Cat Black (Newbreed)

This entry is part 1 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Band Name: Cat Black
Headquarters: London
Band Members: Billy Skinner: vox, Le Grubb: bass guitar, Dave Preston: guitar, Tony Coote: drums, Ed Jalil: guitar/backing vox.
Discography: 2014 – Single: ‘Hung Up’

How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We have know each other for a while as friends, the line up of the band has changed a few times, this current line up has been together for a year now, we used to have Lewis from Little Barrie playing bass with us and also had Oscar from Hidden Charms on drums, both have their obligations with other bands and needed to concentrate on those. We are well happy with our line up now though, so things are moving faster than ever. We had a few previous incarnations but due to line up changes it was difficult to play and rehearse – so its been about 18 months now.

What influences do the band members have in common?

We all share a passion for late 60s rock‘n’roll, Rolling Stones Beggars Banquet period and Exile on Main St. We love bands like the Flamin’ Groovies, Stooges, Cream and so on. So bands that swing like Free, Delaney and Bonnie etc.. Were all just classic rock fans I guess.

Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Well if you love soulful rock‘n’roll you’d proberly like Maker, Hidden Charm, also Unkle Acid And The Dead Beats are from our way too.

What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Good, we have been going to 60s nights for a while now, we love the music man, we go to Moustrap and Crossfire when we can. London has always had a good underground scene. Were a central London band, so there is a lot of stuff going on here. Great clubs and a very vibrant scene. I think this is a good time for vintage fashion, music and culture in general.

How would you describe the style you play?

Loose, soulful, garage rock‘n’roll! Its committed rock‘n’roll with a sense of melody and swing to it. Its kinda heavy at times, but in a subtle way that makes you really want to boogie.

What are your live shows like?

Well we tend to go all in, were not into crowds that don’t feel involved with the show, London folk are a tough bunch to play to at times, not like in Europe, but we love a challenge so Billy goes off into the crowd a lot to get some blood pumping through their veins! So, energetic, fun and a little unpredictable

What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Wow to many to mention, shall we just say as a band anything from 68 to 75 ha! ha!, Well we already play Slow Death by Flamin’ Groovies and we have been known to play some 13th Floor Elevators too. Music we avoid is trendy east London shoe gaze eyeliner crap, the scenesters probably would hate us, I think the feeling is mutual! Also Stones, Stooges, MC5, Moby Grape, Free. I’m not sure we really despise anything in particular as music should be subjective – but bands that think they’re hip but have no songs to back it up kind of annoy us!

What are your main influences outside of music?

Outside of music it can be anything from people who just don’t give a f**k and do what they do with passion, it’s an attitude. It’s a slight cliché I guess but everything from art and culture to fashion , history , travel – it all goes into the pot!

Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We all write the tunes together. Billy does the lyrics, he likes to put some dark stuff in as he had a tough up bringing so he digs a lot out from the depths. Dave will come up with a riff and so will Ed, Grubby will also play a belter of a bass riff and Tony does what he does best and whacks the groove on it, it’s all about a good groove, and a bit of heart-felt chaos! We all have a hand in the arrangements – that’s the formula. We write about personal and real topics, they aren’t whimsical or based on fantasy.

What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

They vary from gig to gig, really tough to say! We all like Hung Up. Fave song is difficult – I think we all would have a different answer to that one.

How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

There’s been some great music that’s come out there’s no question, but what’s always dangerous is that it’s called a scene, as scenes can implode, but band wise, yeah there’s some cracking new psyche stuff out, say no more… ha! ha! In terms of music I think it can become a little too cliquey – that’s my opinion . But I think the scene is healthy. I personally make shoes for most of the bands in the scene – so that’s participation to an extent.

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Well living ain’t always easy, maybe organizing the five of us is enough, musicians are a funny o’l lot! Getting a stable line up – and getting a recording done that we’re all satisfied with. We have done a few but I think we are yet to capture the true sound of the band on a recording.

How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse once a week. We play at least once a month – we could play more live, but I think it’s better to choose better shows and space them out. Crossfire is coming up! Also when ever we meet up theres ideas flying around the room!  Its kinda “play that again will ya!”

What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Well hmm… I just don’t think people wanna take risks on music or bands anymore, so a bit dry to say the least!  But I also think its good that you can seek out press that pertains to the genre you are interested in. But I don’t think its something this band is really too focused on.

Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Guess there are some great bands out there: Uncle Acid, Temples, Rival Sons, Black Keys, Maker, Tame Impala and so on.

Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We record at Sausage Studio in Hackney – Its owned by Franz Ferdinand and run by our mate Sebastian Kellig . Great place and were happy there. Josh Homme, he gets old school Rock‘n’Roll sounding big and dirty he is fab too!

What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

To put out a record very soon. We have started it recently and that’s our main priority. To make our first album, is a focus for sure, we are all keen to do that, we have been honing our set and making it better, we are ready now to do a record we all love for sure!

Weblinks:

Facebook/catblackband


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 14, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page General Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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The Excitements (Newbreed)

This entry is part 2 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Adrià Gual and myself (Daniel Segura) started the band in early 2009, coming out of a more oriented 50s R&B band which I wasn’t enjoying very much. We wanted to get deeper into a more soulful type of music, still retaining the R&B flavour, which at the time (and still now) is a genre that we couldn’t find in a lot of current bands. We just started searching for people around our Barcelona area, and our first finding was Koko, which had just arrived to Barcelona some months before, and had posted an ad in the Internet about starting a band just to have fun. Afterwards the other members were put together by word of mouth, or maybe we knew about them through other bands, etc.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

All the band members gravitate towards any afro-american music from the past century, being it blues, R&B, soul music, gospel, garage… and specially jazz, which is pretty much the only music we can listen to on the same room and not complain.

3. How would you describe the style you play?

We plant our feet deep into the zone where R&B was mutating into Soul music, which seems like a really narrow one, but in fact it is wider than other styles we may be compared to, specially the late 60s funk thing, which we actually are far apart from.

4. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Any greasy R&B artist influences us, from Andre Williams and James Brown to any artist from Fortune Records, Excello, Stax, Okeh, etc. We’ve played several covers through the years, ranging from Rufus Thomas to the Raelettes, The Falcons or Etta James. Common denominator is, when covering, try to get some original not-that-well-known tunes, plus they have to be good ones! We do not despise anyone specific, but we try to avoid any artist (being music, film or whatever other discipline) that isn’t right out sincere about what he does and how he does it. The thing is, when it’s meaningful, it shows, and again, it’s good!

5. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

In my case (and this is a personal opinion) I really enjoy “I’ve bet and I’ve lost again”, a classic southern ballad penned by our rhythm guitar Adrià Gual. It really makes a difference to play that tune every night, it lifts you quite a bit.

Other artists’ tunes, there are tons of them, but I’ll just pick up two that come to mind right now: Sam and Dave’s “Wrap it up”  (best bass line ever), and “Space guitar” by Johnny Guitar Watson (that IS crazy).

6. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Umm, tough question… Maybe just pushing the band forward when the going gets rough, which in our case has been more than half the time. It is funny that we play this kind of music in the 21st century, but the work on the road, conditions, personal and social problems do not differ that much from the ones of the chitlin’ circuit from back then. Yes, we are not black people in Louisiana, but we need the food and the bread to keep alive, and it’s as tough to get it as back then!

7. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse only when we’re changing some song from the repertoire, which is rare during the time we’re presenting an album. That’s mainly because we’re constantly on the road, 100 shows a year more or less, so it is really not necessary (and healthy at the same time!) that we just rest a bit when at home. We’ve been recording every two years since we started, but maybe that changes and we try to do it more often, just a few songs each time, we’ll see. Right now we’re working on our upcoming third album, laying demos and arranging like crazy, we’re actually going into the studio with 4-5 songs next week, and we’ll keep the pace until we have enough to pick through and put an album out that we’re proud of. We’re also rehearsing Betty Harris’ repertoire, since we’ll be backing her up next August at Euro Yeye, a real treat and honour! Some of her songs are quite groovy and a bit different from what we’re used to, so it is really fun to work around those, this is an intense summer!

8. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We were thinking about bringing some of our favourite music legends and try to lay down a song with them, then release it either in an album or seven inches. One I thought about was Don Covay, but sadly he left us some months ago. He had some serious health problems so it wouldn’t have been a good idea to try it if he was still around. I consider him a genius, excellent songwriter and singer, arranger, and unique character. Mick Jagger copied tons of stuff from the guy for a reason.

9. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re very hard-working, we like to play live, we enjoy the communion with the people, and we’ll try to keep the pace playing as much as we can around the world. hopefully, after visiting almost every country in Europe, we’ll step into Japan, Canada and maybe the USA while presenting the next album, we’re working on that. Our ambitions are just to keep moving and alive, grow bigger and better as musicians and people, and making the audience as happy as we are playing this magical type of music.

That Betty Harris show is going to be pretty interesting, we’ll have more horns and hammond player joining us that day, and maybe we can play some other shows backing up other legendary singers/bands in the future, one-shot things, who knows.

We just want the people to join with us and enjoy all that this type of music and show can offer, thanks a lot!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Los Retrovisores (NewBreed)

This entry is part 3 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Los Retrovisores have been fluttering their sounds around since 2006, back then known as The Cutties. They generated a good impact here and internationally, playing in festivals like Essex Ska Festival or The Cooperate in Plymouth, UK. In 2006 they changed their name to Los Retrovisores after a small change in the band. Since then they’ve been serving the likes of soul, deep beat and luminous pop. String sections, wind and Hammonds. Iberian Mod that follows the tradition after bands like Los Salvajes, Los Bravos, Bruno Lomas or Los Canarios. Young, good looking and well dressed. Tibor Fischer once said “God bless a well dressed man”. Vespas, parkers and one foot side burns. Vitalized attitude, respect for the roots and adoration for the black gods of music. All these references are labels that could easily dress Los Retrovisores. A sixties aroma, that could knock you out like Floïd aftershave lotion. Something with character and personality. A true sixties concept we have to say, because words now a days have to be used with a certain tact, an adjective stuck to any manifestation that smells of Yé Yé or old moth balls. But none of that, here we can find reverence and honour. They search in the past for original sounds, drink from what we already know and admire, generate their own sonority, something identifiable. Something that feels good and sounds great.

Headquarters:
Barcelona, Spain

Band Members:
Victor Asensio (Lead Vocal)
Pere Duran (Lead Guitar)
Leo Hernández (Bass)
Quim Cormonias (Drums)
Goncalo Hipólito (Organ)
Hector Fábregas (Tamborine and chorus)
Sergio Sanchez (Bariton Sax)
Edu Polls (Alto Sax)
Alexis Albelda (Trumpet)

Discography:
2006 – VVAA – “L’Edat Daurada”
2007 – VVAA-“Moderno pero español, vol. 8”
2008 – “Somos los Mods” vol.1
2010 – LP “La nostalgia ya no es lo que era”
2013 – EP “Alma y Pisotón”
2014 – EP “En el surco”


01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Since 2006, most of the members came from a Jamaican music band called
‘The Cutties’.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all are late 60’s and early 70’s dance sounds enthusiasts. We love most of the styles: from R & B to soul, reggae, psych or garage, back to rocksteady, and deep into beat… We’re also very influenced by the 60’s Spanish counterpart of that styles, as you could tell listening to our compositions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are so many cool bands in our area: Rubén López & The Diatones (reggae) Penny Cocks (punk 77), Mambo Jambo, The Excitements or Los Fulanos (Latin Soul) to name a few…

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Barcelona has several bands, clubs, promoters, collectors and festivals… Some clubs we highlight: The Boiler Club, Movin’ on, The Gambeat Weekend, Le clean Cut, Wamba buluba and Pill Box. There you’ll find some of our favorite DJ’s: Xavi Beat, Julian Reca, Jordi Duró and many more.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We just play the music we love to listen and dance to, without more restrictions. Our style evolved at the same rate we did. In our current set list you can find from Spanish soul to groovy funk, even freakbeat.

06. What are your live shows like?

The audience define it as fresh and fun. We don’t like the bands that make a script for live shows. We improvise and always try to be ourselves. Our repertoire is compact, short and straight to the neck. No time for solos

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our influences are as wide as our musical tastes. Mainly spanish sixties bands, that like us borrowed the patterns from their own referents, but projecting their own personality to their songs. We really love Bruno Lomas, Los Bravos, Los Canarios, Los Salvajes, Los Nivram, Pau Riba…
We despise too many people to name it here!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our universe is strongly influenced by the sharp & surrealistic Monty Phyton’ sense of humor. The French nouvelle vague and its evolutions are also one source of inspiration for our lyrics and videos.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody does his one’s bit, but to date most of the songs were written by Victor and Pere. This has changed in our last recordings introducing compositions by Leo and Hector.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our favorite song from the current repertoire comes from our EP Alma y Pisotón. It’s named ‘Me olvidé de ti’ wich, by the way, it’s been just released on video in a ‘Horror B movie’ style. Check it out! Our choice by another artist is Fire & Ice’s Music Man. We loved the complex brass arrangements and changing our regular subject –love- to an ode to that DJs that make us dance party over party, and that’s why we covered it (you can find our version at Alma y Pisotón EP too)

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

The underground scene, at least in our city, is in a good shape regarding shows and parties. We all participate in one way or another, Victor, for example, is deeply involved with The Gambeat Wekend & the clubs Pillbox 60’s Club and Bread & Groove.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To forge ahead the band, beside the financial precarity of our members, the lack of public resources and benefits for empowering culture, and the economic depression that we are all suffering.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse minimum once a week, and play an average of three or four shows per month. More than two years passed between our debut album and our second release “Alma y pisotón”, but we’re reducing the time between recordings and we’ll release our third record on june, one year after than its previous work.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

In Catalonia the mass media doesn’t give coverage to the bands that doesn’t belong to the mainstream market. For some time now, specialized magazines start to writing about us. We also make an intensive use of the social networks for reaching our fans.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Unanswered.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d love to record in London with George Martin and a gigantic strings & brass orchestra, just like spanish duet Manolo y Ramón did back in 1970. We’d also like to record with Ricard Miralles, arranger for Joan Manel Serrat in the album dedicated to Antonio Machado.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re still working on consolidate our own sound and our show. We’d like to make people outside the scene dance, without losing authenticity neither selling us to the mainstream culture. We’d like to highlight our appearances at Euro Ye Ye Mod Festival (Gijon, SP) and Festigabal @Festes de Gracia (Barcelona, CAT) In August 2014.

Web Links:

bcoredisc.com
facebook.com/los.retrovisores
twitter.com/LosRetrovisores


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2014 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, ,
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The Exploding Sound Machine (NewBreed)

This entry is part 4 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

We are the Exploding Sound Machine, a machine that has chewed, mangled and spat back out the sounds of the underground acid trips and nightmarish freakouts thrown into a blender of delay and reverb, mix in swirling organ and poundung beats to create something new from something old…

Band Members:
Joey Smiths (guitar, vocals)
Edward Sadowski (guitar, backing vocals)
Sarah Zietz (organ, backing vocals)
Lewis Spink (bass)
Simon Lee (drums)

Discography:
We’ve just recorded a little digital EP called “The First Twist in the Tale”, but hopefully we’ll be able to put it out as a physical release within the next few months.

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: songkick.com/exploding-sound-machine

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We had been going as a three piece with guitar, organ and drums for a while, but it wasn’t until early last year when we met our bass player Lewis that everything fell into place. Just recently, we’ve also added another guitar player which has made a massive difference to our sound. If you’re into a specific type of music, it’s always quite difficult to find like-minded people who share the same ethos, so I think we’ve been quite lucky in that respect.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Our background in music is obviously quite similar. It’s a mutual love for British Psych, early Prog and Folk that has brought us all together, with Lewis also really being into Soul. I think it’s good if everyone has got slightly different preferences as it doesn’t limit us to one sound which hopefully comes across in the music that we make.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Birmingham has got quite a vivid music scene at the moment with lots of new bands emerging, but if I had to take my pick it would have to be Velvet Texas Cannonball. They have been around for a while, but they’re just a great live band with a very early Deep Purple sound.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Birmingham and the Midlands have always been quite renowned for their big Mod scene, but recently, the 60s Psych scene has really started to pick up here. There’s quite a good selection of events to go to now with The Exploding Bubble Club in Birmingham, The Perfumed Garden in Derby or Biff Bang Pow and  the Dandelion Club up in Leicester. It’s also so amazing how many people turn up to these events who you’ve never seen on the scene before but who are massively into that kind of music. Great to see!

05. How would you describe the style you play?

A mix between 60s influenced Psych and early Prog.

06. What are your live shows like?

It’s always hard to tell when you’re the one on stage as you obviously experience it completely different to the audience. Our general aim, however, is to capture people’s attention who might have never seen us before and therefore make our live shows as interesting as possible. We’ve tried to progress our live shows by creating an atmosphere using lighting and different sound effects.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

There are so many bands we feel we’re influenced by, the obvious ones would be Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd, hints of Donovan or even bands like King Crimson. One influence that we chose to cover for a while is The Moody Blues, not only because of their great music, but because it’s a nod to another band from Birmingham. In terms of despising a band, I can’t really say as we never really listen to mainstream radio enough to hate anything that’s out at the moment.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

It’s hard to say as music has always influenced a lot of other things in our lives, such as the clothes we wear, the books we read, the films we watch etc. It might sound silly, but I think a lot of these things are just connected subconsciously.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Joey is our main songwriter and all of our songs have a story somewhere down the line. All the songs seem to have a darker and more mystical edge to them than most standard love songs, something we never really wanted to write. Some of the songs are of course tales of love, but written from a different perspective.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

I think we probably all have different favourites, but some of the songs that are most fun to play are Brick Faced Man, Olympus Fallen and End Of The Sun. It’s difficult to specifically name another favourite song as there are so many, but we’ve been listening to a lot of The Moody Blues again, The Nice and Neil Young more recently.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

As mentioned above, the scene in Birmingham and the Midlands is definitely starting to pick up and it’s great to be a part of it, especially with Joey being the main organizer of The Exploding Bubble Club. Sarah used to live in London for three years when she first moved over to the UK and was totally blown away by the scene there. The amount of 60s clubs down there is just amazing as there’s literally something for everyone, no matter whether you’re into Psych, Soul, Garage or anything else. It’s also a great place to meet like-minded people. We’ve met most of our friends here in Birmingham and across the country through the scene, so it’s undeniably playing quite an important part in our lives.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Definitely finding the right people for the band, especially in a city that was so Soul orientated at the time.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Since getting together, there have been very few days we’ve been apart from each other, whether it’s because we’re at our own studio (The Bubble Factory), on the road or recording, which I think has made us a tighter band. At the moment, we try to play at least three gigs a month, but we’re also really keen on getting our first EP “The First Twist in the Tale” out as a physical release.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Personally, I think it’s a great time for underground music because it’s never been easier to find and read about new bands. It’s also far easier to reach people thanks to social media and magazines like Shindig.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

We all really love a German band called The Magnificent Brotherhood who are absolutely mind-blowing.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Any studio that Brian Eno would come to and produce us (just in case you’re reading this Brian).

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

This year, we’ve been trying to get out of Birmingham a bit more and play some other places which has worked quite well so far. We’ve just played Lunar Festival alongside Donovan, Temples and Tim Burgess which was a really great experience. Generally, we would love to get some more support slots and start playing the North of England a bit more, so we are currently working on that.

Besides that, we have some more London shows coming up which we are thrilled about, plus, obviously the New Untouchables Brighton Fuzz 4 Freaks Weekender in August and the One Beast Festival in Birmingham in June which are set to be great as well.

Web Links:

facebook.com/TheExplodingSoundMachine
twitter.com/Exploding_Sound
soundcloud.com/explodingsoundmachine
theexplodingsoundmachine.bandcamp.com


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 8, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, , , , ,
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Night Beats (Newbreed)

This entry is part 5 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

The Night Beats are an American psychedelic, garage and soul group based out of Seattle, Washington. The group consists of  Danny Lee Blackwell (Guitars, Vox), James Traeger (Drums) and Tarek Wegner (Bass/Vox). Night Beats incorporate sounds of early R&B, Texas Psychedelic Rock, Blues, Folk and Soul.

Discography:
2010 – Single ‘H-Bomb’
2011 – LP ‘Night Beats’, Split Single 10” Night Beats/UFO Club
2012 – Split Single 7” Night Beats/TRMRS
2013 – LP ‘Sonic Bloom’

Tour Dates: 
31/07/2014 Spain, Gijon – Euro Ye Ye Festival

Check our Facebook page for all other dates in August & September.

01. How long have you been playing together for and how did you meet?

James and I since we were 14, in grade school. Tarek in Seattle around 2009.

02. Two of you are from Texas originally, which has a rich history of psychedelic music, and Seattle is of course home to the Sonics. How have these, such important places, influenced your music – if at all?

Both places have been influential. From the R’n’B side of things to the freedom heard in a lot of the Texas psych. But our influences range from everywhere. Not to one genre or era, people listening should know this.

03. What are your main musical influences? There’s an obvious love of psychedelic garage shining through in your music, but your name is taken from a Sam Cooke record? Are Soul and R&B as big an influence as psychedelic music to you?

Both are important. So are movies. Places and people. We try not to focus or put things in order of influence.

04. You’re based in Seattle, are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area?

La Luz.

05. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like in Seattle, is there one? Do you feel a part of it?

60s scene? What year is it? We have our place in the underground yes, but it’s hard to see under the dirt and moss so were not sure sometimes.

05. Night Beats have played with some incredible acts… Roky Erikson, The Zombies, The Black Angels, The Black Lips, The Growlers. You are constantly touring, be it on your own tours or playing every psych festival going. What have been some of the highlights for you?  Do you prefer playing live to recording?

You’ve mostly listed them. We went to South Africa and made good friends down there. That was a big highlight. They’re 2 separate things so I can’t say.

06. Are you looking forward to playing Euro YeYe/in Gijon? You’ve toured quite extensively in Spain haven’t you? I hear their crowds can be pretty wild…

Yes. We love Spain.

07. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? Is there anything you really love, or hate playing live?

Some things were tired of playing. So we give it a rest but maybe bring it back.

08. How do you approach the recording process, I can imagine it’s not very technology heavy – do you take a more, I guess, honest approach similar to your garage influences, using analogue equipment? Is it important to you to have a live sound, so you can easily replicate this on stage?

We generally use tape. Sometimes a little digital. We use electricity and some acoustic instruments. We record live. Some overdubs here and there. Not gonna give away any secrets.

09. Your second album, Sonic Bloom was released in Autumn last year, and showed a real progression from your self-titled debut. Have you already started thinking about recording the follow up? Or have any plans for any singles coming soon?

Thank you. Yes. Stay tuned

10. Between your non-stop touring and own releases as Night Beats, you have various collaborations under your belts already… you seem to be the hardest working band around! Danny Lee has put out some releases with Christian Bland of the Black Angels as The UFO Club, and with Curtis Harding and some of the Black Lips as Night Sun. How did these come about? Are there any more collaborations to look out for, or new projects planned? Will there be any more releases from these bands? Are Tarek or James working on anything on the side of Night Beats?

It happened naturally with each of my projects… Friends coming together with mutual respect and desire to collaborate. Night Sun and UFO Club releases coming soon. Also a jazz record. Tarek is working on a solo album as well.

11. Who are Night Beats listening to at the moment? Who are your favourite artists around right now, and who do you always return to listening to?

The new White Fence. The Oh Sees. An old ‘Sounds of Spain’ record I got for 5 cents. Donny Hathaway, Los Saicos, random hip hop, Love.

Web Links:

facebook.com/thenightbeats
instagram.com/thenightbeats


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Holly Calder

I’m one half of Eyes Wide Open in Glasgow, where we run a club, a label and now the Double Sight Psych & Garage Weekend, which takes place at the start of October. I love psych, garage, freakbeat, popsike, and have even been known to enjoy a wee bit of R&B! Always enjoy travelling to 60s clubs and weekenders around Europe, whether I’m there to DJ or just to mingle and dance!

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July 25, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Psych Scene USA Tags:, , ,
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Paul Orwell and the Night Falls (Newbreed)

This entry is part 6 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Paul Orwell (Guitar,Vox)
Michael Parrett (Bass)
Stu Marsh (Guitar)
Scotty Roberts (drums)

Discography:
Tell Me Tell Me (vinyl only) single,
Only 250 made and sold out in just 7 days of Pre Order a month before release

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: Tell Me Tell Me / Little Reason 45 on Heavy Soul Records (SOLD OUT)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

As a band not long, we have done around 14 shows, I met Michael at a gig we did ages ago in different shit bands, I trashed the stage before he got on, fun times!

I got him to trade the guitar in for a bass, the other members answered adverts I put out it’s worked out well.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Beatles and 60’s fashion.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Nah, they are all bleak, boring and predictable… well from what I can see and hear.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I haven’t found one, a massive gap in the market I think.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Freak Beat.

06. What are your live shows like?

Fun, tight, magical, raw.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

A lot of early beat, R&B and RnR. We only play lively covers if at all that we enjoy, not your every day covers the more obscure the better.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Hard one as my whole life is music, from producing, writing, and finding new gems. I love record collecting and Art.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Me (Paul Orwell) and my tainted heart, messed up mind and butchered soul.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

My personal favourite is “Little Reason” as I sometimes get a chance to go and interact and dance with the crowd, we sometimes do a cover of “When The Night Falls” By The Eyes, that’s fun!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Not really, I’m only sociable around friends, family and fans. I’m not one of those who find it important to be part of a scene, just to do my own thing, that’s what is important. If people like it, great if they don’t, sod them.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Producing a track that takes me weeks to get right.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record?  Anything interesting coming up?

We are good with rehearsals, we are perfectionists so we can get everything right to enjoy being loose on stage. We only play gigs that suite our style, sod playing a load of indie gigs, no fun in that. I record every day, lots of interesting things coming up including new releases, new videos, maybe some more gigs abroad. I would love to do a tour.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s been along long while since I’ve read a music mag or listened to any up to date radio station, so I can’t really answer. I should imagine it’s all favouritism.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Again I don’t listen to much past 1972, I like some, Hypnotic Eye and The Teamsters seem to have some magical sounds going on.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Producers: George Martin, Joe Meek, Phil Spector

Artist alive: Paul McCartney,

Artist Dead: John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Syd Barrett, Otis Redding

These artists all play big parts in the way I think and are very important to me and music.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Record deal would be nice and some good support slots.
29 September 2014 – The Finsbury, London with Magnetic Mind
11 October 2014 – Crossfire 25, 229 venue, London

Web Links:

facebook.com/PAULORWELLOFFICIAL
twitter.com/PAULORWELLMUSIC
soundcloud.com/paulorwell


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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October 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , , ,
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New Electric Ride (Newbreed)

This entry is part 7 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Formed from the last surviving members of the hardest working pub/club band in north-east England, New Electric Ride have achieved some remarkable things in the short time they’ve been together. With support slots for legendary 1960’s group – The Pretty Things, under their belt, a Black Cab Session recorded, regular airplay on UK, Spanish, Belgian and French radio, it’s no wonder that N E R are hotly tipped as one of the best new acts to emerge from the recent psychedelic resurgence.

Band Members:
Jack Briggs (Guitar/Vocal)
Paul Nelson (Organ/Vocal)
Adam Cole (Bass/Vocal)
Craig Oxberry (Drums/Vocal)

Discography:
EP (2013)
Balloon Age (2014, Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records)

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: facebook.com/events  &  facebook.com/doublesightweekender

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been recording as New Electric Ride since November 2012! Jack, Adam and Craig played as a pub band for 3 years and we met Paul at a wedding gig we played. We were looking for an organist and he said he’d love to have a go. Sort of went from there, really!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love and appreciation for music from the 1960’s/70s and a desire to write and record interesting pop music. We’re not real into ‘jamming’, as such. We’re much more interested in writing pop songs.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

We’re living in London at the moment, but where we’re from (Sunderland) there are some great bands kicking about. Lilliput, Hyde & Beast and Field Music stick out. They’re all just doing their own thing and not trying to play to any current popular genre.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

In Sunderland it’s pretty dead, but here in London is thriving! We really love it down here.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Polished, lysergic sleaze-pop.

06. What are your live shows like?

I think they’re pretty intense! The songs can be quite complicated to play and a lot require 4-part harmony, so we’re always kept our toes to an extent. It can be quite hard work due to all the tempo changes and falsetto vocal, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Zappa, Beefheart, Moby Grape, Black Sabbath, Dungen, Peter Wyngarde, Cream, Jethro Tull, Colosseum, Mountain, Tame Impala, Can, Yes, Bobbie Gentry, the list is endless.

I’d like to cover some Tull songs. Any excuse to play the flute.

I don’t think we really despise any artist, to be honest! We despise a lot of how the music industry works, ha. I guess

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

London, Paris, Nepal, the Marquis de Sade, cacti, succulents, Ambrose Bierce, David Icke, isolation, insects, plants.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everyone writes individually, never together, for some reason!

Subjects range from Submarines, French libertines, love (of course), lust (of course), animals, cannibalism and the Royal Family.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

I can’t speak for the other lads, but I love playing Mr. Bumblebee. It has a lovely bounce and interesting parts.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think it’s thriving. People are really beginning to take note of all the great things that are happening at the moment. We don’t participate as much as we should, but when we do, we always have a great time.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording an LP was really bloody hard. Mainly because we had such a short period of time to get it completed, and we are split between London and Sunderland. We had to get the train/coach up to Sunderland every weekend for a month and just hammer the sounds out. It was tough.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We usually get together to rehearse before a show, but apart from that, never! We’re looking to hammer the gigs over the rest of the year and hopefully (fingers crossed) get over to the USA in 2015.

Always interesting things on the horizon! New single, collaboration with Peter Wyngarde, some debauched videos to name a few!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Poor. The levels of snobbery and ‘cool’ are outrageous at the moment. The whole ‘psych revival’ is getting old, too. It seems like anyone with a phaser pedal and a fringe can be in a ‘psych band’.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Tame Impala are impeccable, Prince Rupert’s Drops should be on every radio station, Hidden Masters are absolutely brilliant. There are loads of great bands at the moment, but they’re all being overshadowed by the ones with money. Billboards on the London underground for Temples?! Crazy.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Jonathan Wilson for me, absolutely phenomenal musician and producer. It’d be worth it just to see his collection of amps. What a guy, so passionate.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

More music! We’re planning on releasing a single before Christmas that we think may draw some interest. Gig-wise we’re playing the Doublesight Weekender in Glasgow on October 4th and the amazing Crossfire 25 night on the 11th! Can’t wait for October!

Web Links:

newelectricride.com
facebook.com/newelectricride
soundcloud.com/newelectricride
newelectricride.bandcamp.com


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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The Wicked Whispers (Newbreed)

This entry is part 8 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Mike  Murphy (Vocals/Guitars)
Toby Virgo (Bass/Backing Vocals)
Steven Penn (Organist)
Andy Smith (Guitars)
Nathan Sayer (Drums)

Discography:
2011 – EP ‘The Dark Delights of the Wicked Whispers (Electone)
2012 – Single ‘Dandelion Eyes’ (Electone)
2013 – Single ‘Voodoo Moon’ (Electone)
2014 – Single ‘Chronological Astronaut’ (Electone)
2014 – LP ‘Maps of the Mystic’ (Electone)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The Wicked Whispers formed in 2010 but arrived in 2011 with ’‘The Dark Delights of The Wicked Whispers’ EP on limited 10” which put the band on the map. We  played our first debut show onown event called ‘The Butterflies Ball and The Grasshoppers Feast’ bringing Arthur Brown in as support.. Mike Murphy formed the band after demoing a new project and decided to put a band around it which then evolved into the band people know today.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Doors, Love, Strawberry Alarm Clock, The Byrds, Jimmy Campbell and James Brown.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Levons and Red Sands because they are great and also on Electone Records.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s a small scene in Liverpool which we don’t have much involvement with being honest . There are regular nights at The Go Go Cage (held at the Cabin Club) but we occasionally put on huge shows ourselves like ‘The Butterflies Ball and the Grasshoppers Feast’.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

That’s up to the listeners but you could say it’s a melting pot of US west-coast meets London 60s jangle wrapping around some lucid songwriting.

06. What are your live shows like?

Pretty intense as a lot of our songs are very intricate and short but we like to put on a full on live performance and give it our everything on stage.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our main influences we’ve touched on. We rarely play covers as we put more time into developing our music but we have played tracks by Jimmy Campbell and the Velvet Underground at shows. We don’t despise anyone but we know what music we can relate to and like.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Love, lie and positivity. Plus a load of ale and general laddish behavior.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Mike Murphy writes the songs and prepares the music. The subject matter is vast but he mainly likes to develop dream like perspectives and tries to explore unanswered questions and wonders.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Each member of the group would say something different but ‘Chronological Astronaut’ has been a favorite since the band formed.
Same regards to our favorite songs but lets just say ‘Michaelangelo’ by Jimmy Campbell because it is a classic.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Were not too clued up but it seems fragmented currently. When we started hitting the road in 2011, there was a tight circuit of bands including us playing the same nights up and down the UK. We have seen sparks of this but its not as tight as it was. It would be great to get this going again but we will be popping up at a couple in the near future.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording our debut album and Mike Murphys challenge as first time producer.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

It all depends as there are several levels to consider. We are always working on the next thing and split rehearsals up to required functions. If we have a live obligation we prepare for it, we don’t rehearse blind. But weve already started working on the next thing to follow up from our debut album out September so we are doing sessions for that.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

This is a complicated one as we are fully aware of how the music industry works. We just want to play and release our music and if anyone in the press or media  likes our music and wants to play and write about it, that’s great.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Of course, there’s loads of great stuff currently. Highlights are Temples, French Boutique and Michael Head and the Red Elastic Band.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Theres loads we would like to do. Recording in Sunset Sound in LA is on our list. Regards producers that would be telling our next steps but someone looking to develop new ideas from our favorites music that inspires us.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Theres always stuff coming up but we are most excited about promoting our debut album through the UK over the next few months with some great live shows. Our big album launch in Liverpool will be great as its being held at The Kazimier which is a stunning venue. We are also bringing the brass and string section with us on that one. We have an exciting Crossfire 25 show in October ( the 11th) launching the LP in London and then we are doing some tour dates with Ian McNabb and The Moons with much more on the way including another headline tour. Beyond our debut album lets just say the follow up will be quick as we are headed into the studio before Christmas.

Web Links:

thewickedwhispers.com
facebook.com/thewickedwhispers
twitter.com/Wicked_Whispers 
soundcloud.com/thewickedwhispers


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Big Boss Man (Newbreed)

This entry is part 9 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Big Boss Man formed in November 1998, Their sound is a hip Heavy Hammond hybrid of pop, 6T’s R’n’B / Latin soul and funk. Early 1999 they got themselves a gig at the renowned “Blow Up”, then situated at the Wag club London, as usual the club was packed and the crowd absolutely loved the Big Boss Sound. They were then immediately signed up to the clubs very own “Blow Up” record label. The first release can be found on V2 Blow Upcompilation “Blow Up A Go-Go” with the demo version of the track Humanize, (recorded in the bands very own Ramshackle studios).

Band Members:
Nasser Bouzida: Organ, Mono-synthesizer, Bongos
Desmond Rogers: Drums
Scott “the Hawk” Milsom: Electric bass & Double Bass
Trev Harding: Guitar

Discography: (Blow Up Records unless stated otherwise)

Singles:
Sea Groove/Version (Blow Up Records) (2000) , Big Boss Man/Version (2001) Big Boss Man” The Hawk”/Frank Popp “leave me alone” (2005) (Record Kicks)
Party 7/Kelvin Stardust (2006), C’est Moi (2009) (promo cd only) Black Eye (2010) (promo cd only), Aardvark (2014)

Albums:
Humanize (2001), Winner (2005),
Full English Beat Breakfast (2009), Last Man on Earth (2014)

Compilation Appearances:
Blow Up a go-go (V2) The Later Lounge 1 & 2 (2000 ) (Later Magazine), It’s a Cool Cool Christmas (Jeepster) 2000, Unique Club Culture (Unique) 2000, Midem 2001 (Manchester Music) (2001) Robbi, Tobbi und Das Fliewatuut (Diggler) 2002, Soul Shaker 1 & 2 (2004/5) The Outernational Sound (18 St Lounge), Urban Deluxe (V2)(2005) Kitsch World Tour (Keks) 2007, Come on Soul (Legere) (2007), Raymann is Laat (Sonic Sorcery) 2008, Pradat (EMI) 2008, Vollanalog (private press LP) (2009) Blow Up Sampler (Blow Up) (2011)

Updated Releases and Tour Dates:
28th Nov ’14ZooZoo at The Blues Kitchen, Camden, London, UK
29th Nov ’14 – Jazz Cafe, Camden, London, UK
19th Dec ’14 – R3VIVAL, La Maroquinerie, Paris, FRANCE
27th Dec ’14 – Hipsville Xmas A Go Go, Fiddlers’ Elbow, NW5, London, UK

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We have been together since 1998, Nass, Scott and Trev had been friends playing in bands for years, and when their last band “Skooby” hit the rocks the guys set up Big Boss Man mainly for fun; Nass, known principally as a drummer until this point came out from behind the kit to play organ & bongos and front the band. Scott played double bass in the early days.

One night we played at the Blow Up night at the Wag Club in Soho and were approached to sign to the Club’s Record Label and publishing company, they offered to pay for enough really good recording studio sessions, quality mixing and mastering to make a record we would all be happy with, and cut us in on a good deal so we haven’t looked back since. Around the same time we were invited to play at the Euro YeYe festival in Northern Spain, where we had a blast, it opened our eyes to the scene outside of Great Britain and the possiblities for touring that could be had, we have now toured Spain 5 times!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all love playing, recording, creating, Soul, 60’s Garage, 60’s R’n’B, Psyche, Funk and Bongo-Fuzz sounds.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

We would def recommend: The Bongolian, The Hawkmen and The 45’s, they all feature members of Big Boss Man!

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

We are from all over, obviously London is great: club nights like: NUTs, Weirdsville, Dirty Water etc, Bristol has the frat house and department S.
Still working on Swansea, although there is a good Northern soul night that takes place in Pontadawe occasionally.

05. What are your live shows like?

We are a mainly instrumental band; we have the stage set up with Nass pounding the organ and bongos opposite Des beating the hell out of the drum kit and the two of them going generally mental whilst the Hawk and Trev hold it together.

06. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We don’t do covers these days, though back in the beginning we used to do a rocksteady version of Peter Tosh’s “Steppin’Razor” and a Hammond Version of Elvis’s “His latest flame”

Our biggest influences are mostly black guys called Jimmy: Jimmy Smith, Jimmy McGriff, Jimmy Reed, Jimmy Cliff, Jimi Hendrix, plus James Brown.

We don’t despise anyone!

07. What are your main influences outside of music?

Spinal Tap.

08. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nass writes most of the songs, but there are quite a few team efforts and co-writes. The few vocal numbers we have deal with; love lost, life’s bizarre experiences E.G. “Trans Adonis” and odd people we have met along the way. E.G. “Hail Caesar”

09. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our Favorite song has got to be “Last Man on Earth” from the new LP/CD/digital download “Last Man on Earth” on Blow Up Records

Another Artist; anything by James Brown, say, “Sssh for a while” his avant-garde keyboard work on that track is second to none!

10. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

There are loads of great nights going on all over Europe, more than ever, we participate occasionally!

11. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Deciding which tracks to put on the new LP we settled for: Aardvark, Theme from Last Man on Earth, Blow your own, Hail Caesar, Changing Faces, Crimson 6Ts, The Bear, Project No.6, Le Dernier Homme Sur Terre, Shot Down, Trans Adonis, Painted Rainbow, Sladey and Last Man on Earth (vocal version).

12. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We are always rehearsing, and have been playing a lot in 2014 to promote the new LP, we have been asked by one of the shows on BBC6 Music to come in and record a session, so hopefully that will work out then more gigging in 2015 followed by recording at Beat Mountain and Dog House Studios.

13. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Just get Shindig Magazine, that has it all covered!

14. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

There’s loads of great new bands out there if you look, “The Turning” for instance, good bunch of guys!

15. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Who: Any of the Soul Legends before it’s too late!

Where: Hitsville USA in Detroit (Motown Studio) or Studio 1 in Kingston Jamaica! Maybe some of the spirit of the classic tunes recorded there would rub off on us.

16. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Well we better get working on BBM IV! Next year we return to Spain (In April) so really looking forward to that. And hopefully dates on the UK festival circuit.

Web Links:

big-boss-man.com
facebook.com/BigBossMan
twitter.com/BigBossMan


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

November 10, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , , ,
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The Beatroots (Newbreed)

This entry is part 10 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

The Beatroots are a Glasgow based band featuring members of The Hardy Souls, Figure 5, Red Sands and the Last National Band. The Beatroots perform their own take on psych classics, with live sitar and mind blowing sounds adding their own unique twist to the mix…

Band Members:
Neil Donaldson (Vocals, Percussion)
Graham ‘Groovy’ Gordon (Bass, Sitar)
Seb Jonsen (Drums)
Ian Hill (Keys/Bass)
Campbell Lindsay (Guitar)

Discography:
The Count/Hell Will Take Care of Her 7” single

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

It happened by accident really about 2 years ago. Paul Molloy (Tailor Made/Friday Street) needed a band for his monthly night in McChuills which was in a couple of weeks time. I suggested I could get a band together for it so I got in touch with Seb and Groovy and we put The Beatroots together and played what was a probably a pretty ropey first gig at Paul’s night.

02.What influences do the band members have in common?

A love of 60s music. We all have very different tastes but a love of garage, psych and freakbeat is what we all share.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

We are spoiled in Glasgow really. Helicon, The Fast Camels, Big Hogg, Trembling Bells, Crash Club, The Cosmic Dead, Medicine Men, The Wellgreen and Mushroom Club are all fab. The Fast Camels are particularly great both live and on record with great pop songs that echo early Pink Floyd and Sell Out era Who.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Glasgow has a great club scene with something for everyone who has a love of underground music from the past. Tailor Made, Divine, The Freakbeats Club, Gimme Shelter, Nowt But Northern, Eyes Wide Open as well as the Glasgow Mod and Double Sight Weekenders all play quality tunes from start to finish.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Like a 60s Psych Pop version of a trad folk band. We select not-so-well known songs and do our own interpretation of them. With added sitar.

06. What are your live shows like?

Great fun!

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We play mostly all covers with only a couple of originals. Every musician that plays or has played with The Beatroots has their own band/project that they are involved in so we get together to indulge ourselves in doing songs by our favourite bands of the 60s and obscure psych 45s. Like The Doors’ Peace Frog or I Know What I Would Do by The State of Mickey and Tommy.

I don’t really depise any music these days, I have mellowed somewhat and grown to love a lot of 80s Pop that I would have once hated so I am wary of slagging off anything in case I go on to like it later in life. I do however despise the duke box in Nice n Sleazy. It is beyond pretension. Not that the music on it is bad, but when you are in a pub at 1am you don’t want to be hearing some Low album track. They should check out the Kempock’s in Gourock for some tips!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

The more dandyish aspect of Mod fashion. And grass.

09.Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Oh all the usual… love, betrayal, murder and death!

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

I love doing the 2 songs that are on our 7” single. Our own song The Count and the b-side Hell Will Take Care Of Her originally recorded by Brass Buttons.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Colourful and vibrant. That you can be in London, Derby, Belfast or Berlin and have a mental night and meet so many lovely people is a beautiful thing. I have had some of the best nights of my life at weekenders all over the UK, at home and abroad since first going to Scarborough Mod Rally in 2002.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Dealing with Seb!

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse every week and gig about twice a month.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It is pathetic. Especially on telly. We really need a less mainstream programme than Later with Jools Holland that would showcase the likes of Wolf People and Dead Skeletons and also cover the Liverpool Psych and End of the Road Festivals. Youtube and the internet is all well and good but I do miss looking forward to a good music programme on Channel 4 or the BBC. Shindig! TV perhaps?

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The War On Drugs, Cate Le Bon, Real Estate, Warpaint, Kurt Vile, Woods, The Sufis, Quilt, Ty Segall and Goat all spring to mind.

16.Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Recording the Red Sands album with Marco Rea at the Barne Studio in Clydebank was a great experience and what I would do again if making another record.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Martin Keith that played guitar with me in both Figure 5 and Red Sands will be joining us along with well known face on the scene Charlie Bennett for the show in London at New Year which will be our last. For a good while anyway. I am going travelling in 2015 but I would like to think we will play again at some point, it has been a blast.

Web Links:

facebook.com/thebeatrootsband


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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November 16, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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The High Learys (Newbreed)

This entry is part 11 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

The High Learys are a four piece rhythm and blues band from Perth, Australia. Forming in 2011 the band have taken influence from artists such as Chuck Berry, Ray Charles, Slim Harpo, The Rolling Stones, The Zombies, The Hollies, The Standells, The Bee Gees, The Animals, The Yardbirds and The Kinks.

Band Members:
Jamie Turner – Vocals, Bass
Mike Nutt – Organ, Vocals
Matt Williams – Guitar
Adrian MacMillan – Drums

Discography:
2013 – Album ‘Here Come The High Learys’
2014 – Single ‘Clear My Mind’

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: facebook.com/events

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been playing together now for nearly 3 years. Myself and Matt are cousins and have been playing music together for ages. We met Mike while at school and started playing in bands with him at an early age, a few years later we met Adrian around town while we were all playing in different bands, we decided to get together and start The Learys in 2011 and have been going strong ever since.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all share the love for the 60’s groups, even though we might take influence from different artists we can all agree that our sound is very much built on that.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Thee Gold Blooms are from Perth, Western Australia, they are fantastic!
Their music is very surf influenced and their songs are so damn catchy.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s not too bad actually, we are fortunate to have bands like The Stems come from our neck of the woods, there is also some great bands in the eastern states like The Frowning Clouds.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

It’s a modern take on our 60’s influences. We’re very influenced by the British invasion and so I think that definitely comes through in our playing. The combo organ always adds a nice touch to our songs.

06. What are your live shows like?

I’d like to say it’s energetic, fun and captivating.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our main influences are bands like The Kinks, The Rolling Stones and The Zombies. Our current covers are by The Easybeats, The Clovers and Status Quo. We despise commercial and generic boy band garbage.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Outside of music we are influenced by all sorts, such as art, books and even new technology we find really interesting.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Jamie and Mike write the majority of the songs. The songs are usually about anything from girls to a particular state of mind.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our latest single Clear My Mind is probably our favourite, although at the moment we have some brand new songs that will hopefully be appearing on our next album which are really great to play. Our other favourite is Ice In The Sun which is a 1968 classic by Status Quo, we love playing that one!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

It’s very much alive! There are some amazing bands in the scene that are great players and who write some great tunes as well. We participate when we can!

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

I think our 2013 European tour was a huge challenge, it was so much fun but it was exhausting for all of us.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse at least once a week and play at least a show a fortnight. We like to get into the studio as much as we can! The European Tour is coming up and that’s going to be great.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s always interesting reading articles and interviews of bands. You really get to know the artist and see what they’re all about. Live reviews are always interesting as well.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

A few bands we really like at the moment are Temples and Jacco Gardner.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Abbey Road is the dream as I’m sure it is for most bands. We’ll get in line and keep buying our lottery tickets though. Phil Spector would be great to work with if he wasn’t a holding a gun or anything sharp…

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We hope to write and record a new album in 2015. Our European Tour is really exciting as well, we’re really looking forward to heading back and playing some shows in our favourite countries.

Web Links:

facebook.com/thehighlearys
twitter.com/TheHighLearys
soundcloud.com/the-high-learys


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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November 16, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Fogbound (Newbreed)

This entry is part 12 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Fogbound from A Coruña is the John Colby Sect labels first release with the fantastic Purple Wax/Kicking Eucalyptus Seeds housed in a beautiful picture sleeve. We caught up with Fab to find out what delights they have in store for us on their UK debut show at Le Beat Bespoke 10.

Band Members:
Fabio: Vox and guitar
Borja: Bass guitar
Fernando: Hammond
Pibli: Drums and back-vocal

Discography:
2014 – SINGLE ‘Whispering Corridors’.
2015 – SINGLE ‘Purple Wax’.
2015 – SPLIT  Fogbound/ Mega Purple Sex Toy Kit – ‘Castles in a sand box’/  ‘Your Song’

To buy our singles: New Single: thejohncolbysect.com/eshop

The John Colby Sect underground record label is the new reference for lovers of spacey, reverb-drenched sounds. Somewhere between A Coruña and Madrid, the label’s heart resides in the musical and artistic underground. They specialize in limited editions releases on Vinyl with a unique identity.

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been playing together for 3 years… We started off with covers of British psych songs and the love for this kind of stuff brought us together.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

The common link is the classic pop from the 60s but Fernando enjoys heavy prog psychedelia, Borja is a power pop fan and I personally love popsike.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Yep, I prescribe a big dose of ONE OF THESE DAYS & Thee Heavy Random Tone Colour Lab they are the best band around here… totally dope prog psych!

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s small but cozy and warm.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

If freakbeat means obscure psych, then it’s what we do.

6. What are your live shows like?

I’d say our live shows are raw, powerful and passionate.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Beatles, Pink Floyd, The Zombies sounds like clichéd…but they are a big influence. Obscure bands from the first UK psych era like The Attack are a massive influence on the sound and attitude of Fogbound.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our song Come & See made reference to a Russian film with the same title… so the cult films are another influence.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

This is Fab the composer… the songs are about oneirism and reality in near equal measure.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

“Castles In a Sandbox” is a top fave and I’ll choose “From The Pipeline” by King Midas.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

The psychedelic music has embarked on its second youth thanks to bands such Temples, Tame Impala, The Black Angels… they have commercial pull and people seem to be more interested in this kind of music. Wish us luck!

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

I think the lack of stability is the biggest challenge for a group.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

The three of us try to rehearse twice a week and then Pibli (our new drummer) makes a quick review of the set list before the gig. This situation is difficult to sustain, but we do it for the future of the group and because from the first moment we hit it off with Pibli.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s poor and commercial.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

As I said in question number eleven psychedelic music even shoe gaze, post punk, noise pop are trendy. And we celebrate to hear more bands with these tags.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We think Liam Watson is the perfect producer to record us. We have similar tastes and he owns one of the best analog studios in the world.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

This year we’ll release our second single Purple Wax, promoted with a glorious psychedelic clip, and then a split with Mega Purple Sex Toy Kit featuring Castles In a Sandbox that will delight the dancers. The future is unstable, so we tend to live in the present and go step by step conquering small goals.

Web Links:

facebook.com/fogboundband
fogbound.bandcamp.com
soundcloud.com/fogboundofficial
thejohncolbysect.com/fogbound
popthinkin.com/producto

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Wolf People (Newbreed)

This entry is part 13 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Formed in 2005, Wolf People are one of an exciting crop of 21st century bands mining a rich seam of archaic influences for inspiration, from the psych folk of Jethro Tull, Pentangle, Tudor Lodge and Fuchsia (the latter of whom they played with in 2014 at London’s Strongroom Bar), to classic West Coast sounds, British psych-prog and popsike, library music, British and Italian horror movie soundtracks, cult TV, public information films, and the writings of Victorian authors like M R James.

Sharing a kinship with their (somewhat heavier) geographical neighbours Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats, Southend’s Purson, recently resurrected London folklorists Circulus, West Country glitter-kids Ulysses and Birmingham’s Exploding Sound Machine, they are proof that a healthy scene for intelligent psychedelic rock continues to flourish in the UK . And, whilst not Mods themselves, their sound has plenty for  the discerning Scene follower to embrace and enjoy, their impending debut appearance at Le Beat Bespoke proving yet again that diversity is still very much a key feature of the NUTs landscape.

Band Members:

Joe Hollick – Guitar
Jack Sharp – Guitar And Vocals
Tom Watt – Drums
Daniel Davies – Bass

Ex/former/occasional members: Ross Harris – Flute

Discography

Singles And EPS:
Wolf People EP (Sea Records) 2006, October Fires/Black Water (Battered Ornaments) 2007, Storm Cloud/Cotton Strands (Battered Ornaments) 2007, Tiny Circles/Mercy II (Battered Ornaments) 2009, Silbury Sands (Jagjaguwar) 2011, When The Fire Is Dead In The Grate (Jagjaguwar) 2013, All Returns (Jagjaguwar) 2013

Albums:
Steeple (2010) Tidings (2010) Fain (2013) all on Jagjaguwar

Compilations:
Wolf People – Singles (Self Released) 2008

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We put the band together in 2006 just to play some songs that were about to be released. We started getting gigs before we knew what the hell we were doing, and then just sort of bumbled along from there. Dan joined in 2007 after seeing us at a medieval festival in Port Talbot.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

Our main common ground is fuzzy rock records. Starting from Hendrix and Sabbath and going down into all the things that were influenced by them. So we love Mighty Baby, Mecki Mark Men, Baby Grandmothers, Variations, Iron Claw, Dark. Also a lot of folk rock stuff; Fairport, Pentangle, Trees. Anything weird and interesting really, preferably with fuzz and big drums.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Stick in the Wheel from East London are probably my favourite current group that we know. Stark folk with dark themes and real accents.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

If there is one in Bedford, I’m not aware of it, but that wouldn’t surprise me. There seems to be a strong surge of interest for good old fuzzy rock music across the country and I hope we’ll see more good bands popping up to meet the demand. It would be great to see a new wave of bands do something interesting with it beyond stitching influences together (which we’re probably guilty of to be honest).

5. How would you describe the style you play?

We’re a rock band. Sometimes folk-rock, but usually just a rock band.

6. What are your live shows like?

The aim is to be direct and honest, and carry the songs with some degree of heart without sounding just like the records or the last show. We don’t use a lot of effects or processing, and we try to leave some room for improvisation without overdoing it.

The stark approach can sometimes fall on its arse but we’re happier not hiding behind backing tracks or layers of delay. If we sound good, it’s because we’re playing good.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We’ve only ever done a few covers. We used to play ‘Same Old Story’ by Taste, and ‘Why Am I So Short’ by Soft Machine, that was fun. We’ve tried Mighty Baby covers before too, and there’s a Trees song we want to try.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

I’m interested in oral history, mythology and folklore, and nature, I love birds. As a band probably our main mutual interests outside music is food, and skimming stones.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

They tend to start with me (Jack) or Joe. Then we’ll all work out arrangements together. I tend to base the lyrics on stuff I’ve been reading about. Lots of the newer lyrics are about Earth if humans left or suddenly died out. I’m not sure why though, I didn’t really plan that.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

The one we’re working on at the moment, ‘Not Me Sir’. We were trying to be like an English version of Ersen or Erkin Koray, but our failure to play like that makes it quite interesting. We recorded it in Devon a few months ago after only rehearsing it about twice and Joe’s guitar playing on it is fantastic. So I’m enjoying listening to that.

As for other people’s stuff, I’m still obsessing over ‘I Found You’ by The Tops. It’s pretty much the perfect record.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I don’t go to a lot of gigs anymore, but it seems like there’s plenty of exciting bands out there, I’d just say it’s a pity that so many of the more interesting psych bands are from the States or Australia. I hope there’s a new crop of UK bands on the horizon who can take the reins and produce some truly exciting psych rock music, and do something new with it. We could do it, but we might be too old and stuck in our ways now!

With our band we’ve always skirted the edges of quite a lot of different scenes, so we feel quite lucky in that respect. One year we played a folk festival and a heavy/doom rock festival back to back, and went down pretty well at both I think.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Without a doubt, the biggest challenge is trying to create interesting music and sustain a music career while working full-time. I don’t want to start moaning about it, because I feel very privileged in a lot of ways, but it simply isn’t feasible for us to make a living out of creating music, so we feel like we’re constantly on the back foot. You feel like you’re having to force yourself to do something you actually enjoy after working for eight hours, and that’s not right somehow.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

About once a month we do a weekend of recording/writing/rehearsing. I try to play, write and record at home whenever I possibly can, I don’t like to go a day without doing something. We’re not really playing live at the moment while we’re writing and recording the next album.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I don’t really read reviews or check blogs or whatever as I tend to go on word of mouth recommendations these days. I feel there’s a definite gap in the market for good live music on UK TV though. Jools is the only thing on offer and it’s appalling. Radio seems to be better. Marc Riley features sessions by most of the interesting groups touring, with more fringe shows like Freakzone or stuff on Resonance picking up the weirder things that fall off that radar.

I like the way a lot of people seem to be taking matters into their own hands and providing good music content on the internet, but of course it’s a bit of a minefield and you need time to find the good stuff. Or a good guide.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Like I said, I really love Stick in the Wheel. Psych rock wise, I love Morgan Delt. Klaus Johann Grobe are an amazing group we like from Switzerland. And I love Ariel Pink and Cate Le Bon and Chris Cohen.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

If we could record anywhere I think we’d all choose Sweden. We’re pretty fixated on Swedish rock music, and the country is so beautiful. I often feel like I’m on another planet or in an alternative reality in Scandinavia.

We’d love to record with Martin Stone from Mighty Baby. We spent a day playing with him a couple of years ago and he’s such an instinctive and unique musician. We had some genuine spine tingling moments listening to him play. We were coaxing him to rock out and he just completely blew us away.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re in the middle of writing and recording an album in our own way, just chipping away at it. I think we’re all very excited by how it’s progressing. We’re going to take our time and put it out when it’s ready then start doing some shows.

We’ve obviously got Le Beat Bespoke coming up which we’re really excited about, then we’re going on a short tour with Mudhoney, which should be amazing.

18. Unlike many bands featured in NUTs, you are totally open about your love of – for want of a better term ‘prog rock’. But what do you personally take to be the meaning of that term right here and now, in 2015? Do you see yourself as part of that or any ‘scene’, and what would you say to those who would suggest that playing 60s and 70s influenced music is by definition not ‘progressive’ but ‘regressive’ or ‘retro’?

I’ve never felt like we were progressive, but then I’ve always felt that as the ones making the music, we’re probably the least qualified to label it. So I’ll let people describe it how they like. It’s a paradox to make retrogressive prog I agree, but that’s never been our intention. We’ve always just followed our noses with the kind of music we were making and tried not to over think it. We get so little time to play together that we just like to switch off and enjoy playing when we get together, without really worrying about what it might be called.

We’ve made a conscious effort to shift away from lengthy arrangements with our new stuff though. We want each song to sound like a great 45 side.

19. Until less than ten years ago, things such as folk-rock, European prog, library soundtracks, occult-based music and film, rural imagery, and so-called “hauntology” were still very much fringe interests, with most tastes still shaped by post-punk and indie rules.  Yet now, many bands openly share your influences, clubs with similar themes have sprung up across the capital (and other cities), beards and long hair are sported by ‘hipsters’ everywhere, and there are even pubs, such as Hackney’s Hand Of Glory, that proclaim a “Wicker Man theme”. So, is this a good thing, finally bringing the inspirations that have shaped your work to greater public attention? Or do you think that maybe, as with other fashions, they will ultimately be treated as a bandwagon, briefly ridden then swiftly abandoned by trendsters with no understanding of their actual meaning? And if so, has returning to Bedfordshire after a spell in Bethnal Green kept you separate from such things?

Well I moved to Bedfordshire about ten years ago, while Tom and Dan still live in London and Joe lives in Lancashire, so I guess that helps us keep a degree of perspective. The older you get, the more able you are to completely ignore everyone else and delve on with your own interests regardless of trends.

None of the surface stuff matters anyway, if you’re really into something and feel a deep connection and sense of love and respect for it, it’s easy to recognize others that feel the same way, and ignore those who are along for the ride. I’m certainly not going to stop liking something because too many people are into it. Art and culture are there to be shared and enjoyed and the good stuff will always still be there when the tourists have left.

Web Links:

wolfpeople.co.uk
facebook.com/WolfPeople
twitter.com/wolfpeopleUK

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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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February 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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Newbreed – The Loons

This entry is part 14 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Mike Stax (vocals)
Anja Stax (bass,vocals)
Marc Schroeder (guitar)
Chris Marsteller (guitar)
Mike Kamoo (drums)

Discography:
1998 LP ‘Love’s Dead Leaves’ (Get Hip)
2004 CD ‘Paraphernalia’(UT Records)
2010 LP ‘Red Dissolving Rays of Light’ (Bomp! Records)
2012 7” ‘If You Could Read Your Mind’ (split single with Clinic) (UT Records)
2015 LP ‘Inside Out Your

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band first formed in 1996. There were a lot of lineup changes early on. Anja arrived from England in 1999 after leaving the Diaboliks, Marc joined in 2000, Chris around 2002, and Mike Kamoo in 2005, so we’ve had the same lineup now for ten years, which means we’ve developed a genuine bond as friends and chemistry as musicians.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Between us, I’m sure thousands of influences can be factored into the equation, but there are many that are common to all of us, primarily the Pretty Things, Love, the Yardbirds, the Who, the Kinks, the Outsiders, Q65, the 13th Floor Elevators, MC5—you know, the GOOD stuff!

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Schitzophonics are the best band to emerge from the San Diego area in a long time. They’re like a super high-energy cocktail of early MC5, the Sonics, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Little Richard.
The Neumans from Orange County – archetypal 60s garage, Vox amps and black roll-necks, great music and great people. We love them.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

The scene in Southern California has been undergoing a resurgence in the last few years with the appearance of bands like the Mystic Braves, the Allah La’s, the Sound Reasons and the aforementioned Schitzophonics and the Neumans as well as the return of the Unclaimed, who kicked off the entire West Coast garage revival scene in 1979-80. There’s also the all-girl garage band the Rosalyns (which includes Anja) and the Diddley Daddies (with Mike on bass). We see a lot more younger people at our shows now, which is really encouraging as it means the scene is regenerating rather than growing stale and grey.
There are also a few DJ clubs but it’s mainly about the bands and live music, a bit different from the European 60s scene. The scene is also a good mix so you have your Garage/Freakbeat people along with Scooterists, Mods and Punk Rock kids wanting a good time.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Psychotic Beat.

06. What are your live shows like?

Whether we’re playing to five people or 1,500 people, there’s a certain level of intensity we’re trying to bring to every show we play. The goal is to connect with the audience, engage them with our music, and hopefully have them leave the venue with our songs still ringing in their heads. We feel that, along with memorable songs, a band needs to bring some visual excitement to the stage. We’re never going to just stand there staring blankly at the floor, we’re going to be looking sharp, moving around and trying to grab your attention any way we can.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

I listed our main influences back in question #2. We do have a few covers that we’ll throw into our set list, according to our mood on the night: “Alexander” and “LSD” by the Pretty Things, “You’re Gonna Miss Me” by the 13th Floor Elevators, “My Time” by the Golden Dawn, “All in Your Mind” by Stray, “I Unseen” by the Misunderstood, and even “New Rose” by the Damned, if we’re feeling particularly amped-up and anarchic.
We despise mediocrity in all its forms, bands who spend more time on their ‘look’ than their songs, musicians who use technology as a musical crutch, and people who are always chasing the next trend instead of trying to stake out something original of their own.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Mike Stax:”I’m a voracious reader. Kingsley Amis, Graham Greene, Ross Macdonald, John Le Carre, Lawrence Durrell, L.P. Davies, and Phil K. Dick are a few of my favourite writers and a constant source of inspiration.”
Anja: Also reading a ton but as far as other influences go I am always drawn to design and architecture. Obviously fashion, which I still continue to make and work on with my clothes label here in So Cal (I used to be part of Babzotica Boutique back when I lived in the 90s in London). And my friends!
Marc: Family, friends and surfing. Very simple.
Mike: Any art form that inspires and appeals to my senses.
Chris: Which do you mean sex or drugs?  (Sorry.  Spinal Tap moment = Poor attempt at being clever). Well… I suppose the only true answer would be life, right?

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

All of the band members contribute to the songwriting. Generally, one person will bring a riff, a chord progression or a basic song structure into the practice room; then we all put our heads together and shape it into a full-fledged song. I (Mike) come up with all of the lyrics and most of the vocal melodies. The songs are mostly drawn from personal experiences or observations of the world around us. Sometimes I get inspiration from historical events or personalities. For example, we just wrote a song called “Miss Clara Regrets,” which is all about the 1920s movie actress Clara Bow. It’s going to come out soon on a single on Dirty Water Records.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Mike: “My Desolation” is my current favorite, because it’s a lot of fun to sing live. Favourite song by another artist? “Can’t Stand the Pain” by the Pretty Things – I never tire of that song.
Anja: I like “Miss Clara Regrets” right now; it’s back to the basics and super tribal, really fun to play. Also “My Desolation” for its intensity. By another artist, wow, so many….let’s say top three are MC5 – “Lookin’ At You,” Rupert’s People – “Dream In My Mind” and 13th Floor Elevators – “Slip Inside This House.”
Marc: My favorite song right now from the Loons is “As the Raven Flies”. Probably one of my favorite songs of all time is “Signed DC” by Love. Also “Bo’s Bounce” by Bo Diddley.
Mike: I’m really enjoying ‘Miss Clara Regrets’ at the moment. ‘Dead End Street’ by the Kinks is high on the list currently.
Chris: “Heyday”, and of course, ALL of The Misunderstood set we’re doing with Glenn!  What great songs! What’s your favorite song by another artist? I apologize, but this is an impossible question to answer.  How do you think I fell for music in the first place?

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think the current underground scene is in a reasonably healthy state at the moment, and, yes, we actively participate whenever possible. Of course the scene is clogged up with a lot of mediocre bands, narcissists and bandwagon jumpers, but that’s always been the case. There are also some great bands who are contributing with some potentially timeless music – I hope we’re one of them. Luckily we have a few great life clubs/club owners here who genuinely support bands for the love of the music.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

It’s always been a challenge getting the media over here in the States to give us any attention. Too often they write us off as some kind of ‘60s revival act, because we dress a certain way and utilize vintage equipment and instruments. It’s only in recent years that they’ve begun to take us seriously and realize we’re creating music that is new and reflective of our own personalities, not some kind of nostalgia trip or historical reenactment.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse about once a week. As we rehearse at Mike Kamoo’s recording studio, Earthling, we can record as often as we want—whenever we feel inspired. Our new album, Inside Out Your Mind will be released on May 27. We play live about twice a month on average. We have a couple of exciting upcoming shows: first our album release party on May 28 in San Diego, then of course our set at Le Beat Bespoke in London on April 3.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

There’s not an active national music press in the States like there is in the UK, so the only media coverage most bands get is either through zines and blogs or in the local media. It’s only in the last two or three years that the local media has begun give us any significant coverage. We appreciate all we get because it really does make a difference.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Mike: Nothing mainstream. But I like quite a lot of underground bands from around the world including the Sadies, the Schitzophonics, the Higher State, the Beat Pack, Los Grys Grys, Clinic, the Flowers of Evil, the Royal Flairs and the Maharajas.
Anja: I really like Clinic, The Sadies, Fogbound, the now defunct Soundtrack Of Our Lives, plus the bands we already mentioned from here in California.
Marc: Graham Day and cohorts Allan and Wolf have continued for 30+ years with a singular vision of quality rock ‘n’ roll. I think they sound about as good today as they ever have. Gives me hope.
Mike: Deerhunter, Tame Impala, Caribou, and Viet Cong
Chris: Another difficult question to answer without proper discussion.  I will say… I’ve always liked The Church.  Not sure if that qualifies as current or mainstream or underground (I think they’ve been all the above), but nevertheless they’ve been making good records for 35+ years.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Mike: I’d like to record with Dave Hassinger at RCA Hollywood in 1966 – with Jack Nitzsche helping out with the arrangements. Why? Aftermath, Between the Buttons, and “I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night.”
Anja: For a treat I would love to record with Liam at Toe-Rag again; good times! Jorge from Dr. Explosion is also doing some great work, someone get us back to Spain fast 😉
Marc: I would love to record with Kim Fowley, a great supporter of the Loons. Unfortunately we lost our chance. Liam at Toe-Rag would be cool; I love the sounds from that studio.
Mike: Jorge Explosion – Circo Perrotti. I heard the Fogbound recordings and would like to see what’s going on over there!
Chris: Holy Sh*t!  Is time travel possible?

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Our goal is to keep getting better – write better songs, make better records, play better gigs, and reach as many people with our music as we possibly can. In the immediate future, we’re looking forward to collaborating again with our friend Glenn Campbell of the Misunderstood, and to bringing our music to London for Le Beat Bespoke.

Web Links:

facebook.com/pages/The-Loons
reverbnation.com/theloons9

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 1, 2015 By : Category : Bands Interviews Music Scene USA Tags:, , ,
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