Browsing Tag Eron Falbo

The Jaybirds (NewBreed)

This entry is part 3 of 8 in the series Newbreed2

Mod haircuts, short jackets, pointed boots, hipsters, cufflinks, r&b, freakbeat, style and passion: this is what you find in The Jaybirds nest. The Jaybirds were born in Vienna in 1989 and have had the same line up (except for a guitar player replacement in 1994) all the time. The Jaybirds were unanimously acclaimed as the coolest mod band in Europe in the “authentic side” mods and r&b/freakbeat-scene. Equally lovers of white & black 60’s music, we can find them playing Skip Bifferty to Sorrows or Sam Cooke to Joe Tex masterfully.

1. Who are the members of your band and what do they do?

Bernhard Gold: vocals, harps,
Patrick Nagl: guitar
Norbert Payr: vocals, guitar
Thomas Schmitzberger: drums, percussions
Markus Zöchling: vocals, bass guitar

 2. How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

We (Thomas, Markus and Bernhard) met in a graphic arts school in Vienna in 1989. We started making music together when someday we found out by chance that we are all desperately in love with the RnB sounds of Manfred Mann, Animals, Yardbirds etc. And back in 1989, please believe us, there was nothing else we could be fond of… Patrick joined in 1994 and Norbert came in 1995. So by this time we were already known and we did a lot of shows and tours.

 3. Where are you from and where are you based?

We are all from and still live in Vienna, Austria.

4. How would you describe the style you play?

In short: Freakbeat (authentic Sixties-style). In long: any style from 64 to 68. Depending on the mood we’re in, who’s playing lead guitar, who wrote the song…

5. What are your live shows like?

Mmmhhh, hard one… We try hard to treat our instruments and ourselves bad _ and hope that everybody likes our music. So there is a plan which we call, ‘the Set’ but we do not stick to it very strictly. We are definitively a no-stage-diving band. More relaxed. Cool?

6.What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We are influenced by all kinds of Sixties bands, Sixties culture in general, we only have covers of Sixties bands.

7. What are your main influences outside of music?

Literature, films, art, history, philosophy…

8. How many official recordings have you done? How many released? Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Three LPs, some 7” EPs and we have songs on some compilations.

9. What’s the favourite song of yours currently?

There is still so much to discover that it always changes…

 10. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

There are a lot of events now, so we participate as much as we can, we love those parties with great bands and DJs, girls, alcohol etc. and we enjoy to meet all the people again also that we know for so many years now, the entire thing is this same feeling and life-style in common, but there is still a lot of plurality and great individualism.

11. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Our biggest challenge was of course our support gig for the Rolling Stones, ‘Ah, here they come bringing up this old story again!’ at a local airport near Vienna in front of 80,000 people. We won a battle out of eight bands hosted by a famous Viennese club called the Chelsea and because of a video that was sent to the management of Stones we were happily chosen by them or by the Stones themselves (something that we still believe in to this day). Actually it was an open-air concert on the biggest stage you can imagine and all the business there was crazy with all the huge trucks just for the stage-equipment and so on… But when we arrived there with our old VW-van (1975 or something like that), the stage manager was a bit taken aback for a second but after he collected he’d asked us if this is definitively all? What it was – just three amps and a drum kit. And us of course.

Unfortunately we did not get any money out of this which was ok for us back then (xxxx!!! – just imagine this: if anyone of these 80.000 visitors just have given us one EURO!?) but what’s still nagging us is: that after all we did not have the chance to meet anyone of the Stones personally.

But to be honest finally we are really happy that we had the chance to play a lot of venues in the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Russia.

 

12 How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

Currently, once a week. We play as often as we get booked (though we do not really work hard on contacting people all the time and being a pain in the arse to get booked again) See Q15!

13. What do you think of the music coverage in the modern media?

That’s an issue in Austria in general, life is not easy for a musician here, even for the best or most commercial ones and of course for all the underground bands here. But it got better during the last ten years. Now there is a great guitar-pop scene with all their web, radio and tv possibilities which enables huge followings and is comparable to any other countries scenes nowadays.

14. Do you rate any other current bands?

All sixties-orientated or sixties-influenced bands are our favourite bands. Especially in Austria where we have (had?) the Incredible Staggers, Wild Evel and the Trashbones and the Attention.

15. Who and where would you most like to record and why?

With an endless budget in the background (that we haven’t), at Jorge’s.

 16. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions?

We’ll try to write new songs (some more of this I-love-you-and-you-love-me-not shit), to go into the studio again to do another record this year, to do some more gigs etc, yeah… P.S. fortunately you did not ask about our interests which would be still: sex and alcohol!

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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May 22, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Interviews Music RnB Scene Tags:, , ,
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Wild Evel & the Trashbones (NewBreed)

This entry is part 2 of 8 in the series Newbreed2

Being a savage kid lost in an era of uninspiring music the Staggers’ frontman, Wild Evel, teamed up in 2008 with part of former teenbeaters the Roadrunners and a fuzzface to form a supergroup, providing serious garage punk at it’s best! Take some of Billy Childish’s trashy guitar solos, some of the Miracle Workers’and The Stomachmouths’ catching melodies, add the ‘three-finger organ’, invisible monsters and cavemen and you know what these guys are up to! LET’S GO RIGHT NOW!!!!

For sure the Trashbones have their roots in the 1960s U.S. garage punk, when teenagers started playing their own music, delivering their own ideas and ideals through tight and catchy lyrics telling the conservative society, “here we are”!

The sound, that these proto-punks produced is the same sound of the five Austrian freaks – succinct fuzz-guitars, farfisa organ, furious drumming and wild, howling vocals that represent a 100% hi-octane Rock‘n’Roll attitude.

1. Who are the members of your band and what do they do?

Wild Evel – Vocals/ Organ
Murphy Morphine – Fuzz Guitar
Powl Howl – Backing Vocals/ Guitar
Berni Trashbone – Drumms
Diana Trashbone – Bass

Sometimes we have Guests:
Buddy Grabner – Saxophon (played for Screaming Lord Sutch)
BJ Jaybird – Harp (The Jaybirds)

2. Where are you guys from?

I’m right outta the dirty swamps of Vienna town and the rest live in the sewers of Fuzzville, Graz. So we are from schnitzel county, Austria.

3.How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

When I played with the incredible Staggers we played somewhere in the backwoods of Austria together with a very young band called the Roadrunners! I was amazed by the youngness and primitive garage R&B sound of that band! After that evening we became friends. Berni, Pauli and I decided one drunken night out to make a side project band. Then Murphy Morphine also joined the band. He was a friend for years. Got to know him through the Staggers as well! he was a fan back then and we became friends. I didn’t even know that he could play guitar till I heard his monster fuzz riffs. We had had different bass players thus far. What was a side project in the beginning is now my main band. The incredible Staggers are not playing anymore.

4. Where are you now based?

We are Fuzztronauts from hyper fuzz galaxy FZ-2 and we are based on planet Earth an the moment to Corrupt the human Teenagers to be primitive garage punks!

5. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Jaybirds – R&B/Beat from Vienna, The Attention – Beat from Vienna , Dee Cracks – Punk from Vienna, Dave and the Pussies – Surf, The Slapbacks – Rockabilly, The Shirley McLaines – All Girl Punk from Innsbruck, Bat Man & Robin – Lo-fi Trash from Innsbruck, The Surfaholics – High Octan Rock and Roll from Bregenz….

Cause we like them and/or they are friends. 😉

6. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

There is a little scene, but sadly not to good. People are coming to the shows but there are not to many parties to join on so we have to make them ourselves. I don’t know why people nowadays like so much crap…

7. How would you describe the style you play?

6ts Neanderthal Punk!

8. What are your live shows like?

Let me say it with Phil Istine’s words, “The shows they have done in the past couple of years have been talked about by many. Wild, outstanding, sometimes legendary…” or with the words of Lutz from Soundflat Mailorder, “A tough and trashy fuzz guitar sound, screaming melodies and the ‘three-finger organ’ all add up to a rough, yet stylish Garage band, whose gigs are already legendary…”

 9. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

A. Influences reach from well known 50’s Rock & Roll crypt kickers in the likes of Screaming Lord Sutch, the Wailers and the Trashmen over underrated 6T’s Garage losers and Beat nuts such as the Lyrics, the Tasmanians, the Gentlemen, Shadows of Knight, Moving Sidewalks, the Sonics, ? Mark & the Mysterians, the Remains, Downliners Sect, Paul Revere & the Raiders or nerdy Rock’n’Roll losers like King Uszniewicz to surfing zombies like Dick Dale, the Ventures, Los Straitjackets to Knights of Fuzz from the 80’s, 90’s and now – or in other words fuzz pounding, organ grinding, bass crawling, bone crushing & spine bending freaks…

B. We cover ‘Were You Gonna Go’ from Art Guy, or ‘Black Cat’ from Shapes.

C. All those indie bands that came out in the last years, people have no style anymore! They try to make music for everybody and everything. Thats what they look and sound like and all the rest of the pop music stuff and what there is.

10. What are your main influences outside of music?

Low brow art, horror movies, pin ups, monsters, sex, drugs, life, anything that surrounds us.

11. How many official recordings have you done?  How many released?  Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We released three 7’s. Two more are being produced right now, we just released our first album on Sound Flat and Wohnzimmer records on 17/02/2012 you can buy the album and maybe some of the singles online in mail-order stores and in good record shops and of course you can get the stuff directly at our shows!

I write the lyrics and Murphy the music and also Pauli and Berni are coming up with tunes! But the process is happening in the rehearsal room – somebody comes up with a riff and then we get it into shape.

12. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

My faves are the breaks! haha… I don’t mind plain ‘Oh Yeah!’, ‘I Wanna Be Your Caveman’, ‘Why Can’t We Be’, ‘Rumble the Streets’.

13. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

Yeah, we are 3 DJs in the band. We organise other shows and gigs… the scene is not big! We would prefer if other people would set up more cool happenings.

14. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Getting up early in the morning! Finding new bass players!

15. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

I don’t rehearse too much with the band cause I live in an other town! Maybe once a month I’m with ‘em, but we play way more often. Maybe 3-8 times a month – we record about once a year – depends how much new material we have.

16. What do you think of the music coverage in the modern media?

In the big channels in Austria they only play mainstream stuff, pop music or something… I don’t listen to radio. I don’t watch music channels, there is nothing that gives me a kick!

17. Do you rate any other current bands?

We like the Masonics, the Mentalettes, the Monsters, the Jackets, Wau y los Arrrghs, the Phantom Keys, the Fumestones, Thee Vicars, King Salami and the Cumberland 3….

18. Who and where would you most like to record with and why?

With the Lochness Monster on the planet of the apes!

19. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions?

More wyldeeee Neanderthal Punk! Two upcoming 7’s and working on the 2nd album!

 20. What can we expect from your Le Beat Bespoké 8 performance? What have you got in store for us?

We’ll tear that whole place down! It’s gonna be mental and insane… 😉 We’ll bring even Buddy Grabner who played saxophone for Screaming Lord Sutch as a special guest!

We are totally looking forward to a marvellous night out in london town!

*We can vouch that the answer to question 20 was 100% correct!

 

BAND PROMO Links:

www.trashbones.com

myspace.com/wildevelandthetrashbones

facebook.com/Wild-Evel-The-Trashbones/

 

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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May 22, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, ,
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Force 9 by King Mob (NewBreed)

This entry is part 1 of 8 in the series Newbreed2

Force 9 by King Mob (Four Spinning Records)

Band Members: Stepher W. Parsons, Chris Spedding, 16, Andy Newmark, Guy Pratt

Engineer: Jarrad Hearman

Label: Steamhammer

Release Date: Nov 8, 2011

Loud, powerful and worthy of the cast behind this. I think I saw Glen Matlock from the Sex Pistols in our NUTs promoted gig of theirs. Snips (aka Stephen W. Parsons) from Sharks, the early 70’s too often forgotten nugget, leads this outfit. It’s Hard Rock with elegant saloon guitars, think Jimmy Page gone Swing. It’s got 5 stars average customer reviews from Amazon and apparently there’s only one more copy left on vinyl. I worked with Steve Parsons myself, he worked as a producer in one of my singles. I know his influences and I can vouch for their depth and exquisite precision. Sit back and be swallowed into this all-star cast’s spell. It is a great commemoration of old friends for now, but if more albums pop out of this determined guerrilla militia I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the newbie bands out there call crying.

GRAB YOUR COPY HERE!

 

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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May 21, 2012 By : Category : Bands Front Page Garage Music Reviews Tags:, ,
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The Pepperpots – (NewBreed)

This entry is part 8 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

With 300 appearances and counting, The Pepper Pots have moved audiences in concerts around the globe: Tokyo, Osaka, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Berlin, Paris, London, Moscow, Helsinki, Vienna, Verona, Prague, Bern, Barcelona, Madrid… Their new big soul sound draws from the sound of Motown but with a certain 21st Century twist! Eron Falbo spoke to the band as part of their LBB8 appearance!

1. Who are the members of your band and what do they do?

Adriana Prunell – Voice
Aya Sima – Voice
Marina Torres – Voice
Luiggi King – Guitar
Ireneu Grosset – Hammond, Piano
Enric Fluvià – Bass
Joan Vergés – Drums
Tomy Muñoz – Tenor sax
Gerard Xifra – Baritone sax
Roger Montsant – Trumpet

2. Where are you guys from?

We’re all from in or around Girona, a vibrant small city near Barcelona in Spain.

3. How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

Since Girona is a small city, everybody knows everybody else… We’ve all been in the local scene for ages. We’re all total fans of old school soul music, and that’s what’s kept us together all this time.

4. Where are you based?

We’re based in a small town called Cornella del Terri, close to Girona. That’s where we set up our own Black Pepper Studio.

5. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Certainly! At the moment that are some really good bands playing soul music in Spain. These include the Excitements, the Sweet Vandals and the Cherry Boppers.

6. What’s the 60’s and Modernist underground scene like where you’re from?

To be honest, I would say that we’ve got plenty to learn from places such as Germany or France, let alone the UK! The scene is growing all the time, but it’s nothing compared with other parts of Europe.

7. How would you describe the style you play?

Strictly Soul!

8. What are your live shows like?

Well, we really love playing live, whenever and wherever, but we’ve had great tours in places like Germany and the States and played some fun gigs in the UK. Each time we’re on the road, we realise just how much catching up Spain has to do with the rest of the world in some ways.

9. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We listen to a hell of a lot of authentic American soul artists: Jackie Wilson, The Four Tops, Marvin Gaye, Fontella Bass, Freda Payne, just to name a few… It’s no use denying that we’re massive fans of anything Motown. The artists and the productions of the Detroit label are a great inspiration.

10. What are your main influences outside of music?

We’re all great admirers of Pep Guardiola, the Barcelona coach. He’s got an amazing sense of savoir faire, a quality we really admire. On top of that, he’s a really hard and persistent worker.

11. How many official recordings have you done? How many released? Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We’ve got four albums out: Swingin’ Sixties (2005), Shake It! (2007), Now! (2009), Train to Your Lover (2011) and 2 EPs: Waiting for the Christmas Light (2009) and Time and Place, featuring Eli “Paperboy” Reed (2012).

Most of them were released in Europe, Japan and the US. ‘Train to Your Lover’ also came out in Argentina and Brazil.

It normally starts with a very loose idea that one of the band has. We then work around it until we find what we’re looking for. On other occasions, someone may have a far more intricate and structured ideas. And the song almost writes itself. There are lots of factors at play. On the last album, Train to Your Lover, most of the songs were written by our guitarist, Luigi King.

12. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Well, I guess we might all come up with a different answer. Speaking personally as the drummer, I love ‘Fated Heart’ off our last album. If I had to choose a favourite song out of many, I guess it would have to be  something like Marvin Gaye’s ‘Let’s Get it On’.

13. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

Like I said earlier, we feel that there’s much we can learn from other countries in Europe and the UK, but Barcelona’s become a bit of an underground hub and there’s been plenty of entertaining parties and all nighters recently.

Unfortunately, it’s pretty hard for us to get into, though. Firstly, time is always tight and we spend a lot of time on the road so when you get a day off, you just want to chill out. The other thing is the 120-mile round trip to Barcelona, which often puts us off.

14. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Without a doubt, the EP which we recorded with American Soul singer Eli “Paperboy” Reed. Our managers thought we were a bit mad, since Eli is with a large record label and, I have to say, all the non-musical stuff was not easy.

15. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

Depends on the time of year. We tend to all rehearse as a band once a week, but we also have separate rehearsals among the different sections of the band: the rhythm section, the horns and the vocals. It all depends whether we’ve got any gigs, which will mean less time for rehearsals, or if we’re recording, in which case we’ll practice more. We often play one or two gigs in a weekend, but this also depends on the time of year. There’s plenty of work in Summer, by some of the Winter months it can get a bit slow.

We’ve generally put out a record every two years, with the exception of Time and Place, which came pretty much hot on the heels of Train to Your Lover.

16. What do you think of the music coverage in the modern media?

It’s a very weak comparison when you look at Catalonia or Spain compared to the rest of Europe or the UK. I reckon this is gradually changing though.

17. Do you rate any other current bands?

One of our current favourites and someone who is really making an impact is Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings. Others include Lee Fields, Charles Bradley and Eli “Paperboy” Reed. They all came out of Brooklyn, a Mecca for the old school Soul revival.

18. Who and where would you most like to record with and why?

Ha! We’d jump in our time machine to land in the Motown studios in Detroit between 1960 and 1972, where we’d play with Marvin Gaye or the Temptations.

19. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions?

We’re looking at touring with Eli “Paperboy” Reed and showcasing our new record, ‘Time and Place’, live. We’re close to hooking up a couple of dates in May in Spain.

20. What can we expect from your Le Beat Bespoké performance? What have you got in store for us?

A lot of the music will be from our latest album ‘Train to Your Lover’, which we haven’t really debuted in the UK, so we’re looking forward to doing that. On top of that, we’re thrilled to play together with Soul princess Maxine Brown. This will be our third show with her and it’s always been a great privilege for us. We’re really psyched about Le Beat Bespoké 8. Hopefully it’ll be one to remember.

*The band were perfect and gave a stella performance on the Sunday night at LBB8, sadly Maxine Brown was unable to appear due to a last minute illness and we all wish her all the best! She was greatly missed! The Pepperpots did her very, very proud!


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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May 21, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Club Soul Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, , ,
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NUTsCast – Le Beat Bespoké 8 Special

This entry is part 4 of 11 in the series NUTsCast - Podcast

We brought you a showcase of the best acts that will be playing at LBB8. If you’re still unsure if you’re coming, give it a try… If you’re definitely coming, then get a quick fix. See you all there anyway!


A transcript in case you can’t understand Eron’s Jive English…

Hello everyone and welcome to NUTsCast. We’ve got a special NUTsCast for you on this third official release. Le Beat Bespoké 8 is coming up in April and all the kids are a-shakin’ with anticipation. The crowd dictated our direction and we chose just the songs to give you a taste of what’s coming in April. Sit back, enjoy your cooking, cleaning, your pipe or cigar and beautiful penthouse view of central Tokyo or dodgy dusty basement feel of suburban London. I’m gonna take you on a journey through the acts we chose for Le Beat Bespoké 8.

The Winners of our Battle of the Bands competition and possible rockabilly champions of London will open the festival on Thursday night. Jack Rabbit Slim –  Listen to: Long Time Dead,

Friday night we’ll be bringing you back to the 8 hour technicolor dream in Alexandra Palace 1967… Don’t miss our revealing interview with Arthur Brown and his Surprisingly Crazy World.

A band hailed post-mortem and resurrected to shine even brighter, here’s July with Dandelion Seeds

So we’ve shown you July and we’ve shown you the crazy world of arthur brown, but there’s one more band that will be performing their classic late 60’s album live for the first time since the Hipster Golden Age, a personal favourite of mine, the Pretty Things

ANOUNCEMENT April Come She Will, so hurry and get your tickets before we sell out at www.newuntouchables.com

After the record fair and Dirt Water Records, showcases, Saturday afternoon you’ll hear the wonderful sounds of our new breed garage sensation Thee Vicars,

Before we step into the gloriously sinful night of Saturday, I bring you another personal favourite to grace our stages, Don Fardon & the Sorrows.

There’s a cherry on top of every night, that is the DJs of NUTsWorld who will be taking you into the wee hours of the morn, remember kids, it’s no use whining when the tickets have gone, times are fast and it’s all one click away at  www.newuntouchables.com

I interviewed the Trashmen myself, and they didn’t have a lot to say… they were to busy screaming! Saturday night at Le Beat Bespoke 8

It’s Sad, but it’s Sunday finally. Now we’ll be testing your moves with two rooms on Sunday night, on Room A, Cataluñas Armada devastation the Pepperpots. Singing with the Pepperpots is the unforgettable Maxine Brown

On the other room A will be the garage palatable, a great European band I once had the privilege of having a bus ride with, Wild Evel & the Trashbones

Scotland’s finest will leave you with a pre-nostalgia to an undoubtably memorable event, The Poets live at LBB 8, yes, you heard me right, the Poets…

How does it feel to have heard it all and still not have a glimpse? I’m with you brothers and sisters, tickets at  www.newuntouchables.com

Eron the Red Baron, DJ MrE out…


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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March 12, 2012 By : Category : Bands Beat Club Soul Clubs DJs Events Front Page Fuzz Garage Music Podcasts RnB UK Tags:, , , ,
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Masters – The Trashmen Interview

This entry is part 5 of 20 in the series Masters1

What’s the current line-up of your band, how did you come together in the first place?

Current group consists of Tony Andreason, lead guitar and vocals, Dal Winslow, rhythm guitar and vocals, Bob Reed, bass and vocals and Rob Reed, drums and vocals. The original drummer, Steve Wahrer, Tony and I, (Dal), started playing together in high school back in 1957. Bob joined the group in 1962, one year before we cut Surfin’ Bird.

Steve died of cancer in 1989. Tony’s brother Mark played drums for us for several years before Rob took over about three years ago.

Were there many line-up changes along the way?

It has always been the original group until Steve died. The three of us are the original guys that started back in the early 60’s.

Is everyone in the band from Minnesota?

Bob is from North Dakota, I am from Nebraska, Tony is from Minnesota and Rob, who is Bob’s son, now hails from Florida. Steve and I graduated from the same high school in suburban Minneapolis.

Did you stay there in the 60’s or did you move to somewhere like Los Angeles or New York City after you went professional?

We have always remained in Minnesota.

What are some of your memories from playing in London in the past?

We have never played London or Great Britain before. We were supposed to do a tour in 1965 but it was cancelled after the British music swamped the U.S.

Is there going to be any interesting reissues coming out? A box set perhaps?

There is a new best of the Trashmen compilation coming out this year. Hopefully prior to our gig in London.

What do you think makes London unique, why do think rock n roll lovers flock here?

It naturally is deep in history from the Beatles and Stones to Nick Lowe, etc.

Are there any thoughts behind recording new material? What are your plans for the future?

We have given it plenty of thought but have yet to come up with any material.

What have you got prepared for us for Le Beat Bespoke 2012 performance?

Trashmen songs. Every song we play is one we have recorded in the past. Either in the studio or on live performance. All are available on the Sundazed label.

Did you participate in the recent promotions of ‘Surfin’ Bird’ by the Family Guy cartoon, iTunes and Facebook? Did you expect another surge like this and returning to the charts after so many years?

We were very excited and honored when Seth and Fox chose Surfin’ Bird for the Family Guy Episode. The song continues to amaze us by popping up periodically. It is used on TV, Movies and a couple of video games.

How does this compare to the first time you heard yourself on the radio in the early 60’s?

It is always a thrill and kind of bizarre.

A lot of people describe you as Surf Rock, do you think that is a suitable label for the genre you play?

We are categorized as Garage, Surf Rock and Punk. Mojo has listed us as one of the top Punk groups of all time…

I guess we don’t like to pigeon hole ourselves and feel we probably fit in to all three catagories…

Some would consider “Surfin’ Bird” to be the first ever example of a Punk Rock track. What is your take on that? What is your take on Punk Rock in general?

It sure was not intended to be Punk, since that term was unknown in ’63. It was simply a thing we did one night at a gig that expanded into the full Surfin’ Bird.  Punk Rock is like other forms such as Garage, Surf, etc. You have some really great groups and some pretty sad ones…

On a radio show in New York Ringo said he didn’t like the Trashmen. How did you react to that and how did/do you rate the Beatles work?

We heard that remark and never gave it much thought. We were kind of stunned by the initial popularity of the Beatles but liked their sound. Did not care much for their later works…Undoubtedly, John and Paul were amazing song writers…

It seems your music was recognised by many bad boy film directors such as Quentin Tarantino and Stanley Kubrick. Do you rate their films and do you think their choices depict the true nature of the songs?

They are both highly respected directors. Always been a fan of both. After hearing first hand reports of Vietnam veterans and how they used Surfin’ Bird in the war, we were humbled by the use of our material…

We found some ‘classic tunes’ such as ‘Hava Nagila’ and ‘Greensleaves’ and were very interested in the unique idea of ‘surf rocking’ the classics’. How did this idea arise? Are there more rare releases or unreleased versions somewhere?

These were just ideas that came during practice. Malaguena was another example of this. No unreleased versions that I am aware of.

What’s the story behind the so-called “Trashmen’s Lost Album”?

This was the album we finished to be the follow up to the first Surfin’ Bird album. Our producers decided not to release since it was during the British music trend and they thought it would not be cost effective. Our ties with these goons separated due to this.  We obtained all of our masters and thanks to Sundazed, the album was released about thirty years later…

We’ve heard you say that ‘Surfin’ Bird’ came up almost accidentally in a live gig at Chubs Ballroom, how was the recording process? When you saw it was a hit did you wilfully try to come up with other similar sounding tracks?

That’s true. We had heard another band do a bit of Bird is the Word in Wisconsin and thought we would just try something different one night. Steve said “just watch me for the chord changes and I’ll stop and do something bizarre in the middle”. The result was overwhelming. The DJ said we should record this due to the crown reaction. We cut a copy in George Garrett’s record store basement. Took this copy to the DJ and he said to cut down to two minutes and refine the sound. George said he would pay for the session in Kay Bank Studios, even though he hated the song. The follow up, ‘Bird Dance Beat’, did fairly well but kind of locked us into a gimmick band mold. We spent more time trying to get out of that than trying to duplicate the bird.

Do you have anything special planned for this year as we believe it’ll be the 50th anniversary of the band? Will this coincide with your Le Beat Bespoke performance?

We have a new unit coming out on Sundazed…kind of a best of the best…This is the 50 year anniversary of the Trashmen and next year will be the very same for Surfin’ Bird.

When you were playing ballroom dances in the early days did you ever expect such international admiration and success and so many long years of the band’s survival and triumph?

Never…Only wish Steve was hear to soak it all in…

Band Promo Links:
www.myspace.com/thetrashmenband


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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March 12, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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DC Fontana – (NewBreed)

This entry is part 6 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

Who are the members of your band and what do they do?

Louise Turner: Vocals
Mark Mortimer: Bass
Scott Riley: Organ, piano, vocals
Nigel Horton: Drums
Tony Russell: Guitars, vocals
Miri May: Vocals
Donald Ross Skinner: producer, guitar
Rich Skilbeck: Trumpet, flugelhorn, saxes
Simon Holland: Harmonica, trumpet, flugelhorn
Josh Large: Trombone

How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

DC Fontana’s current line up is relatively new and we create music as a form of constant cathartic evolution designed to keep us out of the asylum as long as we possibly can.

How would you describe the style you play?

Art & soul… I think of it as melodic psychedelia copulating with earthier soul, jazz & folk vibes to create a cinematic offspring. It’s sonic medicine for poorly times.

What are your live shows like?

We never cut corners & always give an honest, 100% all or nothing effort that is value for money for these frugal, screwed up days but also, whenever we have the money, we like to make the bigger gigs more of a happening and add a whole visual ‘art & soul’ aspect to illustrate the music itself. This could mean elements of performance art, surrealism, optical decor etc and is all part of our creed that encourages us to make cool short films as well. We see ourselves as more than just songwriters and musicians and it’s why we spend so much time and money on making our records, videos and gigs up to a certain quality. We revel in working with talented photographers, dancers, painters, film-makers, graphic designers, costume makers, performance artists, lighting wizards, folk-dancers & others.

What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We are a sound-clash of sundry sonic tapestries woven from more than 300 years of influence and many people inspire us – some are probably obvious and a lot are not! The past may inform our present but we don’t feel the need to re-enact anything and so if we do play covers we inject our own DNA direct into their bloodstream. We’ve sprinkled our gigs with a few eclectic covers; from Morricone to World Of Oz, from Peru’s Traffic Sound to Germany’s Heidi Brühl & from the Velvet Underground to Jackie Lomax as well as Julie Driscoll & Pentangle… But there are no boundaries – I’d cover anything we felt we could add our own slant to. It doesn’t have to fit neatly into any generic bag to qualify. I try not to waste my energies on despising anything or anyone and prefer to be vibed up with positivity rather than weighted down in the misery of the gargantuan diet of rubbish the general public is force-fed on…

What are your main influences outside of music?

First & foremost, our friends and families but also I enjoy the various peripheral delights attached to creating music like the elements of art and film-making. Being in a group should be more than knocking off a few chords & lyrics – it should be an exhilarating ride and I am keen to work with people who awash with interesting ideas who can take on board our own individual personalities and help twist things. We made our ‘Six Against Eight’ video an eight-minute short film to pay homage to Pat McGoohan whereas on the more recent ‘Meshkalina’ video we wore hand-crafted animal masks while having fun exploring our love of late 60s/early 70s folk-horror movies like ‘the Wicker Man’ & ‘Blood On Satan’s Claw.’ The ‘Abbesses’ video sees us taking elements of ‘the Avengers’, “the Girl On A Motorcycle’ & late 50s nouvelle vague movies.

How many official recordings have you done?  How many released?  Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

The Contessa / Snake Charmer: 7” vinyl single (DCTone Records)
Six Against Eight: CD / mp3 album (DCTone Records)
Meshkalina / It Don’t Worry Me 7” vinyl single (Heavy Soul Records)
Meshkalina CD / mp3 EP (DCTone Records)
La Contessa CD / mp3 (DCTone Records)
La Contessa 12” vinyl album (Teensound / Misty Lane Records)
All available from www.dcfontana.com/shop.html

Subject matter varies wildly from the everyday like sex, freedom, joy and despair, unrequited love, mortality and even biscuits through to existentialism, metaphysics & the horrors of love turning violent, the ghosts of famous dead people having a mediaeval hoe-down after dark in Paris and the modern-day cult of underachieving banality. Some songs are the product of story-telling and much of it is personal experience given real animated life.  Expect the unexpected.

What’s the favorite song of yours currently?

A brand new one called ‘Devilangel’ which may appear on the next album.

How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Yes we participate whenever we can…. I personally love the diversity of peoples, clothes, tastes and styles: it mirrors our own search for the end of the rainbow.

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Avoiding financial meltdown.

How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record?

We are undoubtedly old school and gig frenetically; usually we play twice a week & rehearse weekly though it’s difficult as we all live so far apart.

What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It can be summed up neatly in two famous words: shit sandwich.

Do you rate any other current bands?

As with all eras there are lots of great bands making great music across the spectrum of genre and even more people producing a great festering pile of kak. I particularly like the Silver Factory among others. The great challenge right now for all of us is to get our music heard because with the music industry imploding and the global economic difficulties I believe it’s never been as tough as it is now for people in the arts to stay afloat, let alone flourish.

Who/Where would you most like to record and why?

Recording with the strings section of the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra on our first record is hard to top actually – that was one of the most amazing things I’ve ever done in my life but we are forever pushing the boundaries with quixotic and interesting ideas and on the next album we are planning to record one track inside a church with a choir.

What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions?

We are very ambitious and currently in a rich vein of song-writing; we’re corralling quite a corpulent collection of new tunes and there is a lot of music to be made yet! We will be heading into the studio as soon as we can to record new material but a lot depends on available funds because it costs us a lot for us to do the interesting things we do and everyone is struggling. I think we’ve made great strides this year and we are looking to keep building on what we’ve achieved thus far, disseminate our music as far as we can and continue to make interesting music and art. Although I find it difficult to quantify ‘success’ in this day and age we are happy with our first records – feel we’ve come a very long way in recent moons. It’s been exciting to play in so many different countries but there’s so much more we want to do; we all see our initial success as laying down a foundation for a brighter future.

Band Promo Links:

Website: www.dcfontana.com
www.myspace.com/dcfontana
www.facebook.com/dcfontana


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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March 12, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych UK Tags:, , ,
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Flight Reaction – (NewBreed)

This entry is part 7 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

The Band are… 

Aron: Bass & vocals
Mats: Drums
Måns: Guitar, vocals & sound fx
Sebastian: Guitar & vocals

How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

Måns and Sebastian run a 60s club (99th Floor) together and they talked about forming a new band a couple of years ago. Soon Mats, from Sebastian’s previous band The Giljoteens, joined. They now had the songs and the style but they needed a young handsome, untouched bass player. Aron, of Les Artyfacts, was the man for the job. He couldn’t play bass at first but he was young, handsome and untouched for sure.

Or: We all knew each other from before and all our previous groups more or less split up at the same time so The Flight Reaction is basically the debris from The Giljoteens, The Maggots and Les Artyfacts.

No seriously, we met at a record fair. We were the only guys who weren’t fat and smelly and fought over expensive seventies prog albums with songs about unicorns. When we started talking it turned out that we all know things about women as well! Incredible where life takes us sometimes!

No really, honestly, we all met at a zoo. We lived in the same cage and then we managed to escape together. You should see us when we haven’t shaved for a couple of weeks.

How would you describe the style you play?

Garage beat ‘n’ moody sounds, with more than a hint of psychedelia. No hippie drivel or stoner shite though.

Our style is very sixties influenced, but with no obvious carbon copy stuff – it’s all our own take on it and we really go for melodies and diversity in arrangements etc. We just pretend that nothing’s happened since 1967 when we compose. That’s not very hard, since almost nothing has happened since then.

What are your live shows like?

We try to present an equal mix of super great songs with tight harmonies and more freaky excursions, without falling into that tired ‘long guitar solo’ trap that a lot of people think is the same as ‘psychedelic’. Instead we opt for just taking off into echoes ‘n’ sounds, kinda Barret Floyd style but mixed with a stronger garage groove. We’re still working on getting a lightshow aswell, but most modern venues have black backdrops and lame ‘rock lights’… Of course we dress up for the occasions as well. You won’t see us hanging from any ceilings though – the music, sounds and our good looks are the show!

What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Covers…

The covers we play at the moment are ‘Citadel’ by the Rolling Stones (a UK band from the sixties who ventured into psychedelia for a short while around 1967, just like The Hollies) and ‘Green Destroys the Gold’ by the Beacon Street Union. We’ve also played ‘My Time’ by The Golden Dawn and ‘Nothing Can Bring Me Down’ by the Twilighters.

Influences…

Måns: The experience… and yeah stuff the 13th Floor Elevators, New Colony Six, Silver Apples, the Pretty Things, Moby Grape, the Dovers, the Seeds, Barret Floyd, the Deep, Tages, countless (mostly US) punkadelic garage bands. A few eighties bands like the early Rain Parade, Laughing Soup Dish, the Steppes and some others also did some things that were very similar to what we wanna project with our music, methinks. Real psychedelia, and garage beat sounds, would be the short answer, I guess.

Aron: Tages, Pretty Things, the Wanted, the Smoke, St Louis Union, les Fleurs de Lys, Ronnie Bird…

Mats: The Crystal Chandelier, the Human Expression, and the Morning Dew – that type of moody psychedelia…

Sebastian: 60’s garage and psychedelia in general from bands that only mostly only recorded a 45 or two. The Dovers, Pink Floyd, Oscar & the Majestics, Electras, MG & the Escorts just to name a few.

Spitting vomit…

Måns: I hate hippie and theatre music, like Santana or the Doors. I don’t like cover bands much, like for example Led Zeppelin. I’m not into sports so I’ve never understood when people play as many notes as possible very fast.

The short answer to this question is: I like good music and hate bad music. And I am always right.

Aron: I have to say that I think Jimi Hendrix is quite boring. Overall bands/artists that play too much just to show how “skillful” they are.

Mats: Bands who are acting cool…

Sebastian: Cover bands are so boring, why bother? I mean the songs have already been done and probably much better anyway…

What are your main influences outside of music?

Måns: L.S.D.! No seriously… hehehe… life itself and all that’s going on around me. Love ‘n’ height. Nowadays I fly on memories ‘n’ feelings when tapping into those certain areas, lyricswise and so on. Magical thinking.

Aron: La belle époque, Napoleonic uniforms and 19th C mysticism.

Mats: Like everyone else I enjoy collecting 45’s and when time allows watching old movies.

Sebastian: Apart from playing, I enjoy collecting records and playing them of course. Food and wine is a great passion of mine and the good thing is that you can combine the two extremely well together with friends, playing those records.

How many official recordings have you done? How many released? Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Three singles to this date. Two are released on Copasetic records in Germany and one is released on 13 O’Clock records in the US.

Where can they be found? In well stocked record stores and around that thing called “the internet”… there is something called “google” which may be helpful when looking for newly released records.

What’s your favourite song currently?

Måns: The 13th Floor Elevators ‘Roller Coaster’ and the Silver Apples ‘A Pox on You’ are always my favourite songs. Right now though I’m particularly fond of playing the Models ‘Bend Me, Shape Me’ on MGM over and over… and I keep getting blown away by Tages ‘Fantasy Island’ every time I play it…

Aron: Ronnie Bird ‘Rain in the City’, Cherry Slush ‘I Cannot Stop You’,  The Wanted ‘Here to Stay’

Mats: The Mystic Tide – “Frustration”, the Raving Madd – “Boundaries” and Crystal Chandelier – “Your Land of Love” go on repeat on my record player…

Sebastian: Park Avenue Playground ‘The Trip’, Painted Faces ‘I Lost You in My Mind’, Ramases & Selket ‘Mind’s Eye’, Paul Martin ‘It Happened’

How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

In Sweden there’s not really an underground scene for what we are doing – but there may be  seeds sown and when/if that’s harvested we will probably be there. We try to contribute organising clubs and spinning records from time to time. People generally love the things we are playing without necessarily being part of the small scene that we’ve got.

Good Swedish bands… Trummor & Orgel, the Fourtune Tellers, Voladoras, the Satans, Early Days…

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To try and live in this world, surrounded by idiots.

How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

Often enough to not forget what we’re doing, haha! We’re recording at the rehearsal from time to time, when we got new songs. It’s a good way to work on lyrics and arrangements in between rehearsals. We’ve been playing live quite a lot. Gigs just kept pouring in for a while. Right now we’ve decided to concentrate on the album instead though, but if the right offer comes along we’re game!

What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Mainstream media rock journalists probably have the easiest and most retarded ‘job’ on the planet… basic writing about whatever is ‘in’ this week and generally just making shit up in between getting drunk at free gigs. The biggest thing since the Beatles is apparently TV programmes where ‘average people’ sing washed out karaoke versions of washed out hits, so that’s what the mainstream ‘music media’ mostly write about these days.

Then there’s fantastic publications like Ugly Things, Shindig!, your own publication and so on, of course.

Do you rate any other current bands?

The Higher State and Paul Messis, Trummor & Orgel… we know there are lots more but these cats are the ones that spring to mind right off the bat.

Who/Where would you most like to record and why?

At the Abbey Road studio in ’67. Why? SF Sorrow, Piper… Or Gold Star in ’67! Or the Fenton studio! But seriously, it would be stunning to record at Atlantic here in Stockholm. It’s a huge old studio that’s been at the same location since the fifties. They still have all the old gear, including a sound technician who’s worked there since the sixties and knows all about doing analog tape phasing etc.. Masses of killer mics and tube compressors. Large recording room, looking just like it did in 1965. Way too expensive for us at this moment though. So we plan to record at our rehearsal and add vocals ‘n’ fluff in a studio run by an old friend who’s a dream to work with. It will hopefully be totally great.

What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions?

We would like to be the new standard bearers of a psychedelic revolution! Change the world etc – nothing less! Get rich, buy castles, invent a time machine and go back to 1966-1970 to buy records and meet Marianne Faithful. Have our own goose farm and produce foie gras. Travel in space. Lay golden eggs.

We will settle for making a really great LP though, and that’s in the works. We have a bunch of new songs and we’ve already made pre production recordings to choose songs, plan the flow and production etc. The plan is to have a good balance between live in the studio takes and whatever studio trickery we may come up with. We think that a studio album is something completely different from a live show. Live there’s the audience and the whole aspect of ‘now’. On a studio album we’ll make up for the lack of that by adding other elements instead – it’s more like a psychedelic ride though your mind, with us as the guides and non-captains!

We also have a new ’45 coming out soon, on 13 O’Clock records which may be the greatest little label in the known universe right now. It’s our take on the Rolling Stones – Citadel, backed with an original – Mourning Light. Apart from blowing you away it’ll also give you a taste of our recording philosophy… a deliberate mess! The third sound must be present and the best way to invite that is to accept chaos and just record what’s going on. Just like life itself. It’s a-happening!

Band Promo Links:

Live:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8w4mWET1l5M&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yxJg2d0x1tA&feature=related

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Flight-Reaction/167460559987563


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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March 11, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Beat Europe Front Page Garage Interviews Music Psych Tags:, , ,
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Screamin’ Vendettas – (NewBreed)

This entry is part 9 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

The Band are…

Four twisted and bitter people, carrying out their cause through early 60s rock n roll.

Where are you guys from?

The highest rafters and the deepest pit. Where screams echo loudest.

How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

Anger and lost love.

Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Voola and the Jayhawks. Voola screams louder.

What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Ups and downs, lefts and rights.

How would you describe the style you play?

60’s style garage with a touch of British rock n roll.

What are your live shows like?

A behind the sofa Dr Who episode

What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Joe Meek. Link Wray. The Renegades. John Leyton. Us? Despise?

What are your main influences outside of music?

Ice hockey. Flowers. Love songs. Vendetta.

How many official recordings have you done?  How many released?  Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

None… yet.

What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

For us, One Fine Day. The Tempests ‘Look Away’.

How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

We’ve only just begun.

What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Seeing each other on stage.

How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

As often as posisble which is about once every two months

What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Getting better, though terms/genres get used too liberally.

Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Toerag Studios! Imagine, they got equipment from Abbey Road Studios!
But I also think we’d do good on a old tape recorder..

What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions?

Stop the screaming in our heads.

What can we expect from your Le Beat Bespoké performance? What have you got in store for us?

We really want to give it all and warm the people up before the Trashmen enter the stage. It’s a true honour to be their pre-band and we will make sure no one will be disappointed. Some dancing, jumping, screaming, and singing about lost love… Join us !!

Band Promo Links:

www.facebook.com/screaminvendettas

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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March 9, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Garage Interviews Music UK Tags:, , ,
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Masters – July Interview

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series Masters1

Eron Flbo took time to interview Brit Psych legends JULY as a preview to the 8 HOUR TECHNICOLOUR DREAM HAPPENING on Friday Night at this years Le Beat Bespoké 8 Event.

July are a psych rock band from Ealing, West London, that were mainly active between 1968 and 1969. The band’s music was a blend of psychedelic rock and pop-sike, with subtle yet lush harmonies, folky guitars, flutey keyboards, and intricate lead guitar patterns. Although none of the band’s records managed to chart in the UK or the U.S., July are today best remembered for their  classic songs ‘My Clown’, ‘Dandelion Seeds’, and ‘The Way’, which can be found on various compilation albums available over the years.

A Casual Conversation with July

July, a conversation about Psychedelia, the 60’s and the mind.  The guys from the band say what they think about Mods & Rockers, the current scene and their new sound. We begin with a new concept I’m exploring, which I explained to them before we began. It’s a poetic live review, that is, a review of a performance written during the performance, in verse.

This was my first attempt at it, written whilst watching July live from the back where the sound engineer was. They asked me to read it to them:

“Marble statues made of styrofoam are getting in the way
Hand written neon signs lay between us
Icarus incarnates the bones and stays
Inside even the marrow of the steamed lust

Slow and powerful the sound of future visions
Hand made axes of the Northern deities
Intrepid prophecies in collision
With those who stand between me and a maybe”

 

ABOUT INFLUENCES, PSYCHEDELIA, MODS & ROCKERS

Tom: Yeah, we started withThe Shadows

Tom:  Yeah, the problem was we didn’t know we were a psychedelic band till way after this.

Alan: We were looking on the internet and we saw ‘this is the best psychedelic band from the 60’s’ I didn’t know we were psychedelic. ‘Cause at that time we just thought Pscychedlia was colours.  John Lennon had a psychedelic car because it had all these swirly patterns all over it.  It wasn’t really used a term for bands in those days, even Floyd.

Tom: Well it wasn’t used as deeply. I think what happened as well, when the term was coined in the 60’s it kind of applied to that Hendrixy wishy washy kind of… and then of course Sgt. Pepper, and you know, so… It was very much the oil wheel light shows and that kind of stuff but it hadn’t developed.  And it was obviously… you know… potheads… you know, were involved.  They were the people who went to these gigs.  But it hadn’t developed into a very deep sort of culture at that time.  It was just like a pop genre.  It was a very pop genre because it was the Beatles that started it and Hendrix.

Tom: So, Mods are suits psychedelics are colours, Heavy metal is bikers

Alan: We’re very popular with Mods as well, so you could so ‘oh we’re a Mod band’, but we would never sort of pigeonhole ourselves.

Alan: One thing that we didn’t do is we never got influences from other bands

Tom: What? Apart from the Beatles.  We did, we got it.  Well, I did…

Alan: We got the R & B sound from Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf all those sort of people.  And that’s what we were interested in.  Tom then started writing words.  And then we suddenly evolved into a different way of doing it.  Cause we’re just one of several hundred thousand bands that copies Chuck Berry, so we can’t carry on like this.  Then we changed and this young man here started writing.

Tom: Yeah, me and Pete. Yeah, but at the time.  my recollection… It’s a bit kind of hazy, it was years ago, was that we were just trying to make money in the pop industry.  We’d gone through the kind of doing… Look, listen, the whole reason for getting into a band in the very first instance was that I had three chords in the guitar and I liked skiffle, I liked Rock Island Line and you know, the kind of Jump bands and stuff, you know…  but as soon as it became… when I met Allan and Pete and Chris, when we formed the Tom Cats.  He Suddenly, and we started to do Shadows numbers and then we got into Eddie Cochran, and you know, we were doing pop covers… you know… we hadn’t written anything by this time.  And then we went into R & B, and R & B in those days were kind of Benny King and Chuck Berry and you know that was…

Alan: Then the Blues!

Tom: And then we got into Blues and then we got influenced by the Beatles.  Once we got influenced by the Beatles we did some Beatles covers in our set and the girls started screaming and we suddenly started to think that… because we were good at the Beatles covers… And that’s when we started writing really…  But it was at no time… None of us did drugs anyway, we were all…

ABOUT THE LYRICS

Tom: It’s terrible! It was just made up… I had to say this but it was… we were trying to… do what the Beatles did on Sgt. Pepper really… So you make lines literally out of nowhere and you don’t have to be stoned to do that.  If you’ve got a reasonable kind of literary background. Make up some lines!

You can make up stuff fairly easily if you, you don’t…. without … I don’t ever remember… well, some of my songs were to do with lost love you know… because I was a terrible romantic… I got dumped

No, No No, it was very much personal adolescent situations.  I fall in love very easily, and… I was a smelly Rocker as well and I got dumped very quickly because the girls I fell in love with were nice clean girls and I was this foul stinking rocker covered in spots and I would get two dates and then they’d dump me and I’d write a song about that.

Alan: He was a Harley Man

Tom:! I was a rocker, yeah!  I built Harley Davidsons out of basket cases and fumbled about at the Ace caff and things like that.

The Mods got in first if you weren’t careful, they’d stick a bottle in your face.  So it wasn’t, yeah.  The point I was trying to make is we didn’t consciously write deep lyrics.  We wrote what we thought were fantastical lyrics on the most simplistic level that you can think of.  At the time, no one was well read; I’ve since read lots.  You know… I’m fairly well read now.  I’m not very well read.  I’ve dabbled in Gurdjieff and Crowley and all that, the mystics.

ABOUT NEW SONGS

When we wrote music, we wanted to be July still, we had that in mind…

Tom: The whole point… we’ve got two albums kind of ready to go.  One’s called ‘temporal anomaly’, which we’re trying to kind of fit in an interesting poetic concept about coming back from the past into now if you like but still having the mental attitudes that we had in 1969, you know what I mean? But having developed older and hopefully wiser bodies but we’ve still got the masculine stupidity of a 17-20 year old, you know?

Pete writes the really Psychedelic songs!  And I was just trying to say that the whole concept of playing again now and the songs that you’re writing now.  I’ve only written two or three songs that have gone in this bunch of stuff.  Because I can’t get me head into the place that his head’s never got out of.  He’s still a twenty year old on a scooter.

He writes incredibly honest songs about his own… what’s going on in his head.  And I tend to write airy fairy songs about what I think might be going on somewhere, you know, so…

I’m very aware of the multiple personalities.  I’ve got millions of them.

ABOUT ACID

Tom: I tried it once when I was in Canada, in Vancouver. All it did was make everything… all the straight lines went bendy. I felt separated. There’s a detachment.

Pete: But you don’t need drugs if you’ve got a dysfunctional mind.

Tom: Probably drugs just introduce dysfunctionality.

Pete: I’ve never taken drugs. I don’t need drugs. I’ve got a dysfunctional brain. It don’t work normally. I talk shit. I write shit.

ABOUT THE CURRENT SCENE

Pete: I love Simon Cowell, I think what he’s doing is fabulous. I think this manufactured plastic music is just what the kids want. I think it’s beautiful!

Alan: He did admit to being dysfunctional!

Tom: He might write this now!

Pete: You should fear nothing, what’s the worse that can happen? Well… lots of shit. Bad things can happen.

Tom: The Horrors are very exciting! We went to see them the other week, last week. And they’re very exciting. It was the Horrors, or one of the Horrors, that got us back into playing, Rhys. He claims that it was July that got him into music in the first place. It would be lovely if that were true.

Pete: Any band that gets people wanting to see them is doing ok. That’s what it’s about.

Alan: I read a quote by Evan Dando (from the Lemonheads) that said exactly the same. That he’s trying to get people listening to July. Somebody said on Facebook ‘What have you done to ‘Dandylion Seeds’ ‘He said ’ We did screw it up, but if it leads one person to listen to July then…‘he’s ’… done no wrong.’

ABOUT LE BEAT BESPOKE

Tom: We’ve been told that the audience that are into the ’68 album want to hear it as close as they can to the actual record.

Pete: We play as we would’ve done now.


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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February 6, 2012 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Podcasts UK Tags:, , ,
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Masters – Roberto Carlos (LP Review)

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series Masters1

Eron Falbo re-visits ‘Splish Splash’ by Brazilian musical legend Roberto Carlos

Production Notes:

Artist: Roberto Carlos
Album:
Splish Splash
Rating:
3 stars and a half
Release Date:
1963
Label:
CBS
Time:
29:36
Styles:
Rock & Roll, Beat, Rockabilly

Borrowing it’s title from an obscure 50’s hit by Bobby Darin, Splish Splash is a fine example of an early 60’s rock & roll album with a formula similar to that of the Beatles. What is most interesting about Roberto Carlos is that he explored the same influences as the Beatles – girl group, R & B and 50’s Rockabilly – while predating the Beatles and becoming far more successful than the fab-four to Brazilian audiences.  Other successful early-60’s rock acts around the world would depend on the Beatles’ success to launch their careers; Carlos was already a teenage sensation by the time the fab-four showed their faces to the world.  While Beatlemania increased Roberto Carlos’ fame immensely, his career had already been launched before the release of Please Please Me (the Beatles’ first album), thus showing him to be quite independent of the Beatles in his career and success.  Splish Splash, then, is an album by a well-established Brazillian pop icon released in the same year as the Beatles’ phenomenal rise to stardom, and therefore is as interesting a first-hear as were Please Please Me, With the Beatles, or Beatles for Sale, all of which follow similar methods of song placement: four or five hit singles, three or four love ballads, a focus on cover versions and a variety of rhythmic styles.

Splish Splash contains only two songs written by Roberto Carlos himself (alongside his Lennon/McCartney-esque writing partner, Erasmo Carlos), namely “Parei na Contra-mão”, an instant success in Brazilian pop charts and the daring rhythmic variation of “É Preciso ser Assim,” a Samba-oriented dancing favourite among the Brazilian 60’s youth.  Other notable additions to the album are the two translations of recognised 50’s successes, “Professor de Amor”, translated from “I Gotta Know”, probably taken from the Elvis Presley rendition of it, and the aforementioned title song “Splish Splash” by Bobby Darin.

The album does extrapolate on love ballads and thus misses the mark of the near perfect Beatles production formula.  Roberto Carlos is well known in Brazil for his over-the-top love ballad compositions, though admittedly, his ballads are the summit of his repertoire throughout his career. In Splish Splash however, the ballads are weak and lacking in energy, and could be seen as nothing more than redundant copies of 50’s love ballads, as opposed to his genial poignant innovations in arrangements to be seen in his later compositions.

In short, Splish Splash is a must-hear, must-own to any ‘60’s rock & roll world’ enthusiast. Its production is nearly comparable to that of the Beatles’ early albums and the original song compositions are easily to be placed among the greatest hits of that year worldwide. Its power isn’t as convincing and jovial as early Who, or Kinks, but the Beach Boys’ suave, summertime, politically correct posture is well remembered here.


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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February 6, 2012 By : Category : Beat Front Page Music Reviews Scene USA Tags:, ,
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What Is Mojo?

What Is Mojo? – If you’ve been too shy to ever ask.

It has been the subject of many a song and film in the 1960’s and beyond, but what is it? I took a trip to New Orleans to ask the Gypsy woman and find out for myself. I walked in to her shed way yonder in the bayou and there she sat with a crystal ball and what seemed to be detached chicken legs. I told her about my love troubles and she smiled as she handed me a bag and a wooden hand and said, “Have you ever heard of Love Potion #9? Come back if you ever have trouble again”. Of course, as she had suggested with her confident toothless smile (which was surprisingly sensuous) I never did go back and never did regret losing those 15 US$. Instead I began to feel a power beyond description, my feet began to sweep rather than trod, my worries metamorphosed into ideas, my sweat smelt of rare rose petals, my voice became thicker and more balanced – in short, I had my Mojo working.

Mojo is when you know nothing can stop you. It’s when you encounter a Victoria’s Secret Top Model and casually remind her of her hidden elektra complex.

It’s arrogant compassion.

When you instinctively yell at the big guy cutting the queue and he feels ashamed to have intruded upon your chivalrous territory.

It’s the alchemical transformation of inconvenience into elegance.

It’s the legislation of near future fashion. It’s light feet and a heavy soul. It’s an inexplicable synchronicity with your intuition.

Mojo is equivalence of form with the sinister powers that shape human thought. It is a world where ugliness does not compute in the game of seduction. It is the triumph of Soul over corruptible matter in the many dance floors of life.

As the perfect words flow out of your mouth from your soul without ever passing through your brain you create fantasies upon foreign ears.

As you effortlessly move from the many corners of the club and appear to be all places at the same time your mission is a mystery to the sea of curious eyes that worship your serenity. Yet when you grace the overwhelmed with sincere and nurturing conversation the veil is lifted and a trusted friend is revealed.

Mojo is hoodoo, voodoo, charms, spells and wishing wells encompassed into a heart of bold intentions and secular sincerity.

Speak to me if you ever need a ‘hand’. You’ll find out what Robert Johnson really did at the Crossroads.


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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February 6, 2012 By : Category : Articles Essays Front Page Tags:, ,
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The Best Films of the Rock & Roll Era (1955-1975)

Author Recommendations –

The Best Films of the Rock & Roll Era (1955-1975) by Year

1955 – Rebel Without a Cause by Nicholas Ray
1956 – Giant by George Stevens
1957 – Twelve Angry Men by Sidney Lumet
1958 – Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Richard Brooks
1959 – Sleeping Beauty by Walt Disney
1960 – The Fugitive Kind by Sidney Lumet
1961 – The Hustler by Robert Rossen
1962 – To Kill a Mockingbird by Robert Mulligan
1963 – The Great Escape by John Sturges
1964 – My Fair Lady by George Cukor
1965 – The Cincinnati Kid by Norman Jewison
1966 – The Good, The Bad and the Ugly by Sergio Leone
1967 – Cool Hand Luke  by Stuart Rosenberg
1968 – 2001: A Space Odyssey by Stanley Kubrick
1969 – Easy Rider by Dennis Hopper
1970 – Little Big Man by Arthur Penn
1971 – A Clockwork Orange  by Stanley Kubrick
1972 – The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean by John Huston
1973 – Papillon by Franklin J. Schaffner
1974 – The Godfather Part II by Francis Ford Coppola
1975 – Monty Python & the Holy Grail by Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones

Disagree? Leave a reply with your own favourites… NUTs Author? Make your own recommendations!

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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January 25, 2012 By : Category : Articles Film Front Page Media Picks Tags:, , , ,
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The Method – (NewBreed)

THE METHOD – WE DON’T KNOW

THE METHOD – ART GALLERY (ACOUSTIC)

This entry is part 2 of 10 in the series NewBreed1

The band…

Richie: Vox, Organ, Guitar
Sanders: Drums, Backing Vox
Johnny: Guitar Noises, Backing Vox
Matt: Trumpet, Tambourine, Noises, Backing Vox
Keiran: Bass

1. How did you guys meet and what drove you to make music together?

Just knocking about Cardiff playing in different bands and things, having mutual friends. We all buzzed off what each other were doing musically in separate projects, so then put it all together.

2. Where are you from and where are you based?

We all live in Cardiff but Richie is from Dublin, Kieran is from Dorset, Matt is from Reading, Johnny is from Port Talbot.. Sanders is the only one that’s actually from Cardiff.

3. How would you describe the style you play?

Hard to say but have been described as ‘Garage Soul’ which sounds alright to us. We don’t really need to describe our style, think that’s for other people to do. Have a listen!

4. What are your live shows like?

Sweaty

5. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We’ve all got so many different things that we listen to individually but all meet musically around a trashy groove. We don’t play covers which is a bit self-indulgent I suppose, but fancy playing ‘7 and 7 Is’ [by Love]. Rich despises Queen…..

6. What are your main influences outside of music?

Clothes, the human condition, being broke… Matt follows Swindon Town, Johnny is learning how to unicycle…

7. How many official recordings have you done? How many released? Where can they be found? And who write your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Have done countless recordings, with our record ‘Dissidents & Dancers’ being the only full length album, along with 3 singles. We don’t want to release everything we do, only what’s ripe. Our next single is in collaboration with Art Gallery Clothing. They designed a knitted polo for us and gave us clothes, so we wrote them a song. The single ‘Art Gallery’ will exclusively be available with the polo or any other Method merchandise bought from Art Gallery Clothing (Until the 7” drops in Feb) and it won’t be on any of our albums. The music can be found in most good record shops along with a lot of bad ones, or online from our label www.seemonkeydomonkey.com. Also our single ‘We Don’t Know’ opened up the recent Acid Jazz compilation ‘Hipsters Vol. 2’.

Rich writes most of the songs, some with Johnny, with some coming from jams. As far as subject matter goes, it’s anything from feeling certain ways about the government and the way we live, to dancing all night with eyes wide as saucers.

8. What’s the favorite song of yours currently?

For the next 4 mins it’s The Electric Prunes – Holy Are You.

9. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

We just go and play and meet good people. We don’t really worry about any scene.

10. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

There’s no challenge… well except for our van breaking down in Belgium, leaving us stranded there for 2 days. And now the van’s fucked, so if anyone wants to drive us around, get in touch!

11. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

We rehearse twice a week normally, over the summer we were playing at least 4 gigs a week. Playing live tightens a band up more than rehearsals ever could. We demo stuff in our studio all year round and are now going to start getting the heads down again for another album next year.

12. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Not sure there is much music coverage, not in the mainstream at least, it all seems a bit X-Factor.

13. Do you rate any other current bands?

Yeah, all of the bands on See Monkey Do Monkey! The Soundcarriers, Django Django, The Revellions… could go on and on!

14. Who/Where would you most like to record and why?

There’s so many people and places we’d like to record with it’s difficult to say! Would love to record with Paul Butler in his studio on the Isle of Wight, or Jorge and Mike at Circo Perotti in Spain, The Sound Factory with David Axelrod, with Simon Dine… well anywhere really! All these people have such distinct sounds and styles… good ones like…

15. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions?

We’re going to go back to our studio and start on the next album, we always play lots of shows so there’ll be plenty more of them to come next year. See you on the dance floor!

Image – Mayor www.associatedminds.com

Band Promo Links –

www.themethod.eu

www.facebook.com/methodcardiff

www.Twitter.com/The_Method_


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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January 25, 2012 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Interviews Modern Music UK Tags:, , ,
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