Fashion – Foale & Tuffin

This entry is part 1 of 4 in the series Fashion Scene 4

Claire Mahoney looks at the lesser-known, but no less influential 60s design duo that was: Foale & Tuffin

Designer Zandra Rhodes described them as the ‘Queens of Carnaby Street,’ others dubbed them the ‘Liver Birds’ of the London fashion scene – the dynamic duo that they are referring to are designers Foale & Tuffin.

You may not have heard of them. (I hadn’t until I started delving deeper into the history of 60s fashion.) But these two East End art school girls has no less an influence on 60s fashion and the mod look than the likes of Mary Quant and to those who were in with the in-crowd, they were the designers that people wanted to wear.

Marion Foale and Sally Tuffin met at Walthamstow Art School. These bright young girls epitomised everything that the 60s was really about. They were determined to do something different and they were going to do it all by themselves and not sell out in the process.

So they stepped straight out of the Royal College of Art and took the bold decision to set up on their own. In 1961 they rented a small workshop and showroom in west London for six guineas a week. Then, with just two old sewing machines bought for them by their parents, they rolled up their sleeves and got to work. Initially they would buy their fabrics from the local department stores. Their workshop was not far from Liberty and the department stores’ famous Arts & Crafts influenced prints became a feature of many of their creations. Entire collections were made lovingly by hand to order and when their business started to take off they opened their shop in Ganton Street just off Carnaby Street.

Their little boutique attracted a devoted following – fans included Jean Shrimpton. Julie Christie, Susanna York and Cilla Black and their house model was Pattie Boyd’s sister, Jenny.

So what was it about Foale & Tuffin’s designs that were so appealing? Well for a start they were rebellious and they understood what young people wanted because they were young themselves.

“We’d had it rammed down our throats – I had to go to Sunday School with white gloves, a hat and a handbag, just like a miniature mum in a dress made by her, exactly the same as hers! I mean who wanted to do that? We just wanted to kick against it all,” says Sally Tuffin. And kick they did. People talk about how Yves Saint Laurent introduced the trouser suit for women but actually, it was Foale & Tuffin that did it first. Their design was in brown corduroy and most importantly was created for women by women.

Marion Foale recalls in an interview for the V&A ahead of a retrospective exhibition of their work in 2009. “I remember us putting a corduroy jacket on Jill Kennington and putting the trousers with it and falling about with laughter – it was so funny. We must have been making trousers anyway, but not with jackets. We put it all together and thought it was hilarious!”

It was good timing. By the mid-60s the sharp mod look was starting to get a little more playful with the likes of John Stephen stocking more dandy-ish styles with frills and Victorian style detailing for men. So as the men began to embrace their feminine side the women could explore a more liberated a less sexualised androgyny, that ironically, was no less sexy for it.

Foale & Tuffin designs were also playful. They were one of the first designers of the era to ignore the rule of matching clothes and accessories and wantonly clashed spots, stripes and checks – sometimes all in the same outfit.

They loved plaids and tartans and created skirt and trouser suits in contrasting prints and colours. They matched them with brightly coloured woollen tights. Their designs were so popular that they were eventually picked up by the big stores in the States and licensed to J C Penney and Paraphernalia.

Foale & Tuffin like many of the brands of that era either fizzled out or changed course in the early 70s, in this case, both had settled down to raise their families. Marion Foale, however, later went on to set up a very successful knitwear design business and Sally Tuffin became a successful ceramicist.

The legacy of their brand may not have been discussed as much as the likes of Quant and Biba. But to those in the know, Foale & Tuffin were a brand to be reckoned with.

To read more about them and see some fantastic pictures of their designs – take a look at Foale and Tuffin: The Sixties. A Decade in Fashion by Iain R. Webb, published by ACC Publishing Group.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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March 1, 2017 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Style UK Tags:,
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Leslie Cavendish: The hairstylist to The Beatles…

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Fashion Scene 4

I first became aware of the name Leslie Cavendish when I was researching for an article that I wrote a few years ago. That article was on the boutique ‘Dandie Fashions’. When the said boutique was taken over by the Apple Corp in the spring of 1968, the boutique then changed its name to ‘Apple Tailoring’. It was decided that it would remain in the hands of John Crittle to run the day to day activities surrounding the boutique. Within the premises there was an unused basement, which became a unisex hair salon. Clientele could be fitted for a garment and then pop down the stairs to the basement for a haircut! The person who was put in charge of running the hair salon was Leslie Cavendish. As far as my research went for the article on Dandie Fashions – that is as far as I got with the hair salon / Leslie Cavendish part of the story.

As I delved deeper into Leslie’s background, it became quite clear to myself that he was an important part in that whole time period of the mid to late sixties. With some more research, I eventually managed to get in contact with Leslie, and as our correspondence increased, a meeting was arranged!

On a cold and grey late November morning, my wife Susie and I headed to London to meet Leslie. The rendezvous venue was chosen by Leslie, so we headed over to Hampstead and a pub called ‘The Old Bull & Bush’. I have to admit that I was quite nervous as we entered through the doors of the pub – lots of anxious thoughts racing through my mind. Within seconds of meeting and exchanging pleasantries, I knew that we were all going to get on fine. Phew….

From the pictures that I had garnered from the internet, it is crystal clear that Leslie was a man of style and great taste. Dark-haired, handsome and mysterious looking – not dissimilar to the guy that used to front the old Milk Tray chocolate adverts! As I looked at Leslie while in our conversation – he still retains the same qualities.

I got to work on asking my questions, almost immediately! Leslie gave me a brief story of his childhood in London, which eventually got to the part where he started an apprenticeship with Vidal Sassoon. From working with Vidal, he eventually got onto the subject of The Beatles and how he become part of that inner-circle. While our conversation deepened, it became apparent that Leslie had incredible understanding and memory of what was happening, in and around himself – back in those heady days! Even within the short time that we shared Leslie’s company, he managed to regale us both in some wonderful stories. I got the feeling that Leslie was enjoying telling his stories, as he had found the perfect audience. Leslie is hoping to get his book of memoirs published in 2017, and I expect lots of these incredible stories to be in the book. So, until that time, the tales Leslie did pass onto Susie and myself will remain as our own special secrets!

We spoke about music, fashion and football. I have to mention that Leslie is a lifelong QPR supporter or sufferer! And like myself, every now and then he was looking to his mobile phone for football updates.

There were still lots of questions that I wanted to ask, but I was aware of not bombarding Leslie or overstaying our welcome. So I asked if I could email him some questions – and that way, he could spend a little more time in his answering.

Before you read the Q&A part of my article – I have to mention what a charming and warm natured man Leslie is. As we left the pub, I think that we both felt we had gained a new friend.

I emailed Leslie a number of questions – here is what I asked, and Leslie’s answers:

01. What age did you take up hairdressing?

I left school at 15. I then started an apprenticeship at Vidal Sassoon at 171 New Bond Street. The apprenticeship was for three years, where I became Vidal’s junior for three months, and I was then promoted to junior hairstylist at his Grosvenor House hotel, Park Lane, salon. Just before my eighteenth birthday.

02. How did you manage to find a job working for the world-famous Vidal Sassoon?

My best friend at school and still to this day, Lawrence Falk (he started the first unisex salon in the U.K. called ‘Crimpers’) started working in a salon in London. I thought why not try it myself – so I asked him where would be the best place to start out. He said ‘Vidal’s salon’. So I called the salon and managed to get an interview and from there I got an apprenticeship.

03. Tell us something about the kind of clientele that would frequent the salon?

The salon had a very mixed clientele. From wealthy ladies who wanted the latest Vidal style to young models (some of which became household names), famous actors, musicians, fashion designers, to big film directors, and Mary Quant, who with the ideal hairstyle, set off the swinging London scene.

04. The world’s music, fashion, arts and hairdressing seemed to all explode in the early to mid-sixties – did you personally feel like you were part of something special that was happening in London?

You didn’t really think too much about it at the time. Life was exciting anyway working at Vidal’s. Added to that, the music and fashion were part of my youth. You did feel like ‘the times they were a changin’!

05. How did you become the personal hairstylist to The Beatles – and what were they like as people?

At Vidal’s, a client of mine was Jane Asher (who was Paul McCartney’s girlfriend) – she asked me one day if I would like to cut her boyfriend’s hair! And I think you know what happened next…

I met them all at a time when they had all decided to stop touring. So they were all a lot more relaxed than I imagine they would’ve been if they were on the road. All four of them were different and I had a good friendship with them all. This also applied to the team that was around them. I was the only one who wasn’t from Liverpool, but because I never spoke to journalists about my link with The Beatles – and never hassled them for autographs etc – I become one of the inner circle that they could trust.

06. What are your memories of managing your own salon within the boutique that became ‘Apple Tailoring’?

It was an intimate salon and very personal to whoever came in to have their hair done. My clients came from the music world and from streetwise people who just found the salon – and loved to have their hair done in the remarkable atmosphere that was ‘Apple Tailoring’! Being in the boutique and watching the dandies of London being dressed up in velvet and frilly, patterned shirts, was extremely interesting. They came in the shop to be dressed, and left as peacocks!

07. What are your memories of working alongside John Crittle at ‘Apple Tailoring’?

At first, John was great to be around, and I used to like watching his friends, who were mostly from the ‘Chelsea Set’, hanging around the shop. After a while though, I lost a lot of respect for John, as he was often stoned and spoke to people in an arrogant manner. He seemed to think that he was a Chelsea via Australian aristocrat, who was doing everybody a favour in dressing them, and he didn’t have time for the regular customer – who were the ‘real’ customers!

08. You were part of the chosen entourage for the now cult Beatles’ film ‘Magical Mystery Tour’ – what are your memories of that journey?

The MMT was one of my great memories and to be on tour with THE BEATLES, especially as they had stopped touring, was something special. If you have watched the film, you will have seen the coach journey and it was great to be one of the passengers, and to be able to watch The Beatles close up. More of which will be in my book!

09. I know that you were very interested in the music that was happening all around you – what were your personal favourite bands, both live and on vinyl?

When I was young I used to like Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, and The Everly Bros. Later on, I discovered Buffalo Springfield, Jefferson Airplane, Vanilla Fudge, The Doors, CSNY, and many more West Coast bands. My taste in British bands were The Animals, Free, The Kinks, Dusty Springfield, and Cat Stevens. I was also into folk music – and Neil Young was a hero of mine. I saw many bands live, but CSNY at the Albert Hall, and David Bowie (Ziggy Stardust), and not forgetting The Beatles, were concerts not to be forgotten.

10. What are your thoughts on the clothing that you were wearing back in those days? From the photos that I have seen you certainly were a snappy dresser!

I loved the whole hippy look – Afghan coats and velvet jackets with ‘Anello & Davide’ shoes. I also got into suits from ‘John Michael’ and ‘Take 6’.

11. What are your thoughts on contemporary men’s hairdressing – and do you still cut hair today?

I am like a gunfighter who put his scissors away in a holster a few years ago. Today’s hairdressing is an art form. The use of electric cutters and the thinning outlooks, makes out for spectacular hairstyles. Hairdressing is like Punk music – nobody makes the rules – you do what you want and that is called fashion.

12. And finally – what other interesting things are you up to these days?

I have now finished my autobiography about my life as a hairdresser at Vidal’s, and this included my time with The Beatles. The book should be out this year. I have given lectures at universities about the culture and fashion during the sixties period. I have been asked to be a guest speaker at The Beatles week this year in Liverpool, which I am looking forward to doing.

I occasionally do VIP Beatle tours. My clients come from all over the world and instead of the usual Beatle tours that take place around London, I can tell them what it was actually like in the recording studios, as well as being in the building, while The Beatles performed on the roof!


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Peter Feely

Married to Susie, both actively involved in the UK 60s scene for many years. My personal interest in 1960s culture goes back over 30 years, with my main two passions being music and fashion, both in equal measure. I run my own menswear label – ‘Perfumed Garden’ clothing, catering for the discerning dandy male - in addition to sourcing and selling vintage mens’ gear, with a particular interest in those hard-to-find jackets and shoes! I also run the Facebook group, ‘Psychedelic Clothing for Men: Then and Now’, with 2200+ members. Although I have no formal training in the fashion industry, what I do possess is a real passion, and through the years I have gained valuable knowledge of many areas of mens’ fashion from the mid to late 1960s. I’m also a musician and have played in many bands in my younger years. I’m an avid collector of music and music-related paraphernalia. I started running my own club nights back in the mid-1990s, and at present I run a psychedelic night in Derby – ‘The Perfumed Garden Of Musical Delights’. Through this I also get to DJ at many exciting events up and down the country

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February 15, 2017 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Inspiration Interviews News Tags:, , , , ,
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Fashion – Space Age

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Fashion Scene 4

Space Age Fashion

The 60’s was the decade when fashion was all about the future. And there was nothing more futuristic than putting a man on the moon. The ‘space race’ that dominated the 60s, not only captured the general public’s imagination, it had the French fashion houses in its grip as well. Celebrating everything that was shiny and new Space Age fashion probably illustrates the thrilling possibilities that the decade offered for the young and hip, more than any other look. Here we take a look at the style’s main proponents of this lunar fashion landscape.

André Courrèges

Courrèges is often credited as being the father of the space age look. He launched his own fashion house in 1961 after working for Balenciaga for a decade. In 1964 he introduced his ‘Moon Girl’ collection, using materials and fabrics never seen before on the fashion runway. Heavy-weight fabrics such as Gabardine and Polyester kept the outline of the outfits sharp and stiff. It was said that Courrèges ‘built’ dresses rather than designed them as the architecture of the outfit was everything. Motifs and cut-out shapes and panels in the dresses, revealed flashes of flesh or were filled in with metal, plastics and PVC. In some cases entire outfits were created out of plastic and PVC – the more man-made – the better. Colours were mostly white and silver. Fake pockets, over-sized belt loops and top-stitching to add emphasis to seams made the dresses and the wearer almost doll-like. Hemlines were raised to around four inches above the knee – in fact Courrèges is credited by many as introducing the mini skirt (as opposed to Mary Quant). Often outfits were finished off with beautifully cut coats with drop waists and hemlines that would fall below the length of the dress. And then there were the boots. Courrèges’ ‘go-go’ boots were introduced in 1963, were mid-calf with a square toe and a low block-heel and manufactured in beautiful kid leather. Demure and stylish and nothing like the full-calf, chunky plastic ‘go-go’ boots that would appear later in the decade.

Paco Rabanne

Spanish-born French designer Paco Rabanne was big on accessories, but rather than wear jewellery as a separate item – his most iconic designs incorporated them into the dresses themselves. His geometric metal link dress is a good example, although perhaps a little uncomfortable – but comfort wasn’t the point. He wasn’t afraid of pushing the boat out when it came to alternative materials and even used chain mail in his designs. His futuristic vision was so inspired, the designer was chosen to create the outfits for Jane Fonda in her role as female astronaut Barbarella: Queen of the Galaxy in 1968. Fonda’s role was the perfect canvas for Rabanne to let his futuristic imagination run wild. There were sculptured plastic crop-tops, mosaic tile body suits and chain mail capes. Lets not forget the over the knee white boots with silver fold down cuffs. These were not designs aimed at the high-street and didn’t really catch on outside of the higher echelons of the fashion world. Not only would the outfits be extremely expensive to re-produce they would be very difficult to wear and maintain. Even so, they ultimately changed the way that fashion was approached and photographed forever.

Emanuel Ungaro

Emanuel Ungaro like Courreges worked for Balenciaga before spending time under Courreges, where he was heavily influenced by the space theme.  He opened his own fashion house in 1965, stating that there would be no evening clothes in his collection because he did not believe in them. Similarly to other designers of the period his designs were stark and almost child-like in their construction, but no less glamorous for it. He did have a softer and more wearable approach to the space look, with items such as pinafore dresses becoming highly popular for day wear. Models such as Twiggy and Penelope Tree were photographed wearing Ungaro masks. These could be sported with leather jackets and hot pants suits worn with metal bras underneath. Indeed Ungaro was a metal fan and used the material whenever he could, creating futuristic body jewellery that carried an ‘out of this world’ quality.

Pierre Cardin


Pierre Cardin was also known for his interest in everything futuristic. He trained first as an architect before moving into couture where he worked for Christian Dior. Like many of his contemporaries, he had a strong and bold vision and so he decided to set up on his own. Detail was everything to Cardin. He loved motifs, particularly circular ones and he made much of the seam – using it not just for a purpose, but to also add great drama and definition to his outfits. Although his dresses and suits were timeless in their elegance, Cardin is perhaps best known for his striking accessories – particularly hats. He used the utilitarian shape of the helmet and turned it into the must-have head-gear of the era, using softer fabrics such as wool and velour. Sometimes his hats would even have plastic visors and goggles moulded onto them. Then there were his astronaut style velour hats which were brightly coloured structured balaclavas with a cut out section for the eyes and mouth. Not an easy look to pull off it has to be said. Cardin, like the others, broke the rules, experimented and pushed the boundaries way into the future and beyond.

These great designers still inspire today, please check out dandylifeclothing.com for some fab items!

Images: Darren Russell


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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February 12, 2016 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Style Tags:, , , , ,
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Mod Girl Fashion

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Fashion Scene 4

Deadlier than the Mod Male 

Mod has always been a bit ‘mad about the boy’. Pick up any mod book or retrospective and its pretty much always about the mod male – the mod girl might get a cursory mention if we are lucky. Of course, during the 60s the social context was very different – women were still on the fringes both economically and culturally – they were used to riding pillion.

Even when I was a teenager at the beginning of the 80s we mod girls were more likely to be found on the side of the dance floor or on the back of a scooter. No matter how much you cared about music, it was really difficult to get yourself taken seriously in those heartfelt debates about whether Sound Affects was better than Setting Sons – this just wasn’t girls’ talk. Boy, has that changed though.

These days, fabulously dressed female mods seem to be all over. The dance floor is packed with them. Often it’s the blokes, not wanting to crumple their suits or get their shoes stained, that are clutching their pints on the sidelines. In fashion terms, eBay and our love affair with all things vintage has unleashed a veritable flood of on and off-line shops. In short, apart from 1964, I’d say there has never been a better time to be into the scene.

Gina Giraffe who got into mod during the revival thinks that part of the reason why women have more choice is because the scene itself is broader than it’s ever been. “Women are into the scene in their own right, not just Mod-WAGs who are dragged along for the ride. They are experimenting with different 60s looks, so the range of clothing and accessories to choose from is wider.”

She still thinks the scene very male dominated however. “In my experience I don’t think attitudes have changed a great deal since the revival. It’s still a male-dominated scene, just a quick glance around any gig, rally or ride-out will quickly prove that. These days women’s opinions do seem to be more considered and respected, but I expect that’s because many of the men of our age on the scene have wives and daughters of their own and have mellowed over the past 30 years. I think things will be very different for the new generation of female mods who are currently in their 20s. They have grown up in a world of real equality between the genders, so the imbalance we experienced won’t exist.”

The availability of original 60s clothing on sites such as eBay has made it easier than ever to get that authentic look. Whether your style in totally vintage or a mix and match approach seems to be a matter of individual taste. In the words of mod, Jane Buttery, whose wardrobe is mainly original 60s: “It’s just a personal preference. However, I find it hard to find many original vintage skirts/trousers, so I shop for skirts and trousers from good old M&S, Boden or Laura Ashley. What I like about it is that you can be creative and individual with how you put an outfit together knowing you can have your own unique take on that era.”

We also have the option of high quality reproductions from the likes of Carnaby Streak (thecarnabystreak.co.uk) who faithfully reproduce 60s dresses and tunics and will even custom size for those of us (i.e. most) not sporting a Twiggy-type figure. Angela Williams set up the company because she saw a gap in the market for: “Good vintage 60s original mod clothing.”

She says: “Much of the vintage clothing worn now is more bold and psychedelic than when I first got into the mod scene. I think this is the reason why so many women are choosing to buy new clothing over vintage. There are companies now that offer good quality clothes that actually look vintage.  Another option many have chosen is to have vintage clothes reproduced.”

There is also the fact that polyester and Crimplene may wash and dry beautifully quickly but it can be very itchy and hot to wear on a night out – so sometimes modern fabrics in a good 60s design are about function as well as form.

A cursory look at Vogue or Elle magazine will confirm that the obsession with the 60s it not over yet. It has been very hit-and-miss on the high street though, with some collections named and shamed by mods who’ve been dressing in a 60s style for years.

Angela hits the nail on the head: “I think the 60s will always be popular fashion-wise. It is such an influential era that it never really disappears from the catwalks. But it’s a double-edged-sword when fashion focuses on the 60s. Although I am introduced to a new generation of 1960’s lovers with every ‘revival’, the high street is flooded with cheap 60s-inspired clothing. These are mostly bad interpretations and the true mod will always seek out the more true to style and well-made clothing.”

Coming up

Over the coming months, we will run a series of articles on female mod fashion from the 60s through to the mod revival of the late 70s to the present day. We’ll be looking at the influential designers from Biba to Quant and how high street brands such as Fred Perry and Merc have evolved over the years to meet the needs of a young generation of women wanting to look stylish and hip. If there are any topics that you think we should discuss do get in touch at claire@newuntouchables.com or #clairem68 or facebook.com/clairelm68


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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February 21, 2017 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Style Tags:, ,
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