Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Masters – Magnus Carlson

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Masters3

We recently caught up with Magnus Carlson, for a chat for NUTSMAG for a preview of his special live show on 21st October 2017 at CROSSFIRE,London.

1. Are you looking forward to our Crossfire night at 229 the Venue in October and what can we expect from a Magnus Carlson show?

Seriously. I can’t wait! I’ve been wanting to go to a New Untouchables event for ages. But I tour so much, the dates have never matched my schedule before. I love and collect your compilations and 7″ singles. I have with me a great seven-piece band. Horns, Hammond organ, congas. the works! Every musician is hand-picked by me for their individual skills and love for 60s style jazz, soul and rhythm-n-blues. Every band member release albums on their own. I’m so proud of them. It’s like I’m the manager for Sweden’s National soul team. Very groovy and danceable. You will love it. I promise!

2. All of us here at New Untouchables extend our congratulations to you on the tremendous success of ‘Long Way Home’. Did you think it would be such a hit when recording had finished?

I’ve been in the music biz full-time since 1997. I’ve always followed my heart and done what I felt like. As a result, I have had a lot of number ones in Sweden but also a few flops. You never ever know what will be successful or not. But I can look back at a career (16 albums in 20 years) and be proud. Most of the stuff I do has a kind of timelessness to it. At least in my mind. I almost only listen to 60s music but I try not to be too retro even if that’s the style of music I make. It’s made today about the world today I think this is the first ever mod number one in Sweden. At least since 1967. When was a mod album number one in the UK last? The Jam?

3. For those who are new to your music, how would you describe your ‘sound’?

If you refer back to question number 1, I think that about covers it!

4. You are a massive star in Sweden and you are following in the footsteps of The Cardigans, Jasmine Kara and a certain 70s pop band to name a few; who have been popular here. How important is it for you to have a higher profile in the UK?

I’ve been doing this for so long now so I know the ups and downs. I’m perfectly happy just with my popularity in Sweden. It all can wish for. But certainly, I’m eager to try the UK. There are more mods there and I’m part of the mod scene. It’s only natural to wonder what could happen. I’m so happy you want me over! I feel grateful and excited!

5. Of course, some of our readers will know you from your time with Weeping Willows. Do you have any plans to record with them?

Oh! We have never split up. It’s my mother ship. That band will exist forever. But sometimes I go out on solo missions outside the ship. Jazz, soul, electronic excursions. Stuff I can’t do within that group. We’re more of a ballad group. The Walker Brothers type of stuff. But we are bigger than ever. We do a lot of gigs with symphony orchestras in sports arenas and Concert halls. This year we go out on a Christmas tour. 17 gigs in December. Next year we will record and release a New album. All our albums are number ones in Sweden.

6. The new album is inspired by Northern Soul. When did you first become interested in that style of music?

I was born in 1968. I grew up with punk and then New wave. I started to listen to everything my idols recommended. Naturally, that meant all kinds of 60s music. All things mod. So, through The Style Council and Dexy’s Midnight Runners, I got to know about rare soul. Then we had a lot of Northern soul clubs in Stockholm in the 90s which I went to because I love to dance. I got to know all the people. The soul scene is my home. And I have always loved and collected 7″ singles. My favourite format since I was a Punk kid.

7. Sweden has had a healthy 60’/Northern Soul/mod scene for a number of years with organisations like Uppers and people like Frederik Ekander. Were you aware of that scene at all?

Oh Yeah! There are a lot of soul clubs and DJs/collectors over here. Club Soul in Stockholm has been going every Saturday for almost 30 years now! Could it be a World record?! They still only play soul on vinyl. I sometimes DJ there. And then there’s the monthly club Soulastatic in Gothenburg that Punky has been doing for about 20 years now. Very strong soul scene. With lots of great DJs!

8. You have recorded the new album in English and spent time at Black Barn Studios with Andy Lewis. What was that experience like?

I knew Andy before. He had heard my Swedish version of Beggin’ from 2003. We have DJ’d together and even wrote songs together before. So, when I finally had the time to make a soul album I knew I had to do it with him. Andy said we should record at the Black Barn. So, we did. It was perfect and a great 4-day session with a great band Andy put together. And a bit of a romantic childhood dream.

9. Who are your musical influences?

Too many to mention. When I was a Teenager the people who made me want to sing was (chronologic) Elvis, The Smiths, Weller, Scott Walker. Through them, I got into the rarer stuff. Now I mostly listen to 60s soul and 50s jazz. I’m going backwards. Next stop for me is probably Blues and old gospel.

10. Are there any current bands or artists that you like?

Goran Kajfeš Subtropic Arkestra is amazing! He’s the trumpet player in my band. He’s a genius. He has a new album out just this week.

11. What is your favourite song by another artist that you could not live without?

I have a big record collection and I sincerely can’t part with any of them. You know how it is. It never ends. I find new old favourite every week! That’s the thrill!

Thank you, Magnus, for taking time out of your busy schedule to talk to With NutsMag. We can’t wait to see you on 21st October 2017 at CROSSFIRE,London.

Band Members:
Magnus Carlson singer
Goran Kajfeš trumpet
Jonas Kullhammar saxophone
Anders Kappelin bass
Anders Lewén guitar
Patrik Kolar organ
Johan Carlsson congas
Christer Björklund drums

Discography:  www.discogs.com/Magnus-Carlson

Social Networks:

facebook.com/magnuscarlson
twitter.com/carlson_magnus


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music News Picks Scene Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – The Wheels

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Newbreed5

NUTsMag recent caught up with The Wheels, who hail from Mallorca, Balearic Islands for a quick chat.

1. How long have you been active and how did you get together?

Three of us started playing music together when we were around 14, it was then that we decided to make The Wheels something more serious. The years have seen members change, some leave and come back but finally we’ve got the final lineup and we’re stoked.

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

A list that no one has time to read. But we began being influenced by music from the 60s when we were starting up, purely because we couldn’t find anything contemporary to relate to then, artists like Kevin Ayers, The Beatles. We also love jazz and Brazilian music. Now there’s loads of great music out there, we think perhaps that the people making it went through a similar experience to us in that they delved back into history to find music that inspired them and when making their own, these influences were exhibited. Artists like The Lemon Twigs, Connan Mockasin, Mild High Club and Mac Demarco have had us pretty hooked recently.

3. Are there any bands you’d recommend in your area?

Definitely, good friends of our, los Nastys are a band people should check out, they’ve come from the underground garage scene in Madrid along with The Parrots and Hinds. All those bands have great songs and a lot of energy.

4. Tell us about the 60s/underground scene from Spain?

We don’t know all that much about what was going on in the rest of Spain during that time but we do know that Mallorca was a melting pot for artists from abroad. Deia was home to people like Kevin Ayers who founded The Soft Machine and later went solo, it also saw Robert Wyatt spend some time there and Yoko Ono is said to have visited as well. Hendrix even played in Palma in the 60s

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Hypnotizing psychedelia with a nostalgic flash from the 60s and a freshness that encapsulates the new wave of psychedelic pop

6. What are your live shows like?

In a way they’re like bringing a sonic painting to life. Having the songs performed widens perception and awakens different senses and emotions.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? Who do you despise?

That’s like asking a poet to pick their favorite word, apart from the influences we adopted as teenagers we’re constantly discovering new music and forever going through phases of obsession with different artists. We don’t play covers but we’d probably do something by Kevin Ayers. Who do we despise? There are so many artists we love and probably more we have a more negative opinion of. But we’re not here to insult anyone… although we hate that fucking song ‘Despasito ‘that’s out at the moment. And Ed Sheeran is a pain in the arse too.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

We read a lot of books, Siddhartha by Herman Hesse was actually an influence on our last album. We’re really into film and also get very inspired by painters like Matti Klarwein (who also lived in Deia), who was one of the psychedelic legends.

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

In everything released until now, Guille has been the main songwriter but the whole band was involved in the process and Tomi even wrote a song for the last album too.

10. What is your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favorite song by another artist?

Dream On – Nó by O Terno

11. How would you describe the underground scene? Do you participate?

The current underground scene is thriving at the moment. And yes, more than participate, we live in it currently. There is brilliant music being made, you just need to look for it.

12. What has your biggest challenge been up to date?

This year it’s been finding time to work on new material because we’ve been on the road so much.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record?

Rehearsing depends on whether there’s a tour or important gig coming up, in those cases its every day. We play live a lot. And we record when we get off tour.

14. What do you think of music coverage in the media?

We think there’s plenty of room for more coverage, especially in mainstream media, it’s embarrassing how little time is devoted to culture. It’s up to the independent magazines, blogs etc. at the moment. Although platforms like Pitchfork and Red Bull are pretty cool.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

All the ones mentioned above and more, we’d be here for days.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We were very happy with Paco Loco and his studio was a wonderful place to record an album, we’d definitely work with him again. At the moment we’d love to record with Jonathan Rado from Foxygen and the location… I dunno Brazil?

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting dates have you got coming up?

We’re already writing new material and we may release a single before the year is out, an album will follow sometime in the future. We’re busy in September with festivals like Ebrovision, Zaragoza Psych Fest, Monkey Week. We’re looking to get more dates in Europe as we toured Mexico before trying to sort out something in our continent. And we’ll be hoping to play more great festivals next summer.

Main Site: thewheels.band/

Social Networks:
Facebook: facebook.com/TheWheels.proj
Instagram: www.instagram.com/thewheelsband/

Band Members: Guille Borrás (Guitar and vocals), Tomi Solbas (Drums and vocals), Rick Sena (Guitar), Toni Sánchez (Keyboard, Synths), Andrés Alcover (Bass and vocals).

Discography: Great Frustrations EP (2014), Born to Fly LP (2015) The Year of the Monkey LP (2017)


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 19, 2017 By : Category : Articles Europe Interviews Music News Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 13 – Kenny Dorham: 6 of the Best

Jazz for Modernists 13 – Kenny Dorham: 6 of the Best

Texas-born trumpeter, composer and singer McKinley ‘Kenny’ Dorham (1924-1972) played an important role in the development of modern jazz trumpet. Recording as early as 1945 with Mercer Ellington and Frank Humphries, he appeared on some early bebop big-band sessions led by Dizzy Gillespie and sustained a career as leader and side player throughout the 1953-1965 period of hard bop. After work with Fats Navarro, Lionel Hampton, James Moody, Charlie Parker, Milt Jackson and Thelonious Monk, his first full date as the leader came in October 1953 and was released for Debut as The Kenny Dorham Quintet (vols. 1 & 2). The following year he was a founding member of (at the time) Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers, a combo soon to be led by fellow co-founder and drummer Art Blakey. Dorham’s own Jazz Prophets followed in 1956, a line-up of which featuring pianist Bobby Timmons recorded his second album for Blue Note, ’Round About Midnight at the Café Bohemia (1957).

Dorham has constantly been regarded as a ‘players’ player’ or ‘underrated’, perhaps due to his never being consistently associated with one major label for any great length of time. Although commercial success eluded him, the pantheon of great names of distinct styles that either played for him or invited him to key sessions is a testament to his qualities of consistency and adaptability. Returning to Blue Note in 1961, he struck up something of a partnership with tenor great Joe Henderson, appearing on three of his Blue Note LPs: Page One (1963), Our Thing (1963) and In ‘N Out (1964). Henderson appeared in turn on Dorham’s Blue Note dates Una Mas (1963) and Trompeta Toccata (1964), while both horn men featured brilliantly on Chicago pianist Andrew Hill’s masterpiece Point of Departure (1964).

From 1965 until his premature death in 1972, Dorham recorded only sporadically, though he did still feature on some excellent LPs including the 1967 debut by pianist and fellow Texan Cedar Walton. Overall, his legacy is a very positive one, often hailed for the quality of original compositions such as ‘Blue Bossa’ (recorded by Joe Henderson), the modal ‘Sunset’ from Whistle Stop (1961) and the twice-recorded ‘Una Mas’. In terms of style, Dorham has been praised in The Penguin Guide to Jazz for his ‘elusive brilliance’ and described as ‘fluid, punchy and lyrical’. Of his Blue Note sides, only ‘Mamacita’ (see no. 5) was issued as a 45 single, though a few EPS on other labels were distributed globally. DJs looking for tracks for the dancefloor or the ‘lounge’ party soundtrack might need to rely on albums. In truth, Dorham was never really an out and out soul-jazz player, though the list below does it’s best to appeal to mods who like to ‘step out’ as well as sit back with a cool beer and watch the network DVD box set of Public Eye.

1. ‘Afrodisia’ (1955) – From Afro-Cuban 10″ Vinyl, Blue Note BLP 5065 & LP, BLP 1535 (1957)


Dorham’s first two lead sessions for Blue Note in January and March 1955 were with expanded versions of the first Messengers line-up featuring Horace Silver on piano, Art Blakey on drums and Hank Mobley on tenor sax. From the second session came ‘Afrodisia’, an infectious piece of Latin hard bop with Carlos ‘Patato’ Valdes on congas and Cecil Payne on baritone sax.

youtube.com/watch?v=7myLXPUBB_w


2. ‘Lotus Blossom’ (1959) – From Quiet Kenny LP New Jazz NJLP 8225


What Billboard (Feb 22, 1960) called ‘the relaxed, warm sounds’ of Dorham’s late ’59 Quiet Kenny LP for Prestige’s New Jazz offshoot owed more than a little to the modal sounds of Miles Davis’ recently released Kind of Blue and the directions in which John Coltrane was taking the hard bop template. Bassist Paul Chambers had appeared on Davis’ seminal album, while pianist Tommy Flanagan and drummer Arnette Cobb in the same year played on Coltrane’s Giant Steps, the first clear exemplum of the iconic saxophonist’s ‘sheets of sound’ experiments. Dorham’s quartet for this date was thus the cutting edge of post-bop improvisation. The modal feel is evident on the exotically-titled ‘Lotus Blossom’, which leads off an outstanding set of laid-back modern jazz.

youtube.com/watch?v=-TwoXLZo6-c


3. ‘Buffalo’ (1961) – From Whistle Stop LP Blue Note BST 84063


Whistle Stop, the third of Dorham’s five dates as leader for Blue Note, is required listening for connoisseurs of the particular period of hard bop (c.1959-1963) that followed Miles’ and Coltrane’s modal experiments and preceded the r & b-driven, finger-snapping funk of Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder. Perhaps the most interesting track from a historical point of view is the bluesy and Indian-inspired ‘Buffalo’, a swinging example of what Ira Gitler’s original sleeve notes describe as ‘southwestern funk as opposed to the usual southern funk we hear’. Mistakenly attributed to Horace Silver, a short version of this tune cropped up on the debut release in early 1963 of visionary acoustic guitarist Davy Graham (The Guitar Player). Taken up by John Renbourn, the tune for guitar was an early blueprint for the fusions of jazz and folk that would lead to the formation of Pentangle in 1967.

youtube.com/watch?v=uQoslZNVjzs


4. ‘Sao Paulo’ (1964 – recorded 1963) – From Una Mas Blue Note BLP 4127


Enter Joe Henderson (and Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams and Butch Warren). Recorded in April 1963, Una Mas (Spanish for ‘One more (time)’) is a record inspired by the Brazilian bossa nova sounds so popular in the United States in 1962. The title track, here extended to over 15 minutes, had appeared a year earlier as ‘US’ on the live Inta Somethin LP for Pacific Jazz. Infectious though this is, it’s the shorter ‘Sau Paulo’, described by Dorham in the sleeve notes as ‘half bossa feeling and the other half is something else’, which best epitomises the ‘light and shade’ feel of Blue Note’s 1960s Latin-tinged modal blues.

youtube.com/watch?v=lN1iQQS5E_A


5. ‘Mamacita’ (1965 – recorded 1964) 45 (parts 1 & 2): – Blue Note 1922; 33 – From Trompeta Toccata Blue Note LP BST 84181


This catchy Joe Henderson tune kicks off side two of Dorham’s last date as leader (Henderson would record a slightly faster version on his 1967 set The Kicker). The last of the five Henderson-Dorham Blue Notes to be recorded (in September 1964), Trompeta Toccata reunites Dorham with Tommy Flanagan and also features legendary drummer Albert Heath and the great Richard Davis on bass. Mid-sixties jazz modernists are urged to acquire this album also for its urgent Afro-Latin title track (with outstanding Henderson solo) and the nocturnal swing of the excellent ‘Night Watch’.

youtube.com/watch?v=0dGFeIcGb_4


6. ‘Turquoise Twice’ (1967) – From Cedar Walton: Cedar! LP (Prestige PR7519)


Dallas-born pianist and composer Cedar Walton had made his recording debut in 1958 on Dorham’s Riverside LP This is the Moment! After a stint with Art Farmer and Benny Golson’s Jazztet, he was part of Art Blakey’s most interesting Messenger’s line-up from 1961 to 1964, playing alongside Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard and contributing bona fide classics such as ‘Ugetsu’ and ‘Mosaic’ to the repertoire. By the mid-sixties Dalton was appearing on numerous Prestige sessions; his first for the label as the leader featured Kenny Dorham, who, though fading from the scene, delivered a searing solo on the majestically lyrical modal blues ‘Turquoise Twice’. Dorham continued to record sporadically (dates with Barry, Harris, Clifford Jordan, Toshiko Akiyoshi and Cecil Payne) until his premature death from kidney disease in 1972. His legacy is a fine one.

youtube.com/watch?v=nFKeU-qKRiA


 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

September 7, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Val Palmer – Hey! Ms DJ

This entry is part 8 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with DJ Val Palmer. Here is what she had to say about her passion for Music, DJing and rare records prior to her next Crossfire slot in London.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Being the youngest of seven kids I grew up listening to the Beatles, Stones, Kinks and Chuck Berry, so have always been into music and was buying records from the age of about nine. I caught the best of the 1970s from Roxy Music to punk, and gradually discovered the soul scene via the re-issues that came out of the ’79 mod revival. I just carried on buying records as usual.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The er… glamorous Crown & Sceptre pub in Great Titchfield Street. A local new year’s eve bash run by my neighbour, Ady Croasdell.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Definitely the first time I DJ’d at the 100 Club all-nighter in the mid-80s – I’d arrived! Talk about a challenge – I heard some guy say ‘F*ck me – it’s a bird DJing…’ More recently, playing at the Subway Soul Club in New York is always a blast, there’s something very satisfying about playing those records back on their home turf.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

An excruciating ‘soul’ night at Whitechapel Art Gallery, of all places. It was the bad idea of some trendy arty types, so virtually zero punters. Me, Keb and Jo Wallace DJ’d to each other all night and there were no middles/spindles, so records were sliding all over the decks, we had to be creative with chewing gum. There were also no wages.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Ian Clarke, Ady C, Bob Jones and the London mob were a huge influence, and I’ve always really rated people like Dean Rudland who can play across any genre, any time. I admire DJs who’ll throw in a few £5 records along with all the uber-rare expensive stuff, there’s so much that is overlooked because it’s not obscure enough.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Well, I’d like to think that good taste has something to do with it? I tend to ‘shape my sound’ depending on what kind of gig it is – from northern to 70s / crossover, or with a smidgen of r&b and funky stuff thrown in, as necessary. I think I’m fairly adaptable, so long as I get my cab fare home.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Stumbling across three mint copies of John & the Weirdest (Can’t get over these memories / No time) in a well picked-over record store in Los Angeles. (They were filed next to Elton John…) I flogged them all eventually, and am probably the only person to get a begging letter from Butch.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I guess it would have to be Curtis Mayfield, which may sound predictable, but the guy has shaped entire generations of music and political awareness. I saw him play a gig at the Town & Country Club in the 90s, just him on guitar plus bass and drums. It was incredible, yet he didn’t even have a record deal at the time.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not particularly, if you obsess over collecting labels, you end up having to buy the rubbish tunes too. In general I’m partial to mid-tempo, which seems to be rather unfashionable at the moment. However, these days I tend to rummage around the bargain bins for classic stuff that I missed the first time around.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The next slot is New York’s Subway Soul club on October 3rd, and then back to London for Crossfire the following weekend, Sat the 10th of October.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Right this minute, it would be Charlene & the Soul Serenaders – Can you win. Everyone seems to have one except me, which is really irritating, and it’s not bloody cheap.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Impossible to answer of course, but off the top ‘o’ my head, these are some of my all time faves.

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Gambrells – You better move (Carla)
2. Tony Hestor – Watch yourself (Karate)
3. Larry Atkins – Ain’t that love enough (Highland)
4. Johnny Robinson – Gone but not forgotten (Okeh)
5. Sharon McMann – Got to find another guy (Karen)
6. Edwin Starr – Just my kind of woman (Ric Tic)
7. Carol Anderson – Taking my mind off love (Whip)
8. Willie Tee – First taste of hurt (Gatur)
9. Vows – Tell me (VIP)
10. Trends – Thanks for a little lovin’ (ABC)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Rhetta Hughes – You’re doing it with her (Tetragrammaton)
2. Tommie Young – That’s all a part of loving him (Contempo)
3. Limitations – I’m lonely, I’m troubled (Bacone)
4. Brenda George – I can’t stand it (Kent)
5. Claude Huey – Why would you blow it (Galaxy)

Next Club Spots: Crossfire  for NUTs, London.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 6, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
2 Comments

Ady Croasdell – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 10 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

Ady is a living ‘Soul Scene’ legend running the 6TS Rhythm & Soul Club at the 100 Club Northern Soul All Nighters and co-running the Crossfire Allnighters.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

The Animals. While living in Derby 1964.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Last Chance 6TS allnighter, 21 Oxford St in 1982.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Every closing Sunday night at the Cleethorpes weekender.

4. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Butch for new sounds, Mick Smith for the old ones.

5. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Randy Cozens showing me there was more than Northern to soul dancing.

6. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Sharon Scott – Putting My Heart under Lock and Key, most famous ones are Melba Moore – The Magic Touch and Frankie & Johnny – I’ll Hold You.

7. Biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Impressions, Lou Johnson & Maxine Brown.

8. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Crossfire – The next night is on Saturday Oct 21st 2017.

9. What is the record you would most like to own?

That one that hasn’t been discovered yet.

10. Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Kim Weston – Helpless
2. Carla Thomas – I’ll Never Stop Loving You
3. Four Tops – Baby I Need Your Loving
4. The Parliaments – This Is My Rainy Day
5. The Sensations – Demanding Man
6. Spellbinders – Help Me
7. Ben E King – Getting’ To Me (Atco acetate)
8. Sharon Scott – I’m Not Afraid (acetate)
9. Barbara Lynn – This Is the Thanks I Get
10. Luther Ingram – Oh Baby Don’t You Weep

Current Top 5 Tracks: 

1. Nancy Wilcox – He’ll Be Leaving You – Pied Piper
2. September Jones – Voo Doo Mademoiselle – Pied Piper
3. Magic Night – If You and I Had Never Met – Roulette
4. Melvin Parker – If I Had My Way (acetate)
5. O C Tolbert – Marriage Is Just a State Of Mind (Dave Hamilton acetate)

DJ Promo Links
www.6ts.info
facebook.com/pages/6Ts-Rhythm-and-Soul-Society/6320844642

 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 6, 2017 By : Category : Clubs DJs Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Callum Simpson – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 6 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod/scooter scene at 15 years old. I bought my first scooter, a Vespa 50cc Special and joined a scooter club called High Moderation. I had an older brother and cousins who were into the Mod scene so I started to hang around with some Mods who were a year above me at school. Once into the fashion it was only a matter of time before I started to get into the music. I started listening to bands such as Paul Weller, The Jam, Small Faces and The Who. My brother had a big part to play in my musical taste progressing, as he was listening to bands like The Specials, Madness and was listening to lots of soul and Motown compilations, which exposed me to artists like Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, The Four Tops and Martha Reeves.

At 16, looking slightly older than my age (not the case now), I was able to start going to clubs like Brighton Beach, local soul nights and the occasional scooter rally. This is where I was exposed to lots of new sounds. I was hearing records like Mel Torme – Coming Home, Sandi Sheldon – Gonna make me love you and Sam Dees – Lonely for my baby. As you can imagine I was blown away by these sounds and the exposure made me delve a little deeper into the music and vinyl records. I bought my first record from Boogaloo Records in Leicester when I was 17 for 6UKP and it was Ray Charles – Go on home.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My First DJ set was in Birmingham; by this time I lived for the weekends and was travelling up and down the country regularly attending mod/soul nights. Through attending nights on a regular basis Pid asked me to DJ along with a couple of mates Soggy and Gibbo. Dudley Steve was also on at the same night. I remember playing records like Joe Tex – You better believe it baby, JJ Jackson – Oh Ma Liddi and The Artistics – hope we have. I also remember playing a reissue, but this was before I was aware of the OVO policy! A couple of people looked amazed that they saw a young 17 year old lad behind the decks playing Bobby Adams & Betty Lou – Dr True Love…quite funny thinking about it now!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My most memorable DJ set has to be in Barcelona at the Boiler club. The city is amazing enough but the Boiler Club is how clubs should be, exciting, vibrant and a full on party from start to finish. I was deliberating weeks before about what I should play and selecting records for my play-box! I was pleased with my sets and judging by the dance floor so were the dancers, it was packed from start to finish… I even played a B-side by mistake and the dancers liked it, thankfully it was a very good B-side!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If ever you get asked to DJ at a wedding DON’T DO IT! I was asked off the back of running a club called ‘Shoutin the Blues’. One of the bar men liked the music and asked me to play at his wedding. At the time I was about 18 or 19 and thought that I could make a few quid. I made it clear that I only had Soul, Mod, R&B, Latin records and that he wouldn’t be getting the usual type wedding DJ playing music like ABBA, The Village People etc. He was adamant that he wanted something a bit different and that his guests would enjoy the music. I agreed to do it and for a price of £150, which I thought wasn’t bad for a few hours work! How wrong could I have been!

I was conscious not to play rare stuff, so I took more mainstream (to me) records which consisted of lots of Motown and dance floor friendly classics. Anyway to cut a long story short only 1 person danced throughout the whole night and that was towards the end of the night… funnily enough it was probably the rarest record I played all night ‘Billy Hawkes – Oh Baby’. Towards the end there were a group of lads who were sat at the back of the room, one of them came to ask me if I would play ‘You’ll never walk alone’, me being a Man United fan replied “I don’t play that stuff”, every record I played then was drowned out by a chant of “Who the f hell are you”. Shortly after that I decided to call it a night. I got my wages and left. Looking back now it’s pretty funny but at the time it was a nightmare!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Mik Parry – Forward thinking and so ahead of the game it’s unreal. It’s only now other DJ’s have been able to acquire records he was playing years ago. A) because the records are pure quality and B) they have seen his playlists. Check out his You tube channel ‘POW WOW MIK’

Karl Heard – Is what I call a proper DJ! This man has the ability to create an atmosphere like no other. Karl had a record collection to die for, but has now sold most of them off…not that I’m complaining! You think of all the big tunes – Volumes, Charles Johnson, Judy Stokes, Notations, Magicians, Harvey Averne, Johnny McCall AND Karl had or has these and loads more of this calibre.

Gav Arno – I always say it but it’s true, he’s a dark horse! Every time I hear him behind the decks and also when I have a look through his playbox he surprises me with what he has. Gav has a passion for unearthing quality unknown records, he finds tomorrow’s big records today!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The three DJ’s I have mentioned in question 5 have helped me shape my taste, especially Karl Heard, over the last few years. Another is by regularly attending club nights and hearing DJ’s spinning new (to me) interesting records. The thing I love about Mod nights is you get such a varied taste of music from Soul right through to Jazz.

The internet is also a great way to hear new records and other DJ’s from around the world. Shows such as Jester Wild and YouTube channels are a great way to hear new stuff. Over the years I have collected all sorts but now I am much more selective about what records I buy.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Tough question…my best discoveries are records I have recently posted on YouTube, Lil Archie & The Majestics, Leave my Girl Alone & Victor Lane, There’s Something About You. I have had them for about 4/5 years now and have been searching hard since but have never come across other copies. That is the reason why I have put them on YouTube to give them more exposure but also to see if other DJ’s/collectors can unearth copies…good luck!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I honestly don’t have a favourite artist, I really like Marvin Gaye but not sure I could call him my favourite. I would relate this back again to question 5 and say that in my time as a resident at The Pow Wow Club, Mik and Gav were massive influences over me musically. The stuff these guys were playing was unreal! Imagine being 19/20 and hearing The Jokers, Jonathan Capree, The Fads, Young Jessie etc. Both well ahead of their time and two great DJ’s.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not in the slightest, if it’s good and I like it I’ll have bid/buy it. I don’t just buy records for DJ-ing with though. If I hear a record that I like but is not right for playing out, depending on cost, I will still by it for Sunday afternoons relaxing at home, listening to a few records.

Although I do like the Soul Brother Records label. It can be found here.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I am not currently a resident or running any club nights but I get asked to guest DJ quite a bit, so if you keep your eyes peeled I’m sure you will my see my name on one or two flyers. In terms of running my own night… watch this space! Callum will be playing at The Nutty New Year Event in London, see all the details HERE!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Another tough one, it would have to be either Eddie Parker, I’m Gone on Awake or The Hopkins Bros, Shake Cherri on Magnetik. I can remember when I first heard both of these records for the first time and thinking Holy smoke!

I first heard Eddie Parker in Sweden at the Soulastic All-nighter when Ginger Taylor was playing. When the first few notes came in the atmosphere was something I had not experienced before at a soul all-nighter and something I will never forget. That night we all went onto an after party and one of my friends had what I thought was a copy of ‘I’m Gone’ and the only difference between his copy and Ginger’s was that my mate’s was a boot (the look-a-like boot). I wasn’t aware of the value of the record at this point and I thought he had a copy, he then explained it was worth in the region of between 5-7K, needless to say, it was hammered that night and played probably about 30 times at the after party… oh what good times!

I first heard Andy Dyson play The Hopkins Bros at Lifeline a few years back and again the place went crazy. Only a handful of DJ’s had it at the time, all the big boys such as Dyson, Butch, Ian Wright… I’m not even sure if Mick H had one at that time!? Shame that it has been booted now! It’s still record of the night every time I hear it out, but I hate that I can now go online and buy a boot of it for £10, it has to be OVO!

12.  Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten Favourites:

1. Eddie Parker – I’m gone

2. Hopkins Bros – Shake Cherri

3. Jonathan Capree – I’m gonna build me a mountain

4. Carol Anderson – Taking my mind off love

5. Ray Agee – I’m losing again

6. Billy Hawkes – Oh baby

7. Volumes – I ain’t gonna give you up

8. Otis Lee – Hard Row to Hoe

9. Parisians – Twinkle little star

10. Tobi Lark – Sweep it out in the shed

Top Five Spins:

1. The Sacred Four – Somebody watching you

2. Ray Agee – I’m Losing again

3. J T Parker – If you want to hold on

4. Judy Stokes – Real Man

5. Charles Simmons – Save the World

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 6, 2017 By : Category : Articles Clubs DJs Events Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Chris Dale – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 9 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Chris Dale took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

New Wave, Mod Revival and Two-tone, but my first ever gig in Dec 1979 at Lewisham Odeon, The Specials, Selector and Dexy’s on the same bill, and my future was sealed.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

St Johns Tavern 1990, I can still remember how nervous I was. This was one of Alan Hanscombe’s many soul and reggae ventures, and still helping him out with RnB123 in 2014, should be due my pension soon.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Sunday night Brighton 2011, something really clicked and is up there as one of the best. I can’t go without mentioning my few 6Ts 100 Club experiences, The Boiler and the Hideaway Manchester, especially after a particular memorable football match. The Rimini Italian Jobs throughout the 90’s and early 2000’s were very special, and finally Scenesville at the Notre Dame hall, great nights and an awesome venue.

04. What, so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve been lucky to have DJ’d at some great clubs and nothing really stands out as a bad experience.

05. Your favourite DJ and why?

The whole 6T’s team at the 100 Club past and present, Colin Law at Shotts (he was untouchable around this time), Roger Banks and Mark Bicknell, Gary Spencer & Carl Fortnum and not forgetting Terry Jones at the Village.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Travelling around the country to various all-nighters and clubs, hearing fantastic music, taking a little bit from each experience, mixing in a little Ska, Reggae and Jazz, trying to mould this into my own style, hoping people don’t realise I’ve pinched it.

07. What was your best ever find/ discovery?

Laying claim to any find this day and age is a very rocky road, always someone out there to trip you up, but Manny Corchado – Pow Wow at the Mousetrap in the late 1990’s, would be a tough one to beat.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Motown stable, as it directs you to everything else, Curtis Mayfield, Marvin Gaye, The Temptations. I also have a great love for Ska & Reggae, which stems from the Two-tone era.

09. Do you collect specific labels/ artist/ genres?

Yes, Yes, Yes and Yes – Tamla, Sue, Studio One, Blue Beat the list is too long…

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Mousetrap
RnB123
Brighton\NYE London
I’m also very fortunate to be asked to do fantastic clubs like VaVaVoom
(25th Oct 2014), Inner City Soul and The Boiler Barcelona.

11. What record you would most like to own?

George Pepp – The feeling is real – Coleman
Jimmy Bo Horne – I can’t speak – Dade
Ray Gee – I’m losing again – Soultown
The Wailers – Diamond baby – Coxsone

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 tracks of all time:

1. George Pepp – The feeling is real – Coleman
2. Paris – Sleepless nights – Doc
3. Flash Mckinley – I’ll rescue you – Bombay
4. Gene Toones – What more do you want – SimCo
5. George Lemons – Fascinating girl – Gold Soul
6. Cleveland Robinson – Love is a trap – Nosnibor
7. Prince Buster – Linger on – Prince Buster
8. Tommy McCook – Goldfinger – Treasure Isle
9. Little John – Just wait and see – Gogate
10. John Harris – Hangin’ in – Kerston

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Charles Sheffield – Got my voodoo working – Excello
2. Judy Hughes – Fine Fine Fine – Vault
3. Constellations – I don’t know about you – Gemini
4. Marvin Gaye – Loved starved heart – Tamla
5. Tan Geers – Let my heart and soul be free – Okeh

Next Club Spots: Nuts 20th Anniversary at Orleans, London – Sat November 18th 2017


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 6, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music News UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Reviews June 2017 – Part 1

The Baron Four

‘Silvaticus’ – LP

Formed 2012, it’s been a couple of years since Baron Four’s last outing, but this has been well-worth waiting for. They have always set out to capture the exciting sound of classic Beat and Rhythm & Blues, and this is another quality example, and in my opinion, their best work so far. ‘It’s Alright’, ‘Don’t Need You Anymore’ and ‘Certain Type Of Girl’ evokes the spirit of the Pretty Things, Kinks and Yardbirds. 2014s ‘Out Of The Wild Come The Baron Four’ is their only album to date, but this EP is a welcome addition to the fine collection of singles before and since that LP. If you are going to the Brighton August Bank Holiday Weekender, you can catch the Baron Four live at Volks Tavern on the Saturday afternoon with Men Of North Country.

facebook.com/thebaronfour
thebaronfour.bandcamp.com

BJ’s New Breed

‘How Come’ b/w ‘I’ll Never Come Back Again’ – Single

BJ’s New Breed rose from the ashes of Vienna’s Jaybirds and The Attention a few years back and return with this classy 45 of Beat-inspired garage. ‘How Come’ is a mid-paced Beat ballad, while ‘I’ll Never Come Back Again’ sees the BJ’s back on familiar territory, with this rockin’ fuzz belter. Definitely, one to look out for on Time For Action Records.

facebook.com/BjsNewBreed

Dukes Of Hamburg

‘Germany’s Newest Hitmakers’ – LP

Surely there are few finer exponents of Beat/R&B in Germany than the Dukes Of Hamburg and they have been ever present on the scene not just in Europe, but in America for a long time. Formed and led by the irrepressible Thilo Pieper, The Dukes give us a rockin’ great set of R&B belters with this album including tracks originally by the likes of Larry Williams, Big Joe Turner, Chuck Berry, Cab Calloway and Herman’s Hermits (yes you did read that correctly !) Their version of ‘I’m Henry The VIII’ is far more enjoyable than the original, just for the sheer fun of it. What I really like about The Dukes is the way they appear not to take themselves too seriously, but really know how to get the best out of any song they tackle.
Great fun and a great album.

facebook.com/DukesofHamburg
www.dukesofhamburg.com

The Haggis Horns

‘Take It Back feat Doc Brown’ b/w ‘Take It Back instrumental’ – Single

The Haggis Horns have been around in the UK funk and soul scene for over ten years and 2015s album ‘What Comes To Mind’ was a highlight of that year. This Leeds-based combo has cut another slice of top-drawer funky soul with this single. The A side features rapper Doc Brown (which may not be to everyone’s taste here at Nutsmag), but make no mistake, the instrumental flip side more than holds its own as a stand-alone track. Rumour has it a new album is on the way, so soul and funk fans, keep your ears open for that one while enjoying this single.

www.thehaggishorns.com

facebook.com/thehaggishorns

thehaggishorns.bandcamp.com

Shindig Magazine

Issue 68

After the scare last year when the future of Shindig looked in doubt (through no fault of Mr. Mills or Mr. Morton) thankfully the best music magazine by a country mile is still going strong and what a treat this edition is; especially for mods. Apart from all the usual features like the extensive reviews, news and interviews with up-coming bands (Shindig are more clued up than most on that score), this edition features the last ever interview with Steve Marriott, a cracking interview with Steve Ellis and a major interview with Paul Weller.
And it is the Weller feature that is proof that Shindig really has moved to the top of the league. Let’s face it; Mr. W is not one to suffer fools or journalists gladly, so when he does give an interview, you know he has checked out exactly who he is dealing with and it is clear from this piece that he was very comfortable in the company of Jon Mills and Paul Osbourne.
In these days where the last surviving music paper is so far up its self it is an irrelevance, the magazine for vinyl junkies has lost its way and the only ‘general’ music mag seems content to wallow in the dull corporate-mire of the music biz, be thankful that Shindig is a reminder that quality, innovation and editorial independence is still alive and kicking.

https://www.shindig-magazine.com
facebook.com/Shindig.Magazine


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Reviews June 2017 – Part 2

The Riots

‘Now Or Never’ b/w It’s My Life’ – Single

If ever there was a band that should have been huge, it is The Riots. This single was a follow-up to 2013’s ‘Time For Truth’ debut album which had massive appeal and support from the mod-rock fraternity in the UK. An ill-fated UK tour was arranged, but due to bad planning by the promoter and the British authorities refusing a visa to lead singer and guitarist Sasha Bolotov, the tour went ahead with the other bands while the two other members of The Riots sat out the entire time in a hostel in London with no money and help. Although they toured the rest of Europe successfully, it was the UK market that they really needed and that put a strain on the band who have been inactive for a while now, but there is always hope they will be back. This single shows just what a powerhouse band they were and that they could match contemporaries like The Spitfires, The Orders or The Costellos. A classy piece of powerpop/mod-rock from Moscow’s finest. Скоро вернусь мои друзья (Come back soon Riots)

facebook.com/TheRiotsBand
theriotsband.bandcamp.com
www.theriots.band

Samuel S Parkes

‘Lock and Key’ b/w ‘Let Me Go’ – Single

This Leeds-based outfit really have gone from strength to strength over the last few years working with the likes of Martha Reeves and the Vandellas and Dennis Greaves. They class their music as ‘new northern’ which is a good way to describe it. ‘Let Me Go’ is a Hammond-driven belter of Northern-influenced dance music, while ‘Lock and Key’ is a delightful soul ballad. Samuel S Parkes is another one of those bands that is destined for even greater things in future and if you haven’t seen them live, you should. Apart from the music, watching backing vocalist and percussionist Rachel Mary Shaw go through her routine is enough to make you feel tired!

facebook.com/samuelsparkesmusic
twitter.com/samuel_s_parkes
samuelsparkes.bandcamp.com/

Sidewalk Society

‘Strange Roads (the songs of Rolled Gold by The Action)’  – LP

Regular readers of Nutsmag Reviews may well be familiar with Sidewalk Society; the trio from Long Beach, California who have a great love of British music of the 60s. This new album on Fruits De Mer Records is their interpretation of the legendary demos recorded by The Action between ’67 and ‘68 that stayed buried until the early 90s when they were released under the title ‘Rolled Gold’. Losing George Martin as their producer became the catalyst for the breakup of The Action which meant the demos remained just that; demos. So Sidewalk Society decided to interpret these songs in a very considerate, passionate and respectful manner. There is no point trying to make comparisons here, so I’m not going to. Dan Lawrence, Dan West and Jerry Buszek are very talented musicians who have used the base material to explore all possibilities without diluting the class of the songs. Sidewalk Society does have their own ‘sound’, so this is no attempt at being copyists. The arrangements are superb, the production is top drawer and in short, they have made an excellent album.

facebook.com/sidewalksocietymusic
www.sidewalksocietymusic.com
www.fruitsdemerrecords.com/sidewalk

Weeks

‘Get Away’ b/w ‘Law and Order’ & ‘Fingers Raised’ – Single

This is the debut single by Isle Of Wight-based four-piece, Weeks. Featuring Liam Hodge (formerly of The Jam DRC), Marc Maitland, Nigel Lynk and Sid Ryan. All three tracks are very definitely in the punk/powerpop/mod-rock style; fast-paced, power chords and angry vocals, but there is something a little different that makes these tracks not quite as predictable as you might assume. Granted, some bands can sound a bit ‘samey’ in this genre, but maybe it’s the fact that all four band members supply vocals or it’s the structure of the tunes or it may be they don’t sound like a rehash of mod ’79. Whatever it is, Weeks have come up with a very impressive debut and they are so new, they haven’t yet organised any social media links, so you will have to go via the splendid Time For Action Records to get a taste or buy a copy.

www.timeforaction.de
https://en-gb.facebook.com/Time-For-Action-Records-299324823433736

The Franklys

‘Are You Listening’ – LP

And so, after five years and over 250 reviews for Nutsmag, this album is my final contribution and it almost seems appropriate that it should be The Franklys debut LP. It was April of 2013 that I first reviewed the debut EP from this band. I heard great potential in what they were doing and through these pages, the Nutscast Sessions podcast and at Blues Kitchen for Nutsmag Review Night, I have tried to champion The Franklys because I thought they could ‘make it’. And here they are with a collection of ten songs, some are familiar to die-hard fans (Puppet, Bad News, Weasel for example) and some that are new numbers. Lead track ‘Castaway’ is the very definition of who and what The Franklys are about; brilliant, in-yer-face, all-girl rock and this is a fine a debut album as you could ask for. They are a complete unit with Jennifer Ahlkvist’s attacking vocals, Fanny Broberg’s lead guitar, Zoe Biggs’ solid, dependable bass, all held together by new drummer Lexi Clark. I am extremely proud of  The Franklys because they are proof that Nutsmag really is at the grassroots of music and is not afraid to recognise great new talent and back it with reviews, interviews and gigs. We listened when no one else did, now four years later, mainstreamers like NME and Louder Than War are taking them seriously. Next stop for The Franklys has to be Glastonbury surely?

So thank you all for reading the reviews over the years. I hope you have enjoyed them and they have led you to discover a band that you have become a fan of because they need you as much as you need them. And I just want to thank Rob Bailey and Barry & Denise Pease for all their help.

www.thefranklys.com
facebook.com/thefranklys
twitter.com/TheFranklysUK


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 12 Grant Green 6 of the best

In the pantheon of guitar greats, Grant Green (1935-1979) stands tall. Troubled with health problems and yet hugely prolific throughout the 1960s, his fluid, bluesy and bebop-inspired guitar licks can be found on over 50 recordings for Blue Note during that decade (as leader and sideman). A melodic player of crisp, crystalline linear runs, inspired as much by saxophonist Charlie Parker as guitar hero Charlie Christian, Green’s first recordings were with tenor sax player and fellow St. Louis native Jimmy Forrest for the United label.

Around 1959/60, after being ‘discovered’ by Blue Note stalwart and alto sax man Lou Donaldson (with whom he toured briefly), Green moved to New York where he was introduced to Blue Note’s Alfred Lion. Hugely impressed, Lion started recording him as leader on a glut of sessions (some unreleased until the late 70s) and sideman for Baby Face Willette, Hank Mobley, Stanley Turrentine, Don Wilkerson, Lou Donaldson, Jimmy Smith and Ike Quebec. Though initially fitting perfectly into the soul-jazz organ trio, gospel and Latin formats, Green’s early experience of playing with Coltrane drummer Elvin Jones would in time see him participating in some of Blue Note’s more adventurous recordings by the likes of Herbie Hancock (My Point of View), Bobby Hutcherson (The Kicker), Lee Morgan (Search for the New Land) and Larry Young (Into Somethin’).

Green’s initial period of success at Blue Note ran from 1961-1965. This was followed by a brief flirtation with the Verve label, a period of enforced absence and a return in 1969 for a series of funky but rather patchy LPs later championed by the acid jazz movement. In terms of overall legacy, mention must be made of four or five outstanding LPs he recorded for Blue Note as leader: Grant’s First Stand (1961), Idle Moments (1963/5), Talkin’ About! (1964/5), Street of Dreams (1964/7) and Matador (1964/79). Ranging from soul-jazz through to modal grooves, these are all essential additions to the collections of the thoughtful mod about town (or in her or his rural retreat). However, for those interested either in the dance floor or creating a party atmosphere, here are six tracks culled from the Green back catalogue that were released as singles (edited versions of album tracks). Some, if not all, will be familiar to long-standing participants in the mod and jazz dance scenes.


1. ‘Miss Ann’s Tempo’ (1961) 45 – Blue Note 1811; 33 – From Grant’s First Stand BST 84064
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

From Green’s second Blue Note session (first to be released), ‘Miss Ann’s Tempo’ was also his debut single for the label, coupled with his version of Porter Grainger’s blues standard ‘Ain’t Nobody’s Business if I do’. A trio date, with Ben Dixon on drums and Baby Face Willette on organ, the vibe is similar to Brother Jack Mcduff’s The Honeydripper session for Prestige recorded just a week later and also featuring Dixon and Green. Intriguingly, a track by Eric Dolphy, ‘Miss Ann’, had been recorded with Booker Little the previous October. There’s plenty of righteous call-and-response jousting here between Green’s limpid melodies and Willette’s chugging chords and gospel-drenched soloing. One for the expert jazz dancers!


2. ‘Mambo Inn’ (1963) 45 – Blue Note 1870; 33 – From The Latin Bit BST 84111
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Throughout 1961 and 1962, Green featured on around 25 Blue Note recordings and a handful for Prestige and one or two other labels. Collectors of Blue Note 45s will therefore hear his playing on singles of the period by other artists. Such mid-tempo dance floor tunes include Lou Donaldson’s ‘Watusi Jump’, Dodo Greene’s ‘You are my Sunshine’ and Don Wilkerson’s ‘Camp Meetin’. Two 1962 sessions also led, the following year, to the release of The Latin Bit, from which the Mario Bauzá-Edgar Sampson-Bobby Woodlen tune ‘Mambo Inn’ was culled for the jukebox. An uplifting blend of Afro-Cuban rhythms and bluesy bop, this tune features Willie Bobo and Carlos Valdes on percussion and John Acea on piano.


3. The Cantaloupe Woman (1965) 45 – Verve VK 10361; 33 – From His Majesty King Funk Verve V/V6-8627
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Likely to be heard at many a New Untouchables night, ‘The Cantaloupe Woman’ comes from Green’s only session as leader for the Verve label, 1965’s His Majesty King Funk. While this swings like an upbeat Lee Morgan tune of the era, a new modal undercurrent is present, provided by the Hammond playing of Larry Young, for whom Green had supplied guitar on his debut Blue Note LP Into Somethin! (1964). On that session, Green was reunited with Elvin Jones and sparred alongside the more avant-garde saxophone playing of Sam Rivers. Change was in the air.


4. Big John Patton: Amanda (1966) 45 – Blue Note 1926; 33 – From Got a Good thing Goin’ BST 84229
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

Between 1963 and 1966, Green appeared on six Blue Note LPs led by Hammond man Big John Patton. The last in the sequence, Got a Good Thing Goin’ yielded the 45 ‘Amanda’, a cooking cover of the Duke Pearson tune that kicked off his 1964 date Wahoo! Although his initial role is to vamp a rhythm, Green lets loose a cracking solo half-way through the album version. One of those addictive melodies that it’s good to know exist in edited format for the club night and in longer versions for domestic pursuits. At over nine minutes, the Pearson version (without Green) is especially wonderful as a soundtrack to preparing vegetables.


5. Ain’t it Funky Now (1970) 45 – Blue Note 1960; 33 – From Green is Beautiful BST 84342
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

On July 1, 1966, Grant Green played on Stanley Turrentine’s Rough ‘n’ Tumble, a date including the wonderful singles: ‘And Satisfy’ (Blue Note 1929) and ‘Feeling Good’ (Blue Note 1933). Apart from a solitary 1967 date later released on Cobblestone as Iron City (1972), he would then be absent until early 1969. By this time, rock, boogaloo and funky soul were entering new dialogues with jazz; the period from 1969-1972 would see Green return as a key figure in the groove-based styles later defined as acid jazz. Much of 1969 was seen recording with Prestige artists such as Rusty Bryant, Charles Kynard and Don Patterson and Reuben Wilson’s enjoyable Blue Note date Love Bug. By October, he was leading his own sessions, one of which, 1970’s Green is Beautiful, gave us the monumental groove ‘Ain’t it Funky Now’, released as a Parts 1 & 2 single. Idris Muhammad’s marvellous drumming helps make this take on James Brown a memorable one.


6. Sookie Sookie (1970) 45 (edit): – Blue Note 1965; 33 – From ‘Alive!’ BST 84360
WATCH & LISTEN HERE

From the subsequent Blue Note LP, recorded live in August 1970 at the Cliche Lounge in Newark (New Jersey as opposed to Nottinghamshire), Don Covay and Steve Cropper’s 1965 ‘B’ side is given a full funk workout. Green, organist Ronnie Foster, and tenor sax player Claude Bartee improvise righteously over a solid groove laid down by Idris Muhammad, Joseph Armstrong on congas, vibes player Willie Bivens and Foster on organ bass pedals. Some of the material Green worked on with Blue Note after 1969 was not as strong as this, but overall he could be proud of the legacy he left for the label from 1960 to 1972. We’ll be looking at more legends of the label in the future. Until then, enjoy these tunes.



 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

June 30, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Hey Mr DJ – Glyn Preece

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 6

NUTSMAG recently caught up with DJ Glyn Preece in for a nice chat about music.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod & scooter scene late 78, early 79 , I grew up listening to music through my parents, They were into Rock & Roll, so I was listening to the likes of Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Chuck Berry & such like, I was going to youth clubs & discos from an early age & hearing The Who, Small Faces, The Jam, & Motown sound and it went from there finding out about Motown, Northern Soul, R&B. Finding out about the clothes, style & Scooters… I was hooked.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first DJ slot was at some old youth club, playing tunes from small collection out my little ” youth club box” which still have.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Most memorable. I get a buzz from DJing anywhere really. Although being asked to DJ in Turin was amazing. I love Italy anyway, so to go and DJ was fantastic. I would love to go again as well as other places abroad. To be asked to DJ at Brighton is a huge honor for such a fantastic weekend.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

My worst DJ experience, thankfully I haven’t really had any apart from the odd technical hitch with decks, amps etc.

5. Your favorite scene DJ’s and why?

Haven’t got a favorite, So many Top DJ’s out there & some brilliant new blood. But whoever the DJ, If they play thumping tunes top tunes, underplayed, never heard before. That’ll do for me.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Well growing up listening to Rock & Roll & the Mod revival going to Northern Soul events & DJing at them as well as Mod & Scooter rallies… Hearing the early R&B, Boogaloo, Latin, Jazz. Always hearing more sounds that not heard.

7. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

My biggest influences are the Small Faces, The Who & Motown.

8. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Haven’t really got any favorites, I hear so many great sounds I couldn’t pick a favorite.

9. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

You can currently see me DJ at OUT of TIME – Wolverhampton, Secret Door – Telford.

10. What is the record you would most like to own?

All of them, my wants list is endless.

11. Please give us a top 10 all time favorites spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
Tough to pick top 10, they’re always changing’, In no particular order:
1. Freddie Hubbard – Return of the prodigal son
2. John Lee Hooker – Money
3. The Young Holt Trio – Ain’t there something that money can’t buy
4. Maurice Simon & the Pie Men – The Git Go
5. The Golden Toadstools – Silly Savage
6. Louis Jordan – What I say
7. The Soul Society – The Sidewinder
8. The Marvelettes – Destination Anywhere
9. Curtis Mayfield – Move on up
10. Small Faces – All or nothing

 


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles DJs Front Page Interviews Music UK Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

UK Tamla Motown singles Part 3

This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series Collectors Corner 2

“I’ll be doggone! – UK Tamla Motown singles Pt.3: TMG500 Series”

 

At the end of the second part of our trawl through the near-perfect run of soul classics released in the UK from the USA stable of record labels (Tamla, Motown, Gordy and Soul), boss Berry Gordy had just put pen to paper for EMI in Britain to follow Decca’s lead (with Atlantic the previous year) and launch Tamla Motown as a stand alone label to release the labels hits pouring out of the USA in the UK. With much fanfare, and with a corresponding (and very poorly attended at times) package tour featuring The Supremes, Martha & The Vandellas, Stevie Wonder, Miracles and the Earl Van Dyke six, March 1965 saw the first six records pressed and released to a British public becoming more and more interested in the soul sounds pouring out of the other side of the Atlantic. TMG 501 was the first release, with its iconic black and silver label, large 45 rpm on the right-hand side, and clad in a beautiful orange / white company sleeve. Things couldn’t have got off to a better start as The Supremes “Stop! in the name of love” hurtled up the charts to number 7, followed swiftly by Martha & The Vandellas “Nowhere to run” which reached #26 at the same time. Thus started a near perfect run of singles, commonly known as the TMG 500 series, which have been avidly collected by record hoarders ever since.

The Supremes quickly established themselves as the labels biggest hitmakers, frequently hitting the top ten throughout the decade, including 500 series favorites “You can’t hurry love” and “You keep me hanging on”. They were soon followed by The Four Tops who hit the charts with “I can’t help myself”, “It’s the same old song” and in 1966, having the first bonafide Tamla Motown UK number one with “Reach out I’ll be there”. Other artists began to have minor hits too, The Miracles “Going to a go-go”, Stevie Wonder’s thumping “Uptight (everything’s alright)”, Marvin Gaye’s “Little darling” and The Temptations “Beauty is only skin deep” all reaching the charts. The same artists also gave us some very sought after rarities too, as they all had flop releases at the same time. The Supremes “Love is like an itching in my heart”, Four Tops “Ask the lonely”, Marvin’s “I’ll be doggone” and The Temptations “Get ready” always fetch good money with collectors, even though they do turn up for sale quite often.

After a great start, the label had more hit & miss luck releasing singles, with 1965 seeing quite a few record releases selling almost nothing then later becoming sought after “lost” classics on the northern soul scene. Early release must haves include Kim Weston’s “I’m still loving you” (TMG511), Brenda Holloway “When I’m gone” (TMG510), Shorty Long’s “Out to get you” (TMG512), The Hit Pack “Never say no to your baby” (TMG514), Choker Campbell “Mickey’s monkey” (TMG517) and The (Detroit) Spinners “Sweet thing” (TMG514). Most of these early singles hit £100+ when they come up for sale, which isn’t very often! The rest of 1965 saw a flurry of good selling releases from label favorites, with The Contours and The Marvelettes also getting in on the action. Four very poor selling releases stand out amongst this run of classics, none of which are easy to find. Billy Eckstine “Had you been around” (TMG533), Dorsey Burnette “Jimmy Brown” (TMG534), The Lewis Sisters “You need me” (TMG536) and Tony Martin “The bigger your heart is” (TMG537) are all sought after, mainly due to rarity as they aren’t amongst the best of the labels’ releases!

As 1966 came around the label continually released great records with varying degrees of success. Joining the artists mentioned above saw releases by Kim Weston, Shorty Long, Gladys Knight & The Pips and, with one of Motown’s greatest ever songs in “This old heart of mine”, The Isley Brothers. Some notable, and scarce releases this year included Kim Weston’s Northern favourite “Helpless” (TMG554), The Contours “Just a little misunderstanding” (TMG564), The Elgins “Heaven must have sent you” (TMG583) and Gladys Knight & The Pips masterpiece “Just walk in my shoes” (TMG576). Hardly a duff release was pressed at all up to TMG599 in March 1967, such was the stellar amount of talent pouring out of Detroit at the time. This is partly why this period of Motown releases is so sought after. Although collecting “the hits” can be done quite cheaply and easily as the label sold tonnes of 45’s in the mid to late 60’s in Britain, completing the set does require quite a fat wallet! Black label stock copies are generally a lot cheaper (though not always easier to find) than the very sought after iconic Red A label demo discs which were pressed in very small numbers and are much cherished by UK soul release connoisseurs. The main exception to this rule is the Spinners “Sweet thing” which is near impossible to find as a stock copy. Monetary value aside, a complete collection is a sight (and sound) to behold, and once complete you’ll be in possession of one of the best ever set of musical releases ever. Happy Motown hunting!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

July 3, 2017 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

The Kinks on Pye: Part 2 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Collectors Corner 5

During our last article, we concentrated on The Kinks hit-packed period when they never seemed to be off the charts. As psychedelia took hold of 1967 and strangled most British bands in beads and flowers, The Kinks took off in a different direction and released some wonderfully wistful and melancholic masterpieces. These songs seemed to hark back to a more innocent time which probably only existed through rose-tinted (psychedelic) spectacles anyway. Ray proceeded to write a series of genius 45’s, and more importantly, albums which unbelievably sold less and less with each release. 1968 started well for the boys with the budget LP release “Sunny afternoon” hitting the top ten during the important Christmas market and selling very well indeed. So when Pye released the first new material of the year in April 1968, the lovely and restrained stand-alone 45 “Wonderboy” would have been assumed to sail into the top ten, but it unbelievably stalled at a lowly number 36 in the charts. This began a run of wonderful, yet underappreciated single releases which were low sellers, hence the rarity of some of them today.

Two months later in June ’68, one of Ray’s most loved compositions, “Day’s” was released and fared much better, just stalling outside the top ten at number 12. Though all the bands singles contain nuggets hidden away on their B-sides, this one had one of the bands hardest rockers on the flip, “She’s got everything”. Originally recorded and shelved two years earlier, it could have been a big hit in 1968 as The Stones, Beatles and Move all had massive rock’n’roll influenced hit singles. Luckily it wasn’t forgotten and still fills mod dancefloors to this day as soon as it starts up. Into 1969, the thumping “Plastic man” was released and again reached no higher than number 31, a flop by the band’s lofty standards. It seemed the better Ray’s songwriting became, the fewer people bought the bands records. “Drivin'” was released in August 1969 and became the first 45 to miss the hit parade since “You still want me” in early 1964. Even worse was the total no-show of “Shangri-la” in September which sold incredibly poorly and is one of the hardest of UK Kinks singles to find. In December, the upbeat album track “Victoria” at least managed to hit the low 30’s in the chart but it took a tale of a Soho nightclub meeting with a transsexual to have the band visiting Top of the Pops again. “Lola” was soon flying up the charts and hit the number two slot in August, kept off the top by Elvis. Shortly after “Apeman”, backed with the wonderful “Rats” on the flip, became the group’s last UK top ten hit when it reached number five in the summer. “Days”, “Lola” and “Apeman” apart, these 45’s are now quite hard to find, especially in top condition and prices have risen in the last few years. Expect to pay between £10-20 for the low sellers and up to £30 “Shangri-la”. All were pressed up as yellow demo copies, these are also really sought after and can reach £100+ at auction. A quick shout must go out to Dave Davies at this point. In between 1967 and 1968, he released four cracking solo 45’s and a super rare EP, “Dave Davies Hits”, which is a £200+ artifact nowadays. All four singles (Death of a clown, Suzannah’s still alive, Lincoln County and Hold my hand) are worth seeking out, the last one, in particular, is hard to find and is coveted for it’s fantastic psychedelic B side “Creeping Jean”.

The decline of fortunes in the singles chart was mirrored with the blue label Pye album releases, none of which charted at all. The 1968 release “The Kinks are the village green preservation society” needs no introduction to Kinks aficionado’s, it’s simply one the all-time album masterpieces. Originally envisaged as a twelve track album, a handful of white label promos were pressed up before the track listing was changed to the fifteen track album we all love today. It’s impossible to put a price on the promo copies, but even the released album reaches £200+ in top condition as it sold in small amounts. This album, and it’s follow-up were both released in mono and stereo, the former the harder to locate and more valuable to collectors. They were both encased in very flimsy laminated gatefold sleeves which are invariably damaged and worn, make sure you look after any mint copies out there! “Arthur (or the decline and fall of the British empire)” was released the following year in 1969, and although similarly full of stellar Ray Davies songwriting, this one sold in small amounts too. Hence it has a £100+ price tag nowadays with the “Queen Victoria” insert still there (it’s invariably missing!). 1970’s “Lola vs Powerman and the money-go-round” was the first to be a stereo only release and sold more than the previous two, mainly due to the massive hit singles released at the same time. For a band to release so many groundbreaking and classic songs on Pye, it’s a shame that their parting shot was a soundtrack to
the 1971 Hywel Bennett film “Percy”, a comedy about a man who has a penis transplant. The album still sells for a good price, mainly due to its creators, and Pye also released four tracks from the album as a “maxi-single” with a picture sleeve at the same time. The band signed a contract with RCA in 1971, becoming the “Muswell hillbillies” of that decade who would, at last, have massive success in the USA. But it’s that catalogue on the iconic pink and blue Pye label that will always hold a place in most collectors hearts.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

May 9, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , ,
0 Comment

Newbreed – Los Retrovisores

This entry is part 5 of 7 in the series Newbreed5

Los Retrovisores a Fuzz Soul band from Barcelona. Sounds louder than 1968.

Band Members:
Victor Asensio: Singer
Leo Hernandez: Bass
Pere Duran: Guitarra
Sergio Sanchez: Hammond
Quim Corominas: Drums
Hector Fàbregas: Chorus and Percussion
Edu Polls: Sax Tenor
Alexis Albelda: Trumpet
Francesc Polls: Bariton Sax

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Since 2006, most of the members came from a Jamaican music band called ‘The Cutties’.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all are late 60’s and early 70’s dance sounds enthusiasts. We love most of the styles: from R & B to soul, reggae, psych or garage, back to rocksteady, and deep into beat… We’re also very influenced by the 60’s Spanish counterpart of that styles, as you could tell listening to our compositions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are so many cool bands in our area: Rubén López & The Diatones (reggae) Penny Cocks (punk 77), Mambo Jambo, The Excitements or Los Fulanos (Latin Soul) to name a few…

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Barcelona has several bands, clubs, promoters, collectors and festivals… Some clubs we highlight: The Boiler Club, Movin’ on, The Gambeat Weekend, Le clean Cut, Wamba buluba and Pill Box. There you’ll find some of our favorite DJ’s: Xavi Beat, Julian Reca, Jordi Duró and many more.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We just play the music we love to listen and dance to, without more restrictions. Our style evolved at the same rate we did. In our current set list you can find from Spanish soul to groovy funk, even freakbeat.

06. What are your live shows like?

The audience defines it as fresh and fun. We don’t like the bands that make a script for live shows. We improvise and always try to be ourselves. Our repertoire is compact, short and straight to the neck. No time for solos.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our influences are as wide as our musical tastes. Mainly Spanish sixties bands, that like us borrowed the patterns from their own references, but projecting their own personality to their songs. We really love Bruno Lomas, Los Bravos, Los Canarios, Los Salvajes, Los Nivram, Pau Riba… We despise too many people to name it here!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our universe is strongly influenced by the sharp & surrealistic Monty Phyton’ sense of humor. The French nouvelle vague and its evolutions are also one source of inspiration for our lyrics and videos.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody does his one’s bit, but to date most of the songs were written by Victor and Pere. This has changed in our last recordings introducing compositions by Leo and Hector.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our favorite song from the current repertoire comes from our EP Alma y Pisotón. It’s named ‘Me olvidé de ti’ wich, by the way, it’s been just released on video in a ‘Horror B movie’ style. Check it out! Our choice by another artist is Fire & Ice’s Music Man. We loved the complex brass arrangements and changing our regular subject –love- to an ode to that DJs that make us dance party over party, and that’s why we covered it (you can find our version at Alma y Pisotón EP too)

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

The underground scene, at least in our city, is in a good shape regarding shows and parties. We all participate in one way or another, Victor, for example, is deeply involved with The Gambeat Weekend & the clubs Pillbox 60’s Club and Bread & Groove.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To forge ahead the band, beside the financial precarity of our members, the lack of public resources and benefits for empowering culture, and the economic depression that we are all suffering.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse minimum once a week and play an average of three or four shows per month. More than two years passed between our debut album and our second release “Alma y pisotón”, but we’re reducing the time between recordings and we’ll release our third record in June, one year after the previous release.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

In Catalonia the mass media doesn’t give coverage to the bands that don’t belong to the mainstream market. For some time now, specialized magazines start to write about us. We also make great use of the social networks to reach our fans.

15. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d love to record in London with George Martin and a gigantic strings & brass orchestra, just like Spanish duet Manolo y Ramón did back in 1970. We’d also like to record with Ricard Miralles, arranger for Joan Manel Serrat in the album dedicated to Antonio Machado.

16. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re still working on consolidating our own sound and our show. We’d like to make people outside the scene dance, without losing authenticity or selling out. We’d like to say thanks for our appearances at Euro Ye Ye Mod Festival (Gijon, SP), Purple Weekend, Festival Beat (IT), Soundflat Ballroom Bash (GER) and look forward to our first ever show in the UK (London) at Le Beat Bespoke, Easter – 16th April 2017.

Discography:

VVAA – “L’Edat Daurada” (Jamaican Memories, 2008) CD
VVAA – “Moderno pero español, vol. 8” (Bon Vivant, 2009) CD
VVAA – Somos los Mods vol.1 (Bip Bip Records, 2010) CD
“La nostalgia ya no es lo que era” (Flor y Nata Records, 2011) LP/CD
“Alma y Pisotón” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2013) EP 7″
“En el surco” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2014) EP 7″
“Sonido Joanic” (BCore Disc/Soundflat records, 2016) LP/CD

Web Links:

facebook.com/Los-Retrovisores
bcoredisc.com
facebook.com/los.retrovisores
twitter.com/LosRetrovisores


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 23, 2017 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment