Fashion – The 60s Suit Company

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Fashion Scene 2

I recently caught up with Sean the owner of 60’s Suit Company for a chat about his passion for fashion.

01. When and how did your passion for fashion come about?

It really started as a young Mod in the mid 80s looking at older Mods & Smart-skins in London and wanting to not only emulate them but surpass what they were wearing. I also wanted to understand exactly why a garment looked as good as it did on them and why they stood out from everyone else wearing something from Melandi or the Cavern. Even if they had said “it was made for me” the difference was obvious in the attention to detail, cut and general swagger of a person wearing the real deal.

02. When did you turn your passion into your profession?

It started in the 90s when I was working above a pattern cutters in the West End of London, owned by an old tailor, I used to go down and annoy him for a few hours but learnt a lot, he was a brilliant tailor and cutter, and also a sign maker! In fact he could probably have turned his hand to anything and I think he did.

03. When and where did 60’s Suit first open?

We have been trading for four years but I have been in the business for sixteen years and a Limited Company Director for nearly thirteen.

04. 60’s Suit’ is very popular amongst the Modernist fraternity; please tell us more about the range?

We are very much a bespoke company but we do small runs of stock items which keeps it fresh and we will be launching a “detail is everything” range at Margate in May which gives more of a modern twist to the traditional Mod styling. However with the bespoke items the pattern is made for each individual so anyone can put their own style and ideas into a garment.

05. We are all different shapes and sizes how do you order a suit from you?

I travel all over the country and people travel to me from all over the UK, but I also work from Union Street tailors based in Maidstone and also Monks in West Malling. We are also talking to a store in London. We will also be adding a take your own measurements page to the website in selected fabrics and linings in the near future, but for the time being please use the “book an appointment” button on our website page here.

06. Any famous clientele?

Dan from the Small Fakers, they are a big deal now and even though a cover band I think that counts and Andy Lewis, Paul Wellers’ bass player. My mate Monkey plus many top Mods but no ‘A-listers’ yet, although I am working on it so if Steve McQueen gets reincarnated make sure I am the first in line.

07. How long have you been designing garments for and any plans to develop your own brand further in the future?

It’s been sixteen years now on the design side but I’d very much like to have part of my range with a modern edge. Mod was very much up to the minute, cutting edge style and I would like to emulate that somehow in the ranges that we do, but not alienate our core clients. What would you call it? modern-vintage? vodern?! lol)

08. Do you tailor also for ladies?

That is something we’re asked for all the time, so never say never, and it would be a fantastic thing to do, but I’m afraid we are concentrating on mens wear for now.

09.What is the 60’ Suit philosophy?

To provide authentic, sixties inspired, quality suiting tailor-made to each customers requirements but above all else giving them something they are proud to own, wear and be part of.

10. Why do you think the Mod and Sixties styles is still revered, respected and revisited with each new generation?

The Mod style will never date for the simple reason that being sharp will never date. I am biased when I say this but – sixties styling looks as good now as it did over 50 years ago, It was a fusion of American, European and West Indian ideas and style that all came together at once the like of which may never happen again. In my eyes – Mod will always be – walking out of your door looking the best you possibly can with the money you have, simple as that really.

11. What are your favorite vintage brands and styles?

John Stephen, Brooks Brothers, Sam Arkus, Arrow, Ivy League and the mid sixties Mod look plus love the Suedehead and sharp Skinhead styles as well.

12. Where do you see brand heading in the future and any exciting projects coming up you want to tell us about?

Yes a lot going on with launching “detail is everthing” and adding to the Sixties Suit Co brand. Currently we are doing a lot of wedding events and have done wedding suits for scene people and non-scene alike.

13. Where can we find you and order a suit?

You can always book an appointment on the website, send us an email, call or get in touch via facebook. We are currently working on improving the website and making it easier to purchase off-the-peg items and a “design your own suit online” option will follow.

Special Announcements/Sales/Promotions

We will be running a 20% off a bespoke suit offer at Margate in May and again at Brighton in August this year. We have got some cracking sports jacket material this year which really is the best you can get, all from British mills – a bespoke item in this material, ordered at these events will enjoy a 20% reduction. Also at these events we will have 25% off on all ready to wear pieces.

Headquarters: (Kent, UK) Bespoke suiting and ready to wear, by appointment. HQ: Basement 57, Hardy Street, Maidstone, Kent ME14 2SJ
Main Site: 60ssuitco.com
Social Networks: facebook.com/pages/60s-Suit-Co


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 28, 2015 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Interviews Style UK Tags:, ,
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Fashion – The Shift Dress

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Fashion Scene 2

The shift dress might have been simple in design but in fashion terms, the word  ‘shift’ summed up perfectly the big changes taking place in British culture – particularly for women.

This loose comfortable style probably had it roots in the 1920s when the flapper girls wore dresses that didn’t cinch at the waist so they could dance about in them.

The ‘shift’ is the antithesis of the so-called ‘wiggle’ dress of the 40s and 50s, as you can actually walk in it or as Mary Quant was often quoted as saying: “Run for a bus in it!” 

This functional form has it’s roots in the sack dress of the late 50s which was designed by Givenchy. The style at this time was more fitted than it’s 60’s reincarnation. But the main elements were there.

The neck would often have a slash or boat neck. There would be no sleeves and there would be a couple of darts sewn in at the bust. Sometimes it would have a kick-pleat for more freedom of movement.

On the other side of the Atlantic, a beach-side juice bar had also cottoned onto the idea that women needed clothes that were functional as well as fashionable.

Lily Pulitzer was an American socialite living the dream in Palm Beach with her husband Peter who owned a number of orange groves there. She decided to start selling juice from the fruits that they grew to then sell to the tourists.

She asked her dressmaker whether she could run her up something that wouldn’t show up the juice stains. The result was a series of shift dresses in bright colours and patterns that suited the relaxed sunny attitudes of Palm Beach at the time.

Soon Lily was selling more dresses than juice and they became known as ‘Lilly’ dresses. Her designs really took off when Jackie Kennedy was photographed for ‘Life’ magazine featuring one of her outfits. Lilly dresses were suddenly all the rage and a fashion brand (which still exists today) was born as a result.

The early ‘shift’ dress wasn’t as short as its later 60s counterpart. It fell somewhere on the knee. It wasn’t until Mary Quant shorted the dress by 7-8 inches that it took on a new life again.

Quant was influenced by earlier modifications of the dress by iconic 60s designer Andre Courreges, a designer that was heavily influenced by modernist design, Courreges, loved the streamlined look the shift lent itself to and would often use the basic outline shape as a tunic to be worn with trousers.

Towards the mid-60s, the outline of the dress started to become more ‘A-line’ and with a flare-out from the waist and modern fabrics enabled this outline to hold its shape. Variations on the shift dress resulted in the so-called ‘tent’ dress and the ‘trapeze’ dress which was almost triangular in shape and flared out at the sides so it would ‘swing’ as you moved.

Designers began to be more playful with the designs – they introduced cut-out shapes such as circles and key holes or panels with plastic or even metal details. The more space-age and utilitarian the better. As the decade progressed the shift became the subject of bright colour and pattern and ‘op-art’ designs. Block colour panels were also a popular feature such as those on Yves Saint Laurent’s, now iconic, ‘Mondrian’ dress which paid a homage to the bold work of the
modern artist.

It’s no surprise then that the shift dress has endured over the ensuing decades. Not only is it a simple dress to make – it’s also simple to wear. All you need are some well-chosen accessories. But most of all it represents as period of emancipation for women who wanted to express their new found freedoms in a shape that didn’t define their gender and instead allowed them to
define themselves.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Europe Fashion Front Page Style UK USA Tags:, , , , ,
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Shopping for the right gear – Pete Feely

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Fashion Scene 2

I am sure that from time to time, we all dream about what we would do if we were given the chance to travel back in time to a certain era in history. I could pinpoint where and when mine would be, and it would involve a lot of shopping! Once London really started to swing, it didn’t take long for the rest of the big cities to to take note and shops and boutiques started to spring up. Added to the shops, mail order catalogues and paying by ‘never never’ schemes became a more viable option for the
working classes.

Regal

Outside the Regal in Soho in the 1980s.

Let us fast forward to the turn of the 1980s. It is now well documented on how a certain concept album by The Who was turned in to a full blown movie. This then became the ‘ground zero’ for what became the first true mod revival. (Thought I must stress that the cult of mod never vanished in the first place!)  Not quite as well known however, is that there was a small but significant scene building up in and around the capital. This scene took its  image straight from the boutiques and shops of swinging London. The spearhead for this was Andrew Yiannakou. Andrew opened his first enterprise in Kensington Market and this eventually ended up in a shop on Newburgh Street. ‘Regal’ clothing’ lasted for about 18 months and then folded, as did the small scene that it inspired. ‘Regal’ clothing has become quite collectable and is most definitely worth looking out for.

Throughout the 1980s, and most of the 1990s, the only real places that men who wished to dress in a 1960s style, would be charity shops and jumble sales. (There were shops in London, i.e. Merc and Sherry’s, that did a great job, but if you wanted a specific garment, you really had to go down the bespoke route.) Specialised vintage fairs and shops didn’t come until much later on. With the advent of the internet and computers becoming an essential tool in most households, shopping as we knew it was about to change forever. People soon discovered that the internet could be manipulated for the buying and selling of goods to a much wider audience. From these beginnings we now have worldwide established websites, such as eBay and Etsy to name just two. In addition, we now have the social media phenomenon, and have reached the stage where we can showcase and trade specialised vintage garments from the convenience and comfort of our own homes. This is all well and good for the fast-paced life of a man in the 21st century, but ask yourself – is this ‘virtual’ shopping really as much fun as walking in to a real shop where you can receive great service and personalised advice on the garments you intend to purchase?

From time-to-time, treasures can still be found in charity shops, although this is minimalised today as most of the charities employ ‘experts’ who will hunt out items to sell on the internet, looking to make larger sums of money than if sold in a local branch (which is fair enough in my book!).

The actual retail shop has never died, and I think we are starting to change the way we shop again. We want to experience the whole feel of what shopping is all about – from looking through the rails, to feeling the fabric, to trying the garment on and seeing how it looks in the mirror.

I’m now going to mention some of the players in the recent and/or current
retail market.

Velvet Illusion

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For me, I have to start with ‘Velvet Illusion’, as I feel that this business in particular really did ‘move the goal posts’ so to speak. The brainchild of VI was an Austrian fashion designer named Mickey Wolf, the ‘Velvet Illusion’ enterprise started building in the late 1990s/turn of the new millennium. Eventually there were two shops running concurrently – one at Camden Stables market and the other located on Kensington Church Street. I personally had the pleasure of shopping at the Camden outlet a number of times. The shop’s interior was truly delightful and it felt like stepping back in time to a world of Verner Panton design heaven. The clothing on display wasn’t to disappoint either. The shop catered for both sexes and some of the garments could be classes as unisex. The male clothing definitely took a leaf out of what now is described as the ‘Peacock Revolution’. Sadly, this business closed it’s doors in 2007. And, like the ‘Regal’ label, ‘Velvet Illusion’ label items are now fast becoming collectable in their own right.

DNA Groove

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‘DNA Groove’ is a name that is now synonymous with both mods and dandies alike. The man behind this business is Claudio De Rossi. Claudio opened up his first shop in Camden Market, London, in 2000. He then moved his business to a premises on Kilburn Lane. This shop lasted three years, and then Claudio decided to move to Spain and carry on the business via the internet and via retail outlets in Spain, Japan and the UK. Claudio says “I am the only micro-business (one man band) that produces quality, full head-to-toe, gents wear. Usually a small business will specialise in a few items, but in my case, I am the only place where one can obtain everything made under one single label!”

Ipcress Mod File

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I can think of only one other clothing label that can hold up to Claudio’s claim – ‘Ipcress Mod File’, based in Tokyo, Japan. ‘Ipcress Mod File’ is owned and managed by Satoshi Abe. Satoshi’s formative years were spent at the Bunka Fashion School. With this background, coupled with Satoshi’s love of mid-1960s style, it was inevitable that he would eventually open his own shop, and this happened in 2005. In addition to the shop, Satoshi has a well-established online business. A more indepth article on Satoshi and his business will hopefully follow in a future article.

Mendoza

nm_apr_2015_mendoza

‘Mendoza’ menswear can be found on Brick Lane, East London. Owned and run by Leroy Hamilton, and his right-hand man, Scott Ogden. The shop started in 2005 as a collective vintage shop. Eventually, Leroy took over the business and started to incorporate his own vision and designs to what we have now got today. ‘Mendoza’ prides itself on a second-to-none quality product, using British only manufactured fabrics where possible. ‘Mendoza’ also has a successful online business. As with ‘Ipcress Mod File’, I intend to cover ‘Mendoza’ in a more indepth future article.

Francois Nordmann

nm_apr_2015_francois

In most towns and cities, you can still find many great specialist vintage shops. These shops are always run by enthusiasts who in turn are usually obsessed with clothing from a bygone era. One of these shops is run by a certain Francois Nordmann. Francois’s inauspicious beginnings can be traced to his formative years rifling through his local thrift shops in Atlanta, USA. He says that treasures were easily found and he had to purchase the goods whether they fitted him or not, as he couldn’t bear to leave behind an item he had discovered! This hoarding instinct, added to his gift for finding the ‘right’ clothing, would inevitably end up with Francois opening his own shop.  When he moved to London in 1996, he eventually opened a stall in Camden Stables market. More recently, he has just moved his business to another premises still located in Camden. His shop is called ‘The Vintage Collection’ and you will find quality garments from the 1940s through to the 1970s. Francois is known for his amazing discoveries, and I now call him the Howard Carter of the vintage clothing world!

Dandy In Aspic

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Caspar de la Mare is the owner of the most well-known vintage business in London – ‘Dandy In Aspic’. Caspar’s parents mixed with certain musicians and arty types back in the 1960s , so it was inevitable that Caspar would be influenced by this upbringing. From a young age he sought out original 1960s garments wherever he could find them. As he got older, his wardrobe started to increase to such a level where he decided it would be a good idea to start selling some of his own gear. He started his first stall at Portobello Market, where the response was overwhelming. This in turn inspired Caspar on his unquenchable thirst in  finding new treasures to sell on his stall, and this now would also include selling womens vintage wear. In 2006, Caspar moved his business over to Camden Market where he has resided until most recently. He is now in the process of moving to a new property, staying in the Camden location. Caspar has got an incredible knack for sourcing such labels as ‘Take 6’, ‘I Was Lord Kitchener’s Valet’ and ‘Lord John’.

With all the businesses that I have mentioned, one thing they all share is a great passion for what they are selling. In today’s drab world of retail shopping, all of the above go that extra step in making sure that the customer receives the personal service one would expect. And with businesses like these around today, men’s fashion of a certain persuasion, is in a much healthier position!


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Peter Feely

Married to Susie, both actively involved in the UK 60s scene for many years. My personal interest in 1960s culture goes back over 30 years, with my main two passions being music and fashion, both in equal measure. I run my own menswear label – ‘Perfumed Garden’ clothing, catering for the discerning dandy male - in addition to sourcing and selling vintage mens’ gear, with a particular interest in those hard-to-find jackets and shoes! I also run the Facebook group, ‘Psychedelic Clothing for Men: Then and Now’, with 2200+ members. Although I have no formal training in the fashion industry, what I do possess is a real passion, and through the years I have gained valuable knowledge of many areas of mens’ fashion from the mid to late 1960s. I’m also a musician and have played in many bands in my younger years. I’m an avid collector of music and music-related paraphernalia. I started running my own club nights back in the mid-1990s, and at present I run a psychedelic night in Derby – ‘The Perfumed Garden Of Musical Delights’. Through this I also get to DJ at many exciting events up and down the country

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April 29, 2015 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Scene Style UK Tags:, ,
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Fashion – Womans Footwear

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Fashion Scene 2

Get on the good foot

‘Diamonds are a girl’s best friend’ – or so the song goes. Well basically, they got that badly wrong. Ask most women and I think they’ll reply the thing that really does it for them is shoes.

For those of us with a penchant for 60s styling, shoes are a vital component of any outfit. How fortunate therefore that our favourite decade offers up more varied and colourful designs than you could shake a go-go girl’s hip at. So in our continuing NutsMag women’s fashion series I thought it was about time we paid tribute to the key styles that keep us Mod types on our toes!

The slingback

Since it’s summer, lets start with the Slingback. So called because the ankle strap forms a sling around the back of the heel and is fastened with a buckle or a button. The style has been around for a couple of decades but the shape of the shoe and the heel look changed in the 50s to a kitten heel with a pointed toe. In 1957 Chanel introduced the two-tone slingback which was beige with a black toe-cap a design which shortens the foot and lengthens the leg. This classic style endured throughout the early and mid 60s with a kitten, block heel or a completely flat ballet pump style heel. The toe would classically be pointed to lengthen the leg and the foot. A square toe with a buckle or the shape of an oversized buckle. They are particularly flattering when worn with a full skirt that falls just over the knee – it makes your calves and ankles look much skinnier.

Ballet flats

Flat shoes were a big deal in the 50s and 60s. Ballet flats are a girls style staple especially those of us that loved Audrey Hepburn’s look in Funny Face. But it was another screen siren that kicked off our enduring love affair with the dance shoe style. Former dancer Brigitte Bardot is said to have requested that French dance shoe atelier Repetto make her a pair of sturdier pumps for everyday wear in red and they have been popular ever since. This easy-chic shoe is available everywhere these days – in patterns and prints and bright primary colours.

Mary Jane’s

The original strappy type shoe – the Mary Jane is so named after a character in a turn of the century comic book. Mary Jane was the brother of Buster Brown and both of them wore this style of shoe which is still popular today. In the 60s the Mary Jane was adapted with double and sometimes triple strap version with both round and pointed toes. Usually a Mary Jane would have a bit of a heel – generally a block heel balances out the shoe best but flat versions were also popular to add a baby doll charm to an outfit. Apart from traditional black, red, white and blue were popular. Variations so such as flowers or circles as well as lace-ups sections at the front and cut-out patterns and rivets marks in the leather.

Loafers

Much like the Mary Jane – loafers go back to the beginning of the century. But they became particularly popular in the 1950s among American students sporting the ‘Ivy League’ look. It was around this time that the term Penny loafer was ‘coined’. Apparently students took to slipping a penny in the diamond-shaped slit on the front of the loafer. The iconic loafer brand of course is G H Bass who brought out their ‘Weejuns’ design way back in 1936. The design itself apparently is based on a Norwegian farm shoe hence the US slang term ‘Weejans.’ In 1966 Italian designer brought out a loafer with a metal strap across the front in the shape of a horses’ snaffle bit, which have had many imitations over the years. The loafer saw a big resurgence in during the mod revival and two-tone era as it exemplified that smart but casual look and perfectly captured the androgyny of Mod for women.

Boots

Boots were a big deal in the 60s. Chelsea boots were iconic in 1960s London and were so-named because of their association with the fashion boutiques of the Kings Road. Vinyl boots, either ankle length or coming up to mid-calf were also popular particularly in white. Sometimes they would have a buckle strap coming across the top. The toe would form a soft point or a chisel effect. They were often called ‘space boots’ as they looked like the boots that astronauts used to wear. Vinyl boots with their high-shine were so popular you could even buy vinyl socks to match your shoes so they looked like a boot. In the mid to later 60s the boots got chunkier looking and lengthened and the block heel more pronounced. The so-called Go-Go boots were named as they were often worn by Go-Go dancers with their short dresses.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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July 8, 2015 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Style UK Tags:, , , , , , ,
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Fashion – 60s print and pattern (part 2)

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Fashion Scene 2

The late 50s and early 60s were all about looking forward. But by the mid 60s many would say that the true spirit of modernism had died out. It was everywhere of course in the media and on the advertising hoardings, as well as manifesting itself in bands such as The Who, The Small Faces and The Action. Mod was popular, so mods moved on. Elsewhere a backlash against modernism meant that artists and designers started to look to days gone by for their inspiration.

In terms of fashion, this resulted in a big cultural shift. Designers borrowed from Victorian era with its high-collars, the military wear of Edwardian-era and the Art Nouveau movement of the 1920s. The plain, abstract motifs of Op-Art gave way to the free-flowing shapes of nature. Fashion houses such as Liberty in London were a huge influence reproducing 19th Century designer, William Morris’ prints onto their fabrics. These designs feature huge swirls of acanthus leaves and other plants and flowers in large ornate colour ways.

A designer that really picked up on this look was Barbara Hulanicki, who opened her Biba store in London in 1964. This interest in more fluid line and pattern was also evident in Ossie Clarke’s designs in the 1960s.

London-based designers Foale and Tuffin who opened their boutique in 1962, just off Carnaby Street, also embraced pattern in their designs, utilising traditional British weaves such as plaid or herringbone or trouser suits trousers and tartan for mini skirts and tights.

The influence of the Empire and the East was also felt in this latest style revival. Touches of Madras and Paisley prints would feature on shirts, dresses and most popularly, scarves, both for men and women. The paisley twisted teardrop motif is thought to have Indian and Iranian and origins enjoyed a revival when it was adopted by the psychedelic’s and dandy’s of the mid to late 60s.

The motif, which looks a little like and uncurling fern or seed pod, in many ways symbolised the burgeoning ‘hippy’ scene.

The ethos of ‘flower power,’ as it was often referred to, was all about rejecting modern consumerism and getting back to nature, against the backdrop of political and social upheaval that was being felt across Europe and the US in the mid- to late 60s.

Fashion was quick to latch on to the movement and floral motifs became a staple form on shift dresses, pussy bow shirts and head scarfs. Sunflowers, daisies and poppies replaced circles targets and squares. The designs were none the less still modern, but the subject matter was entirely natural and not as just years earlier, a celebration of the man-made.

These prints feminised the shift dresses which became softer in line, with empire lines and high collars or huge penny collars added for extra detail. We also see here the introduction of the so-called ‘dolly bird’ style, all legs and doe eyes in short girl-like dresses, often worn with over the knee socks. Not a look many could get away with today, but this was the 60s after all.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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November 10, 2014 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Style Tags:, , ,
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