Modern

Newbreed – The Gallerys

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Newbreed5

The Gallerys; hail from Bristol, Wales, and Kent with band members being: Guitar – James Wood, Bass – Craig Barden and Drums – Dan Maggs. Every so often a new young band pops-up on the scene creating a buzz. We caught up with The Gallerys ahead of their performance at the Margate Mod/Sixties weekender.

How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

With the current line-up of Craig, James and Dan we have been active for a year and a half. Dan and James met at college in Tunbridge Wells where they discovered a shared love for music, and decided to start a band. The original bass player stayed in the band for a few months before leaving for university, at which point Dan had a mutual friend who put the band in touch with Craig who then joined to complete the line-up.

What influences do the band members have in common?

The band members have a lot of musical influences in common; The Who, The Jam, Stone Roses, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Specials, and Oasis.

How would you describe the style you play? What are your live shows like?

Our styles quite innovative in the sense you can’t really put it into one category. It has influences of alternative and indie, mixed with the energy of garage rock and – at times – rhythm and blues. All this is held together by our three-part harmonies. The best thing about coming to one of our shows is that we play our sound which spans many different genres. Our live shows have tons of energy and we always go for it.

What are your main influences in music?

Bands like The Beatles, Oasis, The Jam, were all ordinary guys who – through great songwriting and determination – made something of themselves with their music. We’d definitely take inspiration from these bands; we write our own music, arrange our own music, have created an image for the band and have recorded our own EP. The thing about these bands is that they had an idea of where they wanted to go with their music, which they followed through with and achieved; a great example for us.

Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with? What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently?

Craig and James write the songs although The Gallerys sound doesn’t come until we arrange the tunes as a band in the rehearsal room. James has written songs such as ‘Paisley’,  ‘Is this real’, and ‘The End’ with Craig writing ‘You Don’t Really Love Her’, ‘You Can’t Look Through Me’ and ‘Doctor Friend’. The songs cover real life issues i.e. Paisley describes being totally overwhelmed by a positive feeling in a relationship whereas You Can’t Look Through Me covers the relatable topic of being ‘looked through’ in life whether that’s at work, at school or with friends. Something everybody has felt in their life. We want people to relate to our music and feel something when they listen to our tunes.

What’s your favorite song to play?

Our favorite song would be ‘Imperfect Perception’. It’s a chaotic track filled with descending guitar chords, driving bass lines and punchy drumming, all glued together with vocals from all three members. For me, this tune solidifies it’s a team effort for us. Each of us has an equally important role to play in our sound.

How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I’d say there’s definitely an underground scene out there. We’ve played many gigs in various areas of Kent like Maidstone, Tunbridge Wells and Ashford, we’ve played in London, Bristol, Portsmouth and Leicester, and there’s always bands that are doing something different which hasn’t been touched upon before. I’d say we participate in the sense we have a unique sound which merges lots of different styles and genres.

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The biggest challenge to date would have been recording our three track EP ‘Paisley’, which we finished last December. The EP features lots of three-part harmony so there was a pressure to be on top form from a vocal perspective on the days of recording. We split recording the EP over three dates which wasn’t a lot of time. However, we stayed incredibly focused and managed to record the EP in the time frame that we set ourselves.

How often do you rehearse? Play live? Record?

We don’t rehearse as often as we should do. Most of the time we gig about two or three times a week so it’s very difficult for us to find time to rehearse but as we’re always playing live we’re getting tighter and more familiar with each other’s musical styles. At the moment we seem to be recording about twice a year.

Anything interesting coming up?

We’ve got some good shows coming up. Currently, we’re on a national UK tour with indie rock band The Rifles which will see us support the band in Bristol, Portsmouth, Cambridge, and Oxford. We’ve just supported From the Jam at the o2 Academy Leicester which was one of our best shows to date. The venue was absolutely packed and we played our set which was met with great reception. We’re playing live on BBC Radio Kent during the Breakfast show which is a great experience; you’re able to reach audiences all across Kent. We have a special show at the end of May supporting The Specials guitar player Roddy Radiation in the Dublin Castle in Camden; a top venue we love playing at.

The highlight of our year is shaping up to be when we will support Madness at the Detling Showground in Kent, August. We do however have a big announcement to make very soon so stay tuned for what we have coming up.

On the 28th May, we’re playing a slot at the Margate Mod and Sixties festival in Olby’s music room which is going to be special. We played at a clothing shop in Margate called “Rat Race” before which was very well attended. We have a lot of support in Margate so it’s gonna be great to come back for this festival.

What do you think of the music coverage in the media? Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

There’s a good mixture and variety of music in the media at the minute. Sure there could be more but it seems to be fine at the minute. We rate bands like The Strypes, Temples, The Moons, The Rifles and Miles Kane.

What should we expect from you in the future what are your plans and ambitions?

We want to keep going. We want to write better songs, play to new audiences in new locations and most importantly, make a massive impact with our music.

Social Networks:

Facebook: facebook.com/TheGallerysUK/
Twitter: twitter.com/thegallerysuk?lang=en
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/gallerys

Tour Dates: Supporting The Rifles *

*2nd May, The Thekla, Bristol
*3rd May, Wedgewood Rooms Portsmouth
*9th May, Cambridge Junction
*25th May, The Bullingdon, Oxford
28 May – Margate Mod/Sixties Festival


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Interviews Modern UK Tags:,
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Marta Ren (Newbreed)

Marta Ren & The Groovelvets are based in Porto, Portugal with current band members: Marta Ren (vox), Hugo Danin (drums), Bruno Macedo (guitar), Sérgio Marques (bass), Sérgio Alves (keyboards), Manu Idhra (percussion), Fábio Almeida ( tenor sax), Nelson Ferreira (trumpet) and Hugo Marinheiro (baritone sax)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

I started to sing professionally at 16 years of age, my first band “Sloppy Joe” were together, playing for 10 years, then came “The Bombazines”, I was already thinking of doing a solo album before the band finally ended. Three years ago, I started finding and talking to the musicians that I needed to make the album that I wanted to and I named them “The Groovelvets”, and then the adventure started!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Classic soul and funk, that’s what unites us. We also like other genres but what we really have in common is the love for that core music.

 03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Almost every band coming from Daptone Records, Record Kicks or Timmion Records, I think the reason it’s obvious, they are releasing great classic soul and funk often with a modern twist.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

In the 60’s in Portugal, most of the bands played a lot of covers with adapted lyrics in Portuguese. We also have our famous ‘Fado’ singers and our traditional Portuguese songwriters.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Classic soul and Funk.

06. What are your live shows like?

Normally we have nine musicians on stage, giving it all they’ve got. They’re energetic shows, you have little spaces to breathe, but we came to get you right after you catch your breath.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

I love music in general , if I like a song it doesn’t matter what genre, but my main influences are soul and funk singers or bands. We play a cover from The Doors and another by Lucille Mathis. I despise everything that’s not done with truth and soul.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

I like arts in general , I studied graphic arts from my 10º to 12º grade, but I think what influences me more are the movies.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I always wrote my own lyrics and melodies, I think it’s important to really feel what you’re singing, the compositions came from different composers, some from the producer “New Max”, others from the bass player “Sérgio Marques” others from the guitar player “Bruno Macedo”, one from “Lino Matos” and other from “Eurico Amorim” former Bombazines. I mainly deal with life, with love relationships, frustration, unconformity, sometimes I write about friends stories or stories from movies that I relate to.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

That’s a tough one… it depends, on Monday my favorite is “So Long” and “I wanna go back”, Tuesday “Let’s talk about the kids” and “2 kinds of men”, Wednesday “Release Me” and “It’s today”, Thursday “I’m coming home” and “Smiling Faces” and Friday “Be ma Fela” and “Don’t Look”. It’s so hard to say one, I have many, the first it came to my mind was “Try a little Tenderness” from Otis Redding.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

If you asked me that 10 years ago, I could answer, now I don’t really know. I’m very focused on my family my dogs, my rehearsals with the band, I always try to suggest new arrangements for the songs or live show.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Every record or show are big challenges, but I think the biggest is yet to come.

 13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We try to rehearse every week, with or without shows. Playing live, it really depends on various things, but normally we have three/four shows per month, it depends on the season. We have a lot of interesting shows coming up in Spain, France and England and at this moment we have a new video for “Release Me”.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s the same I think in other similar subjects or arts, normally they cover with high-attention what they are told to do or paid to do, not what has real quality and new potential interest. It’s supposedly dangerous to cover interesting things, people could get clever with that and have their own new ideas!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The past days I spend listening to the new Red Hot Chilli Peppers album ‘The Getaway’.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Every record or producer has their own charm, I don’t really have a favourite. When I start recording I always feel like it’s going to be the first and last thing that I’m going to do in my entire life.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

I expect to play this album as much as I can live, everywhere, all over the world, and make enough money to pay my bills and make the next record. Fortunately I have more than I expected , in Portugal a few new Festivals (not despising the other gigs, every gig is important and interesting to me) and I’m excited to go to Euro Yé Yé and Blues Kitchen and Brighton Weekender.

Discography:
2002 – SINGLE ‘An Easy Night’s Day’,
2003 – EP ‘A Watchjob Apple’,
2004 – LP ‘The Profile Fillers Sing Your Destruction’, 2007 LP ‘Jimmy’

Web Links:
profilefillers.com
facebook.com/marta.ren
instagram.com/martaren_groovelvets
facebook.com/MartaRenTheGroovelvets
myspace.com/profilefillers
twitter.com/martagrooveren
soundcloud.com/profilefillers

 


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 13, 2016 By : Category : Bands Club Soul Europe Front Page Interviews Modern RnB Scene Tags:, , , , , , ,
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Masters – Tjinder Singh (Cornershop) Interview

This entry is part 10 of 20 in the series Masters1

There has always been an individual spark about Cornershop, While Paul Morley, the Observer, has said, ‘as interesting and adventurous as the Beatles’ and fans have described them as ‘instant aural sunshine for a grey day’. In the live arena they have toured extensively in mainland Europe and America with the likes of Beck and Oasis. Man about town, Darius Drewe, caught up with Tjinder Singh of Cornershop for an exclusive interview for NUTSmag.

DD: Why such a massive gap between albums? Five years passed between ‘When I Was Born’ and ‘Handcream’ and then a further seven before ‘Judy’. Are you perfectionists, extremely busy or just lazy?

TS: ‘When I was Born’ and ‘Handcream’ had a Clinton album between them, and between Handcream & Judy I did a film and we released a couple of singles through Rough Trade, and then set up our own ample play label.  Also we all had kids except our percussion who bought more congas and became a qualified nurse. In the last three years we have had three albums out. The average is plain to see even if you are not a further maths prog rock tutor. More seriously though, there is no point in pushing albums out unless you play the game, and we are not in it as part of the game.

DD: Back in the day you were photographed burning pictures of Morrissey due to a throwaway comment made and a misinterpretation of a lyric. How do you look back on all that 22 years on?

TS: Here was a person whose music with The Smiths we had all liked, putting out dubious feelers using Skinhead imagery, unqualified lyrics, Union Jack drapery, and like his denial on his sexuality (which is his right) not elaborating on the issue.  The unfortunate thing is that not elaborating on the issue of fascism still breeds race crime, from someone whom was very influential at the time. As an Asian at a time when Asians were seeing increased street violence this wasn’t something I, and we could let pass.  All these years later, I think we did the correct thing, and our stance on other issues has borne out that we did it with the right intentions.

DD: You were away for a few years, then returned with quite a different style, and a runaway no.1 hit thanks to the remix of ‘Brimful of Asha’. For five minutes, it looked like world superstardom beckoned, but somehow that never quite happened. Why do you think that was?

TS: After the ‘Women’s Gotta Have It’ album we spent a lot of time in America and then the ‘When I Was Born’ album did very well there. We would have been happy as we were to be John Peel’s festive 50 no. 1, but the Brimful Mix change things somewhat.  Even the label gave up on things after that, but for us we had started a Clinton album and that needed to be finished, and we continued as we were.

DD: The album ‘When I Was Born for the Seventh Time’ was very influential and innovative in that it took the ‘Britpop/indie pop’ template of the time (and the usual retro trappings thereof), your own Asian influences, and married both to hiphop beats, breakbeats and samples. Do you feel that, in a way, you were paving the path for a lot of the DJ culture that has followed? And prog rock men, the likes of Gruff Rhys and Gary Cobain, bringing guitar tunes to dance sets mining Eastern playback music?

TS: That is a lovely thought.

DD: What do you think of the recent compilations of Bollywood and Lollywood psych that have been doing the rounds? Do you think the compilers are finding the best tunes? And if not, give us the names…

TS: I’ve not heard much of it in comp’ed form, but there is some great stuff out there, as the music makers at the time mimicked western sounds, sometimes to hilarious results, and sometimes with the passing of time proves how great music can be.

DD: The album ‘Disco and the Halfway to Discontent’ came out under the name Clinton rather than Cornershop. Why was that? And will there be another Clinton record?

TS: Clinton was done so we could work with other people and take a fresh approach to what and how things were done. The music was not radically different, but more of the technology test department of what Cornershop did. In fact, the two are so similar that there probably won’t be another Clinton album. We are very pleased though that some say it predates much music by a decade, and even more pleased that not a week goes by without an inquiry about Clinton.

DD: After that came my personal favourite ‘Shop album, ‘Handcream for a Generation’ and the single, ‘Lessons Learned from Rocky I to Rocky III.’ The single itself, and some of the rest of the album, bore the influence of 1970s glam, while other tracks such as ‘Spectral Mornings’ delved further into the trance-like psych rock hinted at on ‘When I Was Born’. Who are the lyrics on that single referring to, the ‘soft rock shit’ and the ‘overgrown supershit’?

TS: Very glad you favour that album, and that’s why I said earlier that the record company gave up on us.  A lot of brain cells and effort went into that album.  Otis Clay opened it, & by touring with Oasis we had Noel on Spectral Mornings, and Guigsy did the bass on …Rocky I to Rocky III, then we had East London’s Nazerite reggae vocalists on Motion The 11, from USA we asked Rob Swift to help produce a couple if tracks. At the time I think I considered a lot of American groups as being ‘soft rock shit.’ I’m from the Black Country so considered groups like Metallica and Maralyn Mason as ‘soft rock shit’ and overgrown ‘supershit’ but in the fullness of time, I think they’re just shit. They certainly deserve everything that can be chucked at them.

DS: ‘Judy Sucks a Lemon for Breakfast’ seemed to consolidate that same early 70s sound, as if the band had finally reached their ‘happy home’ in an almost retro-rock World. Are you all a bunch of old mods and rockers at heart? And who are your greatest influences throughout? The first thing you tend to notice is a lot of Velvet Underground in the song construction and guitar riffing, and a lot of “soul-chick” backing vocals, which could hint at either the Stones or the Floyd, but how knowledgeable are you on your obscurities?

TS: ‘In terms of production I like the 70s sound, mainly because I lived through the 80s and no musician got out of the 80s unscathed. I liked the rawness of a lot of Indian music, so that always played a part too. In terms of influences, there has never been a strong defining one.  I think the Velvets are a big influence…

DD: The promo videos from that period, particularly ‘Who Fingered Rock N Roll’ all seem to be similarly retro as if you’re hankering after a Britain long past. Isn’t that the imperialist, semi-racist and narrow-minded Britain that you once railed against?

TS: The Who Fingered Rock N Roll video used old footage because friends of ours were helping certain London Borough to archive such footage. The line from the song of ‘Who built the city’ seemed to go well with such footage so that was that.

DD: And now to 2012, and ‘Urban Turban’ Where would you say Cornershop stand in relation to the 2012 music scene?

TS: The Urban Turban album only became an album after a series of singles under the banner of ‘The Singles Club’ were released. I had a good few songs that we not related in any way, and it seemed a good way to put them out, and give something different to our supporters. Then, the tracks seemed to work with each other once they were mastered, and so it became the album.

It’s good to be able to do that, to just put things out, and in relation to the music scene of now, we feel that we are happy to continue as we always have done, without much regard for what others are doing.  People seem to be slowly catching up with Cornershop, and that’s an even bigger thing we have in common with the Velvets than just their music.

We look forward to hearing their well crafted and unique psychedelic sound of sitars and guitars at Le Beat Bespoke 9 on Thursday 28 March 2013.


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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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February 5, 2013 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Interviews Modern Psych Tags:, ,
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Teaspoon – (New Breed)

This entry is part 3 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

Teaspoon are from Gothenburg, Sweden and deal with super authentic mod 60s retro music. (No seriously), we try not to be essentialistic, doing whatever we feel like. We’ve got some spacey kraut, percussion heavy progpsychfunk and more popsike dancers coming up at the moment, not to mention the deep house opera we’re working on.

Band Members:

Stig Steijner – guitar, percussion
Kristian Hermander – organ, synthesizers
Björn Munthe – bass
Sebastian Løken – guitar, vocals, percussion, drums
Various drummers.

Teaspoon have their debut single Dream Girl  released on Cool Glasgow Label EWO available to buy here: eworecords.bigcartel.com

1. How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

I (Sebastian) met Kristian in high school and formed something of a music nerd team straight away, geeking away about music of all kinds and playing together in various constellations, most famously the dadaist proto-punkers World Trade Center. Stig and I are childhood friends and he and his best friend Björn wanted to start up a band so we did.

2. What are your live shows like?

A fart in space.

3. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Popsike dancers, afro rock, heavy psych, Finders Keepers records, Throbbing Gristle, Sylvester, Amon Düül II,  Eddy Grant, Jean-Pierre Massiera, The Egyptian Lover, Goblin, Fela Kuti, Sarge, July, Baris Manco, easy listening, David Mancuso, Toby Twirl, Ibliss, Rich Hero, Pink Floyd, Liquid Liquid, and all that mod psych jazz. We’ve done July – Crying Is For Writers, The Outcasts – Loving You Sometimes, The Poets – Wooden Spoon, Scots of St James – Eiderdown Clown and lots of similar stuff. I’d like to do Andwella – Hold On To Your Mind cause them percussion breaks are awesome. We don’t hate. Hate is so 1939 man.

4. What are your main influences outside of music?

Space, Turkey (the country), Björn’s eyes, Glasgow drinking habits, Turkey (the bird), gardening and other pastoral pleasures.

5. How many official recordings have you done?  How many released?  Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

That’s a lot of questions in one! We have recordings up on our soundcloud page. I used to write most of the old stuff but we are trying to work more collectively now. Subject matters range from hot girls and not-so-subtle drug allusions to sleepwalking old ladies. We need more songs about science and space I think.

6. What’s your favourite song in your reprtoire currently?

Old faves ‘Radiation’ and ‘Doctor Doctor’ still works, as does ‘Dream Girl’ and the new silver apples-meet-michael rother-in-a-garage-y one with working title ‘Not Afraid To Fly.’

7. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Definitely, but seriously the bus scene is where it’s at at the moment.

8. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording both sides of the single in one night, and Ryan Air.

9. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

We’ve been playing quite a lot this year which has been great. We played our first gigs in London and Stockholm. We also played in Maidenhead where we were subject to some amazing Adele renditions from a crazy woman our then drummer Jonas met in Tesco’s and got us all to visit. In Stockholm me and Björn got in a fight and thrashed our luxury hotel room in the process. We also played a weird hippie festival in Scotland where Stig and Mike Heron had an argument verging on fight over cookies in the green room yurt.

We don’t record and rehearse as much as we want to, that’s for sure.

10. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Well, it’s always been kind of shit hasn’t it? There are some great music blogs out there though like 20 Jazz Funk Greats and Galactic Ramble just from the top of my mind. Also NUTs and Shindig! Have both been very good to us.

11. Do you rate any other current bands?

S.C.U.M. and the Horrors are good guys, Dungen and Tame Impala are great as well. The Time and Space Machine, Psychemagik and the Emperor’s Machine are all doing good psych/cosmic disco crossover stuff, lots of stuff out there beyond the ‘rock band’ box.

12. Who/Where would you most like to record and why?

Some Aladdin’s Cave somewhere of old gear to play around with. And be able to spend lots of time there, like years. Don’t know where that would be though.

13. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions?

Right now just writing loads of new songs as that has been neglected recently. Then hopefully touring the european continent next year, and maybe record and release an LP if anybody wants to do it with us?

 

Band Promo Links:
http://soundcloud.com/teaspoonsweden
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Teaspoon/135945863108082


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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February 6, 2012 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Modern Music Scene Tags:, ,
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Frowning Clouds – (NewBreed)

This entry is part 4 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

The band…

Ben: Drums,
Nick: Guitar and Vocals
Daff: Guitar
Jake: Bass and Vocals
Zak: Guitar

1. How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

Some of us went to high school together and others went skateboarding around town. I suppose we just came together for a ‘common love of uncommon music’ as Nick says.

2. Where are you from and where are you based?

We’re from a town called Geelong in the state of Victoria. It’s about an hour away from Melbourne so a lot of our shows are in Melbourne just because there’s a lot more venues there and even more bands. Having said that, Geelong’s slogan is ‘the place to be’. They don’t lie about that. There’s a lot of good young bands in Geelong that are all very impressive.

3. How would you describe the style you play?

The style we play is very 60’s influenced. We all grew up listening to 60’s tunes – some of us liking the grittier side and some liking the more British poppy side, so I guess it’s got all that in there. Nowadays we pretty much listen to all sorts of things. Occasionally something else might slip in but its pretty much 60’s music with 3 guitars – sometimes it’s pretty sloppy.

4. What are your live shows like?

They’re pretty loud and unorganised but we try and have lots of fun. I guess beer always gets things going.

 5.  What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

If you asked each one of us we’d probably say different bands. So me personally, I like the Modern Lovers, the Velvet Underground… all that back from the grave stuff, obviously. Just loose, improvised, gritty yet catchy music. That’s what I love most. I despise all these new ‘indie’ bands that have given ‘indie’ a bad name.

6. What are your main influences outside of music?

Umm, I’m not sure I have many – my girlfriend, the Simpsons… I always steal lines from the Simpsons and use it in songs.

7. How many official recordings have you done?  How many released?  Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We’ve done plenty of recordings. I’m not sure what you count as ‘official’. We’ve done recordings in proper studios that have turned out sounding like shit and most of our releases are all done live to a four-track in a lounge room or a record shop and they’ve turned out fine. Our last single ‘All night long’ was done in our friends lounge room onto his four-track and we tried to re-record it at this studio with all this vintage gear and it just didn’t turn out as good for some reason. Most of our recordings are found in Europe – not many around in Australia. Most of our songs are written by Nick, a couple by me and some by Jake too. Most of them dealt with girls at the start, now its just about not having money or feeling like a social outcast or something like that.

 8. What’s the favorite song of yours currently?

My favourite song at the moment is ‘Always on Time’ by this Australian band called Chook Race. Look them up! Either that or ‘Dodge Vego-matic’ by the Modern Lovers.

9. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I dunno really. There’s a lot of really good bands around today that don’t get played on the radio and stuff, if thats what you mean. I guess we’re not a part of it because we get played on the radio here in Australia. haha

10. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Last week we had a Halloween gig which we had to get public transport to… carrying our equipment, dressed up like idiots. Then they told us the back line wasn’t there once we had already been an hour into our trip.

11. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

We try to rehearse once a week but sometimes it doesn’t really work out. We play live every weekend pretty much, and it’s been like that for about four years now. Don’t do much recording…

12. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I think it stinks ‘cause every time we have an interview we always end up looking like morons, haha! And they just talk about shitty new bands on Sony or Warner or whatever.

13. Do you rate any other current bands?

I rate a huge sackfull of other bands. like: The Straight Arrows, the Living Eyes, Chook Race, Thee Oh Sees, UV Race, Total Control, Strange Boys, White Fence, Brian Jonestown Massacre, my mate Adrian Ball, Cobwebbs, this list could go on for ages.

14. Who/Where would you most like to record and why?

I would like to record the frowning clouds ‘cause we don’t do it enough and our songs go to waste. Where? Anywhere with some tape and a sick dude pushing the buttons.

15. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions?

Don’t expect much ‘cause we’ll disappoint. Expect nothing and we’ll impress you.

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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January 25, 2012 By : Category : Articles Asia Bands Front Page Interviews Modern Music Scene Tags:, , , , ,
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The Method – (NewBreed)

THE METHOD – WE DON’T KNOW

THE METHOD – ART GALLERY (ACOUSTIC)

This entry is part 2 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

The band…

Richie: Vox, Organ, Guitar
Sanders: Drums, Backing Vox
Johnny: Guitar Noises, Backing Vox
Matt: Trumpet, Tambourine, Noises, Backing Vox
Keiran: Bass

1. How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

Just knocking about Cardiff playing in different bands and things, having mutual friends. We all buzzed off what each other were doing musically in separate projects, so then put it all together.

2. Where are you from and where are you based?

We all live in Cardiff but Richie is from Dublin, Kieran is from Dorset, Matt is from Reading, Johnny is from Port Talbot.. Sanders is the only one that’s actually from Cardiff.

3. How would you describe the style you play?

Hard to say but have been described as ‘Garage Soul’ which sounds alright to us. We don’t really need to describe our style, think that’s for other people to do. Have a listen!

4. What are your live shows like?

Sweaty

5. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We’ve all got so many different things that we listen to individually but all meet musically around a trashy groove. We don’t play covers which is a bit self-indulgent I suppose, but fancy playing ‘7 and 7 Is’ [by Love]. Rich despises Queen…..

6. What are your main influences outside of music?

Clothes, the human condition, being broke… Matt follows Swindon Town, Johnny is learning how to unicycle…

7. How many official recordings have you done? How many released? Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Have done countless recordings, with our record ‘Dissidents & Dancers’ being the only full length album, along with 3 singles. We don’t want to release everything we do, only what’s ripe. Our next single is in collaboration with Art Gallery Clothing. They designed a knitted polo for us and gave us clothes, so we wrote them a song. The single ‘Art Gallery’ will exclusively be available with the polo or any other Method merchandise bought from Art Gallery Clothing (Until the 7” drops in Feb) and it won’t be on any of our albums. The music can be found in most good record shops along with a lot of bad ones, or online from our label www.seemonkeydomonkey.com. Also our single ‘We Don’t Know’ opened up the recent Acid Jazz compilation ‘Hipsters Vol. 2’.

Rich writes most of the songs, some with Johnny, with some coming from jams. As far as subject matter goes, it’s anything from feeling certain ways about the government and the way we live, to dancing all night with eyes wide as saucers.

8. What’s the favorite song of yours currently?

For the next 4 mins it’s The Electric Prunes – Holy Are You.

9. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

We just go and play and meet good people. We don’t really worry about any scene.

10. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

There’s no challenge… well except for our van breaking down in Belgium, leaving us stranded there for 2 days. And now the van’s fucked, so if anyone wants to drive us around, get in touch!

11. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

We rehearse twice a week normally, over the summer we were playing at least 4 gigs a week. Playing live tightens a band up more than rehearsals ever could. We demo stuff in our studio all year round and are now going to start getting the heads down again for another album next year.

12. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Not sure there is much music coverage, not in the mainstream at least, it all seems a bit X-Factor.

13. Do you rate any other current bands?

Yeah, all of the bands on See Monkey Do Monkey! The Soundcarriers, Django Django, The Revellions… could go on and on!

14. Who/Where would you most like to record and why?

There’s so many people and places we’d like to record with it’s difficult to say! Would love to record with Paul Butler in his studio on the Isle of Wight, or Jorge and Mike at Circo Perotti in Spain, The Sound Factory with David Axelrod, with Simon Dine… well anywhere really! All these people have such distinct sounds and styles… good ones like…

15. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions?

We’re going to go back to our studio and start on the next album, we always play lots of shows so there’ll be plenty more of them to come next year. See you on the dance floor!

Image – Mayor www.associatedminds.com

Band Promo Links –

www.themethod.eu

www.facebook.com/methodcardiff

www.Twitter.com/The_Method_


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

More Posts - Website

January 25, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Interviews Modern Music UK Tags:, , ,
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