Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Newbreed – Los Retrovisores

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Newbreed5

Los Retrovisores a Fuzz Soul band from Barcelona. Sounds louder than 1968.

Band Members:
Victor Asensio: Singer
Leo Hernandez: Bass
Pere Duran: Guitarra
Sergio Sanchez: Hammond
Quim Corominas: Drums
Hector Fàbregas: Chorus and Percussion
Edu Polls: Sax Tenor
Alexis Albelda: Trumpet
Francesc Polls: Bariton Sax

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Since 2006, most of the members came from a Jamaican music band called ‘The Cutties’.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all are late 60’s and early 70’s dance sounds enthusiasts. We love most of the styles: from R & B to soul, reggae, psych or garage, back to rocksteady, and deep into beat… We’re also very influenced by the 60’s Spanish counterpart of that styles, as you could tell listening to our compositions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are so many cool bands in our area: Rubén López & The Diatones (reggae) Penny Cocks (punk 77), Mambo Jambo, The Excitements or Los Fulanos (Latin Soul) to name a few…

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Barcelona has several bands, clubs, promoters, collectors and festivals… Some clubs we highlight: The Boiler Club, Movin’ on, The Gambeat Weekend, Le clean Cut, Wamba buluba and Pill Box. There you’ll find some of our favorite DJ’s: Xavi Beat, Julian Reca, Jordi Duró and many more.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We just play the music we love to listen and dance to, without more restrictions. Our style evolved at the same rate we did. In our current set list you can find from Spanish soul to groovy funk, even freakbeat.

06. What are your live shows like?

The audience defines it as fresh and fun. We don’t like the bands that make a script for live shows. We improvise and always try to be ourselves. Our repertoire is compact, short and straight to the neck. No time for solos.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our influences are as wide as our musical tastes. Mainly Spanish sixties bands, that like us borrowed the patterns from their own references, but projecting their own personality to their songs. We really love Bruno Lomas, Los Bravos, Los Canarios, Los Salvajes, Los Nivram, Pau Riba… We despise too many people to name it here!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our universe is strongly influenced by the sharp & surrealistic Monty Phyton’ sense of humor. The French nouvelle vague and its evolutions are also one source of inspiration for our lyrics and videos.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody does his one’s bit, but to date most of the songs were written by Victor and Pere. This has changed in our last recordings introducing compositions by Leo and Hector.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our favorite song from the current repertoire comes from our EP Alma y Pisotón. It’s named ‘Me olvidé de ti’ wich, by the way, it’s been just released on video in a ‘Horror B movie’ style. Check it out! Our choice by another artist is Fire & Ice’s Music Man. We loved the complex brass arrangements and changing our regular subject –love- to an ode to that DJs that make us dance party over party, and that’s why we covered it (you can find our version at Alma y Pisotón EP too)

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

The underground scene, at least in our city, is in a good shape regarding shows and parties. We all participate in one way or another, Victor, for example, is deeply involved with The Gambeat Weekend & the clubs Pillbox 60’s Club and Bread & Groove.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To forge ahead the band, beside the financial precarity of our members, the lack of public resources and benefits for empowering culture, and the economic depression that we are all suffering.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse minimum once a week and play an average of three or four shows per month. More than two years passed between our debut album and our second release “Alma y pisotón”, but we’re reducing the time between recordings and we’ll release our third record in June, one year after the previous release.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

In Catalonia the mass media doesn’t give coverage to the bands that don’t belong to the mainstream market. For some time now, specialized magazines start to write about us. We also make great use of the social networks to reach our fans.

15. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d love to record in London with George Martin and a gigantic strings & brass orchestra, just like Spanish duet Manolo y Ramón did back in 1970. We’d also like to record with Ricard Miralles, arranger for Joan Manel Serrat in the album dedicated to Antonio Machado.

16. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re still working on consolidating our own sound and our show. We’d like to make people outside the scene dance, without losing authenticity or selling out. We’d like to say thanks for our appearances at Euro Ye Ye Mod Festival (Gijon, SP), Purple Weekend, Festival Beat (IT), Soundflat Ballroom Bash (GER) and look forward to our first ever show in the UK (London) at Le Beat Bespoke, Easter – 16th April 2017.

Discography:

VVAA – “L’Edat Daurada” (Jamaican Memories, 2008) CD
VVAA – “Moderno pero español, vol. 8” (Bon Vivant, 2009) CD
VVAA – Somos los Mods vol.1 (Bip Bip Records, 2010) CD
“La nostalgia ya no es lo que era” (Flor y Nata Records, 2011) LP/CD
“Alma y Pisotón” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2013) EP 7″
“En el surco” (Soundflat records/BCore Disc, 2014) EP 7″
“Sonido Joanic” (BCore Disc/Soundflat records, 2016) LP/CD

Web Links:

facebook.com/Los-Retrovisores
bcoredisc.com
facebook.com/los.retrovisores
twitter.com/LosRetrovisores


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 23, 2017 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment

NewBreed – New Candys

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Newbreed5

New Candys formed in Venice (Italy) in 2008, consisting of Fernando Nuti (vocals, guitar, sitar), Diego Menegaldo (vocals, guitars), Stefano Bidoggia (bass, organ) and Dario Lucchesi (drums, percussion). Their influences have roots in The Velvet Underground and Syd Barrett.

After a self-produced EP, in 2012 they released the album “Stars Reach The Abyss” on Foolica, a UK tour followed. In 2015 they took part in “The Reverb Conspiracy”, a compilation curated by Fuzz Club/The Reverberation Appreciation Society (Levitation Austin). Later that year “New Candys As Medicine”, album mixed by John Wills (producer and drummer of Loop), has been released on both Picture In My Ear/Fuzz Club and added to The Committee To Keep Music Evil catalogue, receiving praises from Simone Marie Butler of Primal Scream and Stephen Lawrie of The Telescopes.

Two EU/UK tours followed, including festivals like The Secret Garden Party 2015 and Liverpool Psych Fest 2016. They shared the stage with The Warlocks, Dead Skeletons, Crystal Stilts, Slowdive, Savages, Jon Spencer Blues Explosion and The Vaccines among others.

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

For 9 years now, half of us were friends since teenage years, the other half because of the common passion for music.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Lots of bands, every time one of us discovers something cool it starts being played in our van, we talk a lot about what we like to see if it can become an influence on our own music.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are many, all of them truly believe in what they do and we like them: Kill Your Boyfriend, Mother Island, Gli Sportivi, Supertempo, High Mountain Bluebirds, Zabrisky, Miss Chain & The Broken Hills, Father Murphy, Hund, Temple Mantra and many others.

04. What’s the underground scene like where you’re from?

The city we come from is Treviso, a boring city with a passion for food and nothing else, the area of Venice let us become what we are today, with people more passionate about music and real interest in culture.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Modern dark rock’n’roll.

06. What are your live shows like?

It depends, if the venue is not too big and people starts moving and dancing since the beginning, we can show our best. Lights/visuals also have an impact on our performance, the darker the better.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We played some covers of The Velvet Underground, probably our main influence together with Syd Barrett. Nirvana, Oasis and Brian Jonestown Massacre have been important for us too. Speaking about what is normally considered a “classic”, we don’t like Led Zeppelin, Queen and generally all bands where vocals sound like Axel Rose.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Cinema, directors like Fellini, Argento, Bertolucci but also Refn, Kubrick, Lynch to name a few. Poetry, Blake, Bukowski and of course Dante Alighieri.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

We write together, the subjects are surreal sometimes, metaphorical, lyrically we try to describe a scene, like painting, using words just to evoke images, we’re not interested in carrying clear and immediately understandable messages. It is important to give freedom to the listener, let everyone’s sensibility influence the codification of a song.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Probably are the ones from the new album, after a while, you get tired of playing the old songs so the newer sounds fresh and are more interesting to play. From another artist, we like “Some Velvet Morning” by Hazlewood/Sinatra.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

We feel like we are part of a scene because we end up playing shows with the same bands in different parts of Europe, and we can see there is a net that includes all these bands. This is really helpful, we feel like we all share the same attitude, have roots on almost the same cool music.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The recording process, in general, is difficult, psychologically and technically, it’s a completely different thing than playing live and writing.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse at least two times a week, more if we are in a productive creative moment. We play live as much as possible, record once a year (or two).

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Media are not involved much in what we like, the internet is the only way to find interesting stuff. If the music scene is what we see on TV these days, we would probably not be a band now. American hip-hop and mainstream pop bands/singers currently under the spotlight are simply pure rubbish with nothing to say, if people like them, good for them.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Mainstream… The Strokes maybe? About underground bands, we like BRMC, The Black Angels, The Warlocks, The Dandy Warhols, A Place To Bury Strangers, Dead Meadow, Singapore Sling and many others.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We don’t have big knowledge about producers, to be honest, so let’s say with someone interested in us that has done albums we like.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

A new album this year with a US/Canada tour after, that’s our main goal. We’re excited for our new short tour (before the new album), here you can find the shows listed: newcandys.com. Many thanks for the interview!

Social Links:

Website – newcandys.com
Facebook – facebook.com/newcandys
Twitter – twitter.com/NewCandys
Bandcamp – newcandys.bandcamp.com
Soundcloud – soundcloud.com/newcandys
Instagram – instagram.com/newcandys


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 12, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Hey! Mrs DJ – Miss Clawdy

This entry is part 6 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 4

We recently caught up with DJ Miss Clawdy to talk about her musical outlook.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My Dad was a Saxophonist in a band during the 70s and when I was young he used to spin some of the songs he was playing with that band, such as “Booker-T Green Onions and Willie Mitchell 30-60-90”. Those sounds were weird and fascinating to me and at the age of fourteen, my Sister who was a Mod got me listening to classics from the 50s, 60s and Ska.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Was in a club called Indian in Pisa, in front of a few happy people and some drunk friends. I remember being so excited I wrote a quintessential playlist some days prior to the gig that I followed song by song. That night me and my friends had so much fun that I decided to continue DJing and that was an excuse to buy more records.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I particularly like my DJ Spots for a club called “La Limonaia”, in Tuscany. I played the hottest tunes I have to warm up the crowd’s spirits, even the ones I rarely get a chance to play. It was outdoor and the atmosphere was lovely. The moon was out on a summer’s night and the stars were shining brightly. Along with candles and great drinks, people were feeling the vibe and loved my tunes.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

My worst DJ experience that springs to mind and makes me laugh whenever I mention it was when I was young and inexperienced and I was organizing Rock and Roll nights with some friends of mine… those nights were totally crazy. People were opening champagne, wine, beers spilling them anywhere and dancing almost naked… nobody could calm them down and sometimes I didn’t know how to protect my equipment and records! Once I got home I checked all my records and sleeves only to find many of them drenched in wine! Fortunately, the records were fine.

05. Your favorite scene DJ’s and why?

DJ Henry from Milan (Rollin’ and Tumblin’) and all the Tender crew, they have anything you would like to hear.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Rough and crazy sounds combined with Exotic and hot vibes. Probably because these things match with my nature!

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Big Don’s Rebellion – It Was True. When I heard that song for the first time it captured me and I was compelled to hear more. I was positively speechless, getting goose bumps! That record was my first true impulse, it costs me nearly half of my salary at the time.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

Dick Dale.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I have a thing for the Blues, Sun Records recordings, and songs with a minor scale structure from the late 50s to early 60s.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I currently don’t have a standing spot. Right after Le Beat Bespoke, I will be in Florence at the Rollin’ and Tumblin’ club. Just drop me a line on FB for friendship and you can find my next gigs.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Nat Couty & The Braves – Woodpecker Rock – Fox

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1.Lloyd Price – Lawdy Miss Clawdy
2.Louie Louie – Richard Berry
3.Link Wray – Rumble
4.Dick Dale – Misirlou
5.Johnny Kid and the Pyrates – Shakin’ all Over
6.The Cramps – What’s Inside a Girl
7.Hasil Adkins – She Said
8.Yma Sumac – Gopher
9.Etta James – I just want to make love to you
10.Fats Domino – Why Don’t you do Right

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1.Berta Rosen Con Enrique Lynch Y Su Orquesta – Boogaloo En Cuarta Dimension – Sono Radio
2.The Fabulous Silver Tones – Dimples – West Coast
3.Bracey Everett – Lover’S Curse – Atlantic
4.Sugar Boy Williams – Little Girl – Herald
5.Little Florene – Miss You So – Excello

Next Club Nights 2017:

Lady Luck Club at Le Beat Bespoke, London – 14 April
Rollin’ & Tumblin’ – Florence – 22nd of April

Social Networks: facebook.com/claudia.missclawdy
Videos: MissClawdymusic


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 14, 2017 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment

Leslie Cavendish: The hairstylist to The Beatles…

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Fashion Scene 4

I first became aware of the name Leslie Cavendish when I was researching for an article that I wrote a few years ago. That article was on the boutique ‘Dandie Fashions’. When the said boutique was taken over by the Apple Corp in the spring of 1968, the boutique then changed its name to ‘Apple Tailoring’. It was decided that it would remain in the hands of John Crittle to run the day to day activities surrounding the boutique. Within the premises there was an unused basement, which became a unisex hair salon. Clientele could be fitted for a garment and then pop down the stairs to the basement for a haircut! The person who was put in charge of running the hair salon was Leslie Cavendish. As far as my research went for the article on Dandie Fashions – that is as far as I got with the hair salon / Leslie Cavendish part of the story.

As I delved deeper into Leslie’s background, it became quite clear to myself that he was an important part in that whole time period of the mid to late sixties. With some more research, I eventually managed to get in contact with Leslie, and as our correspondence increased, a meeting was arranged!

On a cold and grey late November morning, my wife Susie and I headed to London to meet Leslie. The rendezvous venue was chosen by Leslie, so we headed over to Hampstead and a pub called ‘The Old Bull & Bush’. I have to admit that I was quite nervous as we entered through the doors of the pub – lots of anxious thoughts racing through my mind. Within seconds of meeting and exchanging pleasantries, I knew that we were all going to get on fine. Phew….

From the pictures that I had garnered from the internet, it is crystal clear that Leslie was a man of style and great taste. Dark-haired, handsome and mysterious looking – not dissimilar to the guy that used to front the old Milk Tray chocolate adverts! As I looked at Leslie while in our conversation – he still retains the same qualities.

I got to work on asking my questions, almost immediately! Leslie gave me a brief story of his childhood in London, which eventually got to the part where he started an apprenticeship with Vidal Sassoon. From working with Vidal, he eventually got onto the subject of The Beatles and how he become part of that inner-circle. While our conversation deepened, it became apparent that Leslie had incredible understanding and memory of what was happening, in and around himself – back in those heady days! Even within the short time that we shared Leslie’s company, he managed to regale us both in some wonderful stories. I got the feeling that Leslie was enjoying telling his stories, as he had found the perfect audience. Leslie is hoping to get his book of memoirs published in 2017, and I expect lots of these incredible stories to be in the book. So, until that time, the tales Leslie did pass onto Susie and myself will remain as our own special secrets!

We spoke about music, fashion and football. I have to mention that Leslie is a lifelong QPR supporter or sufferer! And like myself, every now and then he was looking to his mobile phone for football updates.

There were still lots of questions that I wanted to ask, but I was aware of not bombarding Leslie or overstaying our welcome. So I asked if I could email him some questions – and that way, he could spend a little more time in his answering.

Before you read the Q&A part of my article – I have to mention what a charming and warm natured man Leslie is. As we left the pub, I think that we both felt we had gained a new friend.

I emailed Leslie a number of questions – here is what I asked, and Leslie’s answers:

01. What age did you take up hairdressing?

I left school at 15. I then started an apprenticeship at Vidal Sassoon at 171 New Bond Street. The apprenticeship was for three years, where I became Vidal’s junior for three months, and I was then promoted to junior hairstylist at his Grosvenor House hotel, Park Lane, salon. Just before my eighteenth birthday.

02. How did you manage to find a job working for the world-famous Vidal Sassoon?

My best friend at school and still to this day, Lawrence Falk (he started the first unisex salon in the U.K. called ‘Crimpers’) started working in a salon in London. I thought why not try it myself – so I asked him where would be the best place to start out. He said ‘Vidal’s salon’. So I called the salon and managed to get an interview and from there I got an apprenticeship.

03. Tell us something about the kind of clientele that would frequent the salon?

The salon had a very mixed clientele. From wealthy ladies who wanted the latest Vidal style to young models (some of which became household names), famous actors, musicians, fashion designers, to big film directors, and Mary Quant, who with the ideal hairstyle, set off the swinging London scene.

04. The world’s music, fashion, arts and hairdressing seemed to all explode in the early to mid-sixties – did you personally feel like you were part of something special that was happening in London?

You didn’t really think too much about it at the time. Life was exciting anyway working at Vidal’s. Added to that, the music and fashion were part of my youth. You did feel like ‘the times they were a changin’!

05. How did you become the personal hairstylist to The Beatles – and what were they like as people?

At Vidal’s, a client of mine was Jane Asher (who was Paul McCartney’s girlfriend) – she asked me one day if I would like to cut her boyfriend’s hair! And I think you know what happened next…

I met them all at a time when they had all decided to stop touring. So they were all a lot more relaxed than I imagine they would’ve been if they were on the road. All four of them were different and I had a good friendship with them all. This also applied to the team that was around them. I was the only one who wasn’t from Liverpool, but because I never spoke to journalists about my link with The Beatles – and never hassled them for autographs etc – I become one of the inner circle that they could trust.

06. What are your memories of managing your own salon within the boutique that became ‘Apple Tailoring’?

It was an intimate salon and very personal to whoever came in to have their hair done. My clients came from the music world and from streetwise people who just found the salon – and loved to have their hair done in the remarkable atmosphere that was ‘Apple Tailoring’! Being in the boutique and watching the dandies of London being dressed up in velvet and frilly, patterned shirts, was extremely interesting. They came in the shop to be dressed, and left as peacocks!

07. What are your memories of working alongside John Crittle at ‘Apple Tailoring’?

At first, John was great to be around, and I used to like watching his friends, who were mostly from the ‘Chelsea Set’, hanging around the shop. After a while though, I lost a lot of respect for John, as he was often stoned and spoke to people in an arrogant manner. He seemed to think that he was a Chelsea via Australian aristocrat, who was doing everybody a favour in dressing them, and he didn’t have time for the regular customer – who were the ‘real’ customers!

08. You were part of the chosen entourage for the now cult Beatles’ film ‘Magical Mystery Tour’ – what are your memories of that journey?

The MMT was one of my great memories and to be on tour with THE BEATLES, especially as they had stopped touring, was something special. If you have watched the film, you will have seen the coach journey and it was great to be one of the passengers, and to be able to watch The Beatles close up. More of which will be in my book!

09. I know that you were very interested in the music that was happening all around you – what were your personal favourite bands, both live and on vinyl?

When I was young I used to like Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, and The Everly Bros. Later on, I discovered Buffalo Springfield, Jefferson Airplane, Vanilla Fudge, The Doors, CSNY, and many more West Coast bands. My taste in British bands were The Animals, Free, The Kinks, Dusty Springfield, and Cat Stevens. I was also into folk music – and Neil Young was a hero of mine. I saw many bands live, but CSNY at the Albert Hall, and David Bowie (Ziggy Stardust), and not forgetting The Beatles, were concerts not to be forgotten.

10. What are your thoughts on the clothing that you were wearing back in those days? From the photos that I have seen you certainly were a snappy dresser!

I loved the whole hippy look – Afghan coats and velvet jackets with ‘Anello & Davide’ shoes. I also got into suits from ‘John Michael’ and ‘Take 6’.

11. What are your thoughts on contemporary men’s hairdressing – and do you still cut hair today?

I am like a gunfighter who put his scissors away in a holster a few years ago. Today’s hairdressing is an art form. The use of electric cutters and the thinning outlooks, makes out for spectacular hairstyles. Hairdressing is like Punk music – nobody makes the rules – you do what you want and that is called fashion.

12. And finally – what other interesting things are you up to these days?

I have now finished my autobiography about my life as a hairdresser at Vidal’s, and this included my time with The Beatles. The book should be out this year. I have given lectures at universities about the culture and fashion during the sixties period. I have been asked to be a guest speaker at The Beatles week this year in Liverpool, which I am looking forward to doing.

I occasionally do VIP Beatle tours. My clients come from all over the world and instead of the usual Beatle tours that take place around London, I can tell them what it was actually like in the recording studios, as well as being in the building, while The Beatles performed on the roof!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Peter Feely

Married to Susie, both actively involved in the UK 60s scene for many years. My personal interest in 1960s culture goes back over 30 years, with my main two passions being music and fashion, both in equal measure. I run my own menswear label – ‘Perfumed Garden’ clothing, catering for the discerning dandy male - in addition to sourcing and selling vintage mens’ gear, with a particular interest in those hard-to-find jackets and shoes! I also run the Facebook group, ‘Psychedelic Clothing for Men: Then and Now’, with 2200+ members. Although I have no formal training in the fashion industry, what I do possess is a real passion, and through the years I have gained valuable knowledge of many areas of mens’ fashion from the mid to late 1960s. I’m also a musician and have played in many bands in my younger years. I’m an avid collector of music and music-related paraphernalia. I started running my own club nights back in the mid-1990s, and at present I run a psychedelic night in Derby – ‘The Perfumed Garden Of Musical Delights’. Through this I also get to DJ at many exciting events up and down the country

More Posts - Website - Facebook

February 15, 2017 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Inspiration Interviews News Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment

The Kinks on Pye: Part 1 – “I’m not like everybody else”

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

Although The Kinks have long been one of our most influential and cherished groups, in the last couple of years since the hit musical “Sunny Afternoon” and especially since Ray Davies joined brother Dave onstage in London back in December 2015, fans have been hopefully awaiting the reformation of this most wonderful of bands. Although The Kinks back catalogue spans over forty years it’s the halcyon Pye years from 1964 to 1971 in which the band constantly released classic hit records which have collectors scouring record shops, fairs, and the internet for hits and rarities, and a full set of UK releases will set you back a fair few quid should you wish to complete the set. For this two-part article, we’re going to give you a run through of the hard to find releases from the debut 45 back in early 64 to the “Percy” soundtrack eight years later. The first part will concentrate on the “Pink” years, when the band had a string of top ten singles, including three UK number one hits, the second part will then concentrate on the “Blue” years when Ray was at his songwriting peak but the record buying public were not buying the records in such great numbers. Hindsight shows how wrong they were.

Hailing from Muswell Hill in North London, Ray, Dave and bassist Pete Quaife were originally an R’n’B combo called The Ravens who came to the attention of ace producer Shel Talmy after he heard a demo tape and helped get the group signed to the Pye record group where they were enlisted drummer Mick Avory to complete the classic first line up. On 7th February 1964 their debut single “Long tall Sally”, a R’n’B cover of the Little Richard classic was released on the pink Pye label (7N15611) was unveiled to the record buying public. Although the single hit the lower reaches of the NME chart it was a commercial flop making copies a nice rare collector’s item today with prices usually reaching £75-120 depending on condition. The next 45 was released in April 1964 and like all the Kinks singles after the debut, it was a Ray Davies penned number “You still want me” (7N15636). Although the first single sold in respectable amounts, this one was an unjustified complete flop and is by far the hardest Kinks UK 45 to locate in nice condition. Expect to pay at least £200 for a copy of this, one even reached the amazing price of £400+ at auction in 2016! With Pye threatening to cancel the band’s contract if they didn’t have a hit single, Ray composed one of the most influential two and bit minute slabs of musical perfection ever committed to vinyl, “You really got me”. With Dave’s incendiary and groundbreaking lead guitar bursting through the track, it couldn’t fail when it was released on 7th August 1964 (7N15673). And fail it didn’t as it shot up the UK charts, reaching the coveted number one spot shortly after where it stayed for two weeks. The Kinks had arrived.

From then on every single the group released up until 1968 hit the upper regions of the UK charts, with every single release apart from “Everybody’s gonna be happy” hitting the top ten, two of them reaching the top spot. As runs of stellar 45’s go, the following one takes some beating for songcraft, influence and sheer greatness: “All day and all of the night”, “Tired of waiting for you”, “Everybody’s gonna be happy”, “Set me free”, “See my friends”, “Till the end of the day”, “Dedicated follower of  fashion”, “Sunny afternoon”, “Dead end street”, “Waterloo sunset”, “Autumn almanac”. Being massive chart smashes these are usually findable in nice condition for around £3-5 each, with a premium for truly mint copies. All the Kinks singles were also pressed as demonstration copies in small numbers, these are very desirable to collectors and can reach top prices at auction, especially in top condition with unblemished labels. Also look out for UK export release 45’s, mainly for the European market. There are four in total, including album tracks “David Watts”, “A well-respected man” and “Milk cow blues” on a 7″ format. Ray’s songwriting prowess also resulted in some fantastic and very rare releases by other artists around this time. “I go to sleep” was covered by The Applejacks, Peggy Lee, Marion, Fingers and The Truth in 1965-66 although none were hits and it wasn’t till a few years later The Pretenders took the song into the charts. Other great, obscure and coveted releases include Barry Fantoni “Little man in a little box” (Fontana), The Thoughts “All night stand” (Planet), The Cascades “I bet you won’t stay” (Liberty) and Leapy Lee “King of the whole wide world” (Decca). Ironically it’s Dave’s composition “One fine day” which was covered by Shel Naylor and released on Decca in 1964 which fetches by far the most money, with prices sometimes hitting the £500+ mark!

With the band constantly having smash hits Pye also released a nice series of EP’s in wonderful colour laminated sleeves. Five were released in total, the first three”Kwyet Kinks”, “Kinksize hits” and “Kinksize session” are not particularly hard to find, but the fourth “Dedicated Kinks” from 1966 is more elusive and the final EP “The Kinks” from April 1968 is incredibly scarce easily reaching £200+ at auction in top condition. The band’s first three LP’s “The Kinks”, “Kinda Kinks” and “The Kink controversy” were good sellers but easily sell for £50+ in nice condition with clean sleeves. Particularly coveted are rare export Stereo pressings of the first two LP’s with stickered UK sleeves as they were mono only releases in the UK. “Face to face” from 1966 was a move towards Ray’s late 60’s songwriting style and is an absolute classic but strangely failed to chart resulting in scarcity of copies today. This was followed by the live album “Live at Kelvin Hall” in early 1967 and lastly by the masterpiece “Something else by The Kinks” in September of the same year. All were released in both Mono and Stereo, the latter being the scarcer of the two, especially with the Stereo sticker still attached! Prices vary wildly from one week to the next but be prepared to have a large bank account if you want a truly mint copy of any of them. As 1968 approached Ray’s songwriting grew more world-weary and pastoral and the band embarked on an influential but poorly received at the time run of releases on the newly redesigned light blue Pye label. We’ll have a look at these next time around…


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

February 15, 2017 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Reviews February 2017 – Part 2

Les Darlings

nm_january_2017_les_darlings

‘Le Tourbillion’ b/w ‘Hey Baby’ – Single

When you find out who the members of Les Darlings are, it’s easy to see why these two infectious slices of Garage-power pop are so good. Comprising of Pascal, David Peter, Thomas and Dorian, they have joined forces from some of Europe’s top psych and garage bands; namely The Norvins, The Youth and The Wilde Sect. For this single, they have also been joined by Cecile Wurlee (Curlee Wurlee) and to complete the perfect circle it was recorded at Yeah Yeah Yeah Studios with the splendid Dennis Rux at the controls. What else can I tell you about this single? Two full-on Beat belters with all the expected component parts and another success for all involved. Let’s hope Les Darlings are not just a passing phase.

facebook.com/lesdarlingsband
lesdarlings.bandcamp.com

The Seen

nm_january_2017_the_seen

‘The Seen’ – EP

The Seen were formed in 2014 and are from Bonn, Germany. This is their debut five-track EP. Ania, Peter, Max, Vic and Tobias have all been in previous bands before, so they are not exactly novices. The opening track is a cover of ‘Big Sensation’ by Cool Stove which was originally released in 1969 and is something of a rarity, but The Seen have given it a new lease of life. The other four songs are original compositions and are loaded with psych, garage and Beat reference points. Ania’s vocals are perfect for this style with a hint of punk delivery. ‘Time Of Change’, Trouble’ and ‘Since You’ve Been Gone’ are all belters, while ‘Make It Right’ is a well-arranged change of pace. This EP is out on the excellent Copase Disques who also have French Boutik among their roster, so you know this release is going to be good…..and it is…..very good.

www.theseen.de
facebook.com/theseenbn/
theseen1.bandcamp.com
copasetic.de/theseen

Wolf People

nm_january_2017_wolf_people

‘Ruins’ – LP

Arguably, Wolf People are the finest exponents of folk-rock in the UK right now and this new album certainly enhances that reputation. Following on from their previous two studio albums Steeple (2010) and Fain (2013), ‘Ruins’ is not a concept album (as the band insist), but songs linked by a common thread; what would the world be like without humans? Indeed, it is fair to say that this is unmistakably a ‘Wolf People’ album. They have such a wonderfully eclectic range of influences that shape their music, but still retain a very distinctive sound of their own. While that sound may come across as quite heavy at times, there is a genuine intelligence, passion and complexity that makes this album well worth listening to. ‘Ninth Night’ sets the tone, interspersed by tracks like ‘Kingfisher’, ‘Not Me Sir’ and ‘Salts Mill’. Jack Sharp’s rounded, deft vocals fit beautifully around the sterling work by Tom Watt on drums, Dan Davis on bass and Joe Hollick on guitar. For those with a penchant for folk-rock, you’ll be hard pushed to find a better album than this one.

www.wolfpeople.co.uk
facebook.com/WolfPeople
wolfpeople.bandcamp.com

Alex Cooper

portada_club45-ok.cdr

‘Club 45 Again’ – Book

Alejandro Diez Garín, former leader of Los Flechazos and now in charge of Cooper, unpacks his collection of records and memorabilia sixties to offer us 90 unforgettable songs. I know this because we have handy things like translation apps that mean I can understand Spanish sentences, but I’m not likely to use said app to translate the whole book, which has been published in the Spanish language. Yes, I know this will put a lot of people off, unless you are fluent of course, but that said, the publisher; Ediciones Chelsea have done a magnificent job on the production side. Obviously, I can’t vouch for the text, although you do get a sense that Alejandro has done his homework here and to be fair, the selection of songs are very good indeed. But by far the most appealing aspect of this book is the quality of the print and the reproduction of some really great photos and there are lots of them. Most are in colour and the layout of the book is really tidy, allowing your eyes to skim over the pages with ease. It is a shame there does not appear to be an English language version, but let’s hope they can get one organised, as I think a lot more people will find this a welcome addition to their ‘mod-related’ library.

www.edicioneschelsea.com
facebook.com/club45


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 21, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Reviews February 2017 – Part 1

Creamer and Wesley

nm_january_2017_creamer

‘Geoffrey Porter’ b/w ‘Carnivals’ – Single

This was one of those that just missed the deadline for the previous Nutsmag Reviews. Dean Atkins (aka Eddie Creamer) and Kieran Wilson (aka David Wesley) released their debut single on the newly formed Psych-A-Rella Records before Christmas. This is definitely for those with a preference for folky-psych ballads. Acoustic 12 string guitars and whimsical lyrics abound on both sides, with ‘Carnivals’ being mixed by Andy Lewis. As debuts go, it is a solid-enough performance and one that gives a glimpse of good potential by the duo. I’ll be interested to see what comes next.

facebook.com/CreamerandWesley
www.psycharella.com

The Dustaphonics

nm_january_2017_dustaphonics

‘Johnny & Bo’ – LP

It’s been three years since Dustaphonics last outing, the splendid ‘Big Smoke, London Town’. They went down a storm at Le Beat Bespoke in 2016 and now they’re back with yet another cracking slice of manic surf, hi-octane rock’n’roll and a pinch of funky groove on this new album due out early February. Led by the London club scene legend Yvan Serrano, this LP is in keeping with the overall Dustaphonics ‘sound’, but it also has some truly charming diversity. The opening track, ‘You Don’t Love Me Any More’ is familiar territory for the band; helter-skelter, aggressive rock and roll. The title track is a superb blend of Mr Serrano’s influences; those being Bo Diddley and Johnny Ramone (and believe me, it works!), while ‘Q Sounds Groove’ is the first of a couple of collaborations with the French studio’s house band; the very same band that works with Adelains and Little Clara to name but two. We also get a couple of fantastic covers. The Special’s ‘Gangsters’ gets the surf treatment, while Ike Turner’s ‘I’m Hurting’ gets the unmistakeable Dustaphonics stamp. There is a fitting tribute to actress Tura Satana of Russ Meyer’s ‘Faster Pussy Cat Kill! Kill!’ fame and the latin-flavoured ‘Cachaca’ which is a nice, unexpected surprise. Vocal duties are split between Hayley Red, Aina Roxx and Kay Elizabeth, all of whom are first class.
This is a really great album and should do very well.

thedustaphonics.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/TheDustaphonics

Goldie

nm_january_2017_goldie

‘Could It Be’ – EP

It’s hard to understand the rationale of the record industry back in the Sixties. How often have we heard previously unreleased gems which have gone on to gain huge popularity on the scene? One wonders what the ‘decision-makers’ thinking when they ‘canned’ such great songs? Thankfully, for us at least, there is a small, dedicated army of people investing their time and money to unearth these tracks and make them available. This latest release on the Top Sounds label (responsible for 2015’s brilliant The Action EP) is another prime example. Goldie, who arrived on the shores of the UK with her Gingerbreads in 1962, made a handful of great records for Decca as a solo artist and these three previously unreleased gems prove that claim. The A-side; ‘Could It Be’ is a wonderful slice of early blue-eyed Northern, with a lush production. The B-side starts with Goldie’s version of the Goffin & King penned; ‘Goin’ Back’, which, (according to the story contained in the excellent booklet that comes with the EP) Dusty Springfield ‘stole’ from Goldie and got it out before Decca knew what was happening. By that time Goldie was so angry with Dusty, she refused to have it released. If it had been released, I think it would have given Dusty a run for her money. The final track is the Andrew Loog Oldham composition; ‘Headlines’, which again, is a British stab at capturing the Tamla sound. So thanks to Nigel Lees at Top Sounds for delivering another lost belter.

www.topsoundsrecords.co.uk

The Beatpack

nm_january_2017_beatpack

‘Back, Behind and In Front’ – EP

It’s hard to believe it is twenty-seven years since Beatpack released their debut EP, but thankfully they are still going strong with this latest offering on the excellent State Records. If you still know nothing about the band, what you get is an uncompromising, hard-edged fusion of R&B and Garage. Opening track; ‘Loopin’ With Lucy’ is a prime example, while ‘A Fog Is Lifting’ and ‘If I Look Outside’ show they have never been a one-trick-pony with monastic chants and jazz influences shining through.
‘Met Myself Coming Back’ is more familiar territory, but one thing you can be sure of is it’s always top quality. Beatpack have recently completed tours of Germany and Spain and I’m sure there will be UK dates this year. If you get a chance, go see them as it is always a great show. In the meantime, this EP is well-worth the investment.

thebeatpack.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/TheBeatPack
www.staterecs.com/store-uk


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 21, 2017 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

The Lovely Eggs speak to NUTsMag

The Lovely Eggs bring their own artful autonomy and pickled noir humour to a growing list of original, vibrant and offbeat compositions, films, gig/parties with a bold visual and cinematic flavour that really should be on the National Schools Curriculum to dispel the whiff of ‘X Factor’ drudgery and all of its equivalents. Art meets real life talent, we introduce The Lovely Eggs, your own real, new favourite everyday band!

Members:
David Blackwell: drums, guitar, tamb, other stuff.
Holly Ross: Singing, guitar, tamb, other stuff.

01 How did the band get together?

In Paris in 2006.

02 Where did your name come from?

A pigeon laid two eggs in an abandoned nest on our bathroom windowsill.The eggs were incubating while we were writing our first songs. Then during the summer they hatched and that is when we flew back to England and formed our band. It just seemed a natural name. There were two of them and two of us and we were born at the same time.

03 Who were your major influences and inspirations and who do you despise?

We are influenced a lot by everyday life. A lot of our songs are quite observational about the ridiculous things people get up to every day. So in a way just getting up in a morning and mooching round is a big inspiration to us. It’s good living in Lancaster, which is a small northern town, so you know everyone and its funny to see life tick along. We’re also influenced by the obvious poets and writers and artists and that predictable stuff. Our favourite is Richard Brautigan. We don’t despise anyone.

04 What drove you to make music together?

We just wanted to be in a band where there were no rules where we could be free to make exactly the music we wanted to hear.That seems hard for some bands these days but it is really easy!

05 What can someone who has never seen you live before expect from your live shows then & possibly even now?

We like to have a party at our gigs. Parties are timeless.

06 Who writes your songs? What types of themes and subjects do you deal with?

David’s mum. We write about everything in the life capsule.

07 How did your music evolved since you first began playing together?

We maybe sound more powerful now. When we first started David had never played drums before. We had a lot of soft songs when we first started. Now we are more wild and raw.

08 What has been your biggest challenge as a band? Were you been able to overcome this? If so, how?

Our biggest challenge was probably touring across America for 21 days in a car with another band and all the equipment WITHOUT Strongbow!

09 Do you play covers? If you could pick any song, which would you like to cover most and why?

We’re generally not into playing covers, although we once did a cover of It’s Spooky by Jad Fair and Daniel Johnston for a B side of our Halloween single Haunt Me Out. We also covered Hotpants Romance before just to make them scream!

10 Where did you envisage the band being in five years time?

Depends what day, but if it’s January 16th 2017 we’ll probably be mooching round our mums house.

11 Who would you most like to record with?

Well Jonathan Richman would be pretty good.

12 What should we be expecting from the band in the near future?

Some more records, some more gigs and a bit of falling about. We are playing at Le Beat Bespoke 12 Easter next year (2017) We are really looking forward to the whole event.

Thanks To The Lovely Eggs.

www.thelovelyeggs.co.uk/
www.myspace.com/thelovelyeggs
twitter.com/TheLovelyEggs
soundcloud.com/thelovelyeggs
www.facebook.com/thelovelyeggs

 

Thanks to eyeplug.net © 2011


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

December 7, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
0 Comment

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 14 (episode 23)

NUTsCast December 2016
Join The Baron for a look back at some of the highlights of the last twelve months with live tracks recorded at Le Beat Bespoke, Margate and Crossfire by Graham Day & Forefathers, The Stairs, Jim Jones & The Righteous Mind, Wicked Whispers, Dustaphonics, Big Boss Man, Bronco Bullfrog, Paul Orwell, Cat Black and The Mynd Set.

We look ahead to our Nutty New Year’s Eve Party with DJ selections by Irish Greg, Jim Watson, Lee Miller, Peter Feely, Joel Maslin, Ady Lupton & Carolina.

So join The Baron for the last Nutscast Session of 2016.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

December 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 15 (episode 24)

*ROLL OVER IMAGE TO SEE CONTROLS*

Join the Baron for the first NUTSCAST of 2017.
On this show, we have special guest Rob Bailey talking us through the Easter extravaganza that is LE BEAT BESPOKE and the brand new LBB album.

To get you in the mood for LBB12 we have tracks from Corduroy, Novella, Lovely Eggs, Pink Floyd, New Candys, The Arrogants, Los Retrovisores, The Pacers, Stags, & Eliphant as well as selections from our DJ team.

Explore the line-up and event here at: www.lebeatbespoke.com


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 16, 2017 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

My mind’s eye – A 1966 musical Christmas

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

img162

1966 has been in the news a lot this past year. From the 50th anniversary of England’s only world cup final win, the counterculture exhibition at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, through to endless documentaries on BBC4 and magazines celebrating this seismic musical year, 1966 seems to have been everywhere. 1966 was also probably the last year when the POP 45 really was king as a groundbreaking musical device too, album sales would soon overtake it’s 7″ counterpart and the newly labelled psychedelic rock would soon transfer to the much more serious, and expansive LP format. But, although groundbreaking LP’s such as “Pet sounds”, “Revolver” and “Blonde on blonde” were released in this year, the singles chart would still host classic number one hits such as “Paperback writer”, “Paint it, black”, “Sunny afternoon” and “Reach out, I’ll be there” and untold forward thinking 7″ gems from Love, Creation, Yardbirds, The Who, Jimi Hendrix, James Brown and Otis Redding were all vying for the teenagers hard-earned cash. As the year drew to a close and Christmas came a-calling, Psychedelia was still definitely underground and not yet bothering the upper echelons of “Top of the pops” and the Hit Parade, but what was pouring out of transistors and Dansettes in the build-up to the festive season? Let’s have a look at some of the hits, and classic misses of December 1966…

img163

In the run up to Christmas, the 7th December singles chart was stuffed with great music: Number 47 found Martha & the Vandellas with “I’m ready for love” and prime US garage from Question Mark & the Mysterians “96 tears” was on it’s way up at 37. Nudging towards the top twenty you’d find The Temptations “Beauty is only skin deep” at 30, prime Stax soul from Otis, “Fa, fa, fa, fa, fa” at 28, classic UK beat from The Hollies “Stop, stop, stop” at 13 and The Kinks downbeat “Dead End Street” at 16. Just outside the top ten was a slice of pounding Australian beat from The Easybeats with “Friday on my mind”, and nestling inside the top ten you’d find stellar US soul from Lee Dorsey at 6 with “Holy cow” and blue-eyed UK soul from The Spencer Davis Group, with Stevie Winwood’s blistering vocal lighting up the number three spot with “Gimme some loving”. A trip down your local record shop on this week would find new releases from the pre-Slade combo The N’Betweens’ with “You better run”, Ella Fitzgerald’s cracking version of “These boots were made for walking”, and Herbal Mixture’s mod-psych “Machines”. None of these sold at all and are all now much in-demand slabs of vinyl.

img164

A week nearer to Christmas day, the charts of 14th December included some classy new entries to the singles charts including Donovan’s proto-psychedelic classic “Sunshine superman” straight in at number 31, classic Motown from The Supremes “You keep me hangin’ on” flying up into the top twenty at 15, and, much to the groups annoyance, The Small Faces “My mind’s eye” shot into the top ten at number 4! Available this week, and destined for the unsold bargain bins, were releases from John Patto with the double-sided aceness of “Love / Can’t stop talkin’ about my baby”, Mike Leslie’s future NUTS favourite “Right or wrong”, The Olympics soul shindig “Baby do the Philly Dog” and The Mirage’s great take on The Fab Four’s “Revolver” LP show stopper “Tomorrow never knows”.

img167

Onto the week before Christmas and the 21st December saw a multitude of new releases in the lower reaches of the chart, all of which would soon hurtle up to much higher places early in 1967. How about this lot for utter greatness: The Cream “I feel free” at 50, The wicked Wilson Pickett’s “Mustang Sally” one place higher at 49, Motown greatness from The Temptations with “I know I’m losing you” at 47, Andover’s Troggs with “Anyway that you want me” at 39 and The Who’s future top ten hit, and ode to a seaside donkey, “Happy Jack” bursting straight in at number 30. New releases the week before Christmas which ended up in nobodies stocking included Paul Butterfield Blues Band garage stomper “Come on in”, The Flies pop-art madness “(I’m not your) Stepping stone” and The Misunderstood’s truly breathtaking “I can take you to the sun”. As usual, the more parent (and grandparent!) friendly album chart was full of the big selling easy listening gods of the day, with Jim Reeves, The Seekers and Herb Alpert hogging the high sellers league. The Kinks “Face to face”, Beatles “Revolver”, Georgie Fame’s “Sound venture” and Spencer Davis Group’s “Autumn ’66” at least made up some of the numbers below!

img169

So… finally we reached the last chart of that coolest of musical years, the Christmas chart of 28th December 1966, and only two new releases of note bothered the lower echelons, Smokey and the Miracles Motown stomper “(Come round here) I’m the one you need” entered at 45 and Georgie Fame’s cool mod take of “Sitting in the park” came in just above it at number 43. So what were the top sellers of that mighty week you may ask? Well, the album chart had The Seekers, Jim Reeves, The Beach Boys near the top, with “The sound of music” sitting on top where it had been for months! And the singles chart? The Beatles… Nah, they were in EMI studios working on their 1967 masterpiece. The Stones? The Hollies? Small Faces? The Supremes? Dusty? …. Nope, our top three had Val Doonican at 3, The Seekers at 2, and Tom “The voice” Jones on top of the pile with “The Green, Green grass of home”. Changes were definitely in the air though, as witnessed by one 45 released on 16th December 1966: “Hey Joe” by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. This would blow the UK music aristocracy apart with it’s moving of sonic of sonic boundaries, and soon shot into the UK top ten in January. 1967 was just round the corner and our radios and televisions would be introduced to the new sounds and delights of Hendrix, The Pink Floyd, Kaleidoscope, The Doors, Move and many, many more new and exciting artists. Merry Christmas!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

More Posts - Website - Facebook

December 7, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

The Meyer Dancers

The Meyer Dancers are London’s finest specialist 1960s Go Go Dance Company. The Meyer Dancers are made up of professionally trained dancers and choreographers. TMD are assisted by professional make up artists and costume designers to create a truly authentic experience. The Meyer dancers have been performing Go Go for 3 years & are well established with support slots to names such as Geno Washington & The Sonics.

01. How did the The Meyer Dancers originally get going?

Treacle and Cherry founded TMD when they met at dance school and discovered a mutual passion for all things 60’s and 70’s. Treacle was spinning records regularly at club nights around north London and Soho, with Cherry being one of the regular attendees at her nights. The duo had an admiration for 60’s movies and in particular cult legend Russ Meyer. This was where the Meyer Dancers were born and took inspiration from. Swerving a far left from the burlesque movement The Meyer Dancers recreate authentic Go-Go dancing from the podiums reminiscent from ‘Whisky A Go-Go’, shindigs and soul trains!

02. How long have you been interested in this type of dancing?

All our dancers have been dancing since they were nippers but as a company we’ve been Go-Going for 6 years and we are still the first cats on the dance floor! We love to perform our routines but we also like getting up to freestyle. We are trying to get the ‘Go-Go’ word around town teaching a great cardio 60’s workout and learning some of the classic moves! We are currently holding classes twice a month at Haunt in Dalston.

03. What was it like to go from an Idea to your actual first early bookings?

We started off by learning many of the ‘classic’ moves, watching hours of YouTube videos, original film footage, and studying the whole look and vibe. We started out performing with a northern soul cover band in east London every month and it progressed from there into different kinds of bookings from music videos, to dancing for some of our idols!

04. How did you research the types of moves and the sounds and styles and set-ups?

We went out to as many clubs as possible, you learn so much from chatting to people and the dance floors. We also watched endless soul train and Shindig plus loads of Ike and Tina Turner footage!

05. Tell us about your usual preparation behind the scenes for a show?

It usually consists of an overflowing suitcase full of costumes, hairspray and pins. We come dressed in our ’60’s day wear’ ; we get a lot of stuff from charity shops, Paperdress vintage and E-Bay! We also have a constant supply of fake eyelashes! Pre performance you’ll find us backstage warming up and wiggling into costumes, plus some extra backcombing never goes a miss!

06. Where have you appeared over the years?

We have been booked for such a variety! We’ve performed at most of the festivals, Glastonbury, Lattitude, Wilderness, Isle of Wight. Lots of fabulous clubs in London, the North of England and Spain! We have also danced for dome seriously groovy parties one we loved recently was in a disused building on the south bank it was lovingly recreated as Andy Warhols factory and we had pride of place – shakin and shimmying next to the DJ! Not forgetting one of our favourite annual performances at Le Beat Bespoke where we have supported The Sonics, danced our socks off for The Pretty Things and even done ‘the bird’ with The Trashmen!

07. Tell us about your involvement with the New Untouchables?

The New Untouchables make so many people happy – it’s just a pleasure working with them! We started by coming to the nights as punters and Rob Bailey asked The Meyers to perform at Le Beat Bespoke about five years ago and I think we have performed every year since making more glamorous friends every time
we do!

08. What are some of the best and worst memories from your performances?

The worst was probably the back stage glamour being told to head to your dressing room and then arriving to find they’ve whacked a sign up on a random door and the reality is that 5 of us have to get changed in a disabled toilet, then opening the door to a northern man having a piss!

The best bit is we get to do what we love! We love a great crowd who vibe off us and get dancing and we love performing with bands and DJs who are just as passionate as us! We love to keep the authenticity as much as we can to the go-go girls of the era.

09. How do you keep the performances so fresh and vibrant?

Within the paradigm of 60’s go-go we like to go into the sub genres such as psychedelia, mod, French ye-ye and surf so we make routines which suit these vibes and always make a new costume for each of them! We often have clients ask us to perform specific styles within Go-Go so its good to have some variation. We love shopping trips to record shops to find new songs to dance to!

10. Who are your big inspirations in the world of dance and performance?

We love love love Pans People but the original line up to around ’73, they had to put their heads together every week and make magic happen to whatever was the latest hit and sometimes we get given themes or tracks that bring a whole new approach to how we choreograph or style ourselves so it is exciting, exhilarating and also a bit of a giggle! We also love The Hullaballoo dancers and The Gazzarri girls off Hollywood A-Go-Go but inspiration can come from everywhere! The buxom babes of Russ Meyers films of course and party scenes in cult classics like Riot On The Sunset Strip or The Trip Out. Last but definitely not least those Ikettes sure could shake a tail feather too!

11. What are some of your favourite soundtracks to your favourite routines?

Oh we have had so many! We have danced to everything from The Clapping Song by Shirley Ellis, to Henry Mancini’s corker Experiment in Terror (Twist) to Coz I Luv You by Slade! But one of our favourites is probably our routine to Liar Liar by The Castaways.

12. How do people tend to re-act when they see you live on stage?

We get them dancing, some people don’t know what to expect, but then they see what a good time we’re having and they want in on the party you see the feet
start tapping!

13. Who makes your outfits and stage-wear?

We buy original pieces where possible but we also make a fair bit ourselves we love collaboration any fashionistas of costume designers do get in contact! We have been styled by Lucy In disguise and more recently we has costumes made by HUZZAR HUZZAR vintage.

14. What have you got planned for the future?

2016 is going to be an exciting year for us as we have lots of new projects to delve into, we have a project with a fashion designer coming up soon and bookings for the major festivals in the UK and Europe. Watch this space groovy people!

Le Beat Bespoké 12 – London (Easter 2017) – see all the details HERE!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

December 7, 2016 By : Category : Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Jazz for Modernists 11 Blue Note 45s

The iconic status of Blue Note’s catalogue of LPs from the 1950s and 60s in the field of funky and soulful modern jazz is, of course, a testament to the high quality of its recording artists, the general excellence of the music and the production values instilled by owners Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff and perfected by audio engineer Rudy Van Gelder (RIP). However, it would be fair to state that the cover art, designed for the most part by Reid Miles, and with informative sleeve notes by the cream of contemporary jazz critics, together form an integral part of both the listening experience and the overall modernist package. Of those who own the vinyl, especially, who can disassociate the music of, say, John Coltrane’s Blue Train from its cover, or Dexter Gordon’s Our Man in Paris?

One consequence of this is that this most revered of labels tends to be valued for its 33 rpm products almost exclusively, something perhaps a little unusual for the world of mod music collectors. So it may come as a surprise to some (it was to me) to find out that, in addition to the 400+ LPs recorded on Blue Note between 1955 and 1972, the same period also saw something in the region of 350 7” 45 rpm singles released by the label. A handful of rare export copies came in picture sleeves, but on the whole we’re talking blue and blue and white label in paper bag territory.

The first thing to say is that virtually all the singles were sides already cut for an LP. Certainly this holds true for the ‘A’ sides, though a notable exception is the 1958 vocal version of Horace Silver’s ‘Señor Blues’ (see number two in list). The ‘A’ sides are overwhelmingly the ‘catchiest’ track on the LP, and in some cases, such as Horace Silver’s Tokyo Blues LP (1962), as many as three tracks were released on separate singles (as parts 1 & 2), such were the commercial possibilities of that finger-snapping record. Some tracks recorded in the studio for an album were edited in length for the singles or divided across both sides as ‘Parts 1 & 2’. Whether always the same take is something I haven’t yet been able to ascertain.

In future articles, we will look in more depth into the Blue Note singles catalogue (even acknowledging some of the 78s that were released from 1939 to 1955). This will involve examining the social context for their releases and their audience and reception compared with the albums. For now, though, here is an introductory selection of 10 major releases, many of which have been played over the years on the mod scene.

 


sonny_rollins

01. Sonny Rollins, ‘Decision (pts 1 & 2)’ (1957) – Blue Note-45-1669

After nine LPs for Prestige, New York-born tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins recorded four for Blue Note between December 1956 and November ’57. Four singles were culled from these sessions, including this marvellous mid-tempo slice of soulful hard-bop taken from the 1957 LP now known as Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 (BLP-1542). A stellar line-up featuring future Miles Davis pianist Wynton Kelly, drummer Max Roach, bassist Gene Ramey and trumpeter Donald Byrd trace out over 8 minutes the transition from bebop to soul jazz.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


02. Horace Silver Quintet (with Bill Henderson), ‘Señor Blues’ (1958) –Blue Note-45-1710

Horace Silver initially recorded this Latin-tinged tune as an instrumental in late 1956 for the 6 Pieces of Silver LP (BLP1539) and a shorter, alternate take was duly released as a single coupled with ‘Cool Eyes’ from the same session. Then, in 1958, a new lyric version, with a different line-up (though Donald Byrd remained) was recorded with Chicago-born actor and vocalist Bill Henderson. Apparently one of the labels best-selling 45s, ‘Señor Blues’ turned up on the excellent 1993 compilation Blue ‘n’ Groovy. Henderson, who passed away earlier this year at the age of 90, also recorded two singles with Jimmy Smith in 1958.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


03. Herbie Hancock, ‘Watermelon Man’/ ‘Three Bags Full’ (1962) – Blue Note 45-1862

Covered by John Hendricks, Mongo Santamaría and Manfred Mann, among others, Chicago-born pianist and composer Herbie Hancock’s ‘Watermelon Man’ is now a jazz standard both in this, its original form, and the electro-funk version he made over ten years later for the 1973 Head Hunters LP. Some see this track, taken from debut LP Takin’ Off as the first blueprint of one of the label’s key signatures of the next five or six years: the inclusion on an LP of at least one exotically-titled funky, latin-tinged soul-jazz number which, in edited form at least, could get dance floors moving. Featuring Dexter Gordon on tenor sax, trumpeter Freddie Hubbard and, with Hancock, a rhythm section comprising Billy Higgins (drums) and Butch Warren (bass), ‘Watermelon Man’ was written with commercial success in mind and evokes from Hancock’s childhood the cry of a Chicago street vendor and the rhythmic beat of his wagon wheels.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


04. Jimmy Smith, ‘Can Heat’/’Matilda Matilda’ (1963) – Blue Note 45-1905

Taken from his penultimate Blue Note LP, Rockin’ the Boat (BLP4141), featuring Lou Donaldson on alto sax, ‘Can Heat’ is just one of over 40 singles released by Jimmy Smith on the Blue Note label between 1955 and 1972. This one, a nice slice of mid-tempo r & b/soul jazz, is classic mid-60s Smith, one for getting the dance floor bubbling as opposed to an out-and-out mover. A lovely tune, though, for relaxing to with a glass of cool beer or camomile tea for more adventurous souls.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


05. Stanley Turrentine, ‘River’s Invitation’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note 45-1917

Another stalwart of Blue Note’s soulful side, Pittsburgh tenor man Stanley Turrentine (1934-2000) had already recorded with R & B heavyweights Lowell Fulsom and Earl Bostic before teaming up with Max Roach in 1959. In 1960, he married organist Shirley Scott, going on to record with her for Prestige and Impulse! ‘River’s Invitation’, a sparkling orchestral version of Percy Mayfield’s gospel-drenched blues, is taken from Joyride (BST84201) and features Herbie Hancock and guitarist Kenny Burrell.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


06. Lee Morgan, ‘The Rumproller’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note-45-1918

Readers of our recent top 10 soul-jazz LPs will know that trumpeter Lee Morgan’s ‘The Sidewinder’ (both as single and LP) was a massive success for Blue Note in 1964. ‘The Rumproller’, released in late 65/early 66, was the follow-up single and LP (though in the meantime Morgan had recorded the excellent Search for the New Land). A funky blues in the ‘Sidewinder’ fashion, this track was written by pianist Andrew Hill, one of Blue Note’s more experimental artists whose LPs for the label are highly recommended.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


08. Lee Morgan, ‘Cornbread’ (pts 1 & 2) (1965) – Blue Note-45-1930
Recorded at the end of the funky summer of 1965, the Cornbread LP (BST84222) reached the Billboard top 10 when it was finally released in early ’67. Featuring the great ballad ‘Ceora’, the record holds a special place in this writer’s heart as the first Blue Note LP he bought as a teenager. The title track, another infectious bit of bluesy funk, was released as a single.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE



09. Duke Pearson, ‘Sweet Honey Bee’/’Ready Rudy?’ (1967) Blue Note-45-1931
The next single in the catalogue after ‘Cornbread’, ‘Sweet Honey Bee’, by in-house Blue Note pianist and composer Duke Pearson was taken from a late ’66 LP of the same name. At this time, Blue Note was often pairing its funky players with modal modernists and here Miles Davis bassist Ron Carter provides a more spacious and contemplative feel to the rhythm section. Flautist James Spalding, though, dominates with the melody that structures this bouncy mid-tempo track.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


10. Lou Donaldson, ‘Alligator Boogaloo’/’Rev Moses’ (1967) Blue Note-45-1934

Coming on like a slower-tempo ‘Hot Barbecue’ (Jack McDuff), with Lonnie Smith at the organ, this Lou Donaldson swinging groove remains a bona fide mod jazz favourite. Though the album version weighs in at over six minutes, the single, as can be seen from the picture, is an edited version of less than 3 minutes and thus ideal for the discotheque. However, many mods will want to find the (original) vinyl LP for the iconic cover of Peggy Moffitt wearing a psychedelic Rudi Gernreich gown.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


11. Bobby Hutcherson, ‘Ummh’ (pts 1 & 2) (1970) Blue Note – 1966
And so into 1970! This list is completed with a brief homage to the late great vibes player Bobby Hutcherson (1941-2016). LA-born Hutcherson was a regular featured artist at Blue Note and played on key dates such as Eric Dolphy’s Out to Lunch (1964). His own series of dates for the label, including Dialogue (1965), Components (1966) and Happenings (1967) are among the most thoughtful and atmospheric in the entire catalogue. By the time of San Francisco (1970), he had moved from the fringes of the avant-garde into the realm of jazz fusion and funk. Taken from this album, Ummh (pts 1 & 2) features Jazz Crusader Joe Sample on electric piano, John Williams on fender bass, drummer Mickey Roker and tenor sax player Harold Land (he that inspired the title of a song by Yes). It is one relentless gargantuan groove which hopefully Bobby above is still playing along to.

WATCH & LISTEN HERE


Postscript
In 1998, Dean Rudland compiled a selection of Blue Note 45s under the title ‘Blue 45s-the ultimate jukebox’. I don’t have a copy of this, but it might still be available and will no doubt have more useful information.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

More Posts

December 6, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page ModJazz Music Picks Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Reviews December 2016 – Part 2

The Urges

nm_dec_2016_urges

Time Will Pass – LP

This is a welcome return for one of Dublin’s finest, Formed in 2003, there has not been a great deal of recorded material from The Urges, but when a new release does appear it invariably turns out to be top quality as this, their second album will bear out. After the troubled production of their debut ‘Psych-War’, you could forgive the band for being a little disheartened by the whole process. Happily, they are now signed to Mersol Records and one hopes this is the new beginning for The Urges.
The album is pure psych/garage heaven with all the component parts in play. The songs were written by vocalist and guitarist Jim Walters and each one is as jangly and catchy as the next. ‘Passing Us By’, ‘Time Will Pass’ and ‘Now I See’ are arguably the high points, but the standard is pretty high anyway. Great to have you back Urges. Let’s not leave it quite so long for the next LP.

www.facebook.com/theurges

Speed Of Sound

nm_dec_2016_speed_of_sound

Everything Changes  – LP

This is pretty good value from the Manchester-based quartet comprised of John Armstrong, Ann-Marie Crowley, Kevin Roache and Paul Worthington. In essence, if you buy the vinyl you get a bonus cd which is an albums worth in itself. This is their debut LP and they have made a good job of it. With tracks like ‘Checkpoint Charlie’ and ‘Girl On The Roof’, Speed Of Sound definitely have their own ‘sound’ (if you’ll pardon the pun). It brings to mind a combination of Bob Dylan meets Velvet Undergound influences which is no bad thing. The album is out now on B E Records.

www.thespeedofsounduk.blogspot
www.facebook.com/thespeedofsounduk

Various Artists

nm_dec_2016_soho_scene

Soho Scene 62  – CD

This is the first in a series celebrating the Soho Jazz scene from Rhythm And Blues Records, ’63 and ’64 are also available, but if this compilation is anything to go by, the other two will be well worth investing in. With comprehensive sleeve notes by Paul ‘Smiler’ Anderson, this double cd package showcases the best of British modern jazz on disc one and the US equivalent on disc two. Featuring names like Tubby Hayes, Victor Feldman, Don Rendle. Lee Morgan, Chico Hamilton and Paul Desmond, you really cannot go far wrong. The recordings are first-class as is the packaging and liner notes. If jazz is your bag, it doesn’t come much better than this.

www.rhythmandbluesrecords.co.uk

Sidewalk Society

nm_dec_2016_sidewalk_society

The Bowie/Action Covers – EP

Four years is a long time between releases, but such is the case with California’s Sidewalk Society. 2012’s LP ‘Venus, Saturn And The Crescent Moon’ was one of my first reviews for Nutsmag, so it’s nice to finally hear some new material from this band. My view on covers is that it’s only worth doing if you’re going to add something or give the song a new lease of life with a new and different arrangement. I think Dan West, Jerry Buszek and Dan Lawrence have got the balance just about right. They have injected their own vitality and personality on the songs without making a mess of it. I would like to think some youngster will hear these songs and discover the joys of The Action and Bowie’s early career for themselves while remaining fans of Sidewalk Society. Comparisons to the originals is pointless, these are new interpretations and they are done very well. The EP is out on Fruits De Mer Records.

www.sidewalksocietymusic.com
www.fruitsdemerrecords.com
www.facebook.com/sidewalksociety


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

December 7, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment