Rocksteady

Jo Wallace – Hey! Ms DJ

This entry is part 1 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

We recently caught up with the charming and ever so slightly busy DJ Jo Wallace – ‘ace face’ of Ramsgate, Kent, who is currently owner of the Reggae Record Label Ramrock Records, resident DJ at ‘Blouse & Skirt’, host of ‘The History of Black Music’ with Ashley Beedle @ The Latitude Festival, ‘Blouse & Skirt’ @ Festival No.6 and various gigs across UK & Europe including ‘Crossfire’ and ‘Margate Mod Weekender’. How does she
find the time?

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Watching Ready Steady Go in 1964 and seeing Millie and Marvin Gaye. I was listening to my brother’s blues LPs including John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters, he was 14 years older than me and at art college so that was a right result for a 4-year-old!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

1976 – round the back of a pub in Chatham in the skittles alley… classy! It’s been downhill all the way since then!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Festival No.6 doing a 6 hour set with Ashley Beedle covering the History of Black Dance Music… very special!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Hah! I won’t name any names but one venue had been bigging itself up on Soul forums and groups saying that they were getting 200 through the door. I was booked and arrived at an old social club in the middle of nowhere, North of the Watford Gap. There were 5 people there excluding the organisers plus the guests from a wedding in the room next door. The highlight of the evening was getting free ham sandwiches and cake… needless to say, I wasn’t too pleased and had to hustle for my DJ fee as well!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Richard Epps – outstanding taste and the ability to put an interesting set together. Alan Handscombe-McGrath – a legend and trail blazer Randy Cozens (R.I.P) – a visionary ,he anticipated the popularity of mid-tempo numbers years before Stafford.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Listening to other DJs back in the day – all male – and cherry picking the best bits, bingo calling at Margate Lido and broadcasting with Rod Lucas on BBC Radio Kent and commercial radio. My style is old skool – playing the tunes with a bit of MC’ing thrown in, giving 110% on the decks, having my own musical ‘signature’ of mostly Detroit and RnB, reading the crowd and making sure that they always leave with a smile on their face. Simple!

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Minnie Jones – Shadow of a Memory – Sugar – a bit of soul stalking and quick talking bagged me this gem for £100.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

As a record producer, it’s had to have been the Sound of Studio A’s house band, the Funk Brothers and Studio One’s house band, the various guises of the Skatalites. The most important percussion instrument in the world is the Studio One milk bottle – check it out on Prince Buster’s ‘Ghost Dance’. I have included my version on both my Ramrock releases ‘Gentleman Rudeboy’ and ‘Take it Easy’… that’s me with a key on a jam jar and backing vocals in the background! My favourite artists have to be Alton Ellis, Slim Smith, EWF, Dr Buzzards Original Savannah Band and the Temps.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not really. I collect anything that catches my attention whether it’s a riff or a vocal hook and I can imagine other people enjoying it on the dance floor. Or, whether I can incorporate the flavour of certain riffs into new releases on Ramrock and Ramrock Blue!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Blouse and Skirt at Ramsgate Music Hall – a monthly gig with Ashley Beedle  – a selection of 8Ts Dance Hall & Lovers Rock, 8Ts Soul, Studio One, Joe Gibbs and early 9Ts Hip-Hop!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Martha Starr – Sweet Temptation – Charay

12. Please give us your Top 10 all time favourites (with a bit of liberty taking)…

EWF – That’s the way of the world
Dr Buzzard’s Original Savannah Band – I’ll play the fool
Main Ingredient – Happiness is just around the bend
Yvonne Baker – You didn’t say a word
Sapphires – Gotta have your love
Temptations – Witchcraft/Why you wanna make me blue
Crazy Godz – Dynamic
The Motown back catalogue from ‘62 – ‘79
Jackie Mittoo – A tribute to Slim Smith
Earl Van Dyke – All for you

Current Top 3 Tracks:
1. Marriotts – Tell It Like It Is – ABC
2. September Jones – No More Love – Kapp
3. Carl Underwood – Ain’t You Lyin’ – Merging

Weblinks:
facebook.com/jo.wallace

Next Club Spots: Margate Mod Weekender, Latitude Festival, No.6 Festival, Blouse & Skirt


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music Rocksteady Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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Ben Ollins – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

We recently caught up with DJ Ben Ollins  who was pretty excited to be invited to play at the ‘Margate Mod Weekender’. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My older brother introduced me to great records when I was very young. I loved the Beatles, Rolling Stones and the Monkees thanks to him, also T Rex, Slade and Glam stuff – chart music at the time. When the’70s Rockabilly revival scene came along, he and his friends got me listening to that too. I didn’t really know that it was any different to anything else, it was just more stuff I liked. Later there was Pebbles and that set me on the path.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

At The Frat Shack, probably 1991 or ‘92. Those were the best nights.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

A few years ago I played records at my friends’ wedding in New Orleans on Halloween. Outside, the streetcars were packed with people in crazy fancy dress costumes; inside, the bar was jammed solid, everyone dancing – on chairs, on the bar, everywhere. It felt like the whole room was shaking. It was a lot of fun, a very happy experience.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

None stand out as notably terrible, but I’ve certainly cleared my fair share of dance floors.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Three from New York/New Jersey. Todd-O-Phonic Todd, in-person or on air at WFMU, the great Jonathan Toubin and the inimitable Josh Styles. All three have great records and enthusiasm to match.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I used to do a night called The Hideout with my friend Liam Watson, he was never concerned about playing things to impress people, he just wanted them to have fun. That was a lesson, that it’s about playing things people can dance to, not just things you want to show off. The other thing is that I don’t like to hear the same stuff night after night, I don’t even like to hear the same sort of music all night. And finally, my golden rule is that there’s no evening that can’t be improved by hearing Chuck Berry’s Let It Rock.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

There have been a few good ones. Back in the time of paper lists I used to buy blind quite a bit – a stupid expression, it’s really buying deaf – picking stuff up that seemed it would be good, even when I didn’t know it. I got Oscar & The Majestics’ No Chance Baby that way. It was so great hearing it for the first time having no real idea how it would sound and it was incredible! That was a wonderful surprise. Often it didn’t work out so well.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Kicks, which was the magazine Billy and Miriam from Norton Records used to do. When I first bought Kicks (issue #3, from the much missed Compendium Books in Camden Town), it had Link Wray, The Banshees, The Phantom – just great stuff, regardless of genre. That, and also all of Tim Warren’s incredible compilations; Back From The Grave is the benchmark for me.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I’ve always had a pretty tight focus on US garage 45s. That’s been my main love for over 30 years now. I also buy rock‘n’roll instrumentals and R&B – Pittsburgh sounds. I try to curb any desire to complete an artist, I don’t want to be one of those guys with multiple issues of the same 45 all with minor variations, even though that’s an urge I can all too easily understand.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’ve been co-running a club in Soho playing the above Pittsburgh/Mad Mike style stuff for years now, and that’s pretty much it for me. It’s called The Stag O Lee Preservation Society & Drinking Club and is on every other Wednesday, at 57 Greek Street, London W1.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I’ll take an Expressions on Tennalaga please!

12. Please give us your Top 10 all time favourites (with a bit of liberty taking)…

Not my top 10 of all time probably, but 10 45s that I’ve never tired of.

Larry & The Blue Notes – In And Out (Charay)
The Hangmen – I’m Gonna Love You (Flo-Pin)
The Henchmen – Livin’ (Punch)
Apollo’s Apaches – Cry Me A Lie (Barra-Donna)
The Sonics – He’s Waitin’ (Etiquette)
Rockin’ Ramods – She Lied (Bon Bon)
Zakary Thaks – Won’t Come Back
 (J-Beck)
The Nobles – Something Else
 (Marquis)
The Pentagons – Try And Find (Pent)
Chuck Berry – Let It Rock (Chess)
(Yes, that’s 11)

Current Top 5 Tracks:
The Playgue – I Gotta Be Goin’ (Rebic)
The Fabulous Depressions – Just Can’t Tell You
 (Maad)
Richie Knight & The Mid-Knights – Homework (Arc)
Bobby Comstock – Right Hand Man (Ascot)

And I’m still playing the two new volumes of Back From The Grave. A reminder that there’s always more new stuff to hear.

Weblinks:
facebook.com/ben.olins

Next Club Spots: Margate Mod Weekender


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews Music Rocksteady Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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Masters – Count Sputnik (Part Two)

This entry is part 15 of 20 in the series Masters1

Count Sputnik – Part Two:

Scotch Martin continues his interview with Count Sputnik (Vince), the ‘third man’ of British reggae along with Duke Vin and Count Suckle, present at the birth of Britain’s early sound systems, but who never secured his rightful place as one of the first modern DJs in the UK. The story continues as ska begins to become the ‘in’ sound of London’s underground club land.

Reminiscing about the early 1960s Count Sputnik remembers meeting (literally) trombone stalwart, Rico Rodriguez, later to work with the Specials, when he arrived in Britain. “I went to pick up Rico from Victoria station with a fella called Satchmo’, cause he sounded like Louis Armstrong. At the time there were few good musicians in the UK that could play the music so he was really in demand.”

At the very start of the 60s Vince was DJ’ing for the Palmer brothers (PAMA) at the 31 Club, opposite Stonebridge Hotel, often, he reveals, with 78rpm jazz and be-bop records, and a single turntable, chatting between the tunes while changing the disc, but never over them.

The brothers later moved their club down to The Apollo in Willesden which is still there now (or was last month!). “The Palmers were Jamaican, ‘Father Jeff’ as we called him, was the main guy,” says Vince. “They would give me promo copies of their new releases once they moved into the music business and I would play the tracks if I liked them, that was the only way people could hear the records ‘cause there was no radio play back then. You got to keep them of course so that helped to build up the collection. They opened a shop on the High Street (78 Craven Park Road) later on.”

Apart from the flow of demos from the Palmers, records came from other UK sources. Sonny Roberts started Orbitone studios (at 108 Cambridge Road, Harlesden, now a famous address in reggae) in the early 60s and distributed his label, Planetone, through Island. “He was the first person I knew with a recording machine and he brought over Millie Small to this country, they lived upstairs from the studio at Cambridge Road,” says Vince. “There was also a little record shop in Kilburn where the guy would cut you a tune if you needed it, you could borrow a record from back home and take a cut before returning it a few hours later before anyone get worried (this could be ‘Foxley’ referred to by Jah Vigo in Lloyd Bradley – Bass Culture, p.120 of the paperback).

“I used to order my records mail order from Dacares (he can’t remember the spelling and I don’t recognise the name). I didn’t bother with Randy’s and all them – everyone got from them, I got better tunes. The top tunes were always Studio 1, you can say what you want, they were the best tunes.

“When I go on holiday to Jamaica at that time I maybe go into Randy’s, also the Prince was someone I knew but he was supplying juke boxes at that time only, not retail. I knew Buster before he was doing music, when I left Jamaica he wasn’t doing nothing. Later I met him in the Roaring Twenties nightclub at a midday dance and he recognised me, which was cool because he was a star by then.”

By the mid 60s Vince had a young family and was working as a mechanic during the day. Come evening he worked in London’s ska clubs in the West end for promoters like Suckle, the Roaring Twenties in Carnaby Street (now the Ben Sherman shop, ironically…) being the one he refers to most often. Despite not featuring in several online histories of the legendary venue others have confirmed that he was a resident.

“Count Suckle would never leave his records at the Q-club,” says Sputnik. “He always took them away, or occasionally someone like me was there watching them. If he couldn’t do a job then I would do it for him, even the American bases, we used to play for the Americans back then. We would play all kinds for them, jazz, soul and R&B – that’s what we played in the old days so I had a lot of that.

“I played at the Q-Club for two years, it was a very important place. Ronnie Scott booked Nina Simone after hearing Suckle playing her records at the Q-Club, he would wander in often, and we went to his club to hear jazz. Georgie Fame played and that brought the white folks, the young fellas with their sharp suits, but everything closed at 11pm. Q-club opened at 10pm, so we get all the people coming, famous pop stars and people like me, mechanics and drivers or waitresses. It used to be packed. Sometimes there would be coaches travelling from Birmingham.

“On a Sunday afternoon you might have the Small Faces playing and when Elton John started he first played there, he would give the other artists a break from performing. The Soul Brothers and the Soul Vendors and others played there, everyone. All the time we used one turntable and valve amps, for the bass there is no substitute, and when the old transformer heat up proper it’s at its peak.”

A rare foray south of the river in the mid 60s saw him up against Duke Reid. “I always took my engineer with me on these dates, and before the show we would do what we call a tune up. By that time I had a 2000watt amplifier – I started with 100 watt. The amplifiers were made by an African man like i said before, a Mr Hedes (unsure of spelling) and he also worked for Smith’s in Edgware Road (probably what was H L Smith and Co. 287—289, or 350 Edgware Road, London, a wireless shop). He was the amplifier man and everyone went to him, I think he was the best.

“Anyway, my engineer said to me, ‘This man is rough you know’. They come in with all those polished wood boxes, all kinds of stuff, and set up – I started with an instrumental and he didn’t know what I was playing, two records into the set and them cut up the wires. I didn’t make no fuss, no fight, and I never ever had an argument with no other sound system either, it’s just not worth it. That’s what spoiled it all later.”

Despite this brush with the Duke, Sputnik DJ’d well into the 1980s and claims that police crackdowns at that time put an end to the heyday of the sound system, in his opinion. His two sons have continued the tradition, both passionate supporters of the classic Jamaican sounds that paved the way for reggae.

I finished by asking Count Sputnik if he had ever been tempted to make music himself, as a producer or performer given that he played a pivotal role in setting up reggae in the UK. “I never made no music – all I do is pick a tune and put it on.”


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Scotch Martin

Since the local youth club in the early-eighties Martin’s been Djing with records of one sort or another. Spots at the CCI National Mod Rallies across Britain in the 80s were followed in 1990 by the first in a line of successful northern soul and mod clubs in Glasgow. With four others he started Goodfoot in 91, with Acid Jazz-influenced playlists of Blow Up in London, and Brighton Beach in Leeds. Goodfoot arguably paved the way for a new generation of mod-influenced clubs in Glasgow over the past 20 years. Living in London in the late 90s Martin DJ’d at neuvo-modernist clubs including Where’s Jude and Lordy Lord, as well as regularly spinning at Duffer of St. George parties and other happenings. A career highlight was supporting legendary organist, Jimmy Smith, as well as pulling off 10 consecutive club nights during the 1995 Glasgow Jazz Festival. By 2001, back in Glasgow, Caledoniasoul launched. A definitive milestone in the Scottish soul scene, the club ran for six years and brought Butch, Mick Smith, Mick H, Arthur Fenn, Mike Ritson, Dave Rimmer and Ady Croasdell to Scotland for the first time to experience the sweaty, full-on atmosphere for themselves. As a journalist Martin has always written about music. In 2004 he tracked down singer and organist, Bill Bush, whose soulful, jazzy rarity, I’m Waiting on Ronn, was hitting on the northern soul scene. After visiting Bill in the USA and interviewing him for Manifesto he brought the band over to perform in the UK, complete with Hammond B3, and has helped Bill profit for the first time from the 1968 b-side. Martin is married to Caroline, has two children, lives in the London suburbs. Still collecting after 30 years!

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March 7, 2014 By : Category : Articles DJs Front Page Interviews Rocksteady Scene UK Tags:, , , ,
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Masters – Count Sputnik: The Soundsystems’ third man

This entry is part 13 of 20 in the series Masters1

The Third Man

There was a third man present at the birth of Britain’s early sound systems along with who never secured his rightful place in history as one of the first modern DJs in the UK. But after two years searching Scotch Martin tracked down this elusive figure to a minibus garage in north London and interviewed him exclusively for NUTSmag.

Count Suckle and Duke Vin feature large in the story of Black music in the UK, but I first became aware of a third, more shadowy character who was present at the genesis moment of UK reggae through two Jamaican friends, themselves now in their 70s, who remembered an older soundman well-established in the Harlesden area when they first arrived in the UK in the very early 1960s.

One of the two, Patrick Alvaranga, was a DJ at the Railway Hotel in Harrow in the mid-60s and a young mod. We were discussing the ‘old days’ and he remembered dancing to a DJ when he was, ‘just a kid’ at various clubs in the Harlesden area. I volunteered the names of Suckle and Vin, but he was sure it was neither of them – he was also clear that out of the three this ‘third man’ had the best tunes, hands down. That’s quite a claim, given the competition.

As this was nearly 50 years ago the memories are patchy, but over a few months in 2011 while working in Wembley I started to piece it together and eventually the name Count Sputnik came up – not much, but a lead at last. More significantly, Patrick believed he was still in the area.

In the late 1950s the 31 Club in Harlesden (opposite the Stonebridge Hotel) was the Palmer brothers’ (PAMA) first basement venue (later they went on to run The Apollo, which is still standing in Willesden, and PAMA records (around the corner on Craven Park Road).

The 31 Club was ‘the’ place for Jamaican sounds in north London in 1961 and it was probably there that my friend heard the man who I would eventually track down to a minibus company where he works as a valet, despite being almost 80-years-of-age.

Count Sputnik (real name Vince, which was all he would give) moved to the UK in 1958 from Jamaica just as The Trojan and Downbeat sound systems were coming to the fore. His day job when he settled in Harlesden was a car mechanic with the local Hillman garage. Work was easy to come by as Britain flourished after a decade of post-war austerity. Vince wasn’t initially involved in music professionally. Later I found out that he played through the 70s and 80s, retiring in 1990.

“I knew two friends who had sound systems, Count Suckle and Duke Vin, I was the third one in the UK after them,” says Vince. “I knew them from home and they put me onto a Black man who built amplifiers (Vince doesn’t have a name for him but it’s almost certainly the ‘African man’ sourced at the timeby Duke Vin and recalled by Jah Vigo in Scott Bradley’s book, Bass Culture. The African was the only person at the time prepared to provide heavy equipment to sound systems, or more accurately, provide it to Black people).

“I started out with a 100 watt box, and one turntable, not really talking between the records, it spoil the music all that attitude. People dancing away and then (makes a muffled sound like a DJ talking over a poor quality mic).

“I took one record off and another on, double quick. I never moved to the two turntables and some still do use the one turntable now as a tradition. I was always doing the blues parties too, parties in people’s houses, in those days everything finished at 10.30pm so we always had parties. There were no other systems in Harlesden at the time so we’d go straight from the club to the house and after midnight the police would come.”

Vince knew legendary record producers and DJs ‘Coxsone’ and ‘Duke Reid’ personally, and went on to buy records directly from Coxsone, getting many pre-release tracks ahead of any other DJs outside of the Island, which would explain why my friend, Patrick, rated him so highly.

The first place he bought records in the UK was from Peckings (the late George Price), who’s son, Chris, still runs the Studio 1 franchise in London. He reveals that back in Jamaica, Duke Vin was a DJ for Tom (the Great) Sebastian and when he came here started his own soundsystem (again backing up Scott Bradley’s book). “I used to buy stuff from Peckings, he was the main man for records and almost all the records coming into the UK came in through him. He therefore had a direct route into Coxsone.

“Because I had a car working in a garage, I used to take Peckings to the customs office to pick up his goods. Because of that I had first choice then; I got to hear the best tunes first. Back then money was tight in Jamaica, you would do everything on one reel of tape, press up a few tunes then erase the tape, so maybe just a handful of copies would be made, these were pre-release 45s on blank labels normally, there would be no archive.

“Later on Sonny Roberts had a record shop in Harlesden Lane. There was a furniture shop in Harrow Road that sold Jamaican records and Peckings eventually opened a shop in Finsbury Park in the 70s, and of course PAMA in Craven Park latterly.”

Back in the early days Vince bought records from the Jamaican shops such as Randy’s and Muzik City via mail order using postal orders. But it’s the recurring significance of Peckings in the story of Jamaican music in Britain that comes through strong.

I asked Vince about the competition at the time. He looks at me square and says, “Well it seem to me that many of them was afraid of me, afraid to compete.” He’s smiling, but not kidding. For the first time during the interview I can see past this 80-year-old valet to a more youthful man, perhaps a bit taller and more imposing.

“In the mid 60s there was one man, Lord Koos he call himself. He was one of them rude bwoys, you know, a tough guy. He came up around that time. But competition wasn’t really an issue. I had a reputation, a reputation for getting my stuff together – if you know what I mean?”

Part II of Martin’s interview with Count Sputnik covers the mid 60s and the Q club, standing in for Count Suckle, and playing to the mods. Watch out for it later in the year.


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Scotch Martin

Since the local youth club in the early-eighties Martin’s been Djing with records of one sort or another. Spots at the CCI National Mod Rallies across Britain in the 80s were followed in 1990 by the first in a line of successful northern soul and mod clubs in Glasgow. With four others he started Goodfoot in 91, with Acid Jazz-influenced playlists of Blow Up in London, and Brighton Beach in Leeds. Goodfoot arguably paved the way for a new generation of mod-influenced clubs in Glasgow over the past 20 years. Living in London in the late 90s Martin DJ’d at neuvo-modernist clubs including Where’s Jude and Lordy Lord, as well as regularly spinning at Duffer of St. George parties and other happenings. A career highlight was supporting legendary organist, Jimmy Smith, as well as pulling off 10 consecutive club nights during the 1995 Glasgow Jazz Festival. By 2001, back in Glasgow, Caledoniasoul launched. A definitive milestone in the Scottish soul scene, the club ran for six years and brought Butch, Mick Smith, Mick H, Arthur Fenn, Mike Ritson, Dave Rimmer and Ady Croasdell to Scotland for the first time to experience the sweaty, full-on atmosphere for themselves. As a journalist Martin has always written about music. In 2004 he tracked down singer and organist, Bill Bush, whose soulful, jazzy rarity, I’m Waiting on Ronn, was hitting on the northern soul scene. After visiting Bill in the USA and interviewing him for Manifesto he brought the band over to perform in the UK, complete with Hammond B3, and has helped Bill profit for the first time from the 1968 b-side. Martin is married to Caroline, has two children, lives in the London suburbs. Still collecting after 30 years!

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June 3, 2013 By : Category : Articles DJs Front Page Rocksteady Scene UK Tags:, , ,
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