Browsing Tag Dr Robert

Big Boss Man (Newbreed)

This entry is part 22 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 20 years and we met in a pub called the Dolphin.

What influences do the band members have in common?

Mexican Food-fine wine-an eye for the ladies.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Wurzels are from our way and they are amazing.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I think the Godrergraig mod 60’s scene is among the best in the world.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Hammond-Bongo-Fuzz.

6. What are your live shows like?

“The best live band in the uk” was a quote from alive and giving mag.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Soul-Funk-Blues. We don’t play covers though we did used to play im a man and Cloud 9 with congas in.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Baking, shed building and goat herding.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes a lot of the songs and the band also write collectively in their Welsh Mountain Studio “Beat Mountain” Subject matters usually revolve around horses.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Crimson 6ts is my live fave at the mo, fave song by another artist is
“summer holiday”

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Getting the Hammond B3 down the stairs of the WAG club in an orthopedic shoe after ten pints.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse every week midweek and play live most weekends at the moment, the last few years have gone crazy, maybe down to BBC6 music plays I think. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Rubbish.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The Mynd Set are a great band.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Georgie Fame would be cool I think.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

A new album in the winter, we’re playing live all over UK and the rest of Europe, A US tour is on the cards and Japan so its easy to see us live.

Web Links:

Main Site: www.big-boss-man.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bigbossmanofficial
Twitter: www.twitter.com/bigbossmanmusic 
Instagram: bigbossmanmusic 
Spotify: www.spotify.com/bigbossman

Band Members:

Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos
Des Rogers: Drums
Scott “the Hawk” Milsom: Electric Bass, Double Bass
Trev Harding: Guitar

Discography:

Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2000: Sea Groove
2001: Big Boss Man
2004: The Hawk
2006: Party 7
Lps :
2001: Humanize
2005: Winner
2009: Full English Beat Breakfast
2014: Last Man on Earth

Updated Releases and Tour Dates:

22nd April ’16 Acapela Studio, Pentyrch Wales, UK
23rd April ’16 Destination Anywhere Swindon, UK
7th May ’16 TBA Cornwall, UK
27th May ’16 Blues Kitchen London, UK
29th May ’16 Mod & Sixties Festival Margate. UK
3rd June ’16 The Stoke Guildford, UK
24th June ’16 TBA FRANCE


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 19, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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Rat Race Interview

I caught up with Laurence the owner of Margate’s premiere Mod clothing shop Rat Race for a chat about his passion for fashion.

1. When and how did your passion for fashion come about?

As a young man growing up in Thanet, I experimented with many different styles of clothing. As I got older, I got more into stylish clothes but also wanted to wear something other than what could be found in regular department stores. I was fully aware of Margates’ role in harbouring the youth subcultures and styles from the 1960’s to 80’s and I loved looking at old photos of my father and his friends wearing their crombies, boots & braces.

2. When did you turn your passion into your profession?

I accompanied a friend to a trade show in London and spotted some classic Harrington jackets with an embroidered badge ‘Keep the Faith Margate’ on the sleeve. I thought the people of Margate would love them, the jackets were well made and in the original 60’s style. I opened my first fashion store in Margate in 2010 with the classic Harrington jackets, sta-prest trousers and traditional button-down shirts amongst other styles. This is where my passion for Mod and classic styles developed. I did not see the Mod trend as a sub-culture revival; I knew the style had never really gone away.

3. When and where did Rat Race first open?

During the Spring/Summer of 2014 and after experimenting with opening other stores in the South East I decided my passion for Modernist menswear was much better suited to Margate. I joined our two high street shops together internally, re-named and re-branded the stores to open as Rat Race and solely as a classic British clothier. Towards the end of 2015 my partner Bonnie and I expanded further, occupying our third neighbouring shop, which became Rat Race Girl, a store which stocks Mod, Skinhead, Rockabilly and Vintage girl styles .

4. Rat Race is a very popular amongst the Modernist fraternity, please tell us more about the clothing range available in the shop?

We’re a 21st century take on the 20th century’s finest subcultures, Mixing up mod clothing, skinhead style, a touch on the fifties and then adding a contemporary twist. We are official stockists of Merc, Art Gallery, Knightsbridge Neckwear, Brutus Trimfit, Trojan Clothing, Dr.Martens, Delicious Junction, Ikon Originals and many more. Rat Race also stock many other iconic brands, plus Rat Race Girl holds collections from Freddies of Pinewood, Collectif, Lindy Bop and Dolly & Dotty.

5. Are all the items sold in the shop available online?

We opened our online shop only at the beginning of 2016, a lot of our core items are available on our website. We’re growing our website all the time and new collections are added regularly. We always like to hold a few pieces back just for the shop-floor and for our not so web connected customers, so you’ll always find something which isn’t available online – I believe you still can’t beat that moment of stopping into the street to gaze at something in the window.

6. Any famous clientele dropped by the shop?

We’ve had a few well-known customers shop at Rat Race including Neville Staple, Dave Barker & Buster Bloodvessel. Our most recent being Paloma Faith, Preston and surprisingly enough the chatty man himself Alan Carr.

7. Any plans for a Rat Race clothing range in the future?

We have lots of plans and ideas we’re working towards. Our next project will be working in partnership with the 60’s Suit Co. to develop an off-the-peg range of suits designed exclusively for Rat Race. We work closely with the 60s Suit Co. and we would both be involved in the design process to create and release a range of suits, tailor-made for the Margate mods & skins. We are also going to be doing four types of trousers, all in different fabrics, and something to appeal to the Mods, Skinheads and Suedeheads.

8. Do Rat Race cover men and women’s fashion?

We certainly do, we have three high street shops conjoined to make one large shop. Within Rat Race you’ll find ‘Rat Race Girl’ which is our latest addition. It’s great to have a space solely for the girls but also where men and women can shop together.

9. How important to the Rat Race philosophy is it to have local people who know their onions about Modernist fashion working in the shop?

It’s very important to have knowledgeable staff, our Rat Race team certainly know their onions and they also have the same passion and enthusiasm as myself for what we do. I also think it’s important that our staff share the same vision and drive for Rat Race and help create something unique that will stand the test of time.

10. Why do you think the sixties style is still revered, respected and revisited with each new generation?

People from every new generation want to look good and find a style that suits them. When you look good, you feel good, it gives you confidence and young people look at the sixties style and see that un-apologetic swagger. They want to emulate that feeling, they want to know that they look good enough to stand out from the crowd. There is nothing better than Modernist fashion for a clean-cut style and sharpness.

11. What are your favorite vintage and modern fashion brands?

That’s not too easy to answer, there are many brands that I’m into. I love the stories behind the brands and how they have become popular, for example: Brutus Trimfits’ story of Keith Freedman’s visit to Hong Kong’s in 66’ to discover a shop selling half sleeve button-downs shirts for off-duty American soldiers. The shirts were not available in the UK and so with a few adaptations he ordered them in 12 different colours and to this day they still fly off the rails! There are many stories like this and it’s all part of the history of the brands we sell and love.

12. Where do you see Rat Race heading in the future and any exciting projects coming up you want to tell us about?

We hope to continue as we are doing, finding new brands to offer our customers and building up our online shop. We have a meeting with Gabicci this month and hope to become a Gabicci stockist before the coming Margate Mod and Sixties Festival. You can also find us at Folkestone Skabour in September, this will be our sixth trade event for Skabour. It’s a great Ska weekend where we meet many customers and friends, both old and new. Check our website or pop in to see us if you get a chance.

13. With the Mod/Sixties festival coming up at Whitsun where can we find you in Margate and what are the opening hours?

You can find Rat Race and Rat Race Girl at the lower end of Margate High Street, just up from the piazza and harbour. We’re open 7 days a week until 5.30pm and 5pm on Sundays. but check the links below and our website!

Now in-store & online at www.ratracemargate.co.uk // Spring/Summer 2016 Collections from Merc, Art Gallery, Brutus & Trojan Clothing.

Classic British mens & women’s wear.
Open 7 days a weekly 10-5.30 (10-5 Sundays)

Main Site:  ratracemargate.co.uk

Social Networks:

facebook.com/ratracemargate
twitter.com/ratracemargate
instagram.com/ratracemargate
pintrest.com/ratracemargate


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Interviews News Style UK Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Tony Jackson

This entry is part 16 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

First got seriously into music with the Mod Revival in 1979. The Jam and Secret Affair were my favourites. Also 2 Tone, particularly The Specials. After seeing Quadrophenia, I started buying 60’s records, good and bad ones!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Rhythm & Soul Revue (I think that’s what it was called) at Churchill’s, Ramsgate. I was just collecting then, but was invited to spin some tunes. I remember Jo Wallace giving me positive feedback, which encouraged me to do more, whenever opportunities arose. So basically, it’s all her fault!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Margate Mod & 60’s Festival last year. So nice to do a NUTS event with some legendary Mod DJ’s, bringing back happy memories!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

There have been one or two. Faulty equipment, power cuts, sewer blockage, rain, fights, venue running out of beer after two hours… and a plague of flies!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Lee Miller, Rob, Ian Jackson, Pid, Chris Dale, Speed and all the others who, over the years, have given myself and many others some great times. They’ve cost me a fortune in records though! And I must mention Tony Class (RIP). A CCI rally night wasn’t complete without his party music. I didn’t totally get it at the time, but I
do now!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I just play the music that I have collected over the years. It can be Northern, Mod, Jazz, Ska, Reggae, whatever.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I bought an original copy of Luther Ingram – “If It’s All The Same To You Babe” back in the late 80’s for £35. Not a bad investment!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Mod Revival was what got me started, so it would have to be that. It just led on to so many other things and influences. Favourites? The Small Faces and
Dusty Springfield!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No. I try to keep an open mind!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

My regular haunt is The Black Cat Club in Margate. Find it or me on Facebook!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

The one that James Clark HASN’T got!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Small Faces – Don’t Burst My Bubble
2. Herbie Goins & The Nightimers – Cruisin’
3. Sonny Boy Williamson – Help Me
4. Brother Jack McDuff – Duffin’ Around
5. Prince Buster – Freezing Up Orange Street
6. Reg Guest Syndicate – Underworld
7. Geno Washington & The Ram Jam Band – I’ve Been Hurt By Love
8. Timebox – Beggin’
9. The Quik – Bert’s Apple Crumble
10. Walter Jackson – It’s An Uphill Climb To The Bottom

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Bob Seger System – Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man
2. Zu Zu Blues Band – Zu Zu Man
3. Reverend Cleophus Robinson – Shout Shout
4. We The People – Love Is A Beautiful Thing
5. Denny Belline & The Rich Kids – Money Isn’t Everything

Main Site:

www.facebook.com

Next Club Spots:

Soul Cellar on 30th April 2016
Sure Shot on 14th May 2016
Mod & 60’s Weekender on 27-30th May 2016 in sunny (hopefully!) Margate, see all the details HERE!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Hey Mr DJ – Callum Simpson

This entry is part 19 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod/scooter scene at 15 years old. I bought my first scooter, a Vespa 50cc Special and joined a scooter club called High Moderation. My older brother and cousins were into the mod scene which influenced me massively. I started to take more of an interest and hang around with some Mods who were a year above me at school. Once into the fashion it was only a matter of time before I discovered the music. I started listening to bands such as Paul Weller, The Jam, Small Faces and The Who. My brother had a big part to play in my musical taste progressing, as he was listening to bands like The Specials, Madness and was listening to lots of soul and Motown compilations. At 16 I was able to start going to clubs like Brighton Beach, local soul nights and the occasional scooter rally. I was hearing records like Mel Torme – Coming Home, Sandi Sheldon – Gonna make me love you and Sam Dees – Lonely for my baby. As you can imagine I was blown away by which made me to start delving a little deeper into the music and vinyl records. I bought my first record from Boogaloo Records in Leicester when I was 17 for £6 and it was Ray Charles – Go on home.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My First DJ set was in Birmingham at a night organised by Pid. By now I was hooked and lived for the weekends by travelling up and down the country regularly attending mod/soul nights. Through attending nights on a regular basis Pid asked me to DJ along with a couple of close mates Soggy and Gibbo. I was so nervous but managed to get people dancing so it went relatively well. Records I was playing at this point were tunes like JJ Jackson – O Ma Liddi, Artisitcs – Hope We Have and Joe Tex – You Better Believe it Baby, all great tunes!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My most memorable DJ set has to be in Barcelona at the Boiler Club. The city is amazing enough but the Boiler Club is how clubs should be, exciting, vibrant and a full on party from start to finish. I have so many great memories of this club!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If ever you get asked to DJ at a wedding Don’t Do It! I was asked off the back of running a club called ‘Shoutin the Blues’. One of the bar men liked the music and asked me to play at his wedding. At the time I was about 18 or 19 and thought that I could make a few quid. I made it clear that I only had Soul, Mod, R&B, Latin records and that he wouldn’t be getting the usual type wedding DJ. The groom was adamant that he wanted something a bit different and that his guests would enjoy the music. I agreed to do it and for a price of £150, which I thought wasn’t bad for a few hours work! How wrong could I have been!

To cut a long story short only 1 person danced throughout the whole night and that was towards the end of the night… funnily enough it was probably the rarest record I played all night ‘Billy Hawkes – Oh Baby’.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Mik Parry – Forward thinking, has a great ear and is very knowledgeable! Check out his Youtube channel ‘Pow Wow Mik’. The second is Mr Karl Heard, he is what I call a proper DJ! This man has the ability to create an atmosphere like no other. Hopefully I’ll get to see Karl DJ again soon, I hear he is back and still unearthing new tunes!

Gav Arno – he’s a dark horse! Gav has a passion for unearthing quality unknown records like no other, he finds tomorrow’s big records today!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The three DJ’s I have mentioned in question 5 have helped me shape my taste, especially Karl Heard, over the last few years. Another is by regularly attending club nights and hearing DJ’s spinning new (to me) interesting records. The thing I love about Mod nights is you get such a varied taste of music from Soul right through to Jazz. The internet is also a great way to hear new records and other DJ’s from around the world. Shows such as Jester Wild and YouTube channels are a great way to hear new stuff. Over the years I have collected all sorts but now I am much more selective about what records I buy.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

My best discoveries are records I have recently posted on YouTube, Lil Archie & the Majestics, Leave my Girl Alone & Victor Lane – There’s something about you. A few copies have turned up since but they are both extremely rare records!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I honestly don’t have a favourite artist, I love Marvin Gaye but not sure I could call him my favourite. I would relate this back again to question 5 and say that in my time as a resident at The Pow Wow Club, Mik and Gav were massive influences over me musically. The stuff these guys were playing was unreal! Imagine being 19/20 and hearing The Jokers, Jonathan Capree, The Fads, Young Jessie etc. Both well ahead of their time and two great DJ’s.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not in the slightest, if it’s good and I like it I’ll buy it!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I am a resident at the Pow Wow Club in Sheffield and I’ve recently joined the NUTS DJ team.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Another tough one, it would have to be either Eddie Parker, I’m Gone on Awake or The Hopkins Bros, Shake Cherri on Magnetik. I first heard Eddie Parker in Sweden at the Soulastic All-nighter when Ginger Taylor was playing. When the first few notes came in the reaction and atmosphere was something that I will never forget. I first heard Andy Dyson play The Hopkins Bros at Lifeline a few years back and again the place went crazy. Only a handful of DJ’s had it at the time (Dyson, Butch, Ian Wright, Mick H etc. Again the place went mental and the dancefloor was rammed!

Unfortunately both are well out of my price range and probably always will be, I’m hoping I’ll get lucky and find a copy in a charity shop or record fair. The chances of this happening are doubtful but never say never where records are concerned.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten Favourites:
1. Eddie Parker – I’m gone
2. Hopkins Bros – Shake Cherri
3. Jonathan Capree – I’m gonna build me a mountain
4. Mel Williams – Groove my mind
5. Ray Agee – I’m losing again
6. Billy Hawkes – Oh baby
7. Volumes – I ain’t gonna give you up
8. Otis Lee – Hard Row to Hoe
9. Gene Toones – What more do you want
10. Tobi Lark – Sweep it out in the shed

Top Five Spins:
1. Pat Lewis – No One to Love
2. Wayne Champion – Don’t Panic Baby
3. King Carl – Everybody’s feeling good
4. Jokers – Soul Sound
5. Sal Davis – Makini


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, , , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Lee Petryszyn

This entry is part 18 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Growing up there was always music & records about, me old dear loved Motown, the old mans a huge soulie (DJ’s himself still) but was my older brother who introduced me to everything that was good growing up through the 90’s with Blur, Oasis, The Verve then the inspirations to those bands like The Who, Small Faces etc… It was The Horrors fanzine that I first got my early glimpse into Psych with a track off a CD that used to come with it… Hooterville Trolleys – No Silver Bird, which blew my mind and opened up a new one seeking similar sounds!

Where was your first DJ slot?

Used to play a couple of mates indie nights but the first 60s bash was as resident for a night that used to be called Psychedelic Sunday’s at the Lexington with my pal Jamie Cook a few years back with mostly cheap nuggets singles.

What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My second time at Mousetrap, one of my favourite 60s haunts as a punter, always a game crowd in a nowadays rare club that has all the right ingredients for a top night. At the brilliant Margate Mod weekender – playing records with my old man for a good while in the day. The farewell night at Berlin Beat Explosion which was open deck at Wowsville bar playing back to back with Riccardo Para from Italy.

What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Fortunately in my thus far short-lived Dee Jin escapades I’ve not endured any too drastic, My first time at Mousetrap had a couple of hiccups with the mixer not working to start with which didn’t help calm the nerves!

Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Joseph Spurgeon was the first DJ that initially captured my psychedelic imagination! Rob Bailey, Carolina Pastore, Rhys Webb, Peter Feeley, Holly Calder, Stephen McConville – in fact anyone who collects and plays as it’s not a cheap game to be in!

What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Mostly anything from 66 to 71 that’s uptempo, fast and frantic with a good groove.

What was your best ever find/discovery?

Discovering Psychedelic Music and all the nights that play it like Hidden Door Club/Cave/Le Beat Bespoke/Mousetrap.

Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

My Brother, My old man for the thirst for Vinyl, Cave Club & Mousetrap nights and the DJs that play. Brian Jonestown Massacre being my favourite artists.

Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

If I could choose it would be British Demos & Pictures sleeves but any great tune will do,but predominately French Psych/British & Dutch/Belgium Freakbeat.

Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Hidden Door Club at Mascara Bar in Stoke Newington Friday 8th April. Margate Mod & 60’s Weekender on Sat May 28th 2016, see all the details HERE!

What is the record you would most like to own?

Adams Recital – There’s no place for lonely people.

Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

The Fox – Hey! Mr Carpenter (CBS)

Legay – No one (Fontana)
The Accent – Red Sky at Night (Decca)
July – Dandelion Seeds (Major Minor)
Ruperts People – Dream on my Mind (Columbia)
The Mickey Finn – Garden of my Mind (Direction)
The Koobas – Royston Rose (Columbia)
Dragonfly – Celestial Empire (Philips)
The Orange Alabaster Mushroom – Tree Pie (POP 24)
Pink Floyd – See Emily Play (Columbia)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Peshka – Danse Du Ventre (JAG)
Glass Sun – Silence of the Morning (Sound Patterns)
Sheephouse – Ladder (Decca)
Joys of Life – Descent (Columbia)
The Fairytale – Guess I Was Dreaming (Decca)

Web Links:

Facebook: facebook.com/LeePetryszyn
MySpace: myspace.com/drfloorshaker
Twitter: twitter.com/LeePetryszyn
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/drfloorshaker


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 4, 2016 By : Category : Beat DJs Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych Tags:, , , ,
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Bo Ningen

Friday night – 25th March
Bo Ningen + The Hidden Charms
(8pm-4am) £10/£15 (Club only £7/£10 adm from 11pm)

buy_tickets

Interview

Questions 1-8 & 12 answered by Taigen Kawabe and the rest
by Kohhei Matsuda

01. How did the band originally get together and tell us about your name?

We all met in London 8 years ago but came from different parts of Japan. It was an amazing coincidence to form a Japanese band in London. Bo Ningen means “stick man” in Japanese, I named it because we are all skinny.

02. What was the music Scene like locally at that time around you?

Do you mean when we formed the band, right? I guess people did care even more about our shows in East London as there were many fake indie bands.

03. How has you sound evolved over the years together?

It started as total free form improvisation. We didn’t even have any songs for the first couple of shows, only riffs. Then we started to make songs with structure.

04. How much influence have the iconic ‘Psychedelic’ type bands had on your mindset?

Personally, I feel the word “psychedelic” has been abused in the music industry. I don’t find psychedelic at all from most of the recent bands who put “Psychedelic” on top of their genre. They just copy either fashion or drugs or some effect pedals… Psychedelic can’t be the limitation or excuse to take drugs to escape from something, a good drug dealer can’t be a drug junky. I do respect old psychedelic bands and I don’t mind if people call us a “psychedelic” band.

05. What Heavy type bands have inspired you up until now?

I guess more of Noise music rather than heavy bands.

06. How has your recording work in the studio changed since “Henkan” back in 2011?

I think Henkan was the turning point because we had a proper engineer involved in the production. I mixed the first album myself after that our recording became more of a collaboration.

07. What has playing bigger shows meant to the band as a unit?

Well, the bigger shows are great and I love play In front of many people. I thought more about how to connect with the audience after playing big shows. But I also like small shows as its intimate and more physical to me.

08. Your live shows are full of mayhem and energy how do you keep that up?

I feel our live performance is kind of detoxification or purification to me and hopefully for the audience too. We don’t pretend or fake it, but do stretch before the show to make sure we don’t get injured.

09. You have also performed collaboratively with Damo Suzuki, Faust and Savages?

Yes, these things came naturally. Just something great and magical happened.

10. Has the approach to recording and song creation changed since your first LP with Stolen recordings?

Of course. That first LP was 7 years ago or so. Our personal lives etc have changed, so has the approach to music.

11. Tell us about the ideas behind in your latest LP III (2014 Stolen Recordings)?

There wasn’t a specific “concept” behind it, but looking back, that LP is a conclusion of our 8 years path. Next one will be the new start.

12. ‘Line The Wall’ had a UK and Japanese edition, how do you find the difference in singing lyrics and relating the songs in either language?

Only the mastering is different, the lyrics and languages are the same.

13. You are playing at Le Beat Bespoké 11 this Easter in London, on the Friday night are you looking forwards to experiencing this event?

Yes very much so.

14. You are featured in the new Zoolander film that must have been real fun?

Yes. Totally different vibes going on out there. New world

15. How do you see the future for Bo Ningen?

Bright but not a straight path. We’ll try to make it through.

Friday night – 25th March
Bo Ningen + The Hidden Charms
(8pm-4am) £10/£15 (Club only £7/£10 adm from 11pm)

buy_tickets


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Clubs Events Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Little Barrie

Little Barrie are a trio originally formed in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, who since relocated to London. Their sound is a mixture of Garage Rock, Rhythm & Blues, Surf and Psychedelia. The trio is behind the opening theme to ‘Better Call Saul’. Fronted by vocalist/guitarist Barrie Cadogan who has been a touring member of Primal Scream since 2006 and has also worked with artists such as Anton Newcombe, Spiritualized, Paul Weller, Pete Molinari and Scott Asheton. Drummer Virgil Howe is the son of Yes guitarist Steve Howe.

We very much look forwards to seeing them at Le Beat Bespoke 11 on the Saturday night! Darius Drewe caught up with them recently.

Over the last ten years, we have definitely seen a resurgence of musicians with similar inclinations, from Jim Jones’ numerous bands to the Stone Foundation, Cat Black (featuring your ex drummer Billy Skinner) Lynne Jackaman/Saint Jude, Miraculous Mule, Marcus Bonfanti and Vintage Trouble (USA). It seems like a “vintage rock” explosion. But do you see it as a scene? Or is it merely a simple case of several individual bands happening to be in similar places at similar times?

I don’t think some of the bands you mentioned have much in common musically. In cities there are always people making all different kinds of music at any given time. There’s also been an interest in rawer, stripped down forms of rock music for many years. There are bands and musicians that we have a camaraderie with like Jim Jones and Gil De Ray, either through gigging and working together or just liking each others music and having in interest in similar music, but I don’t see it as a scene.

How important is it to have clubs such as Blues Kitchen, What’s Cookin’, Heavy Load and of course our very own NUTs been to establishing it and encouraging musicians and music lovers to combine? And, conversely, now that venues all over the capital seem to be closing every day, how do you think it will be affected? Is there ANYTHING that you think should be done to prevent this wanton destruction?

Music venues, bars and clubs are hugely important to any cities music culture. Some new venues have appeared, but there are so many we’ve played over the years that are now sadly gone. Places where we also saw great gigs, heard new music and met people who have been important to our lives in many ways. These places should definitely be preserved for future generations. The social and cultural cleansing going on in London right now seems to be purely in the name of profit. The people at the top simply don’t care about places of artistic importance or encouraging creativity in the artists of the future. Central London is becoming more bland and boring each year. London could end up just being a giant dull shopping centre no one wants to hang out in, with only Disneyfied versions of its old cultural haunts aimed at the tourist market. The power of change lies with the money men, but I don’t think they give a shit.

On saying that though, the public shouldn’t be underestimated. People will still want to play and listen to music, go out and have a good time, you won’t stop that. Maybe folk will get more guerilla about things and get creative. It’s also easier for people to communicate now through technology and get their heads together.

Lewis: – I feel the  scene / atmosphere in London since I moved here in the early nineties has changed massively. I moved to London excited about music old and new, there were so many outlets for me to DJ music I had already collected and find out about and hear new things I was yet to discover. I genuinely felt I was in the middle of something really vibrant. I used to go to clubs and if I heard a song that was good but unknown people would react positively and now new things seem to clear the dance floor unless they have been on a major advert or radio campaign of some kind. I feel now that there is very little outlet for a scene to develop. Nothing is hidden or underground these days it seems so it doesn’t seem exotic or special. There are a very few venues such as the Blues kitchen that keep what I remember as a night dedicated to a certain quality of music rather than chasing the pound and playing it safe.

As a vocalist and guitarist, who would you say influenced you (Barrie) the most? I can hear traces of everyone from Steve Marriott and Robert Plant to Van Morrison, John Lennon, Dave Berry and even Duffy Power in there: I can even pick up a few traces of Brian Setzer and Gene Vincent!! However, all these could just as easily be accidental…

I’ve had so many influences over the years. As a vocalist I’m pretty limited but I was first drawn to more rhythmical singers like Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan and Lee Dorsey. I do love vocalists like Steve Marriott and Van Morrison but they’re leagues above me. As are all of my favourite singers like Sly and Rose Stone, Iggy Pop, Roky Erickson, Tina Turner, Gene Clark and the mighty Howlin’ Wolf to name a but a few.

My sisters record collection in the late ’80s was a huge influence on me guitar wise. My first big influence was John Squire, followed shortly by Johnny Marr, J Mascis, Jimi Hendrix (from my dad’s records), Ray Hanson from Jim Jones’ band Thee Hypnotics. From there everything opened up and over time keeps going. I’ll keep this short but I love Steve Cropper, Hubert Sumlin, Jimmy Nolen, Magic Sam, Neil Young, Michael Karoli, Ron Asheton, James Williamson, Tom Verlaine & Richard Lloyd, Stacey Sutherland, Danny Kirwan, Steve Jones, Link Wray, Wayne Kramer & Sonic Smith, Cliff Gallup… Better stop!

Though the band’s name is taken from your frontman, the sound is very much the combined work of three people. Do you think listeners sometimes have difficulty remembering that, and tend to not give Lewis and Virgil enough credit for what they bring to the table?

I can’t speak for other people but I think Lewis and Virgil’s presence on Little Barrie recordings and onstage is incredibly powerful. People definitely pick up on that at our live shows. Although the guitar can be upfront in our music and the sound has evolved over the years, it’s always been very rhythmical and beat driven. So much of that comes from the bass and drums. They have their own sound and groove. I do write alone a lot but it’s only when the three of us play together do the songs become what they should be. They’re brilliant musicians.

Has having a drummer with a world-famous father also been in any way advantageous to you, or might it be actually something you perceive as a bit of a millstone? Or do you reckon many people aren’t that aware of it anyway, and simply judge your music on its own merits?

Over to you Virgil: Virgil declined to answer!

Although you’re a contemporary band, your sound is undoubtedly rooted in the classic period of soul, blues and rock 1965-75: a song like Precious Pressure, for instance, sounds like it could easily have been lifted from an album of that period. When recording and playing, therefore, is there any particular guitar amplification, drum kit, bass cab, vocal mike, strings or even choice of instrument you would consider essential to achieving this sound?

We do like a lot of music from that era but we’ve never been on a mission just to replicate old records, we’re not purists. We just want to make music that sounds exciting to us and captures the feel we’re after. The aim is to find sounds we like and try to use them in our own way. Although I love a lot of old guitars and amps for their tone and character, they’re not essential. The key to capturing certain sounds in the studio or onstage has a huge amount to do with how the sounds are being recorded and who’s playing the instrument. To find engineers who understand the difference isn’t always easy. Two people I think are fantastic are Mike Burnham at Lovebuzz Studios in Bermondsey and Seb Lewsley who has worked with Edwyn Collins for many years. They know how to get great sounds. A lot of modern recordings involve over clinical by the book techniques which can kill the soul out of any performance. And for some reason some people nowadays seem reluctant to break those rules. Twelve high spec modern microphones on a drum kit and into a state of the art digital mixing desk won’t help you get a filthy sound like The Sonics. You’re better off with a cassette 4-Track or recording the band in one go on your phone and adding the vocal after.

How important is the bands image and how you present yourselves?

Image is important to us in our own ways. We all look different from each other and dress a little different too. I’m not really a flash dresser, but I do really like clothes and it’s always been important to me. I love old denim, vintage sweatshirts, military and motorcycle leathers and simple slim cut smarter jackets etc. and 60’s style boots. I wear a lot of ladies shirts.

Lewis: I have very little interest in following current trends unless something vibrant and vital has cropped up, most of it is the same old crap being regurgitated or some random baseless idea invented by people desperate to keep their job at a fashion / music mag. A lot of classic styles that I’m personally interested in are because they are things that have been generated by and represent attitude toward how you personally choose to live your life.

As a guitarist, you, Barrie, have played with some of music’s most legendarily “awkward” frontmen, such as Morrissey, Bobby Gillespie and Anton Newcombe, while the entire band has backed Paul Weller (also perceived as being slightly ‘difficult’ on occasion) Are these people the enfants terribles that their legends would suggest, or is it mainly press speculation and exaggeration?

I can only speak from my own experience. These people have all been cool
with me.

One of the biggest influences all three members share is obviously the blues, and a few years ago, two of you got to “live the dream”, as it were, when you went to New York to play for Hubert Sumlin. Tell us a little about that experience.

We opened for Hubert at a gig in 2005. We first met him the year before when we were both on the same US label for a few years. We’d asked if there was any chance of meeting him but didn’t expect anything. So we were in New York for the first time on a promo ‘meet and greet’ trip and had to do this awkward lunchtime showcase gig in the label office in front of the staff (about 15 of them) playing through little amps. We were just setting up and Hubert walks in and sits down right in front of us. I was half over the moon and half shitting myself because now we had to play in front of him. It seemed to go ok although it was nerve-wracking as hell, he was the guitar on Killing Floor! Hubert was a lovely guy, very kind mannered and charismatic. He spent quite a lot of time chatting and took a few pictures with us. He was very encouraging. The following year we were recording in Brooklyn with Russell Simins playing drums. The label had brought him to the studio with the idea of us doing a song together but we never got chance to get stuck into anything. But a week or so later we got a gig opening for him in Manhattan. Towards the end of his set he called me up onstage to play Got My Mojo Working with him. I couldn’t believe it was happening. It was one of the best moments of my life, a true privilege. We hung out and talked with him longer that night. He told us some amazing stories, about him getting his first guitar, him leaving Wolf’s band for a short while to play with Muddy Waters and also that he thought his brother was a better guitar player than he was. It means even more now he’s no longer with us. We were all grateful to have met him.

We couldn’t go much further without discussing your highest-profile recording to date, the theme to the hit US TV show Better Call Saul. How did this come about?

We were approached by Thomas the music director for the series. He was into the band and had all of our albums, which was bizarre to us as he was based in LA and we hadn’t played there much at all. He asked if I could write 17 variations of a short guitar piece for the main title theme of the show and get them recorded in three days. I scrapped all other plans, got them done and we recorded and mixed them on day three and sent them off to him that evening. A few days later he got back to us and asked for 12 more variations, so we did the same thing. Other people were pitching for it too. A few weeks later we found out they’d chosen our theme, which was really cool. It was nice surprise – I’d never even seen
Breaking Bad.

Your new album has seen you experimenting with Krautrock influences- is this something you’ve always been a fan of?

Yes I first discovered Can in the early/mid 1990’s. I’d read somewhere that their sound may have influenced band like the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays who inspired me a great deal. I went out to Selectadisc and bought the Ege Bamyasi album – It totally blew me away. It sounded so modern still and it was from 1972 or something. It was mesmerising, they had a fairly regular rock band set up – guitar, bass, drums & keys but played nothing like British or American rock n roll or R&B. The core of it being that amazing hypnotic rhythm of Jaki Leibezeit’s drums. I got to play with Damo Suzuki a few years back in Paris with a few friends of mine. It was great. He’s an amazing guy, he had some stories too. About his adventures traveling the world solo in the late ’60s. He came to see us when we played in Cologne and took us a Russian bar after the show. A gentleman, a hero and a great host.

You’re already onto your fourth album, in what seems like a short space of time, and each has been a progression from the last, suggesting immense longevity for the future. But where do you see Little Barrie in two decades? Will you still be touring and recording?

To be honest I think we make albums fairly slowly, but some of that can be down to other commitments and financial constraints. We’re writing a new album right now. Little Barrie in two decades??! Who knows… It would be cool if we still played together though. I want to play for as long as I can.

I’m actually doing what you did in reverse in a few months, and decamping from the South to the East Midlands. How would you describe the music scene up there, and are there any clubs or venues you’d particularly recommend, particularly with regard to psych, garage, freakbeat, prog or vintage rock?

I’m probably the worst person to ask Darius… I’ve been in London for 15 years now and am very out of touch with what’s happening in Nottingham these days. I don’t get to go back very often and when I do it’s all about seeing family and a few old friends if I can. But I’ll try to ask a few people and get back to you if they have any ideas. Quite a few of my old friends are music fans and big record collectors. There’s some good record shops there – Look up Rob’s Records and Big Apple for second-hand stuff. There’s also a Rough Trade and probably others too. They could be good places to meet people.


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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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February 22, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News UK Tags:, , ,
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Hidden Charms

Friday night – 25th March
Bo Ningen + The Hidden Charms
(8pm-4am) £10/£15 (Club only £7/£10 adm from 11pm)

buy_tickets

We caught up with the very busy and hard working Hidden Charms recently in full preparation for their up and coming Easter LBB11 appearance on the Friday night spot…

HC_0000_Layer 2

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together since April 2014 , but we’d all been playing in bands with each other for a couple of years before that,  so when a couple of people left one band we just put the remains together.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

At the moment we’re into Nick Cave, Tom Waits and Hip-Hop from the 90’s.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

I think music isn’t thriving in London at this point in time, the music coming out of Liverpool, Manchester, Sheffield, Leeds is much more exciting.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I’m aware of a 60’s underground scene throughout the entire country, which I think has been a permanent fixture almost since the 60’s. However, we are not part of this at all. Not to put anything down, but that era of sound and fashion isn’t a present influence on us.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Cheese being thrown at a windmill.

6. What are your live shows like?

When a crowd knows your songs, a gig scenario is a whole different experience and as a young band, it takes a long time to get people to know you and remember you, so it’s only now that we’re starting to experience what a ‘real’ show feels like. The most important thing is to give it everything, you have to sweat, and you have to bleed, and sometimes shed a tear.

HC_0001_Layer 1

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Despise, that is a very strong word.I despise fakeness and people who have no respect for the origins of their music, it’s not proper to slag off other groups. Like I said before, we like people like Nick Cave, who has a great way of looking at things and an even better way of dressing that up in the studio, or on stage. People who are individual and who inspire me.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

We like our clothes but that’s not to say we’re ‘influenced’ by changes in the fashion industry. We know what we like and we do exactly that.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Ranald and I (Vincent) write the lyrics but it’s only when Josh and Oscar make their contributions that it becomes ‘Hidden Charms’. We write about what we know, which at our age could be not a whole lot… But in my mind, we have experienced a lot in our short time.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

In our repertoire I would say Long Way Down, as it’s always had a good reaction from fans of the band. It’s short and simple. Leave Her Alone by Nick Gillespie of The Persuasion is my favourite song this morning!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

I think it’s hard in London to stay underground or for Scenes to develop at all because of how hard it is to afford just to live there. But as a band, we have no one true home so it’s much more fun to see scenes in LA or Liverpool, or Edinburgh or Eindhoven and be part of that for one night only.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

It’s hard to be told you’re no good, that you can’t write songs, that you can’t sing or any of those constant knock backs that come with doing this job, however the biggest challenge is seeing injustice in the industry, whether it’s losing people to the road, seeing the anodine made successful, or seeing black artist’s being totally overlooked, to see all that and still continue working for an ‘industry’ like that is the biggest challenge.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We did 100 hundred shows last year and probably rehearse 10 times and recorded twice which is all wrong! This year we’re focusing on getting what we do live into the studio.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I feel like there is a lot more of Kim Kardashian’s arse being covered which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

HC_0002_Background

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I rate the Growlers and I rate Little Simz.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’ve been lucky enough to work in some of the best scenarios any young band could ask for. For us, it’s important to use tape machines etc, so any studio we use would have to be Analogue because everybody knows it’s better.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gigs have you got coming up?

An EP to come out in April/May and then hopefully an LP to follow that, towards the end of the year. I think as a band starting out , your dream is to be the ‘biggest’ or to be championed by magazines and the television but if in order to do that your music has to become dull and soulless then it’s better to play for fewer people and be overlooked by the big bad world!

Friday night – 25th March
Bo Ningen + The Hidden Charms
(8pm-4am) £10/£15 (Club only £7/£10 adm from 11pm)

buy_tickets


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Clubs Events Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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The Dustaphonics (Newbreed)

This entry is part 18 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

NUTSMAG recently caught up with the band in London…

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Started 2008 in Hackney, when the actress Tura Satana (Faster Pussycat Kill Kill) asked me to create a few pieces of music for her new film. Sadly she passed away a few months after our first single was released on Dirty Water with the song we co-wrote: “Burlesque Queen”.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

With an additional horn section, we’ve been the backing band of the Blues Brothers’ Dan Aykroyd, and James Moore, Big Mama Thornton (RIP) and Sugar Pie Desanto’s manager, asked us to be Sugar’s backing band for some future UK shows. We love all kinds of good music, but the main thing the band members all have in common is a passion for Rhythm & Blues and R&B-based music.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

I lived in London for 20 years, and there are always some great bands in the big smoke. I am in Lille now (North of France) where you can find cool kids: The Arrogants, The Hoodoo Tones, etc.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I stopped my weekly club night in London (Raison D’Etre) to start the Lille-Roubaix Vintage Weekender (17,000 visitors). Lille is a vibrant city with a great eclectic music scene. The perfect crossroads between London, Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam. John Sinclair (MC5/White Panthers) was there in January for The Detroit Boom Boom; I played guitar alongside his great live poetry performance.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

As a DJ, musician, producer, I’ve been influenced by many genres: Rhythm & Blues, Surf, Rocknroll, Rockabilly, Soul, 60’s/90’s Garage Punk, 70’s PunkRock, British R&B, Latin Boogaloo, Funk, Jazz, Bossa Nova, Ska, Early Reggae, Country, Mambo, etc.  All those elements, at different doses, combine to make the sound of The Dustaphonics! Some people love it and understand the idea beyond and see something fresh. Some people start off really confused about it but often they’re up and dancing a few songs into the set. Would “Vavavoom Rock’n’Roll”
describe us?

06. What are your live shows like?

“Dustaphonics! You are a world-class act and a very fine RockNRoll band!”  Rob Lind (The Sonics) described us that way on stage after we’d supported them at the Forum London. He also asked for a cd, as did Martha Reeves and her 2 sisters when we played with the Vandellas. They even asked us for signed copies of our new single. How crazy is that – some of our heroes asking for our music! Hayley joined us only 3 years ago and she has made great progress, considering that she never really had a proper band before. She does the show on 10,000 volts, BOOM! While, us, the boys, are at the “back” making sure all sounds solid and tight! Dustaphonics shows are simple, energetic, good vibe and open to all.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Despise? I prefer keeping my ears fresh for the bands and artists that I love and ignore the rest. My influence comes from the music arrangements of the 1960s Motown (like the Ramones; not much guitar hero guitar solo), Bo Diddley, Sonics, Hubert Sumlin, Link Wray, Mickey Baker, Cliff Gallup, Them, Ramones, Dick Dale, Larry Collins, The Animals, Ronnie Dawson, Joe Clay, The Saints, The Jam, etc. We do and love covers: Bo Diddley “Dearest Darling”, Sugar Pie Desanto “Witch of The Night”, Louisiana Red “Ride on”, Sonics “Shotdown”,  Sonny Burgess  “Red Headed Woman”,  Ike & Tina Turner “Worried and Hurting”, Howlin’ Wolf “You Gonna Wreck my life”,  traditional Gospel “Don’t let the Devil Drive your car”, The Strangeloves “Night Time”. The other 20 songs or so in the set are originals.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

The good and the bad sides of our society. Girls, 1950s, 60s, 70s Cinema, design, literature. Helping and producing young music talent. Organising music and cultural events.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I bring the theme, the idea, the melody, the riff, Hayley or Aina write the lyrics, I work on the global arrangement while the lyrics are done, then we give a go all together with the full band. We deal about positive things, nothing really dark or too serious. No politics. Few examples: “Party Girl “was influenced by my girlfriend, “When you gonna learn” is about mistakes we can all make sometimes, “Rockin’ Boogaloo” is a tribute to all the DJs who are spinning/collecting the goodies on vinyl.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Too many great songs made by so many great artists. As for the Dustaphonics’ repertoire, they have to be all our favourites, otherwise they won’t be played on stage with soul and passion.

11.How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think the global underground scene at the moment is booming, vibrant with a fresh energy from a new generation of great musicians and bands. Same wherever we are playing: Spain, UK. France, Italy, in a small club for 100 people or on a big festival’s stage for 20,000 people. There is always a great multi generation mix of people at our gigs: Mods, Garage, Surf, Punk, Rockers, Cats, Beatnicks, Bikers and classic music lovers. It is not that easy to be semi-pro musicians by playing niche music in a specific closed circuit, so for that reason, we cannot belong to only one circuit or one scene, we do participate in various scenes who are booking and looking after us.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Coming back alive from 5 fantastic Spanish tours, no, joking. Few years ago I had a very serious accident and ended up paralysed for few months. I had to learn again how to walk, to talk and play guitar, The biggest challenge was my body/brain synchronization and to run the band, keep on doing tours and gigging whilst in a very weak physical and mental condition, but it was the only way, the best therapy for getting better.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We are playing Le Beat Bespoke Festival in London Saturday 26th March! A fast 40 min set before the great Little Barrie and Jim Jones. Book your ticket for the 3 days, there Is an amazing line up of great bands and DJs.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Dustaphonics members can speak English, Spanish, French, German and Italian, so we can read/translate specialist magazines like Mojo, Blues & Soul Mag, Shindig, Vive Le Rock in UK, Ugly Things in US, Ruta 66 in Spain, Soul Bag, Dig It in France. Blow up in Italy, Dynamite in Germany plus some great online blogs too. We would love to have more coverage in the media but we cannot afford to pay a PR for that.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I am ok with a few, like The Hives, Shingai Shoniwa, Erykah Badu, etc. I love and collect mostly vintage 50s and 60s stuff but I do enjoy a lot of current bands like: James Hunter, Sharon Jones, Nick Waterhouse, Jd Mc Pherson ,Phantom Surfers, Mike Sanchez, Lee Field, Junior Brown, Little Victor & Co, Masonics, Bill Kirchen, Bellfuries , Urban Voodoo Machine, Nico Duportal, etc…and of course the new generation too, like in France Fuzzy Vox or Les Grys-Grys, who headlined my event the Roubaix Vintage Weekender 2 years ago.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

1/ Muscle Shoal (Sheffield-Alabama) with Mark Neil? Why? Because I am a big fan of The Unknowns and Mark’s work. In the late 90s we even recorded a song together, that is locked in the secret vault of Toe Rag Studios, with Mark (guitar), Dave Doyle (bass) Liam Waston (drums) and me (guitar). 2/ RCA Studio Nashville with Mark Neil and Liam Watson or Mark Neil and Jim Diamond? 3/ Toe Rag (London )with Liam and Ed? 4/ Rimshot Studio (London (with Mike Thorne and Healer Selecta? 5/ Circo Perrotti (Gijon) with Jorge and Healer Selecta?

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Meeting more and more fans and great people on the road, recording our 3rd album, doing some shows with Sugar Pie Desanto and other legends, coming back alive from our 6th Spanish tour in September. We have just done a great interview too for Ruta 66 magazine (booking Spain via soundealer Madrid).  We are playing a great Blues Soul Festival in France in March with another Motown legend: Bettye LaVette.

Band Members:

Lead Vocal: Hayley Red
Guitar: Yvan Serrano Aka Dj Healer Selecta
Drums: Eric Frajiria
Bass: Devid + Special Guest
Guitar: Dan Whaley
Harmonica: Kevin Smith

Discography:

2015
EP: Q Sound Groove
Q Sound Records Paris

2014
LP: Big Smoke London Town
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Dirty Water Records )

2012
LP: Party Girl
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Dirty Water Records)

2012
Single Jinx/lookin’ At You
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Munster Records/vampisoul Madrid)

2009
CD: Burlesque Queen Cd
(Kingaling Records) 2009

Single: Burlesque Queen/tornado
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Dirty Water Records) 2009

Compilation:

LP/CD Gangster on Specialized compilation: A Modern Take On Specials Classics (Teenage Cancer Trust) 2012 UK

Main Site: www.healerselecta.co.uk
Social Networks:
Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheDustaphonics
MySpace: www.myspace.com/thedustaphonics
Twitter: www.twitter.com/dustaphonics
Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/dustaphonics
Videos: Big Smoke London Town & Party Girl
Updated Releases and Tour Dates: www.reverbnation.com/dustaphonics


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Juan VG Duque – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 13 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with Juan VG Duque recently who lives in Madrid, Spain to talk about his passion for good music.

Reference: Resident DJ at Mod Generation Club, Madrid. Part of The John Colby Sect Record Label

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

When I was a child I used to look over my parents’ records collection. I was fascinated by one box of cassettes recorded by a friend of them who traveled to London frequently. There was 60’s pop, punk or even reggae. Lucky me! I’ve always been very DIY so I have made/done my own style with all the things I have learnt or someone share with me.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

As far as I remember was in Madrid at Groovie, 2010.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Mushroom Machine Club in Feb’15. Crazy and funny day…and night! I was with Fogbound traveling from León to Madrid when our van broke down. We spent the evening waiting for a friend to pick us up…

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve been very lucky spinning records. I can’t remember a bad experience at all.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I love a lot of Djs from Spain: Miguel, Sebas, Emilio, Xavi… They are real friends, amazing record collectors & Djs, I could stay with them days and days learning and talking about music. But if I have to choose my favourites Lolo and Ángel Brocos are the DJs. They’ve taught me almost everything I know about DJing and I love their taste. Coruña rules, neno!

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

In my box there is place for anything : from soul rhythms to garage punk. A DJ must be versatile spinning records.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I like when I find some U.S. band with british influences. I think records like Meddy’s People – Fantasy World or Mechanical Switch – Everything is red are good examples.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I love all freakbeat & popsike records from UK. Classic or rare; Pretty Things or Winston Fumbs. I never get tired of this amazing music.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, but I’m always filling gaps in Decca & Deram labels.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Mod Generation Club, the club I run with Miguel Ygarza & Alber Acedos
in Madrid.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I couldn’t say just one … I want all the records of the world in my library haha!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
1. Caleb – Woman of distinction (Phillips – 1967)
2. The End – Cardboard watch ( Introspection – Decca – 1969)
3. Outsiders – You remind me (Polydor – 1968)
4. The Byrds – I Wasn’t born to follow ( Columbia – 1969)
5. Gene Latter – Holding a dream ( Spark – 1969)
6. Actress – It’s what you give ( CBS – 1969).
7. Left Banke – She may call you up tonight ( Smash – 1967)
8. Turquoise – Saynia ( Decca -1968)
9. 4PK – Down and Out ( No Label – 1966)
10. Barrier – Spot the lights ( Philips – 1968)

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. MG & Escorts – A Someday Fool
2. Enough’s Enough – Please Remember
3. Paper Blitz Tissue – Grey Man
4. Stone Cutters – Fellow Slave
5. The Attraction – She’s a Girl

Web Links:

Main Site: www.thejohncolbysect.com
Mod Generation Club – Facebook: www.facebook.com/modgenerationclub
The John Colby Sect – Facebook – www.facebook.com/thejohncolbysect 
Twitter: twitter.com/johncolbysect 
Instagram: www.instagram.com/thejohncolbysect
Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/thejohncolbysect

Next Club Spots: Saturday 12 Mar, 2016 – Mod Generation Club

Le Beat Bespoké 11 – London (Easter 2016) 24th to 27th March – see all the details HERE!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 20, 2016 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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