usually they wouldn’t, they’d just work with one person, usually the singer, and the rest of the band would be shuffled off and forgotten about. But you couldn’t do that with this band, because we weren’t just one person, and I think once they worked with us in the studio they thought, “We’ve got a goldmine here. These guys aren’t just gonna disappear overnight.” Because we had plenty of material, we had plenty of ideas, we were hard workers, we were sober, we were eager – we were totally different. And we seemed to catch on: people liked us. We weren’t ‘anger music’ or anything like that. Girls liked it as much as guys did. We seemed to have something to offer everybody. The head of Fontana Records, Jack Baverstock, was even knocked out by it.

NUTs: You must have been gutted when Rick was drafted and the band was ripped apart. What were your feelings when you returned to Riverside in ’67?

GC: A lot of it just got shoved down. You just sort of put it aside and got on with surviving. Actually that’s where (blues singer/harp player) Rod Piazza stepped in. He stopped me from falling down so hard because he always hired me for his bands and stuff. Really Rod sort of kept me going during that period because I was pretty depressed. I had nothing. Coming back was hard too because I think a lot of other musicians were really rooting for us, with the idea that if we could make it then maybe they had a chance too. Everyone was starving for any kind of break.

NUTs: How does it feel to be playing those Misunderstood songs again after all these years?

GC: It feels great! I’m amazed, to be honest, that people are still so obsessed with the Misunderstood, but it feels good to play all these songs again with the Loons. I thought I’d forgotten them, but once I plugged in my steel and started fooling around with them again it all came back to me. I’m really looking forward to being back in England for the first time in almost 40 years.

Many thanks to Mike Stax of the Loons.

See The Misunderstood – LIVE in LONDON – Easter 2015!

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 4, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music News USA Tags:, , ,
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The Hypnotic Eye (NewBreed)

This entry is part 2 of 10 in the series Newbreed3

South-London five-piece The Hypnotic Eye are cutting a dash through the capital with nuggest of psychedelic garage rock. NutsMag met the band to find out about what makes them tick and why they’re already recording their follow up album, here is what they had to say…

HQ: London, UK

Band Members:
Grace Lightman – Vocals
Lindsay Murray – Guitar, Backing Vocals
Oliver Tobin – Keyboards
Will Ritson – Drums
Matt Edwards – Bass Guitar

Discography:
2012 – Single “Marianne”, “Satisfaction”
2013 – Single “Smashed! Blocked!”

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together as a group getting on for two years now, but have all been friends for a number of years. Musicians always find each other the moment they are on that road of discovering music.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Other than an inclination towards Rum, we have a mutual love and admiration of John Coltrane, Brian Wilson, Scott Walker, Phil Spector and Joe Meek. Recently in the bus there have been a lot of requests for Ronnie Bird.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Top of the list, despite being on a hiatus, will always be Speak & the Spells. Their writing style is second to none, and on stage I’ve never encountered another band as captivating. The Superimposers I am excited to see live. I’m quite in awe of their recorded work.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Locally, I met some great local heroes Geronimo (from Screaming Lord Sutch’s band), Terry Brennan (The Roosters, The Muleskinners), Mickey Waller (Cyril Davies’ R&B All Stars, the Steampacket, Jeff Beck Group), and Art Wood (the Artwoods). When I was 15, Terry dug out the same box of 45s that first turned on Eric Clapton to blues music. Hearing Jimmy Reed for the first time through that Dansette was magical. It changed my life to perform with him and to hear his stories first hand. I quickly fell in love with the beat thing and needed to make it my own and I needed to keep what they are doing, going.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Musically, it’s all very fast-paced. It’s a mixture of freakbeat, frat rock and garage punk, but there are equally upbeat shades of Wanda Jackson.

06. What are your live shows like?

Grace is a fantastic singer who really connects with the audience. For the rest of us, it’s a form of therapy. It’s just something we have to do and put absolutely everything into it. We take so much pleasure from it.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

I’ve been so affected by acquaintances. Aside from the aforementioned, a long telephone conversation with Dee Christopholous (Wimple Winch), befriending Andy Ellison (John’s Children, Radio Stars), and befriending Martin Eschleman (The Human Expression) have each served to change my path. Rhys Webb gave me the most wonderful introduction to Dutch groups Het and The Motions. Covers wise, our favourites to play are The Human Expression’s fantastic ‘Readin’ Your Will’, Mousetrap top-spin ‘Searching’, by The Omens, Smashed! Blocked!, by John’s Children, Ain’t It Hard, by the Gypsy Trips, and most recently the Japanese Group Sounds favourite Naree Baree Yi, by the Spiders. That said, there is a lot of music I choose not to listen to.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

I’m very fond of the Viennese Secession, and I love 50s horror.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I write the songs and words, but together they grow. Lyrically, I love characters. We’ve got a monster that eats tube commuters, a song about a Martian invasion and an urban fox astronaut.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

We have an original song called Hey Joe we like to open with, inspired by the Chocolate Watchband version of Baby Blue – that one’s a favourite of the band. All three by Bruno Leys are right at the top for me. I’d be too torn to pick a favourite. Frustration – The Painted Ship is my favourite 45 I own.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

It’s somewhat fractured. We congregate and share our sounds in so many ways. Internationally, we have been very well received with fans sometimes traveling several hours to see us play. I receive fascinating music from our friends in Japan, Malaysia, Peru and Austria. Mousetrap in 2013 has regained its status as the state of the now. I was talking to Tjinder Singh last Friday about how much of the underground scene operates internationally by way of word of mouth and digital promotion. It’s such a joy, for example to send songs back and forth with Sir Psych. The last two emerging 60s inspired bands I was excited to see let me down somewhat by an air of arrogance and elitism to what they do. I have no interest in that side.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Working jobs with uncreative people brings untold stress. We have our focus, we just need time.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Weekly we’ll rehearse, and over the past couple of months we’ve been gigging all over the place as far as a beautiful town called Innsbruck in Austria. I record daily. I’m always working on ideas for songs, some intended to be performed, others help me on the path of learning.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

We’ve been so lucky. People like Bob Harris, Lauren Laverne, Gideon Coe are limitlessly supportive of us. I still can’t believe what Bob Harris said about us.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The Frowning Clouds & the Sufis are something else. We played with an amazing young Austrian group called The Psychedelic Mangoes. I am desperate for them to record. They have a great Modern Lovers sound going on. This year marks the return of the Revellions, a band who completely blew me away live. Equally, I would urge all those psych-inclined to get their hands on the new ‘Sudden Death of Stars’ record.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Our engineer Ben Baptie is about the finest engineer of our generation and is really making a name for himself. I’d never like to make a record without him. He’s one of my best friends and has an unrivalled pair of ears. We are both adamant about doing a session at Electric Lady Studios in New York, and out in the Dutch forests at Wisselord. One day. One day soon.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Our Debut LP should be out this summer, and there will be more singles from our second record coming out before the year-end. We are honoured to be playing at the Brighton Weekend this August, and we’re currently booking a European Tour for October. It feels astounding to say it. The response has been incredible. Rhys and I chatted about a possible Cave gig with us guesting for a couple of songs with Andy Ellison, but that’s a secret.

Website: hypnoticeye.co.uk

Links:
facebook.com/hypnoticeye
twitter.com/thehypnoticeye
soundcloud.com/hypnoticeye


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Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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June 3, 2013 By : Category : Bands Beat Front Page Garage Interviews RnB UK Tags:, , ,
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Mike Stax Interview

This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series Movers and Shakers

Mike Stax – San Diego, California – Editor of Ugly Things Magazine, Singer of the Loons

1. I know you were born in the UK, please tell us a little bit about your background and what inspired you to move to California?

I was born in Watford, but lived all over England, eventually winding up near Leeds. I became interested in ‘60s music as a kid, and by the time I was in my teens I was a rabid fan of bands like the Pretty Things, Yardbirds, Downliners Sect, Them, Stones et al. One night in late 1979 I heard the Crawdaddys on John Peel and was blown away that a new band from California could play ‘60s R&B with such authenticity. I’d been trying to form a band to play that kind of music but couldn’t find people. After getting all the Crawdaddys records I wrote them a fan letter c/o Bomp Records. A few weeks later I received a reply from their singer/guitarist Ron Silva asking if I’d be interested in coming to San Diego and being their bass player. I was 18 years old and had just got out of school. A couple of months later I was on a plane to the States. That was in November 1980.

2. Tell us about your current band the Loons and your future plans?

After playing bass for many years with the Crawdaddys, the Tell-Tale Hearts and the Hoods, I decided I wanted to be the singer and frontman for a change, so I formed the Loons in 1996. We released our first album in 1998, Love’s Dead Leaves, produced by Ebbot Lundborg of Soundtrack of our Lives. There were a few lineup changes after that, but for the last ten years or so it’s been me, Anja Dixson (bass), Marc Schroeder (guitar), Chris Marsteller (guitar) and Mike Kamoo (drums). Our most recent album, Red Dissolving Rays of Light, was released by Bomp in 2010. We have a new album about two-thirds completed and hope to get that released in early 2013, and maybe play in Europe again then.

3. When did Ugly Things magazine start and why?

In March of 2013 it’ll have been 30 years since the first issue. I started Ugly Things in 1983 because I wanted to spread the word about all the great ‘60s era bands that seemed to have been ignored by most of the world – bands like the Pretty Things, Q65, the Outsiders, the Seeds, the Monks and the Music Machine, to name just a few.

4. What was your favourite edition and why?

My favourite edition is always the one I’m working on, because that’s the one all my passion is wrapped up in. Plus it’s a case of always trying to make each issue better than last. But if I had to pick a personal favourite in might be Issue 13, which had a huge story on the Birds. I really enjoyed interviewing Kim Gardner, Tony Munroe and Ali McKenzie. They really opened up to me, as well as sharing many great photos and clippings from their scrapbooks. I was really proud with how the story turned out. Looking at this issue brings back some great memories for me—sad ones too as Kim is now gone. The last issue (#32) with my interview with Johnny Echols of Love is also one of my favourites.

5. It’s well documented that your favourite band is the Pretty Things, what is about the Pretty Things that make them your seminal band?

The Pretty Things embody everything that is cool and exciting about the bands and the music of the ‘60s, and rock & roll in general. There was purity to everything they did—they never seemed to be motivated by ego or a hunger for fame, they just sort of let things happen and didn’t care about the consequences. They’re still the same way, and that’s inspiring to me. There’s no compromise at all in their music, be it the early raw R&B records, the psychedelic stuff, or the more progressive records that followed. There were few other bands that could master all of those forms so definitively. There’s something about their image, their lifestyle, their attitude and their whole approach to creating music that I can identify with absolutely,

6. When did the very useful 60’s compilation database start on the Ugly Things website and why?

The Searchin’ for Shakes database was started by Menachem Turchick in the late ‘90s and has been a part of the Ugly Things website ever since. It’s an amazing resource for ‘60s fans because you can cross-reference thousands of tracks, bands, and compilations, along with info about original release dates, labels, etc.

7. There is a phenomenal amount of record reviews in each issue for example along with a big team of authors, how long does it take to complete each issue?

We publish the mag twice a year, and it takes 5-6 months to complete each issue. As soon as I send an issue to the printer, I’m already starting work on the next one.

8. I enjoyed the Misunderstood story immensely anything similar in the pipeline?

I’m pleased you enjoyed the Misunderstood story so much. It was a huge undertaking. I spent about four or five years researching that one, interviewing all the band members along with dozens of other people who were associated with them. I was living and breathing the Misunderstood every day, logging hours of long distance phone interviews to New Zealand and the UK, and even traveling to Thailand to interview Rick Brown, as well as making numerous road trips to the Riverside area to meet with other band members. I don’t have anything else in the pipeline that involves that kind of legwork, but whenever I cover a band I try to do it as definitively as possible.

9. You have met many great musicians from legendary bands through Ugly Things magazine over the years any funny tales you can share with us?

Hanging out with Kim Gardner was always a blast. He’d have me in stitches. It was a bit like being an extra in that Dudley Moore movie, Arthur. It was hard to keep up with him. Any conversation with Sky Saxon was always memorable, too. He was perpetually stoned. He’d go into these long bizarre monologues about saving the dogs so we could save the planet.

10. Any further music related projects like the Philip Debarge & Pretty Things and The Misunderstood albums to follow on the record label in the near future?

Recently I’ve been focusing on seven-inch releases. Last year we did a reissue of the Sloths’ “Makin’ Love” single including a repro of the original sleeve. Next up is the Bees’ “Voices Green and Purple,” which should be out by the end of November 2012, with any luck!

11. Other than the Pretty Things what other old masters have impressed you in recent years?

A couple of years ago Anja and I took our then four-year-old son to see Roky Erickson play an ice cream social for a bunch of 3-7 year old kids. He played about eight songs, including “You’re Gonna Miss Me” and then took questions from the kids. That was one of the most fun and surreal shows ever.

12. What new bands have really grabbed your attention?

I’m really impressed with the Strypes. They’re playing exactly the kind of music that got me excited when I was their age and wound up making me move to the States. There are a lot of other really good bands out there these days though. I love the Frowning Clouds from Australia, the Higher State, of course, and also Paul Messis. There’s a new young band from LA that are really cool, too, called the Shag Rats.

13. You will find Ugly Things in the good London record shops but these are becoming few and far between now. How many issues of the magazine do you produce a year and what is the best way to order a copy?

Ugly Things comes out twice a year. If you can’t find it at your local hip record emporium, order it online at www.ugly-things.com

Links

Facebook: Ugly Things
Facebook: The Loons

Next Events:

Ugly Things #34 out November 2012 with the Bees, the Blue Aces, the Haunted, Cyril Jordan on the British Invasion, the Others, the Viletones, Milan the Leather Boy and more.

Cool Yule with your psychotic friends. The Loons at Bar Pink, 3829 30th Street – San Diego, CA 92104 – December 22, 2012.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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November 26, 2012 By : Category : Bands Front Page Garage Interviews Music Scene USA Tags:, , ,
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Elgazelle (NewBreed)

This entry is part 5 of 8 in the series Newbreed2

The band:

Lead vocal: Paul Wright
Lead Guitar: Lee Morse
Rhythm Guitar and backing vocal: Rick Hyde
Bass guitar and backing vocal: Phil Lodge
Drums and percussion: John Gagon
Trumpet: Martin Wilkinson

Discography: We’ve produced a series of demos / recordings over the years, but feel the raw energy of our live performances has yet to be captured in a studio environment. With recording sessions planned for the near future, we hope that we will have something we are happy to release by the autumn.

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band has been together for 4 years. Paul, Rick and Phil were in a previous band together. Lee joined as lead guitar in January 2008 and John joined in March 2008. Finally Martin joined in December 2009 to complete the line up.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

We’ve all got an interest in 60’s culture, the films, fashions and most importantly the sounds.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Good friends ‘The Minx’, from Wythenshawe Manchester. We both rehearse at Blueprint studios in Manchester and recently shared support slots for the Moons. The band fuse pumping 60’s organ with a punk / scar ethos, which combines to make a unique sound and energy.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

We’ve introduced our own very successful night by the name of Run for Cover as we felt that the underground/60’s scene in Manchester was lacking. The night was held in Chorlton in south Manchester and quickly became very popular. Since then the night has moved to the city centre and has played hosts to such acts as the amazing ROSCO (Sterling Roswell of Spacemen 3) and Psych Folk troubadour John Stammers.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Psychedelic garage with northern soul and mod leanings.

6. What are your live shows like?

Energetic, raw, wire-mesh tight and powerful!

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by?

Our shared influences include 13th floor elevators, The Stairs, The Sonics. Small faces, The Yardbirds. We currently play 2 covers, liar, liar by The Castaways and Psychotic Reaction by The Count Five.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Being from Manchester we’re all into our football & fashion, we like to look our best. We believe that stage performance should be visual as well as audio.

9. Who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Rick is the main song writer although both Lee and John have contributed several songs to the band’s armoury.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our current favourite song is called ‘the beat goes on’. It’s a Mersey Beat-esque jaunt that is effectively, a call to arms, to rise and conquer the pain inflected by a broken heart. Our current favourite song by another artist is Tosta Mista by Hooded Fang.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

The current underground scene is alive and kicking in London and Liverpool where we gig quite frequently. We have also played across Europe in cities like Berlin, where the scene is immense.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Finding a hammond player to join the band.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We are currently rehearsing once a week and have a new ep due to be out in the Autumn. We’re also playing the mod weekender in Brighton for the August bank holiday and will be putting on a single launch at our Run For Cover night in September this year (date to be confirmed)

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

There is coverage of the 60’s underground scene, but you need to know where to look. This suits us. It means those with a genuine interest and enthusiasm for what we do can discover us, and leaves the scene untarnished by those who need to be told what to like.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

We have a lot of respect for The Coral. To us they are a band that stick to their roots, remain credible and still achieve a good level of mainstream success. Recent bands that have caught our attention with 60’s style garage and pop tendencies, include Toronto’s Hooded Fang and The Hypnotic Eye from South-London.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We would love to work with Jan “Stan” Kybert. He’s worked with a number of bands/artists that we admire including, The Stands, The Draytones and of course Paul Weller.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We would like to continue to grow as a band, developing our sound and line-up and to reach as many like minded 60’s enthusiasts as possible, across all of  Europe and beyond!

Band Promo Links –

soundcloud.com/elgazelle

www.facebook.com/elgazelle

www.myspace.com/elgazelle

twitter.com/elgazelle

 


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August 7, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Garage Interviews Music Psych Scene Tags:, , ,
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