UK

Brighton Mod Weekender – Lee Miller

The Jive Five sang about “Main Street” where the In crowd stand beneath the neon lights, listening to the beats from the sidewalk cafés. Well, that sums up the sights and sounds of the corner of North Street and Gardner Street. With smartly dressed Mods from all over the globe, peacocking, checking out the next face walking toward the crowd, greeting friends and preparing for the Mod Weekender ahead!

This year’s New Untouchables events were, again, held at The Komedia. Doors now opening in the Studio Bar at 10pm, with happy hour bar prices, until the main event at 11pm. The bar filled quickly with faces from all over the globe! The DJ soon had the dance-floor moving, playing a mix of 6T’s Mod sounds from Ray Charles, B.B. King, Stevie Wonder & Jimmy Smith and many more.

The clock struck eleven and the main doors opened.. Behind the decks, the R&B assassin Sir Bill Kealy opened the weekend with Arthur Alexander’s – Black Night. Bill is a fantastic DJ who’s selections draws you deeper into the Blues then he rips your heart in two, with some dirty R&B grooves. (Copyright: AI – York). With Bill filling the dance-floor, deck duties were passed to Rob Bailey, who kept the floor grooving, with a great cross-section of sounds. After refreshment, a few hello’s and a long overdue pint with Kris Van Beethoven from Belgium. Next up to add to Friday nights shoe leather wear-down session was myself, bringing an across the board selection of 6T’s Soul, R&B with a bit of Motown thrown in for good measure. Glasgow’s King of Mod Cool, Paul Molloy took the torch and raised the game. Playing a great selection of dancers, with a great mix of Beat, Garage and some classic Mod sounds. 3am came around all too quickly, so off to bed to recharge and Sarah to soak those too hot to trot feet.

Saturday morning and the sun was shining, and so was the chrome. The Brighton air filled with the smell of two-stroke and the ting ting sound of scooter exhausts. The New Untouchables afternoon event was being held at The Volks on Madera Drive where they had also made arrangements for the parking to be suspended so the squadrons of scooters could be parked and displayed. Inside the venue, there were a plethora of stalls offering quality vintage clothing, rare vinyl and tailoring services. The soundtrack to the afternoon was being supplied by DJ’s Wolfgang from Weisbaden, Germany, Julian Rochfort from Frome, Paul from Reigate, Jon Clay from London and Rob Powner, the face behind the club, Wang Dang Doodle, who set my goosebumps off with Earl Connely’s – This Girl !!

The Baron, introduced the afternoons live music, which was delivered by London’s – The Baron Four, the UK’s finest quartet of classically influenced Garage-Punk maestros. Who took us on a journey through their latest album ” Silvaticus” and other great tracks, keeping the appreciative crowd entertained. My favourite being their take on Bo Diddley’s – I Can Tell with Kevin Smith wailing on that harp, what a musician! The second live act was – Men of North Country (MONC) – hailing from Tel Aviv! What a sound, their version of the 60’s Soul Monster – I’m Comin Home In The Mornin’ was absolutely outstanding. The rest of afternoon was spent playing catch up with various friends from around the globe who I see more than the blue mooners. The standard of sussed dress was impeccable, and great to see the New Breed showing some, how it should be really done!

The evening started with that view again, smart dressed Modernists gathered on, that, corner. Again, the NUT’s evening event started in the Studio Bar at ten. When I arrived about 21:45 there was already a queue forming.

Starting the evening’s soundtrack off with Wes Montgomery & Jack Mc Duffs – I’m Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town, with other tracks from Joe Thomas, Jimmy McGriff & Chuck Higgins. Just as the dancers were finding their groove, it was decided that the main room would open at 10:30 as the queue was outgrowing the room capacity. So, record boxes in hand a quick rush down the stairs and let the main event begin, Buddy Guy, John Lee Hooker, B.B. King & Ray Agee coming to the party. Again, Paul Molloy took to the decks, keeping the dance-floor, handclappin’ & footstompin’ to the sounds of original 45’s including, The Game – Gonna Get Me Someone. Tonight, Glynn Preece & Sean Chapman, hosts of “Out Of Time” joined the DJ’s over both floors. Glynn followed Paul in the main room, with some great R&B from Tiny Topsy, Sam & Dave’s great dancer – You Ain’t No Big Thing, Baby, ending his set with Chuck Miller’s – Look Out Mountain – with a great crowd showing their appreciation. Mr Bailey turned up the heat with tracks including The Rebel Rousers – As I Look, The High Numbers – I’m The Face, Johnny Watson – Say, I Love You and Gale Garnett’s version of You’ve Been Talkin’ ‘Bout Me Baby. The R&B assassin then made his mark on this event, giving the dance floor Danny Owens – You’re A Little Too Late, King Karl – Everybody’s Feelin’ Good amongst others. But the highlight for me was seeing Yasu from Japan in the “zone” dancing to The Drivers – Mr Astronaut. The dance-floor was a sea of dancing Mods, with handclapping and whistles appreciating every track played. Now as the song goes, “we came out here to party” – as the first bars of Booker T’s – Green Onions rang out a cheer went up from the crowd as the dance-floor filled, and there it stayed, to classics including, the In Crowd, Cool Jerk and many more great MOD dancers. Meanwhile, in the Studio Bar, Sean & Glynn with guests were showing all how-to party – Out Of Time style… Paul, Rob & Sean kept the sounds flowing in the main-room and the floor moving right up until 5am, with the crowd asking for more…

A bit of a slower start on the Sunday, but a Full English soon put that right. Again, the sun shone and at The Volks, the dealers looked like they were doing a roaring trade, with many more scooters adorning the roadside, with many day-trippers, attending for the impressive ride out, and scooter competition.

More faces from all over the globe were in attendance, chatting, drinking, looking sharp & listening to the music being played by the afternoons guest DJ’s. Suit Yourself Modernist Culture hosted this afternoons selection of DJ’s, Ian Hurford from Basingstoke, Ian “Detroit Executive” Jackson from London, Alan form Brighton and Vinny from The Prince Regents.

Gary Milan and Doug Sturrock joined out host Rob for the in enviable task of judging the scooter competition which lined both sides of the seafront. The standard was truly incredible and it took well over an hour for the final results to come through. The trophies were presented in front of the slush puppy with Brighton Pier as the backdrop for photos, congratulations to:

Best Lambretta – Lee Maxey – TV175 series 2
Best Vespa – Paul Digby – GS160 mk 2
Best Mod – John Gibson – TV175 series 2

After the presentation, it’s time for the eagerly anticipated ride-out across the East Sussex cliffs. The sight, smell and noise of hundreds of scooters is truly incredible and sight to behold. The ride-out was one of the most enjoyable yet from all accounts with a short refuel at Smugglers rest before the return trip back to the Volks. Some riders went onto Beachy Head but were diverted with reports of a mysterious gas cloud, we are happy to say the cloud was not 2 stroke and nobody was seriously injured. Many thanks to judges and all those who helped with marshalling the ride-out, a superb job folks.

The final evening’s event kicked off at 10pm at the Komedia, with Mary Boogaloo joining us in the Studio bar with Brighton Got Soul in the main room, with Ady Croasdale, Chris Dale, Sean Chapman & Colin Baldock.

Mary treated us all to a fantastic Jazz set including Wes Montgomery’s – Swivel Hips. Alan from Suits Yourself treated us to some superb 60’s Soul including Kell Osbourne’s – Quicksand. Bill had the room blocking to some of the best Rhythm & Blues 45’s, including Arthur Griswold – Pretty Mama Blues. Paul played a mixture of Mod dancers finishing with Death In Vegas With Paul Weller – So You Say You Lost Your Baby. Mary & Rob kept everybody dancing, then I was back on for the last 30mins which also involved a bit of double decking with Bill, before closing the night off with Ray Charles’ – The Train.. The crowd then moved downstairs until sun up..

Another fantastic New Untouchables weekender, with the events full of Smart, Sussed Mods from all over the globe. Thanks to the NU team and the fantastic staff at the Komedia and Volks who look after us all weekend.

For more images visit our Facebook PAGE HERE

See you next year… LEE MILLER


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Lee Miller

I've called myself a Mod since around 1980. I first discovered the scene through 2-Tone & The Jam et al. Throughout my 35 years, I have been on a musical journey through the world of "Mod Music" - discovering something new at every RPM. Started attending Mod Clubs & Rallies in 1985, and have never looked back. DJ spots at local events escalated to London and beyond. As well as guest slots, being part of the NUT's DJ team and residencies at The Mousetrap (20 years) I’ve been involved with the hosting of events - From, The Maidstone Brandy & Blues Club, The Sidewinder & Gettin' To The Point (Leeds) and The Dreamsville Mod Weekender (Lowestoft), to name just a few!

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September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Events Front Page Reviews UK Tags:, ,
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Ady Croasdell – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 10 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

Ady is a living ‘Soul Scene’ legend running the 6TS Rhythm & Soul Club at the 100 Club Northern Soul All Nighters and co-running the Crossfire Allnighters.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

The Animals. While living in Derby 1964.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Last Chance 6TS allnighter, 21 Oxford St in 1982.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Every closing Sunday night at the Cleethorpes weekender.

4. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Butch for new sounds, Mick Smith for the old ones.

5. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Randy Cozens showing me there was more than Northern to soul dancing.

6. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Sharon Scott – Putting My Heart under Lock and Key, most famous ones are Melba Moore – The Magic Touch and Frankie & Johnny – I’ll Hold You.

7. Biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Impressions, Lou Johnson & Maxine Brown.

8. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Crossfire – The next night is on Saturday Oct 21st 2017.

9. What is the record you would most like to own?

That one that hasn’t been discovered yet.

10. Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Kim Weston – Helpless
2. Carla Thomas – I’ll Never Stop Loving You
3. Four Tops – Baby I Need Your Loving
4. The Parliaments – This Is My Rainy Day
5. The Sensations – Demanding Man
6. Spellbinders – Help Me
7. Ben E King – Getting’ To Me (Atco acetate)
8. Sharon Scott – I’m Not Afraid (acetate)
9. Barbara Lynn – This Is the Thanks I Get
10. Luther Ingram – Oh Baby Don’t You Weep

Current Top 5 Tracks: 

1. Nancy Wilcox – He’ll Be Leaving You – Pied Piper
2. September Jones – Voo Doo Mademoiselle – Pied Piper
3. Magic Night – If You and I Had Never Met – Roulette
4. Melvin Parker – If I Had My Way (acetate)
5. O C Tolbert – Marriage Is Just a State Of Mind (Dave Hamilton acetate)

DJ Promo Links
www.6ts.info
facebook.com/pages/6Ts-Rhythm-and-Soul-Society/6320844642

 


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : Clubs DJs Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Pid – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 13 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

Pid is one of Birmingham and the UK Scenes’ most respected and longest serving DJs, who has appeared at nearly every Modernist Type Event there is on offer over many years. We asked him a few questions recently and here is his replies.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

As a kid I used to get dragged along to watch bands at various working men’s clubs by my Parents, mostly Jazz stuff, then in the late 70’s my mate played me The Jam LP, All Mod Cons and that got me into the mod thing.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

I think it was upstairs at the Upper Grounds Pub (nick name The Rat Pan) in Witton, Birmingham.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

The Isle of Wight rallies, probably when the Action played.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Ronnie Scotts in Brum a few years back, it was the August Bank Holiday Monday after one of the rallies – I was knackered. They’d asked me to DJ at a soul all-dayer in between these soul bands that were doing all this Blues Brothers stuff, they were shit. It finished about 2.30am, they didn’t give me a cent and I had to be up for work at 5am.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Any DJ who can keep folk on the dance floor.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The variety of sounds, anything from early R&B to 60s beat and psych.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

It was an over the phone auction and I won a track called Love is in the Air by The Liberation Street Singers.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Biggest influence was definitely all the early Jam songs,  I haven’t any favourite artists in particular.

09. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The Moseley Arms, Digbeth, Birmingham and some of the NUTS rallies/events.

10. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Blimey, tough one, it will probably be completely different tomorrow.

All time Top Ten:

  1. Howlin’ Wolf – Smokestack Lightning
  2. Danny Owens – You’re a little too late
  3. Billy Hawks – Oh baby, I believe I’m losing you
  4. The Contours – First you look at the purse
  5. Jackie Wilson – Soul Galore
  6. The Action – Lonely Room
  7. Tintern Abbey – Vacuum Cleaner
  8. Tito Puente – Hit the Bongo
  9. Jimmy Smith – The Cat
  10. Mose Allison – Baby Please Don’t Go

Current Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Evil Eve – Tommy Youngblood.
  2. Jolly Jax – Preciate’ it.
  3. Silas Hogan – I’m in love with you baby.
  4. Lloyd Nolan – I don’t know about you.
  5. Liberation street singers – Love is in the air.

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Interviews ModJazz Music RnB UK Tags:, , ,
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Callum Simpson – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 6 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod/scooter scene at 15 years old. I bought my first scooter, a Vespa 50cc Special and joined a scooter club called High Moderation. I had an older brother and cousins who were into the Mod scene so I started to hang around with some Mods who were a year above me at school. Once into the fashion it was only a matter of time before I started to get into the music. I started listening to bands such as Paul Weller, The Jam, Small Faces and The Who. My brother had a big part to play in my musical taste progressing, as he was listening to bands like The Specials, Madness and was listening to lots of soul and Motown compilations, which exposed me to artists like Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, The Four Tops and Martha Reeves.

At 16, looking slightly older than my age (not the case now), I was able to start going to clubs like Brighton Beach, local soul nights and the occasional scooter rally. This is where I was exposed to lots of new sounds. I was hearing records like Mel Torme – Coming Home, Sandi Sheldon – Gonna make me love you and Sam Dees – Lonely for my baby. As you can imagine I was blown away by these sounds and the exposure made me delve a little deeper into the music and vinyl records. I bought my first record from Boogaloo Records in Leicester when I was 17 for 6UKP and it was Ray Charles – Go on home.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My First DJ set was in Birmingham; by this time I lived for the weekends and was travelling up and down the country regularly attending mod/soul nights. Through attending nights on a regular basis Pid asked me to DJ along with a couple of mates Soggy and Gibbo. Dudley Steve was also on at the same night. I remember playing records like Joe Tex – You better believe it baby, JJ Jackson – Oh Ma Liddi and The Artistics – hope we have. I also remember playing a reissue, but this was before I was aware of the OVO policy! A couple of people looked amazed that they saw a young 17 year old lad behind the decks playing Bobby Adams & Betty Lou – Dr True Love…quite funny thinking about it now!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My most memorable DJ set has to be in Barcelona at the Boiler club. The city is amazing enough but the Boiler Club is how clubs should be, exciting, vibrant and a full on party from start to finish. I was deliberating weeks before about what I should play and selecting records for my play-box! I was pleased with my sets and judging by the dance floor so were the dancers, it was packed from start to finish… I even played a B-side by mistake and the dancers liked it, thankfully it was a very good B-side!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If ever you get asked to DJ at a wedding DON’T DO IT! I was asked off the back of running a club called ‘Shoutin the Blues’. One of the bar men liked the music and asked me to play at his wedding. At the time I was about 18 or 19 and thought that I could make a few quid. I made it clear that I only had Soul, Mod, R&B, Latin records and that he wouldn’t be getting the usual type wedding DJ playing music like ABBA, The Village People etc. He was adamant that he wanted something a bit different and that his guests would enjoy the music. I agreed to do it and for a price of £150, which I thought wasn’t bad for a few hours work! How wrong could I have been!

I was conscious not to play rare stuff, so I took more mainstream (to me) records which consisted of lots of Motown and dance floor friendly classics. Anyway to cut a long story short only 1 person danced throughout the whole night and that was towards the end of the night… funnily enough it was probably the rarest record I played all night ‘Billy Hawkes – Oh Baby’. Towards the end there were a group of lads who were sat at the back of the room, one of them came to ask me if I would play ‘You’ll never walk alone’, me being a Man United fan replied “I don’t play that stuff”, every record I played then was drowned out by a chant of “Who the f hell are you”. Shortly after that I decided to call it a night. I got my wages and left. Looking back now it’s pretty funny but at the time it was a nightmare!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Mik Parry – Forward thinking and so ahead of the game it’s unreal. It’s only now other DJ’s have been able to acquire records he was playing years ago. A) because the records are pure quality and B) they have seen his playlists. Check out his You tube channel ‘POW WOW MIK’

Karl Heard – Is what I call a proper DJ! This man has the ability to create an atmosphere like no other. Karl had a record collection to die for, but has now sold most of them off…not that I’m complaining! You think of all the big tunes – Volumes, Charles Johnson, Judy Stokes, Notations, Magicians, Harvey Averne, Johnny McCall AND Karl had or has these and loads more of this calibre.

Gav Arno – I always say it but it’s true, he’s a dark horse! Every time I hear him behind the decks and also when I have a look through his playbox he surprises me with what he has. Gav has a passion for unearthing quality unknown records, he finds tomorrow’s big records today!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The three DJ’s I have mentioned in question 5 have helped me shape my taste, especially Karl Heard, over the last few years. Another is by regularly attending club nights and hearing DJ’s spinning new (to me) interesting records. The thing I love about Mod nights is you get such a varied taste of music from Soul right through to Jazz.

The internet is also a great way to hear new records and other DJ’s from around the world. Shows such as Jester Wild and YouTube channels are a great way to hear new stuff. Over the years I have collected all sorts but now I am much more selective about what records I buy.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Tough question…my best discoveries are records I have recently posted on YouTube, Lil Archie & The Majestics, Leave my Girl Alone & Victor Lane, There’s Something About You. I have had them for about 4/5 years now and have been searching hard since but have never come across other copies. That is the reason why I have put them on YouTube to give them more exposure but also to see if other DJ’s/collectors can unearth copies…good luck!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I honestly don’t have a favourite artist, I really like Marvin Gaye but not sure I could call him my favourite. I would relate this back again to question 5 and say that in my time as a resident at The Pow Wow Club, Mik and Gav were massive influences over me musically. The stuff these guys were playing was unreal! Imagine being 19/20 and hearing The Jokers, Jonathan Capree, The Fads, Young Jessie etc. Both well ahead of their time and two great DJ’s.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not in the slightest, if it’s good and I like it I’ll have bid/buy it. I don’t just buy records for DJ-ing with though. If I hear a record that I like but is not right for playing out, depending on cost, I will still by it for Sunday afternoons relaxing at home, listening to a few records.

Although I do like the Soul Brother Records label. It can be found here.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I am not currently a resident or running any club nights but I get asked to guest DJ quite a bit, so if you keep your eyes peeled I’m sure you will my see my name on one or two flyers. In terms of running my own night… watch this space! Callum will be playing at The Nutty New Year Event in London, see all the details HERE!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Another tough one, it would have to be either Eddie Parker, I’m Gone on Awake or The Hopkins Bros, Shake Cherri on Magnetik. I can remember when I first heard both of these records for the first time and thinking Holy smoke!

I first heard Eddie Parker in Sweden at the Soulastic All-nighter when Ginger Taylor was playing. When the first few notes came in the atmosphere was something I had not experienced before at a soul all-nighter and something I will never forget. That night we all went onto an after party and one of my friends had what I thought was a copy of ‘I’m Gone’ and the only difference between his copy and Ginger’s was that my mate’s was a boot (the look-a-like boot). I wasn’t aware of the value of the record at this point and I thought he had a copy, he then explained it was worth in the region of between 5-7K, needless to say, it was hammered that night and played probably about 30 times at the after party… oh what good times!

I first heard Andy Dyson play The Hopkins Bros at Lifeline a few years back and again the place went crazy. Only a handful of DJ’s had it at the time, all the big boys such as Dyson, Butch, Ian Wright… I’m not even sure if Mick H had one at that time!? Shame that it has been booted now! It’s still record of the night every time I hear it out, but I hate that I can now go online and buy a boot of it for £10, it has to be OVO!

12.  Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten Favourites:

1. Eddie Parker – I’m gone

2. Hopkins Bros – Shake Cherri

3. Jonathan Capree – I’m gonna build me a mountain

4. Carol Anderson – Taking my mind off love

5. Ray Agee – I’m losing again

6. Billy Hawkes – Oh baby

7. Volumes – I ain’t gonna give you up

8. Otis Lee – Hard Row to Hoe

9. Parisians – Twinkle little star

10. Tobi Lark – Sweep it out in the shed

Top Five Spins:

1. The Sacred Four – Somebody watching you

2. Ray Agee – I’m Losing again

3. J T Parker – If you want to hold on

4. Judy Stokes – Real Man

5. Charles Simmons – Save the World

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : Articles Clubs DJs Events Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Chris Dale – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 9 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Chris Dale took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

New Wave, Mod Revival and Two-tone, but my first ever gig in Dec 1979 at Lewisham Odeon, The Specials, Selector and Dexy’s on the same bill, and my future was sealed.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

St Johns Tavern 1990, I can still remember how nervous I was. This was one of Alan Hanscombe’s many soul and reggae ventures, and still helping him out with RnB123 in 2014, should be due my pension soon.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Sunday night Brighton 2011, something really clicked and is up there as one of the best. I can’t go without mentioning my few 6Ts 100 Club experiences, The Boiler and the Hideaway Manchester, especially after a particular memorable football match. The Rimini Italian Jobs throughout the 90’s and early 2000’s were very special, and finally Scenesville at the Notre Dame hall, great nights and an awesome venue.

04. What, so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve been lucky to have DJ’d at some great clubs and nothing really stands out as a bad experience.

05. Your favourite DJ and why?

The whole 6T’s team at the 100 Club past and present, Colin Law at Shotts (he was untouchable around this time), Roger Banks and Mark Bicknell, Gary Spencer & Carl Fortnum and not forgetting Terry Jones at the Village.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Travelling around the country to various all-nighters and clubs, hearing fantastic music, taking a little bit from each experience, mixing in a little Ska, Reggae and Jazz, trying to mould this into my own style, hoping people don’t realise I’ve pinched it.

07. What was your best ever find/ discovery?

Laying claim to any find this day and age is a very rocky road, always someone out there to trip you up, but Manny Corchado – Pow Wow at the Mousetrap in the late 1990’s, would be a tough one to beat.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Motown stable, as it directs you to everything else, Curtis Mayfield, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations. I also have a great love for Ska & Reggae, which stems from the Two-tone era.

09. Do you collect specific labels/ artist/ genres?

Yes, Yes, Yes and Yes – Tamla, Sue, Studio One, Blue Beat the list is too long…

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Mousetrap
RnB123
Brighton\NYE London
I’m also very fortunate to be asked to do fantastic clubs like VaVaVoom
(25th Oct 2014), Inner City Soul and The Boiler Barcelona.

11. What record you would most like to own?

George Pepp – The feeling is real – Coleman
Jimmy Bo Horne – I can’t speak – Dade
Ray Gee – I’m losing again – Soultown
The Wailers – Diamond baby – Coxsone

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 tracks of all time:

1. George Pepp – The feeling is real – Coleman
2. Paris – Sleepless nights – Doc
3. Flash Mckinley – I’ll rescue you – Bombay
4. Gene Toones – What more do you want – SimCo
5. George Lemons – Fascinating girl – Gold Soul
6. Cleveland Robinson – Love is a trap – Nosnibor
7. Prince Buster – Linger on – Prince Buster
8. Tommy McCook – Goldfinger – Treasure Isle
9. Little John – Just wait and see – Gogate
10. John Harris – Hangin’ in – Kerston

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Charles Sheffield – Got my voodoo working – Excello
2. Judy Hughes – Fine Fine Fine – Vault
3. Constellations – I don’t know about you – Gemini
4. Marvin Gaye – Loved starved heart – Tamla
5. Tan Geers – Let my heart and soul be free – Okeh

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 6, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music News UK Tags:, , ,
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Anita Pallenberg – Fashion Icon

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Fashion Scene 5

Born to Italian and German parents, Anita Pallenberg was the mother of all rock chicks and with her passing in June we say goodbye to someone who embodied the style and sass of the mid to late 60s like no other.

She started her career as a model in her teens in Italy and New York, where she even spent time at Andy Warhol’s Factory. Her life was to change in 1965 when she blagged her way backstage at a Rolling Stones gig in Munich.

She began a relationship with Brian Jones, the two of them were often photographed about town in virtually matching outfits. They were the ultimate in rock & roll 60s cool. Drink and violence eventually drove the couple apart and Pallenberg and guitarist Keith Richards became an item soon after. They remained together for 12 years and had three children.

Although much of the press covering Pallenberg focuses on her intimate relationships with the Stones, her role as the so-called ‘Sixth Rolling Stone’ went way beyond sex and drugs. She was a muse in every sense of the word – a true, deep, visual and musical inspiration.

Jagger was said to have remixed tracks on the band’s 1968 album Beggars Banquet because she didn’t like it on a first hearing. The songs ‘Angie’ and ‘You Got the Silver’ were also said to be written about her and she also provided backing vocals on the 1968 ‘Sympathy for the Devil.’ Richards is said to have written ‘Gimme Shelter’ in reaction to the fact that his girlfriend was across town filming the, ‘not so simulated’ sex scenes with Mick Jagger in the raucous 60s romp ‘Performance.’

Beyond the sex, drugs and rock n roll, it was Pallenberg’s love of fashion that made her one of the coolest women of the era and in turn her natural ability to nail that ‘just got out of bed with a rock star’ look soon rubbed off on the band’s own style. These once suited and booted RnB boys evolved into cocky, dandyish, lolloping rock icons that they have been regarded as ever since. This transformation was largely down to Pallenberg. She just seemed to know what looked good.

Marianne Faithfull wrote of her friend in her biography ‘Faithful’: “How Anita came to be with Brian is really the story of how the Stones became the Stones. She almost single-handedly engineered a true cultural revolution in London by bringing together the Stones and the jeunesse dorée… The Stones came away with a patina of aristocratic decadence that served as a perfect counterfoil to the raw roots blues of their music. This… transformed the Stones from just pop stars into true cultural icons.”

For example, when she was with Jones she dyed his hair even blonder and dressed him in women’s clothes. He once asked her to dress him up to look like French singer Françoise Hardy. By 1967 the Stones were wearing Pallenberg’s trademark Fedora hats, scarfs and fur coats. Keith Richards once said that he started to become a fashion icon simply for “wearing his old lady’s clothes.”

She was the queen of the 60s accessory. The antithesis of the clean cut, butter wouldn’t melt, look of Twiggy. Every outfit was finished with either a low slung large buckle belt, a swishing boa style scarf draped over her long-legged frame and topped off with a wide brimmed hat. Mini skirts would be worn short as you like with knee length suede boots and full length fur coats.

Her flamboyant looks also saw Pallenberg carve out a decent career as an actress. She made 15 films, among them the iconic 60s kitsch classic ‘Barbarella’ where she played the ‘Black Queen’ alongside Jane Fonda in the lead role – her black cat suit cut away in all the right places by Paco Rabanne. After her split with Richards, Pallenberg went on to follow a career in fashion which saw her graduate from St Martins in the 90s and in later days was seen either strutting down the runway herself or hanging out with latter day ‘it girls’ such as model Kate Moss.

Sadly, she never wrote an autobiography because she said the publishers would only be interested in her dishing the dirt on the Stones. Her influence on fashion however will live on. She wasn’t styled by anyone else but herself – her look was hers alone but has been much imitated. A rare bird indeed. Rest in peace Anita.

 


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page News UK Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey Mr DJ – Glyn Preece

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

NUTSMAG recently caught up with DJ Glyn Preece in for a nice chat about music.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod & scooter scene late 78, early 79 , I grew up listening to music through my parents, They were into Rock & Roll, so I was listening to the likes of Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Chuck Berry & such like, I was going to youth clubs & discos from an early age & hearing The Who, Small Faces, The Jam, & Motown sound and it went from there finding out about Motown, Northern Soul, R&B. Finding out about the clothes, style & Scooters… I was hooked.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first DJ slot was at some old youth club, playing tunes from small collection out my little ” youth club box” which still have.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Most memorable. I get a buzz from DJing anywhere really. Although being asked to DJ in Turin was amazing. I love Italy anyway, so to go and DJ was fantastic. I would love to go again as well as other places abroad. To be asked to DJ at Brighton is a huge honor for such a fantastic weekend.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

My worst DJ experience, thankfully I haven’t really had any apart from the odd technical hitch with decks, amps etc.

5. Your favorite scene DJ’s and why?

Haven’t got a favorite, So many Top DJ’s out there & some brilliant new blood. But whoever the DJ, If they play thumping tunes top tunes, underplayed, never heard before. That’ll do for me.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Well growing up listening to Rock & Roll & the Mod revival going to Northern Soul events & DJing at them as well as Mod & Scooter rallies… Hearing the early R&B, Boogaloo, Latin, Jazz. Always hearing more sounds that not heard.

7. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

My biggest influences are the Small Faces, The Who & Motown.

8. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Haven’t really got any favorites, I hear so many great sounds I couldn’t pick a favorite.

9. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

You can currently see me DJ at OUT of TIME – Wolverhampton, Secret Door – Telford.

10. What is the record you would most like to own?

All of them, my wants list is endless.

11. Please give us a top 10 all time favorites spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
Tough to pick top 10, they’re always changing’, In no particular order:
1. Freddie Hubbard – Return of the prodigal son
2. John Lee Hooker – Money
3. The Young Holt Trio – Ain’t there something that money can’t buy
4. Maurice Simon & the Pie Men – The Git Go
5. The Golden Toadstools – Silly Savage
6. Louis Jordan – What I say
7. The Soul Society – The Sidewinder
8. The Marvelettes – Destination Anywhere
9. Curtis Mayfield – Move on up
10. Small Faces – All or nothing

 


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles DJs Front Page Interviews Music UK Tags:, , , ,
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UK Tamla Motown singles Part 3

This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Collectors Corner 2

“I’ll be doggone! – UK Tamla Motown singles Pt.3: TMG500 Series”

 

At the end of the second part of our trawl through the near-perfect run of soul classics released in the UK from the USA stable of record labels (Tamla, Motown, Gordy and Soul), boss Berry Gordy had just put pen to paper for EMI in Britain to follow Decca’s lead (with Atlantic the previous year) and launch Tamla Motown as a stand alone label to release the labels hits pouring out of the USA in the UK. With much fanfare, and with a corresponding (and very poorly attended at times) package tour featuring The Supremes, Martha & The Vandellas, Stevie Wonder, Miracles and the Earl Van Dyke six, March 1965 saw the first six records pressed and released to a British public becoming more and more interested in the soul sounds pouring out of the other side of the Atlantic. TMG 501 was the first release, with its iconic black and silver label, large 45 rpm on the right-hand side, and clad in a beautiful orange / white company sleeve. Things couldn’t have got off to a better start as The Supremes “Stop! in the name of love” hurtled up the charts to number 7, followed swiftly by Martha & The Vandellas “Nowhere to run” which reached #26 at the same time. Thus started a near perfect run of singles, commonly known as the TMG 500 series, which have been avidly collected by record hoarders ever since.

The Supremes quickly established themselves as the labels biggest hitmakers, frequently hitting the top ten throughout the decade, including 500 series favorites “You can’t hurry love” and “You keep me hanging on”. They were soon followed by The Four Tops who hit the charts with “I can’t help myself”, “It’s the same old song” and in 1966, having the first bonafide Tamla Motown UK number one with “Reach out I’ll be there”. Other artists began to have minor hits too, The Miracles “Going to a go-go”, Stevie Wonder’s thumping “Uptight (everything’s alright)”, Marvin Gaye’s “Little darling” and The Temptations “Beauty is only skin deep” all reaching the charts. The same artists also gave us some very sought after rarities too, as they all had flop releases at the same time. The Supremes “Love is like an itching in my heart”, Four Tops “Ask the lonely”, Marvin’s “I’ll be doggone” and The Temptations “Get ready” always fetch good money with collectors, even though they do turn up for sale quite often.

After a great start, the label had more hit & miss luck releasing singles, with 1965 seeing quite a few record releases selling almost nothing then later becoming sought after “lost” classics on the northern soul scene. Early release must haves include Kim Weston’s “I’m still loving you” (TMG511), Brenda Holloway “When I’m gone” (TMG510), Shorty Long’s “Out to get you” (TMG512), The Hit Pack “Never say no to your baby” (TMG514), Choker Campbell “Mickey’s monkey” (TMG517) and The (Detroit) Spinners “Sweet thing” (TMG514). Most of these early singles hit £100+ when they come up for sale, which isn’t very often! The rest of 1965 saw a flurry of good selling releases from label favorites, with The Contours and The Marvelettes also getting in on the action. Four very poor selling releases stand out amongst this run of classics, none of which are easy to find. Billy Eckstine “Had you been around” (TMG533), Dorsey Burnette “Jimmy Brown” (TMG534), The Lewis Sisters “You need me” (TMG536) and Tony Martin “The bigger your heart is” (TMG537) are all sought after, mainly due to rarity as they aren’t amongst the best of the labels’ releases!

As 1966 came around the label continually released great records with varying degrees of success. Joining the artists mentioned above saw releases by Kim Weston, Shorty Long, Gladys Knight & The Pips and, with one of Motown’s greatest ever songs in “This old heart of mine”, The Isley Brothers. Some notable, and scarce releases this year included Kim Weston’s Northern favourite “Helpless” (TMG554), The Contours “Just a little misunderstanding” (TMG564), The Elgins “Heaven must have sent you” (TMG583) and Gladys Knight & The Pips masterpiece “Just walk in my shoes” (TMG576). Hardly a duff release was pressed at all up to TMG599 in March 1967, such was the stellar amount of talent pouring out of Detroit at the time. This is partly why this period of Motown releases is so sought after. Although collecting “the hits” can be done quite cheaply and easily as the label sold tonnes of 45’s in the mid to late 60’s in Britain, completing the set does require quite a fat wallet! Black label stock copies are generally a lot cheaper (though not always easier to find) than the very sought after iconic Red A label demo discs which were pressed in very small numbers and are much cherished by UK soul release connoisseurs. The main exception to this rule is the Spinners “Sweet thing” which is near impossible to find as a stock copy. Monetary value aside, a complete collection is a sight (and sound) to behold, and once complete you’ll be in possession of one of the best ever set of musical releases ever. Happy Motown hunting!


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
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Masters -The James Hunter Six

This entry is part 6 of 7 in the series Masters3

Le Beat Bespoke 2010 was the last time NU had the honor of having The James Hunter Six grace our stage. I managed to have a chat with the main man ahead of the Margate Mod/Sixties weekend show on Friday 27 May 2017 @ Olbys.

You’ve had some rave reviews for the new album. How pleased are you with the way it has turned out?

Very much so! I know the phrase ‘We feel this is our best album’ is generally a coded way of saying ‘We feel this is our latest album’ but I would describe ‘Hold On’ as the record I always wanted to make. ‘Hold On’ is released on the Daptone lable.

How did that deal come about and were you a fan of their output beforehand?

We were between record labels and we wanted to work with a company whose ethos was the closest match to our artistic concept (or “a company who got our vibe” to use the parlance of today’s cider-addled youth). My barber played me Sharon Jones and the Dapkings’ stuff a few years ago and I liked it a lot, so at the first opportunity, we tried to get their label interested in us.

The producer for ‘Hold On’ (Gabriel Roth aka Bosco Mann) has compared you with Smokey Robinson in terms of your songwriting. That is high praise indeed, but how do feel about those kinds of comparisons?

I have been compared to Smokey before, although never favourably. I love his work, particularly his charming quirk as a compulsive rhymer, which effectively turns every fade out into a built-in bonus track.

How much of your life experience has influenced your songwriting?

I don’t think I’ve ever written anything explicitly autobiographical although some real-life moments end up in my songs. But that bit in ‘The Gypsy’ about whacking a fortune teller over the crust with a lead pipe is complete fiction. I deny all knowledge of this incident and I’m prepared to stand up in court and say so.

It’s fair to say your life has been anything but dull, from appearing on The Tube as Howlin’ Wilf, working with Van Morrison and Doris Troy (to name but two), then having to pick yourself up from a very low point to start again, what do you think has been the driving force that has brought you to this point?

Shortly after we appeared on ‘The Tube’ we had two record companies expressing an interest in us (neither of them went for it in the end) but when one of them invited us to the office he played the video of our performance and then turned to us and said: “Well you’ve done it now. You’ll never stop working!” And he turned out to be right, we never did, although there have been one or two lengthy holidays along the way.

The 2006 LP, ‘People Gonna Talk’ was a huge album in America, topping the Billboard Blues chart and earning a Grammy nomination. It was also critically acclaimed, what do you think was the key factor behind its success?

It might have been the novelty value of a middle-aged white bloke from England singing soul music, but hopefully, it was also because some of the songs were fairly catchy!

You have never recorded a cover version, but if you had to do a cover, what would it be?

We did attempt a cover of Allen Toussaint’s ‘Lover of Love’ for the ‘Hold On’ sessions but we didn’t really do it justice, so we’ll have another stab at it one day.

The other five musicians in your band have been with you for some considerable time now. What are their best qualities?

All of them have differing and eclectic tastes in music (anything as long as it’s good!) so each one brings a different element to the music, which stops it becoming too much of a slavishly copyist band. They also contribute to the arrangements of the songs after I’ve written them, which prevents them getting too samey. Oh, and availability is a strong factor as well.

We are really looking forward to seeing you in Margate James, thank you very much for talking to NutsMag.

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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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May 15, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Newbreed – The Bongolian

The Bongolian are based in Wales & London, UK with band members being: Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos, Johnny Drop: Drums, Glyn “tufta” Edwards: Electric Piano, Dan Rooms: Percussion, Trev Harding: Bass Guitar.We recently caught up with Nass and had a good old chatter!

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 17 years , The Bongolian was originally my studio project, but as soon as the LP was released, and such a huge success we are asked by the organisers of France’s biggest festival; Transmusicale to perform the LP live then other offers flooded in so the need for a full live band came about.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love of Nandos, check trousers and eggnog.

03. Many folks reading this interview will be aware of your other band Big Boss Man, so why did you form Bongolian and what are the main differences?

Trev from BBM slaps the bass guitar rather than his usual axe work, and it’s a much more percussive, rhythmic and V-neck jumper based affair.

04. How would you describe the style you play?

Chaotic! Space-age Latin Boogaloo.

06. What are your live shows like?

The live show is a celebration of heavy bongo beats, funky organ and grinding oscillator work. Brian Auger meets Mongo Santamaria in Carnaby Street.

07. What are your main influences in music?

Mod-Jazz with a touch of Psychedelic Bongos!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Wood Carving ( mainly medieval cutlery; spoons, knives, forks etc.)

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes all the songs and Subject matters usually revolve around past experiences of his childhood in Bolton.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Psyche Yam from the Blue Print LP is my live fave at the mo. My fave song by another artist is “Simply the Best – T Turner” or anything from “No Jacket Required”!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate, especially enjoyed the New LP “Moog Maximus” Launch in London’s Blow Up club in Soho.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Creating all layered analog synth tones for the LP Moog Maximus and then arranging for live performance.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse in Beat Mountain, (www.beatmountain.com) – we stay in the studio for weeks on end, carving out the musical maze that is the sound of The Bongolian. We have had quite lot of plays on BBC Radio so we are aiming to tour UK/Europe in Autumn. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Quite good!

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Pine Cone are a great band!

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Lonnie Smith at Abbey Road or Electric Ladyland would be good!

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

I’m working on a hard, uptempo, latin-soul album, and working with Big Boss Man on a new LP, and setting up a new UK and European tour for Autumn. Also check out: www.beatmountain.com  – where I have recorded 548 drum and bongo breaks for use in any musical endeavors.

Tour Dates:
27 May ‘17 Mod & Sixties Festival, Margate, UK
01 July ’17 South London Soul Train, Peckham, UK
22 Sep ‘17 International Festival of Psychedelia, Liverpool, UK
Autumn ‘17 Moog Maximus, European Tour, TBA Europe.

Discography: Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2002: Bongo Head
LPs :
2002: ‘The Bongolian’,
2005: ‘Blue Print’,
2007: ‘Outer Bongolia’,
2011: ‘Bongos for Beatniks’
2016: ‘Moog Maximus’
Main Site:
bongolian.com
Social Networks:
facebook.com/thebongolian
twitter.com/@the_bongolian
spotify.com/thebongolian


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Club Soul Front Page Interviews ModJazz Picks Psych UK Tags:, , ,
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Newbreed – The Gallerys

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Newbreed5

The Gallerys; hail from Bristol, Wales, and Kent with band members being: Guitar – James Wood, Bass – Craig Barden and Drums – Dan Maggs. Every so often a new young band pops-up on the scene creating a buzz. We caught up with The Gallerys ahead of their performance at the Margate Mod/Sixties weekender.

How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

With the current line-up of Craig, James and Dan we have been active for a year and a half. Dan and James met at college in Tunbridge Wells where they discovered a shared love for music, and decided to start a band. The original bass player stayed in the band for a few months before leaving for university, at which point Dan had a mutual friend who put the band in touch with Craig who then joined to complete the line-up.

What influences do the band members have in common?

The band members have a lot of musical influences in common; The Who, The Jam, Stone Roses, The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Specials, and Oasis.

How would you describe the style you play? What are your live shows like?

Our styles quite innovative in the sense you can’t really put it into one category. It has influences of alternative and indie, mixed with the energy of garage rock and – at times – rhythm and blues. All this is held together by our three-part harmonies. The best thing about coming to one of our shows is that we play our sound which spans many different genres. Our live shows have tons of energy and we always go for it.

What are your main influences in music?

Bands like The Beatles, Oasis, The Jam, were all ordinary guys who – through great songwriting and determination – made something of themselves with their music. We’d definitely take inspiration from these bands; we write our own music, arrange our own music, have created an image for the band and have recorded our own EP. The thing about these bands is that they had an idea of where they wanted to go with their music, which they followed through with and achieved; a great example for us.

Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with? What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently?

Craig and James write the songs although The Gallerys sound doesn’t come until we arrange the tunes as a band in the rehearsal room. James has written songs such as ‘Paisley’,  ‘Is this real’, and ‘The End’ with Craig writing ‘You Don’t Really Love Her’, ‘You Can’t Look Through Me’ and ‘Doctor Friend’. The songs cover real life issues i.e. Paisley describes being totally overwhelmed by a positive feeling in a relationship whereas You Can’t Look Through Me covers the relatable topic of being ‘looked through’ in life whether that’s at work, at school or with friends. Something everybody has felt in their life. We want people to relate to our music and feel something when they listen to our tunes.

What’s your favorite song to play?

Our favorite song would be ‘Imperfect Perception’. It’s a chaotic track filled with descending guitar chords, driving bass lines and punchy drumming, all glued together with vocals from all three members. For me, this tune solidifies it’s a team effort for us. Each of us has an equally important role to play in our sound.

How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I’d say there’s definitely an underground scene out there. We’ve played many gigs in various areas of Kent like Maidstone, Tunbridge Wells and Ashford, we’ve played in London, Bristol, Portsmouth and Leicester, and there’s always bands that are doing something different which hasn’t been touched upon before. I’d say we participate in the sense we have a unique sound which merges lots of different styles and genres.

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The biggest challenge to date would have been recording our three track EP ‘Paisley’, which we finished last December. The EP features lots of three-part harmony so there was a pressure to be on top form from a vocal perspective on the days of recording. We split recording the EP over three dates which wasn’t a lot of time. However, we stayed incredibly focused and managed to record the EP in the time frame that we set ourselves.

How often do you rehearse? Play live? Record?

We don’t rehearse as often as we should do. Most of the time we gig about two or three times a week so it’s very difficult for us to find time to rehearse but as we’re always playing live we’re getting tighter and more familiar with each other’s musical styles. At the moment we seem to be recording about twice a year.

Anything interesting coming up?

We’ve got some good shows coming up. Currently, we’re on a national UK tour with indie rock band The Rifles which will see us support the band in Bristol, Portsmouth, Cambridge, and Oxford. We’ve just supported From the Jam at the o2 Academy Leicester which was one of our best shows to date. The venue was absolutely packed and we played our set which was met with great reception. We’re playing live on BBC Radio Kent during the Breakfast show which is a great experience; you’re able to reach audiences all across Kent. We have a special show at the end of May supporting The Specials guitar player Roddy Radiation in the Dublin Castle in Camden; a top venue we love playing at.

The highlight of our year is shaping up to be when we will support Madness at the Detling Showground in Kent, August. We do however have a big announcement to make very soon so stay tuned for what we have coming up.

On the 28th May, we’re playing a slot at the Margate Mod and Sixties festival in Olby’s music room which is going to be special. We played at a clothing shop in Margate called “Rat Race” before which was very well attended. We have a lot of support in Margate so it’s gonna be great to come back for this festival.

What do you think of the music coverage in the media? Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

There’s a good mixture and variety of music in the media at the minute. Sure there could be more but it seems to be fine at the minute. We rate bands like The Strypes, Temples, The Moons, The Rifles and Miles Kane.

What should we expect from you in the future what are your plans and ambitions?

We want to keep going. We want to write better songs, play to new audiences in new locations and most importantly, make a massive impact with our music.

Social Networks:

Facebook: facebook.com/TheGallerysUK/
Twitter: twitter.com/thegallerysuk?lang=en
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/gallerys

Tour Dates: Supporting The Rifles *

*2nd May, The Thekla, Bristol
*3rd May, Wedgewood Rooms Portsmouth
*9th May, Cambridge Junction
*25th May, The Bullingdon, Oxford
28 May – Margate Mod/Sixties Festival


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Interviews Modern UK Tags:,
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Cathy McGowan – Fashion Icon

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Fashion Scene 5

Nicknamed ‘Queen of the Mods’, but what was it about Cathy McGowan that made her so effortlessly hip and cool?

Twiggy said she regarded Cathy McGowan as an icon. “I’d sit and drool over her clothes. She was a heroine to us because she was one of us,” she said. Perhaps that was it – McGowan wasn’t too glamorous and she certainly wasn’t just eye candy. She knew and loved the music she presented on the TV show, Ready Steady Go and responded to it with the same youthful enthusiasm at the show’s television audience.

A year into co-presenting the Ready Steady Go with Keith Fordyce, McGowan, in 1965 was given the job of fronting the show all by herself. Her love of fashion was evident from the start. She had, after all, applied for the job while working on Woman’s Own magazine. She was the epitome of what being a young women in the mid 60s was all about. She was obsessed with anything new and was always looking for the next ‘in’ thing, be it in clothes, music or clubs.

As a presenter on the show, she had to make sure she wore a new outfit every Friday. Her fans would promptly rush out and buy what she was wearing or the next best thing the following Saturday. McGowan wrote articles on music and fashion for the magazine’s Rave and Mods Monthly. Her Mod Snips column in Mods Monthly (which read as breathlessly as she talked) was basically a list of what to wear, listen to, who to see and where to be seen. In one column she writes: “Fred Perry shirts worn by a few girls these days… could catch on!” In another: “ What do you think of red mohair suits… I prefer the tonic ones!” There’s a great blog where you can read a selection of Cathy’s articles for Mod’s Monthly called Tintrunk here.

McGowan was said to have been given a weekly clothing allowance so she could make sure she had something new to wear each week. As the show began to revolve even more around its presenter it began to run a fashion segment too. She was a fan of all the top labels and regularly wore the likes of Biba – where were was a regular shopper and Foale and Tuffin.

In a 1964 edition of Rave magazine, the same year Biba was opening its first shop, she tells the story of how she goes to visit Biba’s Barbara Hulanicki at her flat and Barbara presents her with a dress custom made for her. “It had what in my opinion any outstanding dress should have: simplicity and a design and cut of sheer brilliance.”

Like Barbara Hulanicki, Cathy liked a trouser suit which at that time were considered very high fashion. Shoes-wise she loved the Mary Jane style but, she was also a big fan of boots – the flat heeled, knee-length kind. She remarked in one article that had these in almost every colour. She was also a fan of accessories – large bags and berets and square buckle belts on hipster jeans. On dresses, she would often wear the length just above the knee. The designs again would be simple with minimal detailing – a patch pocket or scalloped collar. Her trademark look though was her hair. Backcombed slightly on the crown and worn either straight and slightly turned up at the ends.

It wasn’t long before she launched her own line of clothing: Cathy McGowan’s Boutique was born in 1965. She sold simple A-line shift dress, tops and trouser suits. They were unfussy designs that any girl could carry off. Any girl that is with an eye-skimming fringe, a love of black kohl liner, and a penchant for the words – ‘smashing’, ‘super’ and ‘fab’!

 


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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May 22, 2017 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page UK Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Simon Penfold

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

NUTSMAG recently caught up wuth DJ Simon Penfold in Tunbridge Wells, Kent for a nice chat about music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Through my parents always playing 50’s & 60’s music in the car growing up and then due to my sister’s boyfriend, who was a Mod in the early 80’s, introducing me to Northern Soul.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

At a Night Owl Northern Soul night in Brighton in the late 80’s.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Honestly, I enjoy them all mainly, none stand out as it were!

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

As above, not one stands out really, it’s with the next event!

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Maybe Ginger Taylor, Andy Crane,  and Ady Croasdell – Ginger and Andy as I like a decent amount of 70’s Northern Soul thrown in and Ady because of his success with The 100 Club which was where I had my first experience of nighters in the late 80’s.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I guess being into Scooters/Northern Soul and getting goosebumps from brilliant, quality oldies!

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

The Imperial C’s – Someone Tell Her – Phil L.A. Of Soul years ago in the USA.

08. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

60’s & 70’s Northern Soul originals.

09. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

At The Little and Swig, Tunbridge Wells, Kent go here folks: facebook.com/Across-the-Street-Soul-Club

10. What is the record you would most like to own?

Lenny Curtis – Nothing Can Help You Now – End (An absolutely BRILLIANT/PERFECT Northern Soul 45)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Shawn Robinson – My Dear Heart – Minit
The Sweet Things – I’m In a World Of Trouble – Date
The Masqueraders – Do You Love Me Baby – Wand
Billy Prophet – What Can I Do? – Sue
Little Joe Cook – I’m Falling In Love With You Baby – Hot

Top 5 Tracks of All Time:

Gerri Granger – I Go To Pieces (Everytime…) – Bell
Arin Demain – Silent Treatment – Blue Star
Christine Cooper – Heartaches away My Boy – Parkway
Ritchie Adams – I Can’t Escape From You – Congress
Mickie Champion – What Good Am I – Musette

Social Networks:

facebook.com/Across-the-Street-Soul-Club

Next Club Spots: Tunbridge Wells – Northern Soul Night – 20th May


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 9, 2017 By : Category : Club Soul DJs Front Page Music UK Tags:,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Pete Kelross

This entry is part 6 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

Pete Kelross is Co Promoting and a DJ at Nightshift Northern Soul @ Lakeside
based in Woking, UK

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I have always loved music of all genres. I guess it started with Two Tone in the early 80’s which I got bored with after a few years, then moved onto 1960s and a Mod influence through the scooter scene, I did my first Northern soul night in 1985 and never looked back.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Soul Spin Syndicate at Woking Football Club in 1991.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Las Vegas 2010, I was in The Plaza Hotel Ballroom, I don’t think I have ever seen a room so up for it in my life,.Having taken over the decks from a Ska DJ the reggae crowd walked off the floor, the soul crowd walked on, I smashed it 🙂

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I won’t mention the club, but having to stop half way through my set to do a meat raffle.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Roger Stewart.. limitless knowledge, Ginger Taylor, vinyl envy, Kieth Woon, taught me they did make good records after 1969 Ady Croasdell, has forgotten more than I Know and my partner in crime. Derek Mead, always introducing fresh tracks to my box.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I just love good powerful brash Northern Soul, I think being brought up on Elvis and Country music by my parents kind of conditioned my musical taste towards powerful vocal and big orchestral backing that raw soul has… sorry Mum

07. How did the Nightshift Club come about?

I started Nightshift in 1998 because all the other nights in my area at that time were solidly focused on rarer and rarer tracks and cared little for oldies at that time, though when the classics were played the floor would fill, I saw an opening for a oldies night with the objective of playing to the floor. After Derek came on board in 2000 we began to bring the big names from Wigan down,the crowds grew and the venues changed leading to the fantastic 15 years we spent at Bisley pavilion that sadly closed its doors last year.

08. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I can’t honestly say I have discovered anything, the two records that spring to mind that I broke to my own circle are Doug banks, I just Kept on Dancing, a massive tune at Mytchett in the early days, and Joe Tex Under Your Powerful Love. Not my discoveries by any means but when a large chunk of your friends scramble to buy them it gives you satisfaction.

09. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Hard to say where the influence came from, soul is all about emotion good or bad so life’s experiences mould the lyrics that grab you mix it with the musical sound you like and that’s where the magic happens, favorite artist wow it chops and changes, but the one that always hits the top for me would be Ray Pollard, I missed his UK live performances, I’m still kicking myself today.

10. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I collect anything. Any genre, any speed, any size!

11. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Nightshift Club, Lakeside, Surrey, UK.

12. What is the record you would most like to own?

The Salvadors, Stick By Me Baby!

 

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. Going To A Happening Tommy Neal – Pameline
2. I Cried My Life Away Tommy Navaro – De Jac
3. I’m A Peace Loving Man Emanuel Lasky – Thelma
4. Little Girl Lost The Shepards – ABC
5. I Can’t Let Go Johnny Summers – Yorktown

Top 5 Tracks of All Time:
1. This Time Ray Pollard – Shrine
2. Cover Girl Carl Spencer – Rust
3. I’m Your Yes Man Clarence Reid – Wand
4. Beauty is Just Skin Deep The Sweethearts – Kent
5. Baby Without You Danny Monday – Modern

Social Networks: 

facebook.com/PeteKelross

Next Club Spots:

Lakeside: 3rd June 2017 Isle of Wight (Crown Hotel) Aug B/H Soul invasion
Los Angeles{ 15-16 Sept 2017


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles DJs Front Page UK Tags:,
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