Browsing Tag Le Beat Bespoke 10

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 9 (episode 18)

NUTsCast Dec 2015

Here it is folks, the latest edition of The Nutscast Sessions where The Baron looks back over 2015 with exclusive live tracks from Le Beat Bespoke 10, Blues Kitchen and studio sessions. Also, we have brand new songs by Mocking Birds, French Boutik and a festive treat from The Dualers. It’s the perfect prelude for the Nutty New Years Eve Party, so join The Baron for the last Nutscast Sessions of 2015.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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December 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Podcasts Reviews Tags:, , , , , , ,
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Le Beat Bespoké 10 – Review

This entry is part 3 of 20 in the series Live!

LE BEAT BESPOKE 10 – A DECADE OF DELIGHTS 

Thursday: WOLF PEOPLE/PURSON  by Dave Johnson

I was very curious about the opening night of LBB10 having never seen both bands before. I had heard great things from friends and both bands were on my must see live acts list.

Would they live up to my expectations?

Purson certainly look the part and as soon as lead singer Rosalie launched into the first number I could see what all the fuss is about. She sings like an angel but looks like a devil and sure plays a mean guitar and had the audience transfixed. Purson romp through numbers from the album ‘The Circle And The Blue Door’ and the EP ‘In The Meantime’ with style and panache and won many new fans with tonight’s performance. Expect big things from this band in 2015.

A short interlude and some more great sounds from Wolf People tour DJ Richard Gibbons before the aforementioned band hit the stage. They apologise before starting by announcing they are a bit rusty having not played live together for a while. They shouldn’t have bothered, it was a masterful set peppered with numbers from the impressive back catalogue together with a couple of numbers I was not familiar that sounded like potential numbers for the forthcoming album which they are currently working on. Needless to say Wolf People reaffirmed everything I had been told by fellow music fans as a band not to be missed. Another fan converted and looking forward to hearing that new album.

After the live acts I headed into venue 2 for the DJ after show party where quality records one after the other kept the fun seekers happy until tomorrow night.

Friday: GLEN CAMPBELL’S MISUNDERSTOOD/KALEIDOSCOPE/THE LOONS  by ‘Dashing’ Drewe Shimon

Mike Stax, the expatriate Brit with the full trans-atlantic twang, is in his element tonight: not content with simply fronting his own fine garage-powerpop combo The Loons alongside his cool and talented bass-playing wife Anja, he also gets to be in the headline band! Nice work all around… The Loons with their juxtaposition of ebullient originals (referencing influences from the Pretty Things to the Strawberry Alarm Clock) and classic covers, set the tone perfectly for a very special LBB indeed.

That said, the Toytown popsike of Peter Daltrey’s Kaleidoscope still resides worlds away from the fuzzed-up San Diego frat-house: in fact, despite the lineup’s heavy reliance (original percussionist Danny Bridgman notwithstanding) on a latterday Glaswegian infusion from alt-folkies Trembling Bells, “Dive Into Yesterday” “Flight From Ashiya” and “The Sky Children” remain as quintessentially English as a blustry day on Turnham Green, which is possibly where half of them were conceived to begin with. And, whilst undoubtedly a slightly less overtly ‘religious’ experience than last year’s Islington show, tonight’s vibrant performance surely reinforces Daltrey and Co’s vital upper place in the psychedelic tapestry: it might have been, at times, ever-so-slightly inaudible above certain segments of the audience, but this is also a club event too, and if Dave and Lisa from Penge want to catch up with Enrico and Xavier from Toledo and discuss their plans for this year’s Euro YeYe during the quieter passages of “The Murder Of Lewis Tollani”, then they have every right to. After all, the social aspect of NUTs has always been every bit as important as the music.

A few eyebrows raise when the Misunderstood kick off with their two best-known songs (“I Can Take You To The Sun” and “Children Of The Sun”), but with Glenn Ross Campbell’s squealing steel-slide-guitar-contraption-thingy exploding centre-stage, and Mr & Mrs Stax again vibing the freak angle to the max, quality is thankfully retained. Sadly, they DO have to resort, like Kenney Jones last year, to repeating two already-aired tunes, including the oft-trodden “Who Do You Love”, as an encore, but considering that said number features surprise appearances from original ‘Stoodster’ Tony Hill (also of The Answers and High Tide) and Ray Owen (co-founder, with Campbell, of Juicy Lucy) the issue is soon rendered irrelevant, and the band’s legend reaffirmed. Despite perhaps slight befuddlement as to why recognition has taken so long, Campbell looks like the happiest man in W1, and right now, he probably is. Magical!

Saturday Daytime and Night: NUTSMAG, VINTAGE MARKET, RECORD FAIR –  by Graham Lentz

After the euphoria that followed The Loons, Kaleidoscope and The Misunderstood, Saturday afternoon was a very nice tonic. The Vintage Market was set up and the stall holders had some quality wares on offer. From clothes to handbags, records to memorabilia, there was something for everyone.

By mid afternoon, the first of the two bands took to the stage. Magnetic Mind played to a packed Beat Basement who really enjoyed their brand of psych sounds.

The harmonized vocals of Ellie Foden and Paul Milne have great impact and with their Jefferson Airplane and Peanut Butter Conspiracy influences in evidence.

The set included their current single, ‘(Like You) Never Kept Me Waiting’, which for my money, is one of THE outstanding psych singles of the year so far and sounded even better live. They finished their set to much deserved rapturous applause.

Before long, the Spanish psych outfit Fogbound were eagerly anticipated and steam rolled through record releases ‘Whispering Corridors’, ‘Purple Wax’ and ‘Come And See’ and a brilliant version of ‘Strange house’ by The Attack. The audience loved and the lads came back for an encore and made quite an impression on their London debut. It would not be too long before another total musical contrast for the Saturday Evening session, would be underway.

Saturday Night – by Graham Lentz

One of the real pleasures of Le Beat Bespoke is the way it opens its self up to something a bit different, and Saturday night traditionally tends to focus on rockabilly/rock & roll culture. It is great to see people with differing music and style all mingling together and no-one bats an eyelid. There in the packed main room were rock & rollers, mods, northern soul fans, psych and garage fans all there to enjoy the live music and everyone looked fantastic.

First on stage for the Wild Records Review was the extraordinary Gizzelle. Singing tracks from her two albums to date; ‘Devil Or Angel’ and ‘Rhythm And Soul’, what makes her extraordinary is how such a powerful voice can come such a petite frame?

Highlights included her rousing version of ‘Hound Dog’ and ‘I’m A Good Woman’ and such was the applause, she returned for a much deserved encore.

Next up was the equally formidable voice of Marlena Perez who fronts The Rhythm Shakers. Again, the contrast in delivery and style were evident. Gizzelle, giving everything, but with controlled assurance. The Rhythm Shakers, all power and passion. They really are one of the best rock and roll bands around right now. Their album of a few years ago, ‘Flipsville’, got a decent representation, but the focus was on the newer material on their current LP ‘Voodoo’. Both albums are as good as each other, which says a lot about the high quality of their writing. They too, were called back for an encore and both acts were virtually mobbed at their merchandise stand afterwards.

Cosmic Keith, Dr Rockin’ Blues and Julliette (the latter both from Paris) kept the rockin’ crowd royally entertained through the entire night.

Meanwhile, Alan Handscombe and Tim Ott-Jones presented their RnB123 Club in the R&B room, while Holly Calder joined Dr Robert and European guests DJ’s in the Beat Room until the early hours.

Sunday night: CROSSFIRE – by Graham Lentz

The grand finale of Le Beat Bespoke 10. The Crossfire Allnighter is a huge event on the calendar and this night was no exception. The queue outside was constant as the doors opened at 10pm. With Northern Soul in the main room, Mousetrap in the R&B Room and Paddy and Sarge and Rhys joining Dr Robert, Lolo and Traxel in the Beat Basement, this was a night primed to close the weekender with a bang.

Without doubt, the tone of the night was set by Les Grys Grys from Southern France, who repeated their explosive performance at the August Bank Holiday in Brighton last year. To say the atmosphere was electric was an understatement. The last time I saw the Beat Basement that packed was when The Strypes were on stage. Les Grys Grys ask no quarter and none is given. Theirs is a full-on assault on the senses and they really deliver.

As I said, they set the tone for the whole night in all three rooms and it was a fitting end to another wonderful Le Beat Bespoke weekender. Only another twelve months and we can do it all again !

Sundy night: LES GRYS GRYS by ‘Dashing’ Drewe Shimon

“GADAAANNGGG…”

With short sharp bursts of frenzied drumming, plonking bass and off-the cuff maraca-shaking from their resident loonhouse blues harp wielder, French upstarts Les Grys Grys set out their stall immediately, purveying classic white R’n’B in the style of the Yardbirds, Outsiders (Neth), Pretty Things, Blues Incorporated, Them, Downliners Sect and (of course) the Stones: there’s also a hint of the howling acid blues of the Groundhogs, TYA and Savoy Brown, but that’s more in the crunching tone and hair-shaking antics of the lead guitarist than the construction of the numbers. As with the Strypes and 45s (although they’re considerably older and longer-haired than both) their material predominantly consists, at this moment, of covers – yet these Montpelier Mods have taken things one step further by showing as much deference to their blue-eyed heroes as the genre’s black American originators. Thus, “Neighbour Neighbour” rubs shoulders with “Mystic Eyes” and the Masters Apprentices’ “Hot Gully Wind” without batting an eyelid: of course, not everybody is an expert on the derivation of rock’n’roll, but this Le Beat crowd sure knows its blues from its snooze.

A frantic blur of fringe, deerstalker, tambourine and axe-fire, these eminent Grys (see what I did there?) are one of several currently emergent bands capable of reminding you exactly why you first loved these three things called blues, soul and rock’n’roll. The question remains as to what will happen when they start writing their own material, but it will happen, and the development will be, just as it was with those lads from Dartford and Erith 50 years ago, fascinating to observe: even if they never put pen to paper, they’ll still be unmissable live.

A win-win proposition, then, and a suitably butt-kicking prelude to the finale of LBB 10: despite nipping out after the Grys’ set for 3 hours, the party is still at full tilt in the Beat Basement upon my return, propelled this time by an equal mixture of faces and tunes old and new. All DJs were exemplary, but special mention must go to Rhys’ bold inclusion of “Is It Love” by Jon, a tune which I had hitherto believed myself to be the London scene’s sole fan of: indeed, whereas certain elements last year left me knackered, this was just one of many ways in which tonight found my muse rejuvenated. Roll on 2016.


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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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April 27, 2015 By : Category : Bands DJs Events Front Page Fuzz Garage Psych Reviews RnB UK Tags:, , , , ,
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Wolf People (Newbreed)

This entry is part 13 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Formed in 2005, Wolf People are one of an exciting crop of 21st century bands mining a rich seam of archaic influences for inspiration, from the psych folk of Jethro Tull, Pentangle, Tudor Lodge and Fuchsia (the latter of whom they played with in 2014 at London’s Strongroom Bar), to classic West Coast sounds, British psych-prog and popsike, library music, British and Italian horror movie soundtracks, cult TV, public information films, and the writings of Victorian authors like M R James.

Sharing a kinship with their (somewhat heavier) geographical neighbours Uncle Acid & The Deadbeats, Southend’s Purson, recently resurrected London folklorists Circulus, West Country glitter-kids Ulysses and Birmingham’s Exploding Sound Machine, they are proof that a healthy scene for intelligent psychedelic rock continues to flourish in the UK . And, whilst not Mods themselves, their sound has plenty for  the discerning Scene follower to embrace and enjoy, their impending debut appearance at Le Beat Bespoke proving yet again that diversity is still very much a key feature of the NUTs landscape.

Band Members:

Joe Hollick – Guitar
Jack Sharp – Guitar And Vocals
Tom Watt – Drums
Daniel Davies – Bass

Ex/former/occasional members: Ross Harris – Flute

Discography

Singles And EPS:
Wolf People EP (Sea Records) 2006, October Fires/Black Water (Battered Ornaments) 2007, Storm Cloud/Cotton Strands (Battered Ornaments) 2007, Tiny Circles/Mercy II (Battered Ornaments) 2009, Silbury Sands (Jagjaguwar) 2011, When The Fire Is Dead In The Grate (Jagjaguwar) 2013, All Returns (Jagjaguwar) 2013

Albums:
Steeple (2010) Tidings (2010) Fain (2013) all on Jagjaguwar

Compilations:
Wolf People – Singles (Self Released) 2008

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We put the band together in 2006 just to play some songs that were about to be released. We started getting gigs before we knew what the hell we were doing, and then just sort of bumbled along from there. Dan joined in 2007 after seeing us at a medieval festival in Port Talbot.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

Our main common ground is fuzzy rock records. Starting from Hendrix and Sabbath and going down into all the things that were influenced by them. So we love Mighty Baby, Mecki Mark Men, Baby Grandmothers, Variations, Iron Claw, Dark. Also a lot of folk rock stuff; Fairport, Pentangle, Trees. Anything weird and interesting really, preferably with fuzz and big drums.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Stick in the Wheel from East London are probably my favourite current group that we know. Stark folk with dark themes and real accents.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

If there is one in Bedford, I’m not aware of it, but that wouldn’t surprise me. There seems to be a strong surge of interest for good old fuzzy rock music across the country and I hope we’ll see more good bands popping up to meet the demand. It would be great to see a new wave of bands do something interesting with it beyond stitching influences together (which we’re probably guilty of to be honest).

5. How would you describe the style you play?

We’re a rock band. Sometimes folk-rock, but usually just a rock band.

6. What are your live shows like?

The aim is to be direct and honest, and carry the songs with some degree of heart without sounding just like the records or the last show. We don’t use a lot of effects or processing, and we try to leave some room for improvisation without overdoing it.

The stark approach can sometimes fall on its arse but we’re happier not hiding behind backing tracks or layers of delay. If we sound good, it’s because we’re playing good.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We’ve only ever done a few covers. We used to play ‘Same Old Story’ by Taste, and ‘Why Am I So Short’ by Soft Machine, that was fun. We’ve tried Mighty Baby covers before too, and there’s a Trees song we want to try.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

I’m interested in oral history, mythology and folklore, and nature, I love birds. As a band probably our main mutual interests outside music is food, and skimming stones.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

They tend to start with me (Jack) or Joe. Then we’ll all work out arrangements together. I tend to base the lyrics on stuff I’ve been reading about. Lots of the newer lyrics are about Earth if humans left or suddenly died out. I’m not sure why though, I didn’t really plan that.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

The one we’re working on at the moment, ‘Not Me Sir’. We were trying to be like an English version of Ersen or Erkin Koray, but our failure to play like that makes it quite interesting. We recorded it in Devon a few months ago after only rehearsing it about twice and Joe’s guitar playing on it is fantastic. So I’m enjoying listening to that.

As for other people’s stuff, I’m still obsessing over ‘I Found You’ by The Tops. It’s pretty much the perfect record.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I don’t go to a lot of gigs anymore, but it seems like there’s plenty of exciting bands out there, I’d just say it’s a pity that so many of the more interesting psych bands are from the States or Australia. I hope there’s a new crop of UK bands on the horizon who can take the reins and produce some truly exciting psych rock music, and do something new with it. We could do it, but we might be too old and stuck in our ways now!

With our band we’ve always skirted the edges of quite a lot of different scenes, so we feel quite lucky in that respect. One year we played a folk festival and a heavy/doom rock festival back to back, and went down pretty well at both I think.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Without a doubt, the biggest challenge is trying to create interesting music and sustain a music career while working full-time. I don’t want to start moaning about it, because I feel very privileged in a lot of ways, but it simply isn’t feasible for us to make a living out of creating music, so we feel like we’re constantly on the back foot. You feel like you’re having to force yourself to do something you actually enjoy after working for eight hours, and that’s not right somehow.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

About once a month we do a weekend of recording/writing/rehearsing. I try to play, write and record at home whenever I possibly can, I don’t like to go a day without doing something. We’re not really playing live at the moment while we’re writing and recording the next album.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

I don’t really read reviews or check blogs or whatever as I tend to go on word of mouth recommendations these days. I feel there’s a definite gap in the market for good live music on UK TV though. Jools is the only thing on offer and it’s appalling. Radio seems to be better. Marc Riley features sessions by most of the interesting groups touring, with more fringe shows like Freakzone or stuff on Resonance picking up the weirder things that fall off that radar.

I like the way a lot of people seem to be taking matters into their own hands and providing good music content on the internet, but of course it’s a bit of a minefield and you need time to find the good stuff. Or a good guide.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Like I said, I really love Stick in the Wheel. Psych rock wise, I love Morgan Delt. Klaus Johann Grobe are an amazing group we like from Switzerland. And I love Ariel Pink and Cate Le Bon and Chris Cohen.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

If we could record anywhere I think we’d all choose Sweden. We’re pretty fixated on Swedish rock music, and the country is so beautiful. I often feel like I’m on another planet or in an alternative reality in Scandinavia.

We’d love to record with Martin Stone from Mighty Baby. We spent a day playing with him a couple of years ago and he’s such an instinctive and unique musician. We had some genuine spine tingling moments listening to him play. We were coaxing him to rock out and he just completely blew us away.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re in the middle of writing and recording an album in our own way, just chipping away at it. I think we’re all very excited by how it’s progressing. We’re going to take our time and put it out when it’s ready then start doing some shows.

We’ve obviously got Le Beat Bespoke coming up which we’re really excited about, then we’re going on a short tour with Mudhoney, which should be amazing.

18. Unlike many bands featured in NUTs, you are totally open about your love of – for want of a better term ‘prog rock’. But what do you personally take to be the meaning of that term right here and now, in 2015? Do you see yourself as part of that or any ‘scene’, and what would you say to those who would suggest that playing 60s and 70s influenced music is by definition not ‘progressive’ but ‘regressive’ or ‘retro’?

I’ve never felt like we were progressive, but then I’ve always felt that as the ones making the music, we’re probably the least qualified to label it. So I’ll let people describe it how they like. It’s a paradox to make retrogressive prog I agree, but that’s never been our intention. We’ve always just followed our noses with the kind of music we were making and tried not to over think it. We get so little time to play together that we just like to switch off and enjoy playing when we get together, without really worrying about what it might be called.

We’ve made a conscious effort to shift away from lengthy arrangements with our new stuff though. We want each song to sound like a great 45 side.

19. Until less than ten years ago, things such as folk-rock, European prog, library soundtracks, occult-based music and film, rural imagery, and so-called “hauntology” were still very much fringe interests, with most tastes still shaped by post-punk and indie rules.  Yet now, many bands openly share your influences, clubs with similar themes have sprung up across the capital (and other cities), beards and long hair are sported by ‘hipsters’ everywhere, and there are even pubs, such as Hackney’s Hand Of Glory, that proclaim a “Wicker Man theme”. So, is this a good thing, finally bringing the inspirations that have shaped your work to greater public attention? Or do you think that maybe, as with other fashions, they will ultimately be treated as a bandwagon, briefly ridden then swiftly abandoned by trendsters with no understanding of their actual meaning? And if so, has returning to Bedfordshire after a spell in Bethnal Green kept you separate from such things?

Well I moved to Bedfordshire about ten years ago, while Tom and Dan still live in London and Joe lives in Lancashire, so I guess that helps us keep a degree of perspective. The older you get, the more able you are to completely ignore everyone else and delve on with your own interests regardless of trends.

None of the surface stuff matters anyway, if you’re really into something and feel a deep connection and sense of love and respect for it, it’s easy to recognize others that feel the same way, and ignore those who are along for the ride. I’m certainly not going to stop liking something because too many people are into it. Art and culture are there to be shared and enjoyed and the good stuff will always still be there when the tourists have left.

Web Links:

wolfpeople.co.uk
facebook.com/WolfPeople
twitter.com/wolfpeopleUK

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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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Les Grys Grys (Newbreed)

This entry is part 16 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been playing together for five years. We are playing gigs only since 2012.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

The love for yellow socks, Joe Kelley’s haircut and the Netherlands.

3. How would you describe the style you play?

Rock and Roll. People may describe it as “Long haired R&B played loud on bended knees”

4. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We love the sixties blues. We cover that stuff. Thor’s Hammer, Q65, The Misunderstood… etc… We don’t like to cover “garage” songs; we prefer the R&B feeling.

5. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

We cover “You Said”. Original is by The Primitives. Sounds brutal. Favorite song is “Long Tall Shorty” by The Rhythm Checkers.

6. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Wake up the drummer.

7. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We try to rehearse everyday at Subsonic in Montpellier. We play live quite often, like one live show a week. Recently, we have been recording with Jorge from Circo Perrotti in Spain. It’s out soon. Maybe on a London record label… More info coming up soon!

8. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Anyone who is cool and has the same love for rock and roll as us. However we prefer to play live than recording.

9. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We will tour soon in March and April; it includes Le Beat Bespokè in London and a lot more. What should you expect from us? Man, we don’t have any plan. Just stick to the rock and roll. Hope to have fun.

Web Links:

facebook.com/LesGrysGrys
soundcloud.com/les-grys-grys

Discography: 2014 – SINGLE ‘Hoy Gully Wind/Neighbour, Neighbour’

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Fogbound (Newbreed)

This entry is part 12 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Fogbound from A Coruña is the John Colby Sect labels first release with the fantastic Purple Wax/Kicking Eucalyptus Seeds housed in a beautiful picture sleeve. We caught up with Fab to find out what delights they have in store for us on their UK debut show at Le Beat Bespoke 10.

Band Members:
Fabio: Vox and guitar
Borja: Bass guitar
Fernando: Hammond
Pibli: Drums and back-vocal

Discography:
2014 – SINGLE ‘Whispering Corridors’.
2015 – SINGLE ‘Purple Wax’.
2015 – SPLIT  Fogbound/ Mega Purple Sex Toy Kit – ‘Castles in a sand box’/  ‘Your Song’

To buy our singles: New Single: thejohncolbysect.com/eshop

The John Colby Sect underground record label is the new reference for lovers of spacey, reverb-drenched sounds. Somewhere between A Coruña and Madrid, the label’s heart resides in the musical and artistic underground. They specialize in limited editions releases on Vinyl with a unique identity.

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been playing together for 3 years… We started off with covers of British psych songs and the love for this kind of stuff brought us together.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

The common link is the classic pop from the 60s but Fernando enjoys heavy prog psychedelia, Borja is a power pop fan and I personally love popsike.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Yep, I prescribe a big dose of ONE OF THESE DAYS & Thee Heavy Random Tone Colour Lab they are the best band around here… totally dope prog psych!

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s small but cozy and warm.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

If freakbeat means obscure psych, then it’s what we do.

6. What are your live shows like?

I’d say our live shows are raw, powerful and passionate.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Beatles, Pink Floyd, The Zombies sounds like clichéd…but they are a big influence. Obscure bands from the first UK psych era like The Attack are a massive influence on the sound and attitude of Fogbound.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our song Come & See made reference to a Russian film with the same title… so the cult films are another influence.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

This is Fab the composer… the songs are about oneirism and reality in near equal measure.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

“Castles In a Sandbox” is a top fave and I’ll choose “From The Pipeline” by King Midas.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

The psychedelic music has embarked on its second youth thanks to bands such Temples, Tame Impala, The Black Angels… they have commercial pull and people seem to be more interested in this kind of music. Wish us luck!

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

I think the lack of stability is the biggest challenge for a group.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

The three of us try to rehearse twice a week and then Pibli (our new drummer) makes a quick review of the set list before the gig. This situation is difficult to sustain, but we do it for the future of the group and because from the first moment we hit it off with Pibli.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s poor and commercial.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

As I said in question number eleven psychedelic music even shoe gaze, post punk, noise pop are trendy. And we celebrate to hear more bands with these tags.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We think Liam Watson is the perfect producer to record us. We have similar tastes and he owns one of the best analog studios in the world.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

This year we’ll release our second single Purple Wax, promoted with a glorious psychedelic clip, and then a split with Mega Purple Sex Toy Kit featuring Castles In a Sandbox that will delight the dancers. The future is unstable, so we tend to live in the present and go step by step conquering small goals.

Web Links:

facebook.com/fogboundband
fogbound.bandcamp.com
soundcloud.com/fogboundofficial
thejohncolbysect.com/fogbound
popthinkin.com/producto

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Lolo – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 19 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

DJ Lolo is Co-organizer of Pop-Think-In! and Instant Party weekender, also active member of The John Colby Sect, based in A Coruña. Galicia, Spain. We grabbed a chance to quiz him on some of his favourite things!

How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I remember myself as a child listening to my Dad’s LPs: Beatles, Deep Purple, Simon And Garfunkel but probably wouldn’t be writing these lines if a school friend hadn’t of taped me a Jam compilation when I was 15, then came The Who, Kinks, Small Faces and so on.

Where was your first DJ slot?

In the summer of 98 in a little town where I used to spend the summers, mainly for the free drinks, just like today he! he!

What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Difficult to answer, but some came to mind like the first Le Beat Bespoke, Beat Goes On, Mushroom Machine (always a blast!), Upclub, UFO weekend in Toledo.

What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Getting into a club and finding out there’s none or only one turntable, luckily it’s been a very long time since that happened.

Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Must go back to my younger days and I think I should mention Speed, Philippe Golbert, Rob Bailey and Mr. Anello. They played the tunes I liked and loads of unknown stuff to me in the same vein. When you felt like “What the hell is this??” Also I was very impressed the last time I heard Stephan Golowka djing a couple of years back in Euroyeye.

What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

You can see above, tapes were very important for me at that time. Like the Mousetrap ones and Rob Bailey’s Hipshakers Series.

What was your best ever find/discovery?

Bargains are still out there. But getting Smoke “Dreams of dreams” in a “Lot of UK Prog 45s” for was certainly a standout. Also The Bucket 45 for 15$ (sending the cash inside an envelope aah, those crazy pre-Paypal daze!)

Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Small Faces, Pretty Things, Hollies, Simon And Garfunkel, Who, Zombies, Kinks, Byrds, Left Banke, Powder, Tomorrow, Smoke, Nazz, Attack, The Jam, Prisoners. The British bands from mid to late 60s are most of all amazing to my ears, no matter if they made 5 LP’s or just a one-off 45.

Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not really, but I love Page One, Immediate and Decca/Deram labels.

Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I currently co-organize the Pop-Think-In! parties in my hometown, next month will be our fifth anniversary!

What is the record you would most like to own?

Oh Difficult. But Factory “Path through the forest” has been in my want list since the beginning of times. Also one of the best UK psych 45s, both sides.

Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Fleur de Lys – “Mud In Your Eye”
Rupert’s People – “Dream In My Mind”
Billy Nicholls – “Would You Believe”
Kinks – “Shangri-la”
Powder – “Magical Jack”
Tony Colton – “I’ve Laid Some Down In My Time”
Smoke – “It’s Just Your Way Of Lovin’”
Byrds – “She Don’t Care About Time”
Big Star – “The Ballad Of El Goodo”
Zombies – “Changes”

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Elastic Prism – “Time Change”
Abdullahs Regime – “Sally I Do”
Soul Inc – “The Leaves Of Grass”
Booby Trap – “Jenny Hill And Marilyn Bloom”
Quest – “The Last Days”

Main Site:
popthinkin.com
thejohncolbysect.com

Social Networks:
facebook.com/lolo.pelouro
facebook.com/popthinkin
facebook.com/thejohncolbysect

Next Club Spots:
You can find me at Mushroom Machine in Madrid, 14th February 2015
Also: Pop-Think-In! –  5th Anniversary on 7th March 2015.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 4, 2015 By : Category : Beat DJs Europe Front Page Fuzz Interviews Scene Tags:, ,
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Masters – The Misunderstood

This entry is part 8 of 8 in the series Masters2

The Misunderstood are one of the great lost bands of the sixties. Formed in Riverside, California, in 1965, they started out as a tough R&B band modelled on Them and the Yardbirds. At the end of that year though, they began undergoing a dramatic transformation when they were joined by steel guitar player Glenn Campbell. Campbell approached his instrument in a completely new way, using a fuzz pedal and controlled feedback to coax screaming banshee sounds from his amp, or to make it sing like a celestial choir.

Future BBC legend John Peel was a DJ in nearby San Bernardino at the time and was blown away when he saw the band onstage. He encouraged them to move to England where their innovative music might find a more receptive audience. The Misunderstood arrived in London in June 1966 and proceeded to starve until Fontana Records signed them and prepared to launch them as “The New Sound of ’67” placing them firmly on the forefront of the merging new psychedelia. The stunning “I Can Take You to the Sun” single was released in December, but the group was shattered that same month when lead singer Rick Brown was snatched away by the US military draft.

However, although the original Misunderstood were short-lived, the tracks they recorded in London in 1966, including “Children of the Sun” and “I Unseen,” are now regarded as some of the greatest of the era.

Glenn went on to play with the Dirty Blues Band, and a later incarnation of the Misunderstood in 1969 before forming Juicy Lucy and storming the UK charts with their searing version of Bo Diddley’s “Who Do You Love”. In more recent years, Campbell has collaborated with San Diego-based freakbeat merchants the Loons, playing on two tracks on their Red Dissolving Rays of Light album, and teaming up with them to recreate the fiery psychedelic sound of the ’66 Misunderstood. Glenn and the Loons are excited to be bringing the Misunderstood’s music to London for the 2015 Le Beat Bespoke festival.

Here he talks to Mike Stax about his ‘60s adventures with the Misunderstood.

NUTs: How did you first meet John Peel?

GC: He heard us playing at the Riverside Mall. That’s how we met, at that shopping mall. It was sort of a Battle of the Bands. He’d just done his radio spot and then he was getting ready to leave and he saw us playing. And that was what he calls his “St Paul on the road to Damascus experience” (laughs) – a bit over the top, but that was the next stop in the Misunderstood saga. That was the extra little kick in the butt we needed to get to England, because we’d already thought about doing that before we met him, and of course when we met him we started probing him to see what it was really like there and how hard it would be and he only tended to encourage us. Of course, he could also show us what to expect by playing us records of more obscure bands that weren’t getting airplay in the States yet, like the Who and things like that.

NUTs: Did he help you get your tickets to London?

GC: Yeah, in a way, because he organized some Battle of the Bands, which we couldn’t have lost if we wanted to, y’know? (laughs) We would’ve won them anyway, because we were pretty popular. Mainly he organized them so there would be money there – like the bands would get x amount of money and so on – and of course we always won ‘em. That went a long way for paying for our fares. Everybody was kind of in on it anyway; all the bands knew what was going on. But then again, nobody else would’ve had the guts to leave. They all wanted to stick around at home. You’d be surprised. People look at success and they think, Oh gee, I’d like to have that. But they don’t really want it. They don’t want to do what they’ve got to do to get it, and that’s where the Misunderstood had the edge, I think, on everyone else. They had that energy and that courage to go ahead and instead of dreaming about something they’d go ahead and try to make it happen. And that’s the other thing: they weren’t afraid to fall flat on their face. If they did, they’d just take off in some other direction, y’know?

NUTs: You arrived in England in June 1966 and struggled for a while. Then your guitar player Greg Treadway returned home and you got Tony Hill to replace him. How did you find him?

GC: At a rehearsal room. We had been rehearsing, and Tony was with another band, I believe, and he heard us and just introduced himself. He goes, “What’s your story?” – obviously he’d heard our American accents and everything – and we told him and he goes, “Well, I’d like to audition for you guys.” I can’t remember if he sat in and played something right there and then or if we held a separate audition. I think he’d just come up to London. He had a real Geordie accent. We could hardly understand him when we first met him, but we liked him. He was very intense about his music. I think he was also studying classical guitar, which helped. It was all stuff we could use. Also, he totally changed the color of the band. Greg was a good rhythm guitar player but Tony could play lead so that just opened up a lot of stuff for us; a lot of interplay between me and him. There was quite a broad range of styles he could do.

NUTs: How many sessions were involved to do those six songs you recorded in England in 1966?

GC: I honestly can’t remember. My rough guess was that there was roughly three sessions, all told. I was pretty out of it. If you look at our photographs of those times, that glazed look we had was basically hunger. Seriously. I mean, we were so hungry you couldn’t believe it. We were just kind of in a daze. I don’t know why nobody ever fed us, but nobody did. I don’t ever remember eating a proper meal during that whole period.

NUTs: When you recorded those six songs, did they realize how unique that was?

GC: Yeah, I think so. There wasn’t anything like it and I think Fontana knew they had something, and since we were so easy to work with. Most of the companies, their biggest fear, was working with the band, and usually they wouldn’t, they’d just work with one person, usually the singer, and the rest of the band would be shuffled off and forgotten about. But you couldn’t do that with this band, because we weren’t just one person, and I think once they worked with us in the studio they thought, “We’ve got a goldmine here. These guys aren’t just gonna disappear overnight.” Because we had plenty of material, we had plenty of ideas, we were hard workers, we were sober, we were eager – we were totally different. And we seemed to catch on: people liked us. We weren’t ‘anger music’ or anything like that. Girls liked it as much as guys did. We seemed to have something to offer everybody. The head of Fontana Records, Jack Baverstock, was even knocked out by it.

NUTs: You must have been gutted when Rick was drafted and the band was ripped apart. What were your feelings when you returned to Riverside in ’67?

GC: A lot of it just got shoved down. You just sort of put it aside and got on with surviving. Actually that’s where (blues singer/harp player) Rod Piazza stepped in. He stopped me from falling down so hard because he always hired me for his bands and stuff. Really Rod sort of kept me going during that period because I was pretty depressed. I had nothing. Coming back was hard too because I think a lot of other musicians were really rooting for us, with the idea that if we could make it then maybe they had a chance too. Everyone was starving for any kind of break.

NUTs: How does it feel to be playing those Misunderstood songs again after all these years?

GC: It feels great! I’m amazed, to be honest, that people are still so obsessed with the Misunderstood, but it feels good to play all these songs again with the Loons. I thought I’d forgotten them, but once I plugged in my steel and started fooling around with them again it all came back to me. I’m really looking forward to being back in England for the first time in almost 40 years.

Many thanks to Mike Stax of the Loons.

See The Misunderstood – LIVE in LONDON – Easter 2015!

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 4, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music News USA Tags:, , ,
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Newbreed – The Loons

This entry is part 14 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Mike Stax (vocals)
Anja Stax (bass,vocals)
Marc Schroeder (guitar)
Chris Marsteller (guitar)
Mike Kamoo (drums)

Discography:
1998 LP ‘Love’s Dead Leaves’ (Get Hip)
2004 CD ‘Paraphernalia’(UT Records)
2010 LP ‘Red Dissolving Rays of Light’ (Bomp! Records)
2012 7” ‘If You Could Read Your Mind’ (split single with Clinic) (UT Records)
2015 LP ‘Inside Out Your

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band first formed in 1996. There were a lot of lineup changes early on. Anja arrived from England in 1999 after leaving the Diaboliks, Marc joined in 2000, Chris around 2002, and Mike Kamoo in 2005, so we’ve had the same lineup now for ten years, which means we’ve developed a genuine bond as friends and chemistry as musicians.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Between us, I’m sure thousands of influences can be factored into the equation, but there are many that are common to all of us, primarily the Pretty Things, Love, the Yardbirds, the Who, the Kinks, the Outsiders, Q65, the 13th Floor Elevators, MC5—you know, the GOOD stuff!

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Schitzophonics are the best band to emerge from the San Diego area in a long time. They’re like a super high-energy cocktail of early MC5, the Sonics, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Little Richard.
The Neumans from Orange County – archetypal 60s garage, Vox amps and black roll-necks, great music and great people. We love them.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

The scene in Southern California has been undergoing a resurgence in the last few years with the appearance of bands like the Mystic Braves, the Allah La’s, the Sound Reasons and the aforementioned Schitzophonics and the Neumans as well as the return of the Unclaimed, who kicked off the entire West Coast garage revival scene in 1979-80. There’s also the all-girl garage band the Rosalyns (which includes Anja) and the Diddley Daddies (with Mike on bass). We see a lot more younger people at our shows now, which is really encouraging as it means the scene is regenerating rather than growing stale and grey.
There are also a few DJ clubs but it’s mainly about the bands and live music, a bit different from the European 60s scene. The scene is also a good mix so you have your Garage/Freakbeat people along with Scooterists, Mods and Punk Rock kids wanting a good time.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Psychotic Beat.

06. What are your live shows like?

Whether we’re playing to five people or 1,500 people, there’s a certain level of intensity we’re trying to bring to every show we play. The goal is to connect with the audience, engage them with our music, and hopefully have them leave the venue with our songs still ringing in their heads. We feel that, along with memorable songs, a band needs to bring some visual excitement to the stage. We’re never going to just stand there staring blankly at the floor, we’re going to be looking sharp, moving around and trying to grab your attention any way we can.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

I listed our main influences back in question #2. We do have a few covers that we’ll throw into our set list, according to our mood on the night: “Alexander” and “LSD” by the Pretty Things, “You’re Gonna Miss Me” by the 13th Floor Elevators, “My Time” by the Golden Dawn, “All in Your Mind” by Stray, “I Unseen” by the Misunderstood, and even “New Rose” by the Damned, if we’re feeling particularly amped-up and anarchic.
We despise mediocrity in all its forms, bands who spend more time on their ‘look’ than their songs, musicians who use technology as a musical crutch, and people who are always chasing the next trend instead of trying to stake out something original of their own.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Mike Stax:”I’m a voracious reader. Kingsley Amis, Graham Greene, Ross Macdonald, John Le Carre, Lawrence Durrell, L.P. Davies, and Phil K. Dick are a few of my favourite writers and a constant source of inspiration.”
Anja: Also reading a ton but as far as other influences go I am always drawn to design and architecture. Obviously fashion, which I still continue to make and work on with my clothes label here in So Cal (I used to be part of Babzotica Boutique back when I lived in the 90s in London). And my friends!
Marc: Family, friends and surfing. Very simple.
Mike: Any art form that inspires and appeals to my senses.
Chris: Which do you mean sex or drugs?  (Sorry.  Spinal Tap moment = Poor attempt at being clever). Well… I suppose the only true answer would be life, right?

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

All of the band members contribute to the songwriting. Generally, one person will bring a riff, a chord progression or a basic song structure into the practice room; then we all put our heads together and shape it into a full-fledged song. I (Mike) come up with all of the lyrics and most of the vocal melodies. The songs are mostly drawn from personal experiences or observations of the world around us. Sometimes I get inspiration from historical events or personalities. For example, we just wrote a song called “Miss Clara Regrets,” which is all about the 1920s movie actress Clara Bow. It’s going to come out soon on a single on Dirty Water Records.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Mike: “My Desolation” is my current favorite, because it’s a lot of fun to sing live. Favourite song by another artist? “Can’t Stand the Pain” by the Pretty Things – I never tire of that song.
Anja: I like “Miss Clara Regrets” right now; it’s back to the basics and super tribal, really fun to play. Also “My Desolation” for its intensity. By another artist, wow, so many….let’s say top three are MC5 – “Lookin’ At You,” Rupert’s People – “Dream In My Mind” and 13th Floor Elevators – “Slip Inside This House.”
Marc: My favorite song right now from the Loons is “As the Raven Flies”. Probably one of my favorite songs of all time is “Signed DC” by Love. Also “Bo’s Bounce” by Bo Diddley.
Mike: I’m really enjoying ‘Miss Clara Regrets’ at the moment. ‘Dead End Street’ by the Kinks is high on the list currently.
Chris: “Heyday”, and of course, ALL of The Misunderstood set we’re doing with Glenn!  What great songs! What’s your favorite song by another artist? I apologize, but this is an impossible question to answer.  How do you think I fell for music in the first place?

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think the current underground scene is in a reasonably healthy state at the moment, and, yes, we actively participate whenever possible. Of course the scene is clogged up with a lot of mediocre bands, narcissists and bandwagon jumpers, but that’s always been the case. There are also some great bands who are contributing with some potentially timeless music – I hope we’re one of them. Luckily we have a few great life clubs/club owners here who genuinely support bands for the love of the music.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

It’s always been a challenge getting the media over here in the States to give us any attention. Too often they write us off as some kind of ‘60s revival act, because we dress a certain way and utilize vintage equipment and instruments. It’s only in recent years that they’ve begun to take us seriously and realize we’re creating music that is new and reflective of our own personalities, not some kind of nostalgia trip or historical reenactment.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse about once a week. As we rehearse at Mike Kamoo’s recording studio, Earthling, we can record as often as we want—whenever we feel inspired. Our new album, Inside Out Your Mind will be released on May 27. We play live about twice a month on average. We have a couple of exciting upcoming shows: first our album release party on May 28 in San Diego, then of course our set at Le Beat Bespoke in London on April 3.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

There’s not an active national music press in the States like there is in the UK, so the only media coverage most bands get is either through zines and blogs or in the local media. It’s only in the last two or three years that the local media has begun give us any significant coverage. We appreciate all we get because it really does make a difference.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Mike: Nothing mainstream. But I like quite a lot of underground bands from around the world including the Sadies, the Schitzophonics, the Higher State, the Beat Pack, Los Grys Grys, Clinic, the Flowers of Evil, the Royal Flairs and the Maharajas.
Anja: I really like Clinic, The Sadies, Fogbound, the now defunct Soundtrack Of Our Lives, plus the bands we already mentioned from here in California.
Marc: Graham Day and cohorts Allan and Wolf have continued for 30+ years with a singular vision of quality rock ‘n’ roll. I think they sound about as good today as they ever have. Gives me hope.
Mike: Deerhunter, Tame Impala, Caribou, and Viet Cong
Chris: Another difficult question to answer without proper discussion.  I will say… I’ve always liked The Church.  Not sure if that qualifies as current or mainstream or underground (I think they’ve been all the above), but nevertheless they’ve been making good records for 35+ years.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Mike: I’d like to record with Dave Hassinger at RCA Hollywood in 1966 – with Jack Nitzsche helping out with the arrangements. Why? Aftermath, Between the Buttons, and “I Had Too Much to Dream Last Night.”
Anja: For a treat I would love to record with Liam at Toe-Rag again; good times! Jorge from Dr. Explosion is also doing some great work, someone get us back to Spain fast 😉
Marc: I would love to record with Kim Fowley, a great supporter of the Loons. Unfortunately we lost our chance. Liam at Toe-Rag would be cool; I love the sounds from that studio.
Mike: Jorge Explosion – Circo Perrotti. I heard the Fogbound recordings and would like to see what’s going on over there!
Chris: Holy Sh*t!  Is time travel possible?

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Our goal is to keep getting better – write better songs, make better records, play better gigs, and reach as many people with our music as we possibly can. In the immediate future, we’re looking forward to collaborating again with our friend Glenn Campbell of the Misunderstood, and to bringing our music to London for Le Beat Bespoke.

Web Links:

facebook.com/pages/The-Loons
reverbnation.com/theloons9

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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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February 1, 2015 By : Category : Bands Interviews Music Scene USA Tags:, , ,
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Masters – Kaleidoscope

This entry is part 7 of 8 in the series Masters2

Peter Daltrey of UK Psyche Icons Kaleidoscope, took some time out of his busy creative day to answer some of our questions prior to the Band’s appearance at Le Beat Bespoké 10 at Easter in London.

01 Are you happy and exciting to be invited to play at the 10th anniversary of Le Beat Bespoké?

**Ha, ha…! I’m happy and excited to be invited to play anywhere! Look, I’m an old geezer who thought he and his psychedelic ditties had been dead and buried for decades – so to find that new fans are discovering our music and enjoying what they hear is a massive shot in the golden arm for me. My band was fortunate enough to be creating our music in that short window of opportunity that presented itself from around mid ’66 to the end of ’67: the short-lived but much-loved blossoming of psychedelia. The fact that the genre is garnering new adherents in the 21st century is astonishing. Perhaps as the world turns darker with grim and terrifying incidents turning nightmare into reality the need to turn again to more innocent times is inevitable. And music itself has lost its way some would say, with commercialism dominant and creativity and inventiveness overshadowed and certainly undervalued. OK, the commercial needs of the music business have always been there, but when we were recording our albums we were allowed free rein in the studio to allow creative ideas and envelope-pushing to flourish. So to be able to stand up on stage and perform these pioneering songs to a new audience is very rewarding. And goes some way to compensate for the cold shoulder we were shown back then. The sound of applause for these songs is sweet sure enough, balm to my tinnitus-riddled old ears.

02 What special songs are you planning on playing during your performance?

It’s very important to me that the set list is crafted to supply what the audience want. I’ve released eighteen solo albums since the band broke up back in ’71 but sadly no one wants to hear any of those songs! So all the Kaleidoscope favourites will be played with the emphasis on our brand of poppy-tinged psychedelia. We will also perform some Fairfield Parlour tracks. Allowing for time constraints if we played all the favourites we’d be there all night! Fan’s will get to hear everything from Flight from Ashiya to Dream for Julie – from the mellow Monkey to the mayhem of Music.

03 How important do you think live events such as this are in todays wider music scene?

The income stream for musicians has dried up. Although the internet and this crazy digital world in which we live, together with innovations in recording technology have all contributed in musicians being able to become their own masters, to shrug off the multi-national record company yoke, there has been a massive price to pay. With the welcome demise in the universal power of the big labels a new dawn signalled hope for the fortunes of musicians and bands who realised they could grasp the nettle of control for themselves. Which many of us did – only to find that with the catastrophic decline in physical record sales streaming and downloads raised their ugly heads. The digital dawn brought with it the ability for file sharing, piracy and unfettered copying of music. Even allowing for the fact that CD copying was once rife, now it is so much easier to literally steal music off the internet. As soon as you release an album some misguided fan will think he or she is doing you a big fat favour by uploading it to YouTube or wherever for everyone to hear. And for many to simply copy. Even going down the legitimate road brings few rewards for the musician. The earnings from downloads are minimal; the earnings from streaming are miniscule. So having the opportunity to play live is also an opportunity to recoup some losses. But music is always more exciting and more visceral live. The interaction of the audience with the performers is what gives music its magic. To be in the centre of that, to feel all that energy as you stand on stage is a privilege. Special interest festivals of music like Le Beat Bespoké play an important part in disseminating styles of music to new ears, turning people on to music they might otherwise have missed. Particularly if it came out half a bloody century ago…!

04 Le Beat Bespoké brings together a lot of different styles and type of people, do you think this helps your own approach to playing there?

I’m not sure if it helps my approach to playing. But it is amazing to see ageing hippies with wispy white hair rubbing shoulders with neat young Mods in sleek Italian suits, pensioner flower-children singing along to Faintly Blowing alongside teenage Mary Quant lookalikes. I noted the same at the Euro Ye Ye festival we played in Spain a couple of years ago. It really is heart-warming and rewarding to meet fans in the flesh after the gig. At the end of the night I always leave the venue with a big humble smile on my old boat race.

05 Tell us about your early Mod years in the early 1960s?

After a short spell as a rocker with full leather gear and slicked-back hair I became a Mod. Some guys went for chubby Vespas, but I always preferred the sleek Italian lines of the Lambretta. Fashions changed monthly, weekly: one minute everyone had chrome bars and carriers front and back, then just on the front, then the back, then no bars, but with chrome side panels. I had my panels sprayed racing green with a big white number on. We wore USA Army parkas and Pork Pie hats, loafers and short, dyed slacks. Then Fred Perry shirts with close-cropped hair. It was a nightmare trying to keep up.

06 You were known as The Sidekicks, then The Key before eventually forming as Kaleidoscope?

We had played our first gig at a nurses’ party at Fulham Hospital on the 26th June 1960 something, but the next day we had our first public booking playing for kids at the Cinema: Saturday Morning Pictures; a British institution. I remembered it fondly myself: off to the cinema via De La Mura’s to watch cartoons and space serials and the Lone Ranger, yelling and chewing and punching. We got a gig playing in the interval. We set up in front of the stage at the ABC cinema in Edgware, north of London. The kids didn’t shut up for a minute. But we got a taste of what it was like playing in front of an audience.

By August we had gained enough confidence to book ourselves into Central Sound Studios, 6 Denmark Street in London. We recorded ‘House of the rising sun,’ ‘Mona,’ ‘Hi Heel Sneakers’ and our very first self-penned composition, ‘Drivin’ around.’ We wanted some songs of our own; we wanted to rise above being just a covers band. Ed and I just fell into writing without anyone ever discussing it: Ed wrote the music and I wrote the words. Terrible bloody songs to begin with! But we had all gradually become ambitious, driven on by the encouragement of friends and family. Around this time we had a name change to The Key.

As The Key we played many of our own songs in a set. We were quite creative on stage. We used to have a cute girl in a mini skirt sitting on stage with us. She sat there reading a book of poetry throughout our set. Ed and I would eat an apple during one number. Probably meant to be very symbolic and mysterious but just made it difficult to sing with a mouthful of apple mush. And then during our finale number – the explosive and now long-lost ‘Face’ – I bit on a plastic blood capsule and collapsed on stage just as the last chords were fading. It caused a right old riot and we were chased out of the building by the gig organizers who had called an ambulance, completely fooled by my Oscar-winning on-stage death and they felt pretty silly having to explain their donkey-brained mistake. We were pushing at invisible boundaries.

07 What other bands did you admire and how did you hear them and their music?

We were Beatle nuts, simple as that. The Beatles were our musical gods. It’s been said so many times but the Sixties really was a magical time in many areas, music and fashion in particular, but also film and photography.

We measured everything we did against the Beatles. We had our own style but we were attempting to always achieve their standards. They set the bar for so many bands. I also liked Donovan, Leonard Cohen – Dylan, of course. He was my ultimate hero at the time along with the man who invented great pop music, Buddy Holly.

08 What was the nightlife and live circuit like in those heady days?

We were so focused on our own band on our own quest that we didn’t go to gigs or clubs. We were obsessed with only one band, Kaleidoscope.

09 What shaped your song-craft?

The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ changed everything. ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’ was the catalyst. I was never entirely happy as the lyricist writing endless soppy love songs. The Beatles showed us all the way, followed closely at the time by the Bee Gees who wrote amazingly weird songs like ‘Lemons Never Forget’ and the flawless ‘New York Mining Disaster 1941.’ It didn’t kick start me into writing songs like ‘The Murder of Lewis Tollani’ and ‘Dive into Yesterday,’ as I used to assume; I have since found out that ‘Horizontal’ came out after we were writing such songs – but it did show we were heading in the same direction. But don’t forget that Psychedelia was very short-lived. It lasted not much more that eighteen months. It was that truly magical period between late ’66 to early ’68. Fortunately for us this was the time we hit gold, securing our first recording contract with a major label, Philips/Fontana, and getting all the time we needed in a professional studio.

10 What were your thoughts on the emerging UK psych scene at that time, the girls, cars, fashion, clubs and drugs?

By now Carnaby Street had properly erupted in a florid flush of boutiques with loud music and mini skirts and Mary Quant rip-offs and lace shirts and high-heeled boots for men and see-through dresses and it was spend spend spend! Teenagers had money and they were going to spend it. Records. Clothes. Alcohol. Cigarettes. Drugs. Holidays in Spain. Hairdos. Cheap food. Magazines. The tide was turning. The old school grey drab Fifties establishment was drowning. We were going to change the world. And we had our own leaders, thank you very much: John, Paul, George and Ringo.

11 What kind of pressures, challenges and expectations did signing for Fontana and the music industry at large provide for young bands like yourselves?

On the 24th February 1967 we had our first recording session as Kaleidoscope at Philips’ Stanhope Place Studio just a giant leap for mankind from Marble Arch. Although nervous, entering this mysterious, subterranean dimly lit cavern, we knew that we could not allow anything to go wrong. We recorded ‘Holiday Maker’ and ‘Kaleidoscope.’ Unlike every recording session we’d ever had before – in egg-box dives – we were not disappointed with the results. In fact we were stunned by the clarity of the results, fascinated by the recording process and pleased to find that the engineers were friendly and co-operative. The actual recording process was taken out of our hands and was something of a mystery: we did what we were told in terms of levels and retakes. The arrangements were down to us, although Dick did have some input via carefully phrased suggestions. We were always willing to listen and incorporate inventive ideas. But all the songs went into the studio fully formed. We never wrote in the studio like some bands. Our songs were very carefully written, rewritten, arranged and polished long before recording sessions. Dick produced, obviously aware of the beating of our novice hearts, allowing us time to settle down, to accustom ourselves to the cathedral studio. In fact, the studio was so enormous that when we set up our equipment we only occupied a small area, but this was how we preferred it – reminiscent, perhaps, of our nights rehearsing at the school hall in Acton not so long before.

12 You released 6 singles for Fontana in a short period of time, were you happy with them as a collection or set of work?

We always approached singles in a different frame of mind to writing for albums. In fact most of our singles never appeared on our albums. I’m very happy with the singles – but still frustrated that we came so close to chart success but never close enough. The songs were finely honed to be radio-friendly. Both ‘Jenny Artichoke’ and ‘Bordeaux Rose’ came so close to providing us a hit record. Both were what we referred to in those radio-dominated times as ‘turntable hits’.

Our career was scuppered by our own record company whose distribution was so lousy it was legendary in the business – a fact unbeknown to us upon signing our contract with them.

13 You also released 2 seminal LPs around this time, what was that studio experience like and the entire writing and production process?

They were magical days in the huge Number One studio at Stanhope Place. Our second home. Dick was always willing to open his door to Ed and I. He was always asking us for new songs. In the studio itself he took subtle control but always allowed our creativity to rule the sessions from the studio floor. We often recorded all afternoon and long into the evening.

The entire writing and production process…?! I’ll have to bow out of that one. There’s only twenty-four hours in the day and I ain’t getting any younger. Suffice to say it was exciting, exhilarating and rewarding.

14 This set you on the way to being well-known in the ‘Swinging London’ period, how had the clubs, culture and scene evolved in this short period?

No idea. We never went to clubs. We were far too busy gigging and writing. The ‘scene’ in any era is often vacuous, and then and now holds no attraction for me. Sorry, were you hoping for ultra-colourful anecdotes of swinging London….? * (Editor – yes but the truth is more rewarding by far!)

15 Jagger and McCartney were big fans, your lyrics were evocative and painted pretty and vivid milestones?

Jagger and Pauly… Were they really? I doubt it. Probably something an interviewer said to heighten interest in his piece.

Looking back it’s easy for new generations to ridicule the style and lyrical content of music from way back then. It was a colourful burst of fashion in music. And as we all know fashion comes and goes swiftly. Fortunately for us it is also true that there is nothing new in this world and fashion styles always return. Psychedelia is again enjoying a substantial revival — and it is great to have caught that wave.

We were certainly not writing to appeal to the druggy crowd. At this point we had very little experience of drugs having dabbled frighteningly in the early Sixties’ purple heart period and being put off pills for life. Younger people look back and think there were drugs and free love available on every street corner. Nope. We weren’t particularly interested in the former and the latter didn’t come up and offer itself to us. Besides, we had total tunnel vision: we lived for our music. Nothing was going to make us waver from our righteous path.

16 Your sense of harmony and melody and ability to create memorable tunes meant that your horizons were moving constantly?

‘Faintly Blowing’ showed our maturing as writers and musicians. It also showed that the record company were still fully in support, willing to invest a lot of money in studio time and orchestral arrangements. Yes, of course, we were looking for a hit record. Dick Leahy wanted to release ‘If you so wish’ as a single — possibly as a double A-side with ‘Black Fjord’ but he lost his sense of direction and went for the more immediately commercial ‘Jenny Artichoke.’ Although ‘Jenny’ was a massive radio hit being played constantly on our one radio station at the BBC, it failed to sell for the same old reason: poor distribution. With hindsight that single should have been followed by the ‘If you so wish’/‘Black Fjord’ single. If Philips/Fontana had then got there act together properly with better distribution and promotion, we would have had a hit that would have really stood the test of time, more likely to endure than ‘Jenny.’

As writers Ed and I were always seeking the perfect song and this inevitably lead to us improving over time. We were always pushing ourselves further.

17 What was the final straw for Kaleidoscope and how did you evolve into Fairfield Parlour?

We then changed our name to Fairfield Parlour after we shrugged off our Psychedelic colours and embraced the progressive folk sound that was fast approaching. We didn’t feel the name Kaleidoscope was appropriate for our new sound and image. In retrospect I guess it was maybe a bit of a mistake. We should have stuck to our guns, proud of our name. But at the time it still seemed the right thing to do.

We had fallen out with the suits at Fontana/Philips because we had failed to produce a hit single. These were executives that thought, at first, they had the new Beatles. They gave us an ultimatum: record the songs of some hit writers -Tin Pan Alley hacks – or your days with us are numbered. We went into the studio under protest and attempted to record two songs that had been scraped from the bottom of a bucket that a publisher was chucking out. The sessions – fortunately – were a disaster!

The Radio 1 DJ, David Symonds had noticed our slightly rudderless ship passing through his studio on numerous occasions and now approached us with a proposition: Let me manage you and get you away from this blindfolded record company. We jumped at the chance to try something new. Ed and I were writing differently. Gone were the battalions in baby blue and in came the lonely old spinsters cutting up pictures of wedding dresses and photos of Marlon Brando. A name change was therefore suggested.

As Fairfield Parlour Farm – yep, we dropped the ‘Farm’ bit in the cold light of the next morning – we, or rather our shiny new manager, approached Fontana and demanded a new contract where we would record independently of the studio and simply lease the tapes to the company, retaining copyright. They agreed, but suggested we climb aboard their new label, Vertigo. Which would best suit our more progressive music, that being the way musical fashion was heading after the short-lived Psychedelic flower withered and died.

18 This period saw you invited to enter into the world of film with the ‘Eye Witness’ soundtrack which housed the new bright young thing Mark Lester?

An up and coming Director offered us the job of writing and recording the theme song and incidental music for a feature film, ‘Eye Witness.’ From the depression and dejection of just six months previous, we were now on a high, rising phoenix-like from the ashes of our former selves. 1970 was clearly going to be an outstanding year!

19 Eventually you were invited to play one of the key events of this entire period, The 1970 IOW Festival?

This really was going to be ‘the big one.’ Not only had we secured ourselves a place on the billing for the 1970 Isle of Wight festival – our manager had persuaded the organisers to let us write and record a ‘theme song’ for the festival. We cut a demo of the song, ‘Let the world wash in,’ at the Livingstone Studios in East Barnet. The Foulk Brothers loved it and so we spent two nights at Sound Techniques in Chelsea recording the song. Lennon’s classic, ‘Across the universe’ is a little too obviously the influence for the song, but nonetheless, the resulting track is warm and sincere. It is one of my favourite recordings of the band, featuring a full, well-produced sound, focusing quite correctly on the chorus.

From the 16th to the 20th of August we rehearsed at a pig farm in Woking. Yes, that is right. In the height of a sultry summer we were in a narrow tin-roofed pig hut strutting our stuff. (All right it was a new building that had yet to see a poor porker.) We’d discussed our set, arriving at a list of songs that reflected our more pastoral side, as some of the critics liked to call it. We would play more of our acoustic songs, the ones we often left out of college gigs. We realised from the outset that we were likely to be dwarfed by the physical dimensions of the gig and the stage itself. We would look ridiculous if we went out there in the middle of the day with our heavier material. We all agreed we would be grass- chewing-folk-loving-bucolic-gentle-rockers for the day. But the pre-gig excitement had already permeated the pig hut. This was going to be enormous.

The day after we left Woking, ‘Let the world wash in’ was released. The rest is history as they say – well our nadir, perhaps. You will have to buy a copy of my book, ‘I Luv Wight’ to read the whole sorry saga. Suffice to say the single bombed and our experience of the festival was tainted by the raging politics behind the scenes concerning the fate of the record at the festival itself.

20 What was the come down like post IOW Festival, what happened next?

‘White-Faced Lady’ shelved for two decades. Disillusion, despair, heartbreak – and rebirth…

21 As a Solo Artist you have been very productive indeed, releasing 19 or so LPs on various labels?

I can’t stop writing and recording. A creative person can`t simply turn off the tap – although having said that the bloody tap occasionally turns itself off. Yes, plenty of albums to choose from for those fans of the band who might be tempted to dig into my own body of work.

I have two albums (one with Damien Youth) currently available on GRA Records in America: and a third due for release soon…

And another on Rocketgirl Records, a double CD with Damien Youth: 

And a fab collaboration with US Psyche-Masters Asteroid#4 called ‘The Journey’:

If all goes to plan I will be joining Asteroid#4 on stage on the 20th of October to premier a few of these songs:

22 What about your various books and work as an Artist?

I have six books out at the moment – available here, – with a seventh on the writing & recording of ‘The Journey’ album coming shortly. And my continuing passion is photography which currently takes up more of my time than music – although that is about to change…

23 What have you got planned for the future?

A great deal. No time like the present. Strike while the iron is hot. Best foot forward. Nothing ventured etc etc. You get the secret picture.

24 Can you tell us a joke please?

A guy walks into a Bar and takes himself a quiet seat. Before he can even order a beer, the bowl of pretzels in front of him says ‘Hey, you’re a handsome fellow!’  The man tries to ignore the bowl of pretzels, and orders a fine Pilsner beer. The bowl of pretzels then says ‘Ooooh, a Pilsner, great choice. You’re a smart man!’  Starting to freak out, the guy says to the bartender ‘Hey what the hell, this bowl of pretzels keeps saying nice things to me!’ Bartender says ‘Don’t worry about it, the pretzels are complimentary!!!’

Web Links & Credits
For all things Peter Daltrey go to:  chelsearecords.co.uk
Thank you To: Anna Pumer Photography: annapumerphotography.com

See more interesting interviews and reviews on Eyeplug Magazine.

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February 16, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , ,
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