Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Hey! Mr DJ – Joel Maslin

We recently caught up with DJ Joel Maslin to talk about his musical outlook.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into R&B and soul (and later rocksteady) alongside my best mate Ollie when I was 18 or so, after discovering the Mod scene. We’d previously been into house and drum & bass until then!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I was very lucky to be asked to DJ at Shotgun with Vic Ranger and Gav Evans, one of the best mod/rhythm & soul nights in London at the time.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Probably the first time I was asked to DJ at the 100 Club as I was so nervous. I had a fantastic time but I can remember having pretty bad butterflies as I got up onto the stage. Outside of that pretty much all of my experiences DJ-ing in Spain, (particularly Runaway Love in Asturias) have been amazing. The venues, the beautiful scenery, the food but mainly the great friends.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve fallen over, dropped records down the back of stages, broken the mixer, although I did DJ at a big gig a few years back and completely bombed, not sure why but I was trying out a new aftershave at the time so it could have
been that.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Rare soul – Butch, Dave Thorley, Marco Santucci, Keith Money. The incredible unissued records, new sounds and rare 45s that you hear every time they play is what keeps me interested in the music. R&B wise I always like the sounds that Callum Simpson plays.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve been through a number of different ‘sub-genres’ of soul music, from R&B to the odd funk track but I just try to keep my ear to the ground and talk to collectors and other fanatics of this brilliant music to discover new records that I like and I hope will work on the dance floor. Sometimes I try to play more R&B and 60’s orientated sounds, and other times crossover and funkier tracks. Sometimes I even get it right!

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Most records have been ‘discovered’ by one of the manically dedicated diggers on the scene way before my time, so I can’t claim anything there – but I remember being pretty chuffed when I finally got a copy of Little Tommy ‘Baby Can’t You See’ many years ago. And the seller had used a couple of really good R&B records as record stiffeners!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Ace Of Bass. Or everyone at Motown.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No I’m a bit too haphazard for that!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

100 Club 6ts Allnighters -London, VaVaVoom – London

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Way too many to mention but I’ve always coveted a copy of Jimmy Gresham ‘This Feelin’ I Have’.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Et White – Got To Find A True Love – Great Potential
2. Charles Smith – You Need Education – Trend
3. Little Soul – Problems – Solid Soul
4. Emanons – Bird Walkin’ – All Brothers
5. Emma Frances – Leave You Runnin’ – De Mo Rr Is

Top 10 Tracks Of All Time:

At The Moment – In No Particular Order:
1. ‘Keni Lewis’ – She’s Not The Marrying Kind – Unissued
2. BB King – Think It Over
3. Lil Major Williams – Girl You’re So Sweet, You’re So Fine
4. Alton Ellis – Breaking Up Or Willow Tree
5. John Bowie – You’re Gonna Miss A Good Thing Baby
6. Jimmy Gresham – This Feelin’ I Have
7. Deon Jackson – Someday The Sun Will Shine – Unissued
8. Guitar Ray – You Gonna Wreck My Life
9. Gwen Owens – Just Say You’re Wanted (And Needed)
10. Parliaments – This Is My Rainy Day

Weblinks

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Next Club Spots:

Friday 7th: Soul Shaker At The Gowlett, Gowlett Road, London SE15 4HT
Dec 3rd: 100 Club
Dec 31st: VaVaVoom NYE, 229 The Venue as part of Nutty New Year!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 26, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Hey Mr DJ! Charlie Salvidge

NUTsMag caught up with Charlie Salvidge recently for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My Dad was a local radio DJ and growing up I immersed myself in his collection of 45s, many of which had been relieved from the BBC grams library in Bristol. The Beatles’ ‘She Loves You’ and The Tornados’ ‘Telstar’ were the ones that left the most profound impact.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Probably my cousin Leila’s Wedding in Edinburgh. I played some melt melting psychedelia to an indifferent audience then received a substantial burn injury when a stray spark from an indoor sparkler lodged itself between my leather wristband and wrist.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

DJing at The Park stage, Glastonbury 2015. Feeling the vibrations from the immense PA and witnessing a crowd of trollied festival goers get their groove on to Hawkwind and Sabbath through an inch-high slit in front of the decks was exhilarating stuff!

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

When a bloke came up and ‘scratched’ with one of my most treasured discs (think it was Paul & Richie and The Crying Shames) at some gig in central London. I almost scratched his block off.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Me old pal Rhys Webb has most of the best psych singles, me old pal Sam Davies has got all the others.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I enjoy sounds that are of a fast tempo just as much as languid folky numbers. Above all I love well-produced pop singles or things with weird effects. I don’t really know why! I just like a song with a lot going on instrumentally or
production wise.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

In all the years of searching for bargains I’ve only ever successfully found two rare records for cheap, The First Editions’ ‘Just Dropped In..’ and Don Fardon’s ‘Belfast Boy’, both for 50p in a Gloucester charity shop. San Francisco seems to be a good place to find albums by people like Country Joe and Quicksilver Messenger Service for a dollar, usually they’re a bit battered but you can’t find anything like that in an English record shop for less than a days wages of a brakeman.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Beatles.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Mud, Bread, Pilot, Vladimir Ussachevsky and The Master Musicians of Joujouka.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Occasionally at The Lexington, Islington, and sometimes at one of Mr. Bailey’s nights. I’m doing Crossfire later this year.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Kevin Ayers – Soon, Soon, Soon. Unfortunately it doesn’t exist!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

The Rationals – Guitar Army (Crewe – ‘70)
Motions – Take The Fast Train (Decca, ‘68)
Clear Light – She’S Ready To Be Free (Elektra, ‘67)
Steve Flynn – Mr Rainbow (Parlophone, ‘68)
Yellow Taxi – Anna Laura Lee (President, 70)

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

The Beatles – Strawberry Fields Forever
July – Dandelion Seeds
Buffalo Springfield – Rock &Amp; Roll Woman
Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday
Names And Faces – The Killer
The Zombies – Leave Me Be
Jon – Is It Love
Kevin Ayers – Singing A Song In The Morning
The Byrds – Lady Friend
The Who – Cobwebs And Strange

Social Networks:

Main Site: www.thebandtoy.com
facebook.com/charliesalvidge

Next Club Spots:
Crossfire 29 – 22nd October, London


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 22, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ LongTall Simon

NUTsMag caught up with LongTall Simon recently for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I guess I got into music about 11 years old, I used to make tapes of the Essex Radio Soul Show in the late 80s and John Peel as well. I then started saving my school lunch money and going into Southend on a Saturday and buying records. My Dad had loads of records as well, a mixture of early 60s Jazz LPs and a box of 45s left over from when he and his friend put on nights in Southend in the early 70s, these were a mixture of Motown, Stax, Soul, Reggae and stuff, tunes like 25 Miles, Aint Nothing But A house Party – Show Stoppers, The Night – Frankie Valli (and some crud too!) But these 45s became the base of what I played when I started DJing a few years later.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first Dj gig was in 1996 aged 19 supporting The Phrogs at Mr Grays in Westcliff (near Southend). My mate Handy Joe used to organise the DJs for them and I convinced him to let me play. If memory serves I think Martin Morgan was the main DJ that night. I then started DJing for them at some of their gigs and
club nights.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Too many to pick one, I’ve been fortunate to play records in lots of different scenes and places and if I’m honest I can’t remember a lot of them, haha.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If I’ve had bad DJ experiences it’s usually been my own fault for accepting gigs I knew would be trouble, never had a bad one on the mod scene or where the crowd are there for the music. I’ve got plenty of “have you got any Britney Spears” moments but that just makes me laugh, you have to take it all with a pinch of salt really. I actually enjoy the challenge of playing music to townies that they don’t know and making them dance, it can be done if you stand your ground and have a sense of humour 🙂

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Well half my friends are bloody DJs so it would be unfair to single anyone out! A good DJ to me is someone who first and foremost is enjoying what they’re doing and having fun. Some DJs just play their rarest records back to back to impress their mates, but that to me is just dull, you need some improvisation, imagination and some risk-taking, take people on a journey, surprise them a bit and enjoy yourself.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve been into (and still am) all different types of music and try to be open-minded, after being into the mod scene for a few years I got into funk/disco breaks, Old School Hip Hop, Jazz, Afrobeat, Electronic stuff and all sorts and it was always surprising to me how many of the same tunes keep cropping up in different worlds, music is all connected. My sets nowadays are primarily 60s but that could mean Soul, Jazz, Latin, Cumbia, Gospel, Popcorn, Funk, R&B, Ska, Reggae or whatever.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I went to Cuba a couple of years ago and picked up some nice 60s latin/salsa/boogaloo 45s for £1 each in Havana that I play out quite often, I’ve looked them up and there’s no record of them anywhere on the internet!

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I’ve never had a favourite artist as such, I’ve always just picked bits I like from wherever I find them.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not really, I’m not fanatical (not there’s anything wrong with that) about labels etc, I just buy stuff I like.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

1st Saturday of the month at Bande a Part – R&B Club, Troy Bar, Hoxton Street. And here and there all over London.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Probably Mulatu Astatke – Yegele Tezeta an Ethiopian release on Amah Records from 69, I love the Ethiopian/Egyptian jazz sound.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Orchestra Harlow – Freak Off
Derek Martin – Daddy Rollin’ Stone
Hank Jacobs – Elijah Rockin’ with Soul
Jorge Ben – Take it Easy My Brother Charles
Darrow Fletcher – The Pain Just Gets a Little Deeper
Mark Murphy – Why Don’t You do Right
La Lupe – Fever (1968 version on Tico)
The Hustlers – Boston Monkey
Harvey Averne Dozen – Never Learned to Dance
B. B. King – Think it Over

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – I Put a Spell on You (1966 version on Decca)
Afro Blues Quintet Plus One – La la La la la
Sylvia Robbins – Don’t Let Your Eyes Get Bigger Than Your Heart
Milton Grayson – It Aint Necessarily So
Lee Moses – Reach Out I’ll Be There

Social Networks:

Main Site: facebook.com/bandea

Next Club Spots: 1st Saturday of the month at Bande a Part, Troy Bar, Hoxton


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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October 3, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ Liam Large

NUTsMag caught up with Liam Large recently for a chat about his passion
for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

There were records and music around me when I was young as my father is a musician. I would listen to what was playing and then began to develop my own taste at quite a young age, from around 9 or so gravitating to the soul and blues stuff in my Dad’s collection and a couple of years later getting into Hip Hop which really opened me up to the full spectrum of black American music, and since then I’ve been constantly trying to find new sounds and styles which fit my ear. Record collecting might be a strange and ignoble pursuit at times but music is always an enriching, pure and wholesome addiction!

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

I honestly can’t recall. I was always trying to broadcast my tastes to my friends via mixtapes etc. My first public outing as a DJ was probably a house party when I was 15 or 16, then I would do turns on the little common room radio thing at 6th Form College. In terms of first playing at a club, I was probably around 17 or 18 but I can’t remember where or what.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Another one that’s hard to answer, there are so many memories, most of them vague. I enjoyed it when Jukebox Jam hit its peak after about a year at the original venue, the George Tavern. Other than that, there’s been lots of times throughout my many years DJing here and there when you just feel that you have the crowd in tune perfectly, which may not happen as often as I’d like because I tend to go for a more roundabout approach, not playing too many obvious classics. This does mean that when you do connect fully with the crowd, it feels more rewarding I think, when you’re playing stuff from different genres and things they may never have heard before, and they go with it.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Similar answer – too many to pick from, haha. DJing is not nearly as glamorous as people may think, and if you’re ploughing away at a niche angle, even less so. You can find yourself doing near-pointless spots to indifferent bordering on hostile crowds for the sake of a little bit of pocket-money.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I’m going to mainly list a couple of people I know, and not because they would be offended if I didn’t mention them, but because these are people I’ve connected with predominantly through music so it means there is some shared taste – I’ll go with Duncan Brooker, who is the most dogged record obsessive I know, has compiled many very successful compilations but is yet still largely under-exposed, Snakester who played at Jukebox Jam with me and is probably still the best DJ I’ve heard for 50s R&B. On the R&B / mod scene in particular, I give credit to Mik and the Pow Wow lads obviously, for popularizing so many great records – any scene needs reinvention to survive, and they breathed fresh air into it.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

You take up influences all over the place, but the one thing that really guides you – or at least should do – is nothing more complicated than your own taste. For me, I have always honed in on a kind of melancholic sound. Black Music from all around the world is often infused with melancholy, so even the best, seemingly joyful and uptempo dance music has this underpinning juxtaposition of sadness found either in the key, melody or lyrics – or all at once. I also like many genres, I don’t want to ever limit myself to one particular era or style, and I’m constantly trying to find that sound in many different areas and if at all possible build those different records into my sets.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I don’t know, I think the concept of discoveries is a bit bogus. A bit Christopher Columbus! There are plenty of records I’ve picked up and not seen anyone else I know either listing or playing, but I don’t know if that’s because other people didn’t really feel them as I did, and either way I don’t really claim to have discovered anything – all old second-hand records by definition have been owned and played by someone before you!

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

From a young age, people like James Brown, Otis Redding, Elmore James, and rap groups like ATCQ, Nas, De La Soul, Ultramagnetic and many others.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, label running is a collecting thing primarily. I’ve always seen myself as a DJ who collects, so the music is the first thing I care about, not the logo on the label.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’ve been a bit quieter than normal this year, but I do a residency at Strongroom with Cousin Benson and guest spots around and about. Will hopefully be getting back into a little promoting soon.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I’m not telling.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Fitz Vaughan Bryan – Koyato
Morris Pejoe – Screaming And Crying (Abco)
Delores Ealy – I’Ve Been Looking (Velvet)
Ethiopians – Give Me Your Love (Doctor Bird)
Creations – I Wanna Talk To You

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

I like so many different kinds of music that this is really difficult, and if I tried to compile this list again in 30 minutes time the songs would probably be completely different, but here are 10 songs that after all the times I’ve listened and loved them, I can only presume I’ll never grow tired of hearing again. Most of these aren’t songs to dance to, they’re mostly ballads. I love uptempo stuff, especially to DJ obviously, but for me it’s the deeper stuff which seem to stay with me the longest. No order to these.

Irma Thomas – It’s Raining
Sun Ra – Somewhere In Space
Slum Village – Untitled
Combo Loco – Ven Mi Amore
Paragons – Danger In Your Eyes
Little Ann – Deep Shadows
Muddy Waters – Can’t Be Satisfied
Ornette Coleman – Lonely Woman
Howlin Wolf – Moanin At Midnight
Theron & Darrell – I Was Made To Love Her

Social Networks:

Main Site: www.jukeboxjam.org
facebook.com/Liamlarge

Videos: My channel is here, all kinds of random stuff
www.youtube.com/liamsrekkids

Next Club Spots: Crossfire 29, October 22nd, London


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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October 3, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 12 (episode 21)

NUTsCast July 2016
Join the Baron for a look ahead to Euro YeYe and the Brighton Mod Weekender with tracks from some of the featured bands playing these events. The live session comes from The Beatniks, plus new tracks from The Kumari, Bongoloian, Senior Service and classic floor-fillers as chosen by our stable of guest DJs.


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admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

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July 23, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Podcasts Reviews Tags:, , ,
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Dr Robert – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

A short profile of New Untouchables Head Honcho and globe spinning DJ Dr Robert 

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Through the kids at our school and one of our teachers who used to DJ and played ‘Green Onions’ at the Christmas disco (quite sure they don’t play that anymore). Mum and Dad’s old vinyls – mainly 60’s pop and the odd Motown and Ray Charles record. We also had some great local bands in the Medway area including the Prisoners and Milkshakes.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Along with old pal Lee Miller at our local ‘Cool Running Scooter Club’ nights held at Ditton Community Centre. The system comprised of two old 70’s record players from our homes hooked up to two speakers.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Wow, tough one! So many great experiences in the last twenty-five years.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

My worst experience has to be the trip to the Wilderbeat Festival in Canada. After a long travel by airplane and then a car ride from Toronto down to the lakes. An hour before I was meant to start the festival was closed down by the Police for noise problems.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Another tough question! So many good DJ’s on the scene that are easily identifiable for particular songs or sounds that contributed so much. Ady Croasdell as the first ten Kent albums had a profound influence on getting me interested in buying the rarer Mod club sounds. My DJ team Pid, Chris Dale, Speed and Lee Miller for so many fantastic performances over the last twenty years and also the great variety of Mod sounds. International DJ’s like Philippe Golbert, Michael Wink and Frantz who have contributed many great discoveries, I could go on and on.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

My sound has changed naturally over twenty-five years and I genuinely enjoy a wide variety of Mod and 60’s sounds which is why I’m still able to enjoy it after all this time. When I started DJing at the weekenders and London clubs it was a mix of Northern/R&B/Jazz/Ska and some British sounds. After a few years, I wanted to do something different as hardly anyone in the UK played Freakbeat and then Psychedelic and Garage music soon followed. In 2004 the NUTs Organisation started the Le Beat Bespoké LP series and the annual event. I still buy all the styles of music I love and play different choons at different venues.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

One that comes to mind is the Gene Latter – Holding a Dream on UK Spark which has a super blend of Soulful vocals, fuzz guitar with funky drums.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Beatles, as you can’t deny the consistent quality and the very same artists they themselves idolised and covered at the start of their career, ended up covering the Beatles songs a decade later.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Never fallen into that trap. I’m a DJ, not a collector. I buy records with the dance floor firmly in mind. It’s become such an expensive habit now, especially if you draw records from more than a couple of genres like I do.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

At numerous New Untouchables events and clubs like Mousetrap, Le Beat Bespoke, Brighton, Margate, Crossfire, Blues Kitchen and International weekenders and festivals. Keep an eye on the website and my facebook page.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Soul record: Gwen Owens – Just Say You’re Wanted (And Needed)
Groovy Record: The Pretty – Moustache in Your Face

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten

1. Mike Leslie – Right or Wrong

2. Caleb – Woman of Distinction

3. The Paragons – Abba

4. David Bowie & Lower Third- Can’t Help Thinking About Me

5. Rebel Rousers – As I Look

6. Eddie Jefferson – Psychedelic Sally

7. Billy Hawks – Oh Baby

8. Hold Back The Sunrise – Ron Gray

9. John Lee Hooker – Money

10. All My Loving – Prince Buster

Soulful Sounds

1. Charles Spurling – Just A Minute

2. Bo Junior – Coffee Pot Part 1

3. Vivian Reed – The Shape Of Things To Come

4. Jesse Slaughter – I Had a Dream

5. Utee – Rosa Lee Brooks

Groovy Sounds

1. The Cords – Too Late (To Kiss You Now

2. I know – Dan Nix & The Teen Sounds

3. Oedipus & The Mothers-  How It Used To Be

4. Travis Pike’s Tea Party – If I Didn’t Love You Girl

5. The Tears – Rat Race

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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February 14, 2017 By : Category : Articles Clubs DJs Events Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Paddy Dreadful

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 4

We recently caught up with Belfast DJ, Co-Reanimator, Dr Crippen’s Waiting Room; Chief Drummister @ Thee Penny Dreadfuls, Paddy Dreadful and quizzed him about his musical obsessions and passions.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

The first music that caught my attention was my Mum n Dad’s Queen’s Greatest Hits tape in the car. I went with my pocket-money and bought A Night At The Opera, and on reflection, a 12-year-old buying a 1975 prog rock LP must’ve concerned my parents.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Lou’s 30th birthday party. We didn’t have any clubs that played the music we wanted to hear, so we started our own… and Cripz was born unto us!

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

DoubleSight Tokyo. Just the most bestest experience ever.

04. So far, what has been your worst DJ experience?

Doing the door at Cripz, where I was asexually harassed by a skinhead who looked like Nick Cotton. She was terrifying!

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s, and why?

Uncle Jack is the king of the mods, without Rob Bailey there wouldn’t be any of this; and when he turns up, Sarge is alright too I suppose.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound & why?

My frequent visits to Leeds to party with The Evil Hoodoo crew made me the man I am today. Blame them.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

A 6lb lump of ambergris on the beach. Result.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist?

I had the honour of playing drums with Dave Lewis’ Andwellas Dream two years ago. Love & Poetry is such a good album, and playing with the band really was something special.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Nope. If I like it… and I can afford it…. I buy it!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’m usually in from work before 3:00, but if you could leave til’ after The Chase.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

A Penny Dreadfuls platinum disc.

Next Club Spots: EuroYeYe, DoubleSight, Cripz

Current Top 5:
1. BZN – Just Fancy
2. Paul King – Mabrouk
3. Velvet Night – The Velvet Night
4. Equip 84 – Ladro
5. Love Society – Wanda

Alltime Top Ten :
1. Andwella – Hold On To Your Mind
2. Dick Wagner & The Frost – Sunshine
3. Sheephouse – Ladder
4. Rasputin – Sympathy For The Devil
5. Owl – Spirits
6. Rocky Cabbage – Freedom
7. La Revolution Francaise – Y Mouille A Sciaux
8. Help – Runaway
9. The Flies – Magic Train
10. Boney M – Belfast


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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June 15, 2016 By : Category : DJs Europe Front Page Music Tags:, , ,
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Big Boss Man (Newbreed)

This entry is part 22 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 20 years and we met in a pub called the Dolphin.

What influences do the band members have in common?

Mexican Food-fine wine-an eye for the ladies.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Wurzels are from our way and they are amazing.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I think the Godrergraig mod 60’s scene is among the best in the world.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Hammond-Bongo-Fuzz.

6. What are your live shows like?

“The best live band in the uk” was a quote from alive and giving mag.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Soul-Funk-Blues. We don’t play covers though we did used to play im a man and Cloud 9 with congas in.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Baking, shed building and goat herding.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes a lot of the songs and the band also write collectively in their Welsh Mountain Studio “Beat Mountain” Subject matters usually revolve around horses.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Crimson 6ts is my live fave at the mo, fave song by another artist is
“summer holiday”

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Getting the Hammond B3 down the stairs of the WAG club in an orthopedic shoe after ten pints.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse every week midweek and play live most weekends at the moment, the last few years have gone crazy, maybe down to BBC6 music plays I think. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Rubbish.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The Mynd Set are a great band.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Georgie Fame would be cool I think.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

A new album in the winter, we’re playing live all over UK and the rest of Europe, A US tour is on the cards and Japan so its easy to see us live.

Web Links:

Main Site: www.big-boss-man.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bigbossmanofficial
Twitter: www.twitter.com/bigbossmanmusic 
Instagram: bigbossmanmusic 
Spotify: www.spotify.com/bigbossman

Band Members:

Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos
Des Rogers: Drums
Scott “the Hawk” Milsom: Electric Bass, Double Bass
Trev Harding: Guitar

Discography:

Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2000: Sea Groove
2001: Big Boss Man
2004: The Hawk
2006: Party 7
Lps :
2001: Humanize
2005: Winner
2009: Full English Beat Breakfast
2014: Last Man on Earth

Updated Releases and Tour Dates:

22nd April ’16 Acapela Studio, Pentyrch Wales, UK
23rd April ’16 Destination Anywhere Swindon, UK
7th May ’16 TBA Cornwall, UK
27th May ’16 Blues Kitchen London, UK
29th May ’16 Mod & Sixties Festival Margate. UK
3rd June ’16 The Stoke Guildford, UK
24th June ’16 TBA FRANCE


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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April 19, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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Masters The Embrooks

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Masters3

1. When did the Embrooks form originally and why reform now?

We met in the summer of 1995, when Mole’s group at the time, The Mystreated, played with the group Alessandro was playing then, Head & the Hares, at the Italian beat festival in Castel San Giovanni (Piacenza). In September of the same year, Alessandro moved to London to study and stayed in touch. Mole and Lois first created The Lyds (Lois on drums, Merv on guitar and Mole on bass and vocals), they released one single as Lyds then Merv left and Alessandro was invited to join. The group really began to exist at the end of 1996 and lasted until the summer of 2005 (our last show was in Liverpool as part of The International Pop Overthrow festival). The main reason for reforming is the fact that, after almost 10 years of retirement, Lois and Alessandro re-started actively playing music (with Thee Jezebels and Merry-Men, respectively), before that it would have been a struggle to even think of getting us together in a practice room. Other factors are the fact that concrete offers came along to play at Festivals in the UK and Europe and possibly (this might sound silly) the fact that Alessandro recently bought a 1964 Vox AC30 amp and did not know who to use it with (laugh).

2. What influences do the band members have in common?

The aggressive pop (Easybeats, The Who, The Small Faces, Move, The Yardbirds), the freakbeat/psych bands (Eyes, Creation, Game, Smoke, Open Mind, The Koobas, anything on the Rubble compilation series), the rock of the late 60s early 70s (Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath), classic pop (the Beatles, Zombies, Left Banke), the US garage rock (Love, 13th Floor Elevators) but also lots of European and Australian beat. Many different things as you can see!

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Because of recent involvement of Mole in the Medway Scene, we have to mention Galileo 7 and Graham Day and the Forefathers. We also like bands based where Alessandro currently resides (London) as the Magnetic Mind and See See/Hanging Stars among those with a more authentic 60s sound and Pacers for their 60s influenced but less nostalgic approach (Alex, the singer, has a brilliant voice!) and Little Barrie and Cat Black in the 70s rock/Stones/Flaming Groovies department. We are looking forward to share the stage with some of these over some of the future New Untouchables events.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

There was a prolific scene in the 80s garage revival period mainly gravitating around the figures of Martin Ratcliffe, Tim Ray and Mole (Mystreated, Stewed). These bands subsequently gave birth or support to other combos that are still active today such as Higher State, Paul Messis and, of course, us.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

We started off by being a group inspired by USA “moody teen-punk” as of bands sounding like those included in the New England Teen Scene or Crude PA compilations. That period is reflected in our early 45s and our first LP, Separations. However, we have agreed not to include any of this material in our current live shows. Over the years we have gradually evolved into a more Euro-beat and British sound taking most of the inspiration from UK freakbeat and psych. Our latest LP Yellow Glass Perspections (YGP) could be described as “Mod Psych” and this is more or less the style that we are currently playing digging a lot from Our New Day, YGP and slightly earlier Toe-Rag sessions.

6. What are your live shows like?

Extremely loud! We also aim at keeping the energy high and especially to have fun on stage. There is nothing worse than seeing people not enjoying what they do.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

We mentioned all our main influences above. Mole had roots also in the punk/post punk sound from the 70s and Alessandro is recently digging a lot the modern ‘psych’ bands from California (White Fence, Ty Seagall, Oh Sees) and Australia/USA (King Gizzard, Nightbeats, Heaters) although we still pretty much sound the same as we ever did. We are still performing most of the covers that we used to play in the early 2000s, personal favorites are ‘Dawn breaks through’ by the Barrier and ‘Francis’ by Gary Walker and the Rain as our versions have been often indicated to be superior(!?) to the originals. The latter is also our only song to be present in Spotify. We are not into ‘posers’ and people who are not genuinely passionate about what they do.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Alessandro digs cinema a lot, especially Italian movies from the most prolific era of the 60s and 70s (‘commedia all’Italiana’ and giallo/horror especially, which has implicit links to music via soundtracks Goblin and more recently Calibro 35).

9. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Historically Mole and Alessandro wrote the original material separately or in collaboration and this is what still currently happens. Initial ideas from the writers are brought to the practice room and finalized as an Embrooks product altogether. Alessandro’s songs are typically autobiographical and related to heart-breaking love stories and daily life. Mole writing is a little more eclectic ranging from autobiographical experiences to more fictional/poetic material such as ‘Emilia Burrows’.

10. What’s your favorite Embrooks song? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Emilia Burrows, Standing Upside Down and Helen are possibly our top three songs. Helen never came out as a 45, which is probably our biggest regret. One of the aims of us reforming is to try to go back in the studio to rectify this. The list of favorite songs by other artists would be rather long….we all probably agree that ‘You’re gonna miss me’ by 13th Elevators is one of the top tune ever written!

11. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

The USA tours in the 2000s were fun but also a bit of a challenge. The worst show we ever did was definitely one given in November 2000 in Iowa City. No one had come to the concert, the hall was empty and there were only us and our first parts! This city was a University town full of students and stupid farmers who have absolutely no interest in rock! The next day we had to reach New York after an almost 24 hour drive during which we were also stopped by the police for speeding on the highway and risked to be taken to the police station had not we paid the speeding fee on the spot!

12. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Currently we are trying to practice twice a month, or at least monthly. After our first reunion show on Dec 31st 2015 as part of Hipsville NYE extravaganza, we have been committed to a number of festivals in the UK and Europe in 2016. We are planning to re-record Helen for a brand new 45 backed by a new original this summer. We are looking forward to do as much as possible in the near future. There are already offers to do more shows in 2017.

13. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

We tend to avoid mainstream publications, some have become even worse than they ever were (e.g. the new free version of NME, ouch!). There are a number of old and new mags targeted to a more niche audience whose coverage is excellent and some available in the main shops. Flashback is probably the most interesting one, not proposing features of acts already largely covered in the past. We also rate Ugly Things and Shinding! Mole was a contributor for the latter.

14. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

We look with interest to the ‘new psychedelic’ scene which includes a lot of different styles some of them which we would not personally classify as ‘psych’. There are definitely interesting bands playing at those festivals. Besides those mentioned above, other often neglected bands from the UK are Clinic and Archie Bronson Outfit for example. Their approach is modern but 60s influences are undeniable and they seem genuinely into what they are doing.

15. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Most of our recordings were done at Toe-Rag studios in Hackney engineered and produced by Liam Watson, famous for his work with numerous 60s sounding recording over the past 20 years as well as the Grammy awarded work with Jack White on the album Elephant in 2004 as Best Alternative Music Album (White Stripes). More recently Mole has started his own recording studio (originally in a basement in Sandgate more recently in Hastings and now in his own living room) producing excellent material mostly featured in his own successful ‘State Records’ label. This will be also the home of next Embrooks recording session.

16. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’d like to promote the new 45 and get as much exposure as possible. We still have some of our historical fans following us around but most of the ‘new generations’ have not heard or seen us live so the challenge is to try to impress them as well as retaining the old ones. As mentioned we are have interesting offers to play other festivals and mod-rallies across Europe and we hope to build on those and possibly attract attention even outside the usual niche of 60s aficionados.

Band Members:

Mole (Bass and vocals)
Lois Tozer (drums)
Alessandro Cozzi-Lepri (guitar and vocals)

Website:

facebook.com/theembrooks

Discography: 

Albums

Separations… (Dig the Fuzz; Dyonisus) 1999
Our New Day (Voxx) 2000
Yellow Glass Perspections (Munster) 2004

Singles and EP

The Embrooks EP (Sympathy for the Records) 1998
But I Didn’t Know Him/Fight Fire (Dig the Fuzz) 1998
More Than Ever/You Can Be My Baby (Guerssen) 1999
If You Let Me Go EP (Max Picou) 2000
Jack/Dawn Breaks Through (Circle) 2000
Back in My Mind/The Time Was Wrong (Butterfly) 2002

Compilations

45 & High Times (Munster CD) 2005


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , , , ,
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Rat Race Interview

I caught up with Laurence the owner of Margate’s premiere Mod clothing shop Rat Race for a chat about his passion for fashion.

1. When and how did your passion for fashion come about?

As a young man growing up in Thanet, I experimented with many different styles of clothing. As I got older, I got more into stylish clothes but also wanted to wear something other than what could be found in regular department stores. I was fully aware of Margates’ role in harbouring the youth subcultures and styles from the 1960’s to 80’s and I loved looking at old photos of my father and his friends wearing their crombies, boots & braces.

2. When did you turn your passion into your profession?

I accompanied a friend to a trade show in London and spotted some classic Harrington jackets with an embroidered badge ‘Keep the Faith Margate’ on the sleeve. I thought the people of Margate would love them, the jackets were well made and in the original 60’s style. I opened my first fashion store in Margate in 2010 with the classic Harrington jackets, sta-prest trousers and traditional button-down shirts amongst other styles. This is where my passion for Mod and classic styles developed. I did not see the Mod trend as a sub-culture revival; I knew the style had never really gone away.

3. When and where did Rat Race first open?

During the Spring/Summer of 2014 and after experimenting with opening other stores in the South East I decided my passion for Modernist menswear was much better suited to Margate. I joined our two high street shops together internally, re-named and re-branded the stores to open as Rat Race and solely as a classic British clothier. Towards the end of 2015 my partner Bonnie and I expanded further, occupying our third neighbouring shop, which became Rat Race Girl, a store which stocks Mod, Skinhead, Rockabilly and Vintage girl styles .

4. Rat Race is a very popular amongst the Modernist fraternity, please tell us more about the clothing range available in the shop?

We’re a 21st century take on the 20th century’s finest subcultures, Mixing up mod clothing, skinhead style, a touch on the fifties and then adding a contemporary twist. We are official stockists of Merc, Art Gallery, Knightsbridge Neckwear, Brutus Trimfit, Trojan Clothing, Dr.Martens, Delicious Junction, Ikon Originals and many more. Rat Race also stock many other iconic brands, plus Rat Race Girl holds collections from Freddies of Pinewood, Collectif, Lindy Bop and Dolly & Dotty.

5. Are all the items sold in the shop available online?

We opened our online shop only at the beginning of 2016, a lot of our core items are available on our website. We’re growing our website all the time and new collections are added regularly. We always like to hold a few pieces back just for the shop-floor and for our not so web connected customers, so you’ll always find something which isn’t available online – I believe you still can’t beat that moment of stopping into the street to gaze at something in the window.

6. Any famous clientele dropped by the shop?

We’ve had a few well-known customers shop at Rat Race including Neville Staple, Dave Barker & Buster Bloodvessel. Our most recent being Paloma Faith, Preston and surprisingly enough the chatty man himself Alan Carr.

7. Any plans for a Rat Race clothing range in the future?

We have lots of plans and ideas we’re working towards. Our next project will be working in partnership with the 60’s Suit Co. to develop an off-the-peg range of suits designed exclusively for Rat Race. We work closely with the 60s Suit Co. and we would both be involved in the design process to create and release a range of suits, tailor-made for the Margate mods & skins. We are also going to be doing four types of trousers, all in different fabrics, and something to appeal to the Mods, Skinheads and Suedeheads.

8. Do Rat Race cover men and women’s fashion?

We certainly do, we have three high street shops conjoined to make one large shop. Within Rat Race you’ll find ‘Rat Race Girl’ which is our latest addition. It’s great to have a space solely for the girls but also where men and women can shop together.

9. How important to the Rat Race philosophy is it to have local people who know their onions about Modernist fashion working in the shop?

It’s very important to have knowledgeable staff, our Rat Race team certainly know their onions and they also have the same passion and enthusiasm as myself for what we do. I also think it’s important that our staff share the same vision and drive for Rat Race and help create something unique that will stand the test of time.

10. Why do you think the sixties style is still revered, respected and revisited with each new generation?

People from every new generation want to look good and find a style that suits them. When you look good, you feel good, it gives you confidence and young people look at the sixties style and see that un-apologetic swagger. They want to emulate that feeling, they want to know that they look good enough to stand out from the crowd. There is nothing better than Modernist fashion for a clean-cut style and sharpness.

11. What are your favorite vintage and modern fashion brands?

That’s not too easy to answer, there are many brands that I’m into. I love the stories behind the brands and how they have become popular, for example: Brutus Trimfits’ story of Keith Freedman’s visit to Hong Kong’s in 66’ to discover a shop selling half sleeve button-downs shirts for off-duty American soldiers. The shirts were not available in the UK and so with a few adaptations he ordered them in 12 different colours and to this day they still fly off the rails! There are many stories like this and it’s all part of the history of the brands we sell and love.

12. Where do you see Rat Race heading in the future and any exciting projects coming up you want to tell us about?

We hope to continue as we are doing, finding new brands to offer our customers and building up our online shop. We have a meeting with Gabicci this month and hope to become a Gabicci stockist before the coming Margate Mod and Sixties Festival. You can also find us at Folkestone Skabour in September, this will be our sixth trade event for Skabour. It’s a great Ska weekend where we meet many customers and friends, both old and new. Check our website or pop in to see us if you get a chance.

13. With the Mod/Sixties festival coming up at Whitsun where can we find you in Margate and what are the opening hours?

You can find Rat Race and Rat Race Girl at the lower end of Margate High Street, just up from the piazza and harbour. We’re open 7 days a week until 5.30pm and 5pm on Sundays. but check the links below and our website!

Now in-store & online at www.ratracemargate.co.uk // Spring/Summer 2016 Collections from Merc, Art Gallery, Brutus & Trojan Clothing.

Classic British mens & women’s wear.
Open 7 days a weekly 10-5.30 (10-5 Sundays)

Main Site:  ratracemargate.co.uk

Social Networks:

facebook.com/ratracemargate
twitter.com/ratracemargate
instagram.com/ratracemargate
pintrest.com/ratracemargate


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Interviews News Style UK Tags:, , ,
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UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside

This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Collectors Corner 2

“In my lonely room – UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside”

nm_april16_mv

After beginning to make bigger leaps into the UK record buying markets in 1963, the Tamla / Motown / Gordy group found themselves under the umbrella of the EMI subsidiary label, Stateside in October of the same year. Stateside was formed in mid 1962 by EMI to release singles under licence from American labels such as Swan, Wand and Vee-Jay in a similar style to Decca records very successful London American imprint. Licensing tracks from many independent USA labels ensured Stateside released a whole slew of great current rhythm’n’blues and soul releases, and the label soon endeared itself to mods and soul fans on this side of the Atlantic. As well as having hits with Freddy Cannon and Gene Pitney, early releases included such stellar names as The Isley Brothers, Jimmy Reed, Chuck Jackson and The Shirelles. When Oriole’s UK contract with Motown ran out the previous month the new distributor launched its first release on Stateside on 11th October 1963 with Martha and the Vandellas all time classic “Heatwave” (SS228). When sales were quite brisk, the label then released three more singles the following month by Little Stevie Wonder, Mary Wells and Marvin Gaye’s fantastic “Can I get a witness” (SS243).

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By January 1964 Motown was causing quite a stir on these shores, being regularly name checked by the UK’s biggest pop combo, The Beatles, who took Mary Wells on tour with them and mentioning Motown artists numerous times in interviews. Add to this the burgeoning underground mod and soul club scene which was hungry for the dance floor friendly sounds coming out of Detroit and it wouldn’t be long before Stateside had a bona-fide hit single on their hands. Between January and April 1964, no less than twelve 45’s were released in the UK, including tracks by The Miracles, The Marvelettes and debut UK releases from The Temptations, “The way you do the things you do” (SS278), and the group that would soon hit the top spot, The Supremes “When the lovelight starts shining thru his eyes (SS257). On May 8th 1964 Stateside released a hook laden single written by Smokey Robinson, and it was sung by Motown’s number one lady of the time, Mary Wells, “My Guy” (SS288). Two weeks later, on the 21st May 1964, “My guy” entered the UK charts at number 37, finally hitting the heady heights of number 5 the following month. Berry Gordy’s company had now scored their first of many big hit singles in Britain.

nm_april16_kw.

Between May ’64 and March 1965 Stateside issued a further 30 singles, including debuts from The Velvelettes, Earl Van Dyke, Four Tops and Kim Weston. Most of these were steady sellers, with titles by Marvin Gaye, Martha and the Vandellas, Mary Wells and The Temptations all scoring top fifty placings. On 28th August, and eight months after their initial flop, The Supremes “Where did our love go” (SS327) was released to an impressed public, who bought the single in droves, sending it number three in the chart. Less than two months later, and capitalising on the nation’s newfound love with the sounds from Motor City, “Baby love” (SS350) was released and hit the top spot soon after, with the group actually having two songs in the top ten at the same time for one week in October! Unfortunately not all releases were massive hits and some are now hard to find. These always sell for good prices when they appear on the market, especially in mint condition. Martha & The Vandellas “In my lonely room” (SS305), Brenda Holloway “Every little bit hurts” (SS307), The Tempations “Why you wanna make me blue” (SS348), Earl Van Dyke “Soul stomp” (SS357), Kim Weston “A little more love” (SS359), Four Tops “Without the one you love” (SS371), Carolyn Crawford “When someone’s good to you” (SS384) and Tony Martin “Talkin’ to your picture” (SS394) are probably the hardest to find, especially the last two. Also coming with a ridiculous price tag, all the Stateside EMI singles were sent to pluggers and radio DJ’s as red and white label demonstration discs and all are extremely collectable, and valuable too!

nm_april16_rb

EMI was also loved to release EP’s and hundreds of them were released across their labels from the early ’50’s to the late ’60’s. After no EP releases on Fontana or Oriole, Stateside bit the bullet and released no less than five of them in the time they were licensing material. Little Stevie Wonder was afforded the only single artist EP, “I call it pretty music but old people call it the blues” (SE1014) which is ridiculously hard to find. There were also four editions of a cracking new EP series, concentrating on material otherwise unavailable in the UK on 45, “R & B Chartmakers”. The series featured some great tracks, including two stellar previously USA only releases from Eddie Holland, “Just ain’t enough love” and “Leaving here”, all came in amazing picture sleeves too. Although steady sellers they’re hard to find in great condition nowadays, expect to pay between £50-£100 for each of them. By March 1965 the label was as big, if not bigger than Atlantic over here in the UK so it came as no surprise that, with a little help from super fan Dave Godin, Berry Gordy signed an exclusive deal with EMI to set up a brand new record company in Britain, Tamla Motown records. On 19th March 1965, clad in an iconic orange and white company sleeve, record stores took release of a new disc, TMG 501, “Stop! in the name of love” by The Supremes and the rest, as they say, is history.


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
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Interview with Mark ‘Bax’ Baxter about documentary Tubby Hayes: A Man in a Hurry (Part 1)

Jazz for Modernists 6 & 7 

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On a cold January afternoon in Soho, Jazz for Modernists had the pleasure of meeting Mark ‘Bax’ Baxter, author, stylist and producer of Mono Media’s groundbreaking Tubby Hayes, A Man In A Hurry (2015), a 50-minute documentary dedicated to the great, much-missed British jazz multi-instrumentalist Edward ‘Tubby’ Hayes (1935-1973). It’s a great film, already the subject of an excellent review in NutsMag by Graham Lentz HERE! Bax has been a fan of Tubby for over 30 years, embarking around 2011 on his four-year project to make a film paying tribute to a man he describes as “the face of modern jazz in the UK” in the late 50s and early 60s. Primarily a tenor saxophonist, but also an outstanding vibes player, Tubby, alongside Ronnie Scott part of the seminal Jazz Couriers from 1957 to 1959, appeared on over 60 LPs in a career that lasted until his untimely death in 1973, a sad consequence of a life lived ‘in a hurry’, but also to excess. His playing can be heard on such British 60s cinema classics as Alfie and The Italian Job, while he appeared in person in less-well-known cult films such as All Night Long (1962) and Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (1965). Beyond jazz and film, he arranged and led the brass section on Family’s Music in a Doll’s House (1968) before the saxophone became a regular ingredient in early progressive and jazz-rock line-ups. Bax, who is also co-author with Paulo Hewitt of The A to Z of Mod (Prestel, 2012), explains in detail the genesis of his film and its subsequent success.

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01: So, how did this project come about?

MARK BAXTER – Initially through the mod scene, mod revival…My family have always been interested in clothing and bespoke-made suits. The mod thing fitted in with that. When Paul Weller formed The Style Council, I stayed with it…through some of his interviews he’d mention Blue Note jazz…He was quite a big influence on me finding other aspects of music and things. Someone said (early 80s) “try Ray’s Jazz Shop in Shaftesbury Avenue” and I just started going to the shop and picking up all the classic American jazz…Coltrane, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonius Monk, Chet Baker. One of the guys in the shop asked me if I knew the British angle on all this and I said “not really, I’m just trying to learn my way”. He said I should listen to the Jazz Couriers, a modern jazz outfit (’57-’59)…they’ve got a really good player called Tubby Hayes. I didn’t know that name at all – no Google or Internet back then. Ronnie Scott I knew, because of the club. I became a member of the club when I was 23, just to soak up a bit of the history, find out who was playing there and learn from that. I went to see Miles Davis at the Royal Festival Hall when he was wearing sort of what I’d call clown’s clothing, big flowy silk stuff, doing cover versions of Cyndi Lauper. It was completely wrong for me at the time, but he was still Miles Davis. One day I picked up a Jazz Couriers album. I really liked the late 50s sound and started looking for more stuff on Tubby which was quite hard to find. The vinyl was very rare and expensive, but you could pick up other Jazz Couriers reissues on vinyl and a couple of Tubby solo efforts. Then a compilation come out by a DJ called Paul Murphy who used to run nights at the Electric Ballroom in Camden, jazz-dance nights. I went down there a few times. He put out a compilation called Jazz Club 2… there’s a Tubby Hayes track called ‘A Pint of Bitter’ which he recorded in New York in 1961 – VIDEO. That song stayed with me, so I just carried on my journey of interest in music and fashion. As well as a 9 to 5 office job, I worked on market stalls, had a clothes shops, so was always doing various things, but always interested in jazz and music in general. Then, around 2002, I started to write, I wanted to give it a go and get some books published. I did do that in 2003/4 and one of the first interviewers asked me what my interests were. I said “Millwall Football Club, red wine and Tubby Hayes”. I used to throw that in to get a conversation going, cos most people said “Tubby Who?” That was the general starting point. About ten years ago, I said “I will write a book about Tubby Hayes”. At first, I couldn’t find anything about him. This was early 80s, no Google, no Internet. So that was really quite a tough subject.

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Jazz Club 2 (1985) featuring Tubby Hayes’ ‘A Pint of Bitter’

02: Back in the 80s, did you find any old copies of Melody Maker or Jazz Journal that had interviews with him?

MB: A couple of bits ‘n’ pieces. Back then, my general interest was 60s culture. It wasn’t specifically about Tubby or jazz in general. I was buying Rave magazines with stuff like Small Faces and The Who. I was into that general mod thing really…

03: In the mid-80s, then, was the mod scene in London moving towards a jazz direction as opposed to soul and r & b?

MB: Yeah. My main interests have always been clothes and music. Obviously, I went to a few club nights. When things started going more acid-jazzy, late 80s, Gilles Peterson, bands like Galliano, some of that woke me up because the look was quite moddy, Duffer of St. George, that clothing thing, but the music was more the stuff that I’d been listening too. The mod revival and stuff that purported to be ‘modern mod’ didn’t interest me at all. I was always going back… listening to the old bands, the originals and soul music and jazz were part of that really.

04: Around this time (early 90s), I learned a lot from the compilations by Dean Rudland…

MB: Yeah, that was always the entry point, the compilations. I was buying a lot of records, but mainly all the famous albums of Small Faces, Who, Action etc. Because jazz was so vast a subject, it was quite daunting. So compilations, I would start there, collect those and then you would pick the one or two acts or performers from those compilations and investigate further. That’s where Tubby came into it.

05: Some mods are clued up on soul jazz and Latin jazz. Would you agree, though, that some of the best 50s/60s modern jazz is still considered almost alien territory because it’s primarily music for listening to or watching rather than dancing?

MB: Yeah. I’d go to Dingwalls or Electric Ballroom and hear danceable jazz, but the stuff I was listening to at home was purely for listening to, like classic Miles Davis or Coltrane. You’d be in trouble trying to dance to some of that, I think. It was a real broad church but I kept coming back to Tubby Hayes for some reason. I’m not quite sure why.

06: You grew up in south London. Tubby Hayes grew up in south-west London. Was this a factor in your interest?

MB: Up until about 3 or 4 years ago, I didn’t know much about his personal life. Every now and then, I would need to find out something and with the Internet bits of information were coming through. But I didn’t know he was married or what he died of, or where he lived. I knew he was a London guy but I didn’t know where. I started googling his name quite a lot and I thought “there’s a book in this”. I kept seeing this guy called Simon Spillett, who’d been writing this book on Tubby Hayes for ten years (The Long Shadow of The Little Giant – The Life, Work and Legacy of Tubby Hayes (Equinox Publishing 2015). I emailed him one day, probably four years ago, and asked him if he was going to do this book because, if not, I’m a writer and I want to do it. He said he was nearly there, that he’d spent two years writing the book, eight years trying to find a publisher. I said “if you want to write a book, I want to make a film”. He gave me all his research notes which is very rare in this little tiny industry we’re in. No one really gives away anything, not like that!

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Simon Spillet’s authoritative volume on Tubby Hayes (2015)

07: That’s a pretty kind gesture!

MB: Yeah, that was really encouraging. I took it l on holiday with me to Italy and spent a week just reading all this stuff, which filled in all the blanks about Tubby. That he was married twice and had two kids, obviously a massive drug habit which I didn’t know much about really – that he lived in Raynes Park (South West London) as a kid, then here, there and everywhere. I still didn’t have a lot of his records at the time. The music side was “I like what I like” but I never really went mad on investigating it. Simon told me there were 60 albums out there and I thought I was never gonna get there, what with working full-time, trying to keep the wolf from the door. My first idea for the film was, having been through the publishing process, trying to get a commission. I couldn’t find anyone to back it though, so it became quickly evident that I’d have to do it myself and find the money myself.

08: Did that take a long time?

MB: Well, first of all, I saved up about three grand, thinking “well that’s a start”. Then I had to find someone who was a cameraman, editor, director, sound recordist all in one really, as I knew I couldn’t afford a crew. I do PR, short-term contracts, long-term contracts, and one job was for a band called Stone Foundation, a Midlands soul band. I went on a video shoot one day and the guy making the video was a self-contained one-man band called Lee Cogswell…[he was] very quiet, getting on with his work. I had a look through his viewfinder on his camera and the quality was great. It was really nicely framed. As luck would have it, Lee was looking to make a film. He knew nothing about jazz, but he was a musician, played drums and piano. So the music angle interested him. This was probably in 2012/13… I was aiming for a 2015 release, cos that would have been Tubby’s 80th birthday.

09: And you reached it…

MB: Yeah, just about made it. All the way through 2012-14, it was touch and go. We would find maybe two grand and then spend it quickly on expenses and bits of equipment and travelling around the country, interviewing these various people. My role of producer meant that I had to find a location; I had to get Lee down from the Midlands to film, and I had to pay for all that personally. So, it was just trying to find money all the time, really. We got the funds together and most of it was just getting Lee to film people, then obviously we needed some archive. So that was another process, getting involved with the BBC who own most of the archive.

10: What’s that archive like? The BBC is well-known for having deleted great footage from the 1960s.

MB: I had 8 or 9 hours of footage to go through including one-hour specials featuring him on one or two tracks. Ella Fitzgerald Live at the BBC from 1964/5 – a couple of solo spots where he’d stand up and play. So, in that 45-minute clip, there’d only be 5 minutes or so focussing on him, but he’d be in the line-up. We had to literally go through all these programmes trying to find the classic bits featuring Tubby. 9 hours sounds a lot, but there’s probably about an hour and a half of Tubby. But the fact that it still survives is incredible. There were one or two late 50s TV shows, then as the Sixties rolls on they are better quality and more Tubby-focussed. Jazz Goes to College, 45-minute sets with the big band, fantastic – so maybe two hours altogether. Also, Jazz 625, classic Tubby big band, which has been shown once there’s a load of clips of that on YouTube.


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Interview with Mark ‘Bax’ Baxter about documentary Tubby Hayes: A Man in a Hurry (Part 2)

Jazz for Modernists 6 & 7

11: How did you go about promotion and distribution?

MB: I got so entrenched with making the film, I didn’t think about showing it to anybody. We set ourselves that target (Spring 2015)…we were well short – we didn’t have enough footage, or enough money to finish it. We had to finance it ourselves. An archivist who was helping me find the footage from the BBC said to me one day, “you need a distributor, someone to put this out for you”. I thought that was a really good shout, I hadn’t really thought of that. I found a company called Proper Records, a reasonably sized independent record label, putting out lots of stuff by Nick Lowe and Van Morrison, I think. They had a jazz department and the guy I spoke to used to work for Mole Jazz in the 80s, who were like Ray’s, a destination shop for jazz buyers. He’d put out a couple of Tubby Hayes reissue compilations, one being Mexican Green (1967 LP), which he put out through his own Mole Jazz label. So, it was a done deal. Once I told him about Tubby Hayes, he said “we’ll have that!”. So we knew we could get it out into the shops, Amazon was taken care of, Waterstones etc. He also mentioned Foyles, which was where Ray’s Jazz shop is now.

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All Night Long (1962), featuring Patrick McGoohan, Charles Mingus and Tubby Hayes

12: The first showing was at Foyles in London [19 November 2015]. Tell us about that.

MB: That was amazing. I just walked in one day and said we were making a film about Tubby Hayes. Can we do a little bit of filming in Ray’s? People going through the racks – cut-away stuff. The guys there were great, really supportive. They said they had an auditorium upstairs and asked if I wanted to launch it up there. It was a 200-seater, fantastic space, so I thought “why not?” The [idea of the] film started in Ray’s, it’s gone back to Ray’s thirty years later. It was the London Jazz festival that week, around October. It all just came together, pure fluke. We were just desperately trying to get it out by a certain time. By getting those guys on board – Proper, Foyles and the London Jazz Festival, it suddenly became very serious. All of a sudden we had deadlines and fairly big-hitting companies looking to speak to us and put our product out.

13: Has the film done well?

MB: Yeah, it’s sold well, we had 2 000 DVDs made and pretty much sold them out within ten weeks. We were delighted with that. From those first sales we earned money to get some more made for Christmas. We’re into our second run. It’s worked.

14: Any evidence that sales of Tubby’s music have increased as a result of the DVD?

MB: I can’t say for certain, but the awareness of his name and his work has gone up. Through my social media, I get a lot of feedback, people saying they’ve never heard of this guy, but like the sound of him, the era, the music, the films he worked on (eg. The Italian Job, Alfie). A lot of 60s enthusiasts that I know personally would go and check out a film, or YouTube, or Spotify and then they may end up with a CD or a bit of vinyl, and then end up with the DVD. It had been quiet for a long time on the Tubby front but now there are a lot more reissues going on.

15: [question from April 2016]: What were the subsequent showings at Regent’s Street Cinema like, in February and just recently in April?

MB: Our screening at the Regent Street cinema in Feb 2016 was a sell out, which was very encouraging for us all and proved that word of the doc. had got round to the right people. A good mixture Mod and 60s enthusiasts as well as film buffs turned up in the 180-strong crowd.
We had Simon Spillett and his new quartet play live and after the doc, myself, Simon and director Lee Cogswell took part in a Q & A session. Then DJs took over in the bar with a fine selection of jazz-inspired tracks.
The night was such a success that the cinema immediately asked us back and in April we repeated it all again. This time we had an older, more jazz-based crowd, which pleased me. We had new people to tap into!
We also screened at Ronnie Scott’s in March, which was a real mark of approval from the UK jazz world. For the rest of 2016, we have other screenings already booked for Gateshead, Southend, Chichester, Brecon and back in London in the coming months.

16: If you had to recommend one Tubby Hayes LP, which would it be?

MB: The one album that everyone should get is Mexican Green, which he made in 66/67. It’s going the Coltrane style, more than the fast, ‘crash-bang-wallop’ sound of Tubby when he was in full flow in the early sixties. There are certain tracks with three or four different styles within one track. It’s not an easy listen, you’ve got to work at it, but that’s the education of it all. That’s the last album he made of any real note, he made a contractual album after that called The Orchestra (1970), an album of cover versions (‘These Boots Are Made for Walking’, ‘Hey Jude’ etc). But Mexican Green is the one I’d definitely go for. From the earlier period, Tubbs (1961), Tubbs’ Tours (1964) and Tubbs in NY (1961) are all valid.

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The classic Mexican Green LP (1967)

17: Of all the British sax players of the time, he was perhaps the most well-known in America…

MB: Yeah, definitely. There’d been a musicians’ ban on UK guys going over there. Then it was reciprocal. If Miles Davis played two weeks here, we had to send someone to the States. They didn’t want anybody. There was no one of any note that they wanted. When Tubby popped up, they said “he can do it”. He went to New York in 1961 at the Half Note Club. Miles Davis was in the audience on the first night. Tubby was the one guy who could go out and hold his own in that company. He played two weeks there, mixed with the musicians, recorded and became part of the scene for a little while. A lot of the guys we spoke to said he should have stayed there, committed to two or three years in the States. Personally, I think he liked being the big fish in a small pond. Over here, he’d get plenty of work, plenty of press, TV appearances. He was the only one anyone had heard of.

18: One UK-based artist who did go to America before Tubby was Dizzy Reece. Did Tubby play with him?

MB: They played on a Blue Note LP recorded over here [Blues in Trinity, 1959], with a version of ‘Round Midnight’ on it.
19: By the mid-sixties, of course, we were getting great jazz musicians, but in return were sending over the likes of Herman’s Hermits….
MB: Yeah. Once the beat boom started coming in, jazz clubs would become a beat club, or they’d book more acts like that. That’s what the kids were demanding. Jazz suddenly became quite old overnight. The work dried up quite quickly, or the club gigs dried up. The recordings weren’t selling massive numbers. The Stones and The Beatles were selling in big numbers. The trade papers stopped writing about them [jazz musicians], maybe a little bit of a mention. But really, the front cover would be given to the Beatles, Stones, Small Faces, Who, Otis and soul music. This is why he stared to play on jingles and films, looking for other work.

19: And this would lead Tubby to other work?

MB: Yeah, he’d be hired for a session. He wouldn’t know a lot about the band. His studio or agent would get him a bit of work. He would turn up and pretty much be able to play anything. But the timing was all wrong for him, because he wasn’t very well. He was in and out of hospital for months on end. He was probably offered work, but couldn’t make the gigs for one reason or another. His health wasn’t great [around 70/71] and there’s a school of thought that maybe he was still dabbling a little bit [heroin], and he had a heart valve operation in 1970, and then again in 1972. In 1973, he couldn’t play – he was physically incapable of playing.

20: Finally, would you consider making a feature film about Tubby Hayes starring James Corden in the title role?

MB: Simon (Spillett) has said that he’s aware of Tubby Hayes. The similarity has been pointed out to him. Whether that will ever go anywhere I don’t know? James Corden would be perfect. The only problem is Tubby lost about five stone, six stone, around the 60s when the drugs kicked in and I think Mr. Corden might struggle to lose the weight.


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Film Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Summer Fashion

Mods do like to be beside the sea-side in the sunnier months. Be it Brighton, Margate or even Beaulieu-sur-Mer. So in this issue of Nutsmag we have decided to take a look at the quintessential items of clothing that feature in the spring/summer Modernist wardrobe, plus a little history behind what makes these items so iconic in terms of style.

Breton tops
The fresh stripes on a boated-necked Breton top give an instant whiff of French New Wave to any summer outfit – especially when paired with a pair or cropped slim-fitting trousers. The tops have never really gone out of fashion since they were adopted by Beatniks, Mods and lovers of all things cool in the late 50s and 60s. They were also a favourite fashion item among movie stars sported by the likes of James Dean, Audrey Hepburn, Edie Sedgwick and Bridget Bardot. But the history behind the Breton goes back much further. Right back, in fact to 1858, when the Act of France introduced the tops for all French Navy seamen. The original design was said to feature 21 stripes, one for each of Napoleons’ victories. It was originally nicknamed the ‘Chandail’ which is a shortened version of the French Marchand d’Ail (garlic merchant) who would wear them as they crossed the English Channel to sell their wares. The tops were made and still are to this day, in the Normandy town of Saint-James. The original fisherman’s sweater version of the top had three buttons on the shoulder and was long and close-fitting with a slight turtle neck.

Loafers and drivers
Feet also need something a little lighter in summer and loafers and driving shoes are perfect for both men and women. With loafers, the slip-on style, based on a moccasin is both comfy and cool. Plus there are so many variations of loafer style that there is still room for some individualism, from tassels to a plainer penny-style. Opting for lighter colours in suedes or even a basket weave, keeps the look light and hip. Driving shoes were developed in the 60s off the back of the sports car boom by the brands Car Shoe and later Tods. Their design featured a longer ‘vamp’ than a loafer with a leather tie across the bridge of the shoe and the signature ‘nubs’ on the heel, which prevented you from damaging the shoe when you switched between accelerator and brake pedal. The good looks and comfort of the shoe meant that people wanted to be seen wearing them outside of their vehicles and were soon being sported by wealthy automobile fanatics. The original shoes were beautifully crafted out of fine leather but soon cheaper variations became widely available. However the style still gives off the requisite air of affluence due to its association with 60s motoring.

Summer strides
Levis are a mod staple, but come summer away went the dark denim and out came its white counterpart. This all started in the 60s when mods, in a bid to try anything different, started wearing their strides in a variety of colours. White was a particular favourite and was often sported by the likes of The Who and The Small Faces both on and off camera. But if you want to wear white, well you have to adhere to a few rules. First off you need to keep them really really clean. So try to avoid sitting anywhere likely to be even remotely grubby. Then there’s the cut itself. They should be of a slim fit (not too tight and not too baggy) with the hem ending just on the ankle, exposing a bit of flesh or a nicely coloured sock. Avoid wearing white with white and think of the jeans as a back-drop for the rest of your outfit to help make the colours ‘pop’ and to team them with a coloured polo top or merino knit for a touch of pure Riviera chic. For women, try a cotton trouser in white or pale pastels in a capri pant cut. Look for the signature slit at the hem, it’s much more flattering than a clam-digger! Again make sure they are slim-fit and not to tight or loose. This look is where coolness follows comfort and ease.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Reviews Style Tags:, , , , ,
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