Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Women’s Winter Fashion

The 60s threw the rule book out the window when it came to coats. They could be worn in any colour from zingy orange to sky blue in any fabric from wool to wet-look. Prints were equally outlandish from polka dots to plaid. We take a look at some of the iconic designs that were popular and why they have never really never gone out of fashion.

The Mac
Mary Quant claims to have been one of the first designers to use PVC and vinyl for coats and jackets making the plastic mac a key look for the mod era. This lightweight coat would usually have a large collar and front pockets and fancier versions would have a prominent belt at the waist. Buttons looked great but the best versions had zip-up front with a classic ring pull zip. Black and white versions were very popular but as the decade progressed designers experimented in brighter colours. They might look good and keep you dry but they were terribly squeaky and could get a bit smelly. As technology product in new weather-proof fabrics, sturdier versions were produced that were still light and structured with a more canvas like feel, particularly popular were brands such as Dannimac.

The Trench
Despite being more than 100 years old the trench coat still looks stylish. Originally conceived as a practical wet weather coat in the 1850s by Thomas Burberry and John Emary (whose company later became Aquascutum). The ‘Trench’ name was adopted during the war although the military version was of course far more robust. Worn by both men and women in classic beige, key style elements include a belt at the waist and on the cuffs, slight flare from the waist and a cape across the shoulders at the back to help. Collar buttons at the neck. Best worn by women without showing any dress or skirt under the hem. If you wanted to nail the continental look – this would be a wardrobe must have.

The Peacoat
Military style had a massive influence on the designs of the 60s. In the 1960s Yves Saint Laurent’s pea-coats hit the catwalk and were immediately popular with both men and women and formed part of an androgynous trend that worked its way through fashion in the 60s. A pea-coat traditionally would finish at the top of the thighs – but longer lengths were also popular with women especially as they kept your legs warm in winter when you were wearing a mini. Traditionally though a peacoat is a paired down design with no belt at the waist with slit pockets on the front. Yves Saint Laurent and other designers, would of course, adapt them with their own little finishes such as a flat ‘Peter Pan’ style collar and oversized pockets and top stitching details.

The Cape
Capes weren’t just for ‘super-heroes’ and were a great addition to the modernist 60s wardrobe. You could move freely in them and still keep warm and they added to rather than concealed the outfit underneath. Most importantly they gave a sharp structure to your look. They came in a variety of colours and prints with buttons or front zips. Look out for fabulous versions in plaid or classic Welsh retro wool prints can be picked up quite easily in vintage shops and online these days. Look out for lovely details such as buttons running up to the shoulder and tie-belts to cinch in your waist.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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December 7, 2016 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Ady Lupton

We recently caught up with DJ Ady Lupton to talk about his musical outlook.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My older brother went from being a mod to skinhead to punk & then a psycho billy throughout the 80’s so over the years I grew up hearing all sorts, The Kinks, Small Faces, The Who, Motown, Ska, 2 Tone, The Pistols, Stiff Little Fingers, Dexys, The Stingrays, The Meteors & Northern Soul, a fairly mixed bag. Inevitably I also got into all or most of it too & started buying & collecting my own records when I was about 13 or 14. At about 15 I started knocking around with a lot of my brothers mates who were all a few years older & had scooters,that’s when I started going to a lot of gigs & rallies. The record collecting continued albeit nothing major, Motown bits & pieces, reissues, a few cheap originals, Kent & Charly albums. Although I was out hearing all sorts during the late 80’s it was always the Northern Soul that had become my real passion & after being taken to the 100 club for my 1st proper allnighter by my friend Rob Holmes in the early 90’s it felt like I’d found what I’d always been looking for & the deal was sealed so to speak.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

The Whitstable Assembly Rooms. It was an old dance hall with a sprung dance floor, freezing cold & damp, with a make shift bar that you had to hire in (i.e. A bloke with a load of cans through a hole in the wall). I started organising do’s for my club The East Kent Sovereigns there, well we did a few anyway. Unfortunately it’s gone now.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

It’s got to be the 1st time I played the 100 club, “Bricking it” were 2 words that spring to mind.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Oh blimey, there’s too many to mention:-) It can be demoralising when you play what you think is one good track after another only to have people sit around & stare at you. Still it’s all good fun & character building.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Mick Smith the Governor, always plays the right records for the occasion. Butch goes without saying. Ady Croasdell for continually doing what he’s been doing, need I say more. Also Alan H, Greg & in the early days Lee Miller for sharing their knowledge, showing me the road to righteousness & being bloody good mates.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The 100 club & that dare I say it, what I think of as a more London soul sound, 6T’s Rhythm & Soul a la Kent. Then the influences of The Capitol soul club & later still Lifeline. When Djing I’ll always try & mix it up in a set, a mixture of quality Detroit pounders, classy Chicago soul, some good rhythm & soul & some nice crossover & 70’s depending on the venue, that normally does the trick. If you play a bit of everything you can normally please most of the people most of the time.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I can’t claim to have ever discovered anything seeing as most of the stuff we like is 60’s/70’s It would be foolish to think I was the 1st to hear it but I believe I was one of the 1st to start playing The Sherrell Bros The Price on Currison & I’ve never heard anyone else play Marva Lee – Old & Grey on Rugby took me 14 years to get that! Was lucky enough to be in the right place at the right time when I got Glen Miller on Jamaican Stag. They were all known records just not that well-known.
There’s been a lot of records & still are that I’ve played & people come up & ask what’s that I’ve never heard it before. I’ve never heard anyone else play it either but they must’ve done either on a tape, at someone’s house or at a do, otherwise I wouldn’t have known it.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Almost anything penned by Sonny Sanders & Don Davis floats my boat. Favourite artists, Barbara Lewis, Fred Hughes, Billy Butler, Jackie Wilson, Brenda Holloway number one’s gotta be The Temptations hasn’t it?

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No/yes & no/sort of.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

London VaVaVoom NYE 2016 & usually somewhere in Spain.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I wouldn’t say no to a Lester Tipton, Magnetics-Lady in green, Mello-Souls the list goes on & on.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. The Intensions – Feel So Good – Moneytown
2. The Temptones – Girl I Love You – Arctic
3. Benny Harper – My Prayer – Harper-Soul
4. Otis Clay – Baby Jane – Dakar
5. The Royal Imperials – This Heart Of Mine – Mellow Town

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
1. The Originals – Suspicion
2. Bernie Williams – Ever Again
3. Jack Montgomery – Dearly Beloved
4. The Temptations – Get Ready
5. The Salvadors – Stick By Me Baby
6. Billy Butler -Help Yourself
7. Barbara Lewis – Hello Stranger
8. Jean Carter – I Wanna Know
9. Ben E King – Gettin To Me
10. Kenny Shepard – What Difference Does It Make
11. The Small Faces – Tin Soldier
(If Spinal Tap can go up to 11, so can I).


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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December 7, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 13 (episode 22)

NUTsCast October 2016
In this episode of the Nutscast Sessions, The Baron looks ahead to the mighty Crossfire Allnighter with tracks by the bands representing the Heavy Soul Records showcase, selections by our guest DJs and new songs by French Boutik, Missing Souls and The Embrooks. Also listen out for a one-off special ‘The Baron’s Belters’. Three tracks from his lordship’s personal collection.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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October 11, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Podcasts Reviews Tags:, , , , , , ,
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Masters – Bronco Bullfrog

This entry is part 2 of 7 in the series Masters3

01.  For those new to Bronco Bullfrog, can you give us a quick account of who, how, when and why the band started?

Andy: 1996 (20 years ago – Jesus!). Mike and I had been in The Nerve and Louis had been in The Beatpack, Immediates, Morticians and probably others. He was in garage bands when he was about 10. These bands were playing the same ’60s/mod circuit in London and slowly got to know each other; dogs sniffing each other’s arses, so to speak. I joined Louis’ post-Immediates band Vibraphone sometime around 1990 but left after we were involved in a motorway accident after a gig in Spain. In ’96 all three of us found ourselves at a loose end and decided to try our luck together with something a little different. The garage/psych/mod approach had been mined pretty deep and we’d all started listening to a wider palette of music; country-rock, folk, powerpop, sunshine-pop. The aim was to absorb all of these influences into one cohesive whole while retaining our roots as Who/ Kinks/Small Faces worshipping fanboys. There were no rules at the beginning: if we liked the sound of it, it was in.

02.  You took your name from Barney Platts-Mills’ 1969 film, and your debut LP included ‘Del Quant’, based on the main character. What was it that captured your imagination about that film?

Andy: We’d all discovered the film around the time the band was starting out and I suspect, like many bands, needed a name for a poster in a hurry. It was to hand and it stuck. I had no idea there was a Spanish Oi! label with the same name. We watched the film endlessly and used to run off copies of my third-generation VHS, taped off Channel 4 in the ’80s, for our mates. When we were writing that first flurry of songs, it loomed large in our world and that’s where the lyrics to ‘Del Quant’ came from. Louis and I wrote it in the kitchen in the house we were sharing in Fosse Road South, Leicester. ‘Down Angel Lane’ is also named after a street in Stratford that appears in the film.

03.  Your debut album, Bronco Bullfrog, came out in 1998 on the small independent Twist label. In the preceding few years swathes of bands with even the slightest 60s echo were signed to big labels and had money pumped into them. Bronco Bullfrog had far more depth, imagination and superior songs (I’m allowed to say this, you can agree….) but got overlooked. Why do you think this was and was it a source of irritation?

Andy: We’ve talked about this a lot over the years (and over the beers) and we’re still not sure. Laziness? Nonchalance? Ignorance probably. When we started there was very little awareness of a lot of the stuff that most bands seem to crave from day one: we had no desire to get signed up or play at certain cool gigs or support Supergrass or whatever. We’d come up through provincial bands where playing to 40 people on a Saturday night was kind of enough. We weren’t chasing any kind of success or acceptance; we were literally doing our own thing. It all felt very insular; us against the world, getting stoned and buying obscure pop and psych records from Leicester market and writing these little songs.

We’d save up our pennies and when we had £150 we’d go into the cheapo studio in Leicester YMCA and cut three or four songs; that was our first album. Mark Le Gallez from Twist asked Louis if he had any Immediates recordings that he could put out. Louis said no but he had a new band, that was that. We recorded a couple more songs and all those short bursts of music on there and Twist put it out. We were on the same label as The Solarflares so all was well.

04.  You enjoyed a greater appreciation in other parts of Europe than in the UK. What were the differences at home and abroad and why do you think that was?

Andy: Again, we’ve asked lots people, particularly in Spain, where we’ve achieved a modicum of success, about this as we have no idea. The over-riding impression we’ve been given is that they like the songs primarily, and secondarily the way we try to put them across, with gusto and without fear of failure! Perhaps our tendency to “over-write” songs, to keep adding more musicality, more chord changes and structural elements, singled us out somewhat. I wasn’t hearing a lot of bands playing songs as naively adventurous as ‘Greenacre Hill’ and ‘7:38’ around that time. Still don’t actually. I guess the balance of downbeat, often melancholic lyrics in a spunky, super-pop framework isn’t that common either.

05.  Talk us through the Bronco Bullfrog albums. Are you self-critical? Some of the songs, particularly early on, appear very autobiographical and personal. What emotions do they provoke in you now?

Andy: Like I said earlier, this was 20 years ago, we were young men writing about the travails that young men go through: break-ups, breakdowns, high times, low times, girls, films, pubs and cake. Life was easier then – we didn’t have responsibilities like we do now.

What I hadn’t done before (as primary songwriter) was to write about myself and my emotions and those of my friends and the world around me. The Nerve was resolutely a psychedelic rock band; the lyrics were, for the most part, meaningless. The wah-wah and the Hammond were more important. It was only when people started telling me how much the words to ‘Paper Mask’ or ‘Sweet Tooth’ meant to them that I started to consider that there might be some emotional depth to what we were doing. Then we’d get on stage and try to be The Who in 1968 and any subtlety went straight out the window!

All three of us are incredibly self-critical of Bronco Bullfrog’s recordings, I can’t bear to listen to anything other than the first album and a couple of tracks from each of the others. They were all recorded cheaply, quickly and honestly – which is the way we wanted it – but that method can result in some rather, er, candid performances. We weren’t confident in the studio and would continually swap instruments if the other guy could do it better. That spirit was lost as time passed. And the red light syndrome always defeated us.

06.  Which three songs would you pick to give the best representation of Bronco Bullfrog and why?

Andy: Tricky. The first batch will always remain the most resonant as they represent a snapshot of our lives and our friendship at that time; precious, life-affirming memories. After that we tried our hand at all sorts of things but ended up gravitating towards a fairly regulation powerpop / power-trio format and some of that variety was sacrificed. Stylistically, a selection that I like would be ‘Paper Mask’ for its emotional heft, ‘Sweet Tooth’ for its blind pop optimism (poptimism?) and something like ‘Down Angel Lane’, ‘History’ or ‘One Day With Melody Love’ for almost capturing the essence of all those ’60s 45s we adore: punch, power, melody and dynamics. And mistakes!

07.  After years away Bronco Bullfrog have reformed in a very gentle manner, releasing a series of stand-alone 7 inch singles and the occasional gig. Tell us about those. What prompted the three of you getting back in the studio? Did you have songs you’d already written or did you write them once the idea had settled?

Andy: I guess we needed some time apart after the band split up in 2004; some growing up had to be done. I’m not saying any of us have grown up but we’re all best mates again now and that’s by far the best thing that’s come out of this reunion.

The singles were a natural by-product of getting back together and not wanting to go straight back on stage; we were more interested in writing and recording a bunch of new songs in as informal and low-key a manner as we could manage. We went to State Recorders when it was in Folkestone, then when it moved to St Leonard’s, as we’d known Mole and Marty since their Mystreated days and liked the rough and ready sound they were busy patenting. I emailed a few labels and low and behold! We’ve done four 45s on four labels so far.

08.  So many bands reform years down the line. People have mixed views about this, what’s your take? What makes a successful reunion, both from the point of view of a musician and a fan?

Andy: I can only speak from my own experience, which is that the whole time we were out of action we were still getting requests to go and play in Spain, Germany and Italy. After a while we realised that people remembered us and maybe we should give it a shot. We did a couple of warm-up gigs late last year to quell the nerves, then headed back to Spain in December and dived in at the deep end at Purple Weekend. We’ve done two tours over there since then and, while we’ve undoubtedly become less ragged, we’ve also realised that playing those songs for 90 minutes when you’re 47 is knackering!

09.  What can we expect from Bronco Bullfrog in the future? More gigs? Singles? An album?

Andy: We haven’t recorded anything for 18 months as we were preparing our sea legs for the Spanish shows. We’re all in other bands too and have assorted jobs and families that require our attention. The plan, however tentative, is to record an album and another single early next year. We’ll probably do it ourselves, in our time and space, on a couple of old four-tracks so a) it sounds more like the old records we dig and b) you can’t hear the mistakes so well.

10.  Finally, your 2013 single for State Records included ‘Never Been To California’ (my favourite track of the new BB-era). For someone whose songs have so often included Californian sunshine pop in their grooves, please tell me this isn’t true!

Andy: Sorry Mark, it is true. Neither Louis, Mike nor myself have been to the US of A so I thought I’d write a song about it and we’d try and make it sound like a Californian sunshine-pop band. Obviously we failed but that’s what Bronco Bullfrog has always been about really: creating something interesting and exciting by failing!

Weblinks:

broncobullfrog.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/broncobullfroguk

Gigs:

Sat 22nd October – Crossfire 29 @ 229 The Venue, London 


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Mark Raison

I've spent three-quarters of my life wandering the mod path with detours down its side streets and dark alleys. From an enthusiastic youth to a still-enthusiastic-but-harder-to-tell grizzled old goat, I've dabbled in all parts of the scene from writing fanzines 'Round Midnight and Something Has Hit Me; to promoting bands; attempting to manage bands; singing in the mighty garage combo The Electric Fayre; putting on indie, psych and soul clubs including Freak Scene, Orange Sunshine, and Shake!; writing liner notes for Reg King releases on Circle Records; and, in fitter times, tucking away the odd goal for the New Untouchables. I still DJ from my box of R&B humdingers but more often you’ll find me tapping away on my blog at monkeypicks.co.uk. I like the poetry of Charles Bukowski and dislike the taste of cheese.

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October 3, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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The Baron Four (Newbreed)

This entry is part 2 of 7 in the series Newbreed5

Band Members:

Mike Whittaker (Bass/Main Vocals)
Joe Eakins (Git/Vocals)
Kevin Smith (Git/Vocals)
Mole (Drums/Vocals)

Discography:

She Said Yeah (7”)
Yes I Do (7”)
Out Of The Wild Come (LP)
Walking Out (7”)
I Don’t Mind (7”)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The band has been going for about 4 years, the current lineup has only been together a few months. We knew each as we were all already in other bands and would end up on the same bill sometimes. We always seemed to be on the same page music wise.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Humour, we all have an immature sense of humour which is important when you’re around each other a lot. Obviously we all enjoy the same sounds and styles of music which is also quite handy…

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Not particularly. There’s a few good bands around but not much new… The Missing Souls, The Masonics, The Thanes, The Teamsters, The Kaisers are all pretty exciting.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

There isn’t one.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Raw & Savage Beat Music.

06. What are your live shows like?

Unexpected.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Main influences would be mainly relatively unknown 60’s groups. Blues music has been a massive influence on my life – Howlin Wolf, LIghtnin Hopkins, Slim Harpo, Leadbelly to name but a few, also a lot of Soul music, Punk (70’s Punk that is).

We do a few covers – You’re No Good (Dee Dee Warwick/Clint Ballard Jr), I Just Wanna Make Love To You (Willie Dixon), Wild Angel (James Bond & The Agents).

I despise talentless mannequins who are marketed to make money.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

As Cliché as it sounds, probably sights, sounds, experiences and feelings.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Myself (Mike), my strange thoughts and feelings, love, hurt, depression. Subjects that people might relate to but also subjects where people probably have no idea what I mean (or what I’m saying for that matter).

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

My favourite song of ours at the minute is probably ‘Certain Type Of Girl’ simply because it’s brand new, fast and fun to play, pretty catchy too if I do say so myself.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Not really sure there is one? I’ll go to something if there’s genuinely something good on or a band I really want to see otherwise I’m not fussed.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Touring for 6 months at a time, that was in my previous band Thee Vicars though, that was pretty challenging being around the same 4 people for that long without killing each other.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We don’t get a lot of chances to practice as we all live so far apart. Generally we normally play often enough to stay tight together, or even practice just before a show. We record probably twice a year, it depends on how quickly the recordings get released. We have a 2nd LP to come out soon, we are taking our time to choose the label wisely, with a tour to follow.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Shite.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

No, there was a spell where there were some great bands coming in but then they all went south very quickly. Bands like The Strokes, The Hives, even Kings Of Leon were great when they first came onto the scene but JESUS, WHAT HAPPENED!?

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Joe Meek because he was incredible. Also Phil Spector.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Release a 2nd LP, and then much more after that I’m sure.

18th November – Putney, London (Half Moon Pub) w/ The Masonics
31 December– Nutty NYE, London @ www.229thevenue.co.uk
4th February – Wachina Festival – Valencia, Spain.

 

Social Networks:

facebook.com/thebaronfour

Updated Releases and Tour Dates:

LP coming soon…


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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October 3, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , ,
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Paul Orwell and the Night Falls (Newbreed)

This entry is part 6 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Paul Orwell (Guitar,Vox)
Michael Parrett (Bass)
Stu Marsh (Guitar)
Scotty Roberts (drums)

Discography:
Tell Me Tell Me (vinyl only) single,
Only 250 made and sold out in just 7 days of Pre Order a month before release

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: Tell Me Tell Me / Little Reason 45 on Heavy Soul Records (SOLD OUT)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

As a band not long, we have done around 14 shows, I met Michael at a gig we did ages ago in different shit bands, I trashed the stage before he got on, fun times!

I got him to trade the guitar in for a bass, the other members answered adverts I put out it’s worked out well.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Beatles and 60’s fashion.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Nah, they are all bleak, boring and predictable… well from what I can see and hear.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I haven’t found one, a massive gap in the market I think.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Freak Beat.

06. What are your live shows like?

Fun, tight, magical, raw.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

A lot of early beat, R&B and RnR. We only play lively covers if at all that we enjoy, not your every day covers the more obscure the better.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Hard one as my whole life is music, from producing, writing, and finding new gems. I love record collecting and Art.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Me (Paul Orwell) and my tainted heart, messed up mind and butchered soul.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

My personal favourite is “Little Reason” as I sometimes get a chance to go and interact and dance with the crowd, we sometimes do a cover of “When The Night Falls” By The Eyes, that’s fun!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Not really, I’m only sociable around friends, family and fans. I’m not one of those who find it important to be part of a scene, just to do my own thing, that’s what is important. If people like it, great if they don’t, sod them.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Producing a track that takes me weeks to get right.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record?  Anything interesting coming up?

We are good with rehearsals, we are perfectionists so we can get everything right to enjoy being loose on stage. We only play gigs that suite our style, sod playing a load of indie gigs, no fun in that. I record every day, lots of interesting things coming up including new releases, new videos, maybe some more gigs abroad. I would love to do a tour.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s been along long while since I’ve read a music mag or listened to any up to date radio station, so I can’t really answer. I should imagine it’s all favouritism.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Again I don’t listen to much past 1972, I like some, Hypnotic Eye and The Teamsters seem to have some magical sounds going on.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Producers: George Martin, Joe Meek, Phil Spector

Artist alive: Paul McCartney,

Artist Dead: John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Syd Barrett, Otis Redding

These artists all play big parts in the way I think and are very important to me and music.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Record deal would be nice and some good support slots.
29 September 2014 – The Finsbury, London with Magnetic Mind
11 October 2014 – Crossfire 25, 229 venue, London

Web Links:

facebook.com/PAULORWELLOFFICIAL
twitter.com/PAULORWELLMUSIC
soundcloud.com/paulorwell


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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October 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , , ,
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Jazz for Modernists 10 – Ten Classic Soul-Jazz LPs, 1958-1967

Jazz for Modernists 10 – Ten Classic Soul-Jazz LPs, 1958-1967

Ok folks, after veering off into free improvisation and progressive rock, it’s time to steer our jazz ship back to the (perhaps) less stormy, but equally exciting, waters of soul. Sometime in the mid-1950s, partly in direct contrast to ‘cool’ or ‘West Coast’ jazz, boppers on the East Coast and in Detroit and Philadelphia began to infuse their modern jazz with healthy new doses of rhythm and blues, swing, Latin and gospel. The subsequent sound, as practised by groups such as Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, the Horace Silver Quintet and the various combos of Clifford Brown, Cannonball Adderley and Sonny Rollins, became known as
hard bop.

Before long, much of this music was being described as ‘funky’ and ‘soulful’, terms denoting the down-home earthiness of the blues and the call-and-response spiritual union of black gospel music. As early as 1953, Silver had recorded ‘Opus de Funk’ and Blakey the drum piece ‘Nothing but the Soul’ for the 10” Blue Note LP Horace Silver Trio Vol. 2 and Art Blakey-Sabu (Blue Note 5034). The gospel influence was clearer on Silver’s ‘The Preacher’, originally released in 1955 on the 10” Horace Silver Quintet, Vol. 2 (BLP 5062), a collection also featuring a track entitled ‘Hippy’.

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Horace Silver Trio Vol. 2 and Art Blakey-Sabu, 1953 (Blue Note 5034).

Anyway, as the 50s rolled on, ‘soul’ became an increasingly important ingredient in the hard bop vocabulary, often identified in track titles. Examples from 1957 include Cannonball Adderley’s ‘Another kind of Soul’, Milt Jackson’s ‘Plenty Plenty Soul’ and Horace Silver’s ‘Soulville’ (also the title of a track and LP by Ben Webster). Though ‘soul-jazz’ wasn’t really a distinct, recognized genre before 1959, the fusion of r & b and gospel vocal music perfected around this time by Ray Charles (what in future would be called soul) was seeping into the jazz idiom. This was virtually inevitable the great man was an accomplished jazz pianist and arranger (taught by the equally great Quincy Jones back in 1948 in Seattle) and Atlantic, his label, had been recording the Modern Jazz Quartet since early ’56.

What follows is a selection of ten LPs, one each from years 1958-1967, which forms a short introduction to soul-jazz. It’s not a ‘best of’, but something charting the development and variety of the genre during its glory years. Of course soul-jazz continued to evolve after 1967, but that’s another story.

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1. Ray Charles & Milt Jackson, Soul Brothers (Atlantic), 1958 (1957)

The first of two 1957-8 collaborations between MJQ vibes man Milt ‘Bags’ Jackson and Ray Charles (the other, Soul Meeting, was held back until 1961), this is an important stage in the evolution of soul-jazz. Though a trained bopper, Jackson was a member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, at the time synonymous with the rather formal chamber jazz style. That Atlantic should pair him with their gospel-drenched blues genius Ray Charles was recognition that cool jazz could swing and a clear indication that future soul-jazz would benefit from the metronomic structure of cool rhythm sections (MJQ drummer Connie Kay is on both dates). Another important feature is the guitar, played by Skeeter Best on Soul Brothers and Kenny Burrell on Soul Meeting. The title track is by Quincy Jones, life-long friend of Charles and a huge influence on later orchestral settings for soul-jazz. WATCH VIDEO

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2. Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Moanin’ (Blue Note), 1959 (1958)

An essential album for any serious jazz modernist. Featuring 20-year-old Lee Morgan (trumpet), Benny Golson (tenor sax), Jymie Merritt (bass) and Bobby Timmons (piano), drummer-leader Art Blakey provides the backbone for an excellent and varied session of hard bop. Known today as ‘Moanin’’, after the Timmons-penned opening track, the album was released as Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Leonard Feather’s notes describe the opening chorus of ‘Moanin’’ as “the quintessence of funk, based on the classic call-and-response pattern, with Bobby’s simple phrases (focused on the tonic) answered by the horns and rhythm punctuations on straight, churchy pairs of chords (B Flat and F)”. Quite so, and, heard once, it remains lodged in the brain along with images of New York skyscrapers and men in pork-pie hats. Shorter vocal versions were recorded soon after by Bill Henderson and Lambert, Hendricks and Ross. WATCH VIDEO

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3. The Cannonball Adderley Quintet, Them Dirty Blues (Riverside), 1960

With pianist Bobby Timmons providing the link with Blakey’s Moanin’, this might well be the first bona-fide classic soul-jazz LP (though much hype surrounded the previous Cannonball Adderley Quintet in San Francisco). Leader and alto sax player Julian ‘Cannonball’ Adderley had recently excelled on Miles Davis’s timeless modal classic Kind of Blue, but his forte was definitely funky hard bop and soul-jazz. Them Dirty Blues contains three absolute classics of the soul-jazz genre: Timmons’s ‘Dat Dere’, a version of Duke Pearson’s ‘Jeannine’ and cornet player Nat Adderley’s ‘Work Song’. Mod dancers will be familiar with Oscar Brown Jr’s vocal versions of all three. WATCH VIDEO

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4. Jack McDuff, The Honeydripper (Prestige), 1961

Used in American churches since its invention in 1935 and then in pop, swing and rhythm & blues (Ethel Smith, Fats Waller, Count Basie, Wild Bill Davis, Bill Doggett), the Hammond organ, most notably the B-3, would soon become a fundamental instrument in soul-jazz. Jimmy Smith started his incredible run of Blue Note LPs in 1956 with A New Sound… A New Star and readers may be surprised not to see Back at the Chicken Shack in the list. Well, though the best of the Blue Notes are great, personally I prefer the big band sound of his Verve debut Bashin’ (see 5) and The Cat (1964). So, 1961’s soul-jazz organ spot goes to Jack McDuff’s The Honeydripper, the Illinois man’s third LP for Prestige. From the opening blast of ‘Whap!’, McDuff’s quartet (with tenor sax legend Jimmy Forrest, drummer Ben Dixon and the great Grant Green on guitar) never falters. WATCH VIDEO

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5. Jimmy Smith, Bashin’: The Unpredictable Jimmy Smith (Verve), 1962

Smith’s first date for Verve was with a stellar big band led by Oliver Nelson, whose recording for Impulse, The Blues and the Abstract Truth (1961) will be familiar to fans of Eric Dolphy, Freddie Hubbard and Bill Evans. The arrangements of standards ‘Walk on the Wild Side’ (Bernstein & David), ‘Ol’ Man River’ and Ellington’s ‘In a Mellow Tone’ are so tight and clean that, when it arrives, the Hammond screams out at the listener. The title track, an original played just as a trio, is, in contrast, fairly gentle for a bashin’, while Nelson’s ‘Step Right Up’ echoes the jaunty Copeland feel of ‘Hoe-Down’ from the Abstract Truth LP. A fine record. WATCH VIDEO

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6. Lee Morgan, The Sidewinder (Blue Note), 1964 (1963)

A comeback date for the young Morgan, The Sidewinder’s title track set the bar high for finger-snapping soul-jazz/funky hard bop in both its musical execution and commercial success (the album and a parts 1&2 single of the title track made the Billboard top 100). An LP format of sorts thus evolved around 1964-8, whereby a swinging blues would be followed by two or three hard bop blowouts, a ballad and maybe something modal (though the greatest Blue Note dates of the period transcended this pattern). Echoing the bodily movements implied by The Sidewinder, examples of the mid-sixties Blue Note house style include Morgan’s The Rumproller (1965), Hank Mobley’s The Turnaround! (1965) and Horace Silver’s wonderful The Jody Grind (1966). Shorter versions of The Sidewinder by Woody Herman (with vocal), Soulful Strings, Quincy Jones and Kai Winding are popular on the dance floor. WATCH VIDEO

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7. Horace Silver, Song for My Father (Blue Note), 1965 [1964]

As already stated, pianist Silver was at the ground zero of soul-jazz. His Cape Verdean heritage drove him on to exploring folk tunes and Latin, African and other rhythms which he combined expertly in the funky stew. By 1964, his style had absorbed some of the modal touches of players like Bill Evans and McCoy Tyner, making his 1960s recordings for Blue Note amongst the most atmospheric and exotic in the hard bop and soul-jazz cannons. Recorded with different line-ups over two dates in ’63 and ’64, Song for My Father is the crown jewel in a golden run of albums Silver recorded for the label. Check out this 1968 live version of the title track here: WATCH VIDEO

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8. Jazz Crusaders, Chile con Soul (Pacific Jazz), 1965

The very epitome of Latin-inspired 60s funk, the Jazz Crusaders deserve a place in any top ten of soul-jazz. Throughout the decade, the combination of Joe Sample (piano), Wilton Felder (tenor sax), Hubert Laws (flute), Wayne Henderson (trombone), Stix Hooper (drums), Al McKibbon (bass) and others produced an incredible sequence of smooth and swinging albums for the Pacific Jazz label, including the classic 1965 ‘Chile con soul’. Highlights include opening salvo ‘Aguadulce’, a second version of ‘Tough Talk’, ‘Tacos’ and ‘Dulzura’. Warning – once heard, this music is addictive. WATCH VIDEO

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9. The George Benson Quartet, It’s Uptown (Columbia), 1966

A wonderful LP by a master guitarist, sounding as fresh today as it must have done 50 years ago. Taking his inspirations from Gershwin standards, Marvin Gaye, boleros, bossas and more, George Benson produces a record as varied and virtuosic as anything in the soul-jazz guitar canon. Though stylistically different, it shares the adventurous spirit of Davy Graham’s Folk, Blues and Beyond. For sheer excitement, opener ‘Clockwise’ and closing number ‘Mynah Bird Blues’ are hard to beat. The contributions of organist Lonnie Smith are particularly effective throughout. Dancers will want to check out ‘Summertime’, ‘Ain’t that Peculiar’ and ‘Jaguar’ (where Benson gets his guitar to sound like a flute!) WATCH VIDEO

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10. The Soulful Strings, Groovin’ With the Soulful Strings (Cadet), 1967

Although Blue Note would divide some of their funkier extended tracks into parts 1&2 singles (if anyone’s got a nice 7” copy of Horace Silver’s ‘The Jody Grind’ please write in), it was not really responsible for the mid-sixties shift towards shorter, bite-sized chunks of soul-jazz aimed either at the dance floor or the singles charts. Arguably that was Chess subsidiary Cadet (earlier Argo), which, from 1965 to the 1970s, released a slew of singles and albums usually comprising shorter tunes, many influenced by, or cover versions of, contemporary pop, bossa nova and r & b songs. Amid some admittedly patchy albums between 1965 and 1967, one that definitely stands out from the pack is Groovin’ with the Soulful Strings. Mixing the cream of the Chess house band (including guitarist Phil Upchurch) with violas, violins and cellos, group leader Richard Evans takes us on a strange, at times psychedelic journey from Bach to the Beatles, via Miles Davis. The single ‘Burning Spear’, an Evans original featuring a kalimba (an African traditional instrument known also as the mbira), is big on numerous dance floors, a flute-driven precursor to Johnny Harris’ ‘Stepping Stones’. WATCH VIDEO


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : Articles Front Page Music Picks Tags:, , , , , , ,
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Brighton; about the young idea

Claire Mahoney looks at the young generation of mods that set the New Untouchables Brighton Mod Weekender alight this August with
impeccable style.

It’s not often that you use the word ‘Face’ when talking about mods these days. The term seems a little outmoded, especially when so many of us in the scene are way past our prime. But this year at the New Untouchables Brighton Weekender, a clutch of young mods seemed to get everyone talking, staring and most likely wondering just how they managed to get it so right.

It was as if the many black and white images of the 60s we so lovingly scoured for inspiration had suddenly come alive but with little twists of today. Of course, red lipstick was not really ‘a thing’ in the early to mid-60s as it is now. In fact, the 60s mod girls were pretty much bare-faced by today’s standards.

Original mod women that had perhaps painstakingly applied kohl eyeliner and battled with unforgiving false eye-lash glue some 50 years ago, would be forgiven for feeling a little envious of the flawless application of cat-eye flicks and eyebrow arches on these young doll-like faces. But everyone was in agreement that they looked absolutely brilliant.

Lara Bossence was at Brighton again this year and at just 14 is probably the youngest of the gang. She combines a traditional 60s look with early 60s skin and suede-head touches.

She says: “I like a clean-cut yet, young and fun style. I’m young and want to have fun with my style. I think attention to detail is key. For me, mod is standing out a little from the norm. I definitely see the difference between the Go-Go and psych styles. Mod is more classic.”

She says that she takes a lot of her inspiration from the continental styles of the French and Italians. Because of her age of course, she hasn’t just got first generation mods to look to for inspiration and has, in fact four or more decades of mod’s evolution to take ideas from.

“I suppose the hard mod/suedehead look is also of interest to me. I also admire the early rude girl look too. I just seem drawn to these styles the most. I don’t wish to stick rigidly to a ‘uniform’ as it were but, more to add my own twist and ideas to keep it fun too. My boyfriend is a skinhead and the smart, traditional skinhead look is also of interest.”

One thing that unites all of these girls it that their look is so true to original mod 60s styling. They don’t really do dresses and instead focus on well-chosen separates and accessories. Knee length skirts, loafers, driving shoes, flat Mary Janes, boxy jackets (bum freezers) and fitted knitwear.

Scarlett Bayliss is pretty much the British face of young mods today. Her look is unmistakable. And like any mod she is obsessed by detail. Last year at Brighton, I remember her raving to me about anoraks with a particular type of zip and was proudly sporting a hard to get hold of pair of brown Dr Scholl ladies driving shoes. At the moment she has a thing for green: “I don’t think I could live without my green jackets whether it’s an anorak or my green suede coat.”

What would be her wardrobe staples I ask?: “Essential elements would probably be any items in green or suede, or both! That would be something special. A nice fitted pair of trousers and smart bum freezer jacket, you can never go wrong.”


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Style Tags:, , , ,
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V & A Exhibition – Revolution: Records and rebels 1966 – 70

Saturday 11th September – Revolution: Records and Rebels 1966 – 70

At the Victoria and Albert Museum

This most eagerly anticipated of exhibitions has been on the radar for anyone with even the most passing of interests in the 1960’s counter-culture movement for some months now. These monumental events that are covered within this exhibition, all seemed to occur or explode, as the case may be – concurrently, all over the world. And all of this was happening in which must seem like medieval times to folk of a certain age, who have never lived in an age before mobile phones and the internet.

The exhibition itself was two years in the making, and to have the extra financial clout (sponsorship) of the Levi brand on board – the signs are good, even before you start on your excursion into what is an Aladdin’s cave of ultra rare artifacts & memorabilia from 1966 – 70.

On entering the exhibition, you’re given a head-set – which is all part of getting your mind and soul in the correct frame-of-mind. So while your eyes are busy eating-up all the scrumptious feasts on display, your ears are also being fed a constant menu of your favourite music!

The exhibition itself is set out in a considered and chronological order. Which I personally appreciate, as I am a guy who likes to have his record collection, book collection and clothing organised into considered groups!

I don’t really want to give the game away, (which in essence makes doing a review – redundant) as I strongly feel that the individual needs to experience this most incredible of collections for oneself. I will promise that you will be welcomed by the most amazing of visual surprises throughout your visit.

My personal passion lies within the music and fashion of the counter-culture movement, which just seemed to appear, just-like-magic – and on a daily basis, throughout this era! And much of it is now just an arm’s length away from
your eyes!

What made the whole experience so much more special for myself, was the more serious subjects that really influenced the whole counter-culture movement and were all represented within this exhibition. From Pete Seeger’s guitar (with the ultimate proto slogan that has never been bettered) right through to the race and gay right activist movements. And too many more to mention – that all need to be experienced on your visit.

When my group of friends finally left the exhibition, we were met by a member of staff who was quite astonished that we had spent 210 minutes within the exhibition. And chose to mention that we’d by far spent the most time within the exhibition. (It’s only been open a week, so I not too proud of that fact) Well, I am planning a return visit in the coming months and I predict a new record being set…


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Peter Feely

Married to Susie, both actively involved in the UK 60s scene for many years. My personal interest in 1960s culture goes back over 30 years, with my main two passions being music and fashion, both in equal measure. I run my own menswear label – ‘Perfumed Garden’ clothing, catering for the discerning dandy male - in addition to sourcing and selling vintage mens’ gear, with a particular interest in those hard-to-find jackets and shoes! I also run the Facebook group, ‘Psychedelic Clothing for Men: Then and Now’, with 2200+ members. Although I have no formal training in the fashion industry, what I do possess is a real passion, and through the years I have gained valuable knowledge of many areas of mens’ fashion from the mid to late 1960s. I’m also a musician and have played in many bands in my younger years. I’m an avid collector of music and music-related paraphernalia. I started running my own club nights back in the mid-1990s, and at present I run a psychedelic night in Derby – ‘The Perfumed Garden Of Musical Delights’. Through this I also get to DJ at many exciting events up and down the country

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : Articles Arts Design Fashion Front Page Inspiration Style Tags:, , , ,
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Collectors Corner – “The UK Atlantic Records story Pt 2”

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

In mid 1964 Britain’s hit parade was in the middle of a musical hurricane sweeping the country, home-grown guitar and harmonica wielding beat groups. From a chart ruled by Cliff Richard, Frank Ifield and Billy Fury barely a year earlier, 1964 found 45’s by young, modern and decidedly hipper groups such as The Animals, Rolling Stones, Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames and The Kinks hitting the number one spot. One thing all these artists had in common was the great big influence of American rhythm & blues, and more recently soul music. This in turn made the kids who bought records by those artists want to hear the original music itself. Along with constant name checking from stars like Dusty Springfield, John Lennon and Eric Burdon, soul music was coming out from the underground discotheques and into households via plays on the new pirate radio stations and Redifusion’s Friday evening must-see TV show “Ready, Steady, Go!”. This was where you could hear, and also see, the latest releases from Martha & The Vandellas, James Brown and Otis Redding (who even got a whole episode to himself, watch it on YouTube!). Although R’N’B had been released in the UK in large amounts since the mid ’50’s, the major labels now realised this stuff could sell, and in large amounts too. Pye records set up the International imprint back in 1958 which was followed in 1963 with an R&B series, EMI followed suit with it’s Stateside imprint which released heaps of great black American soul music, and Decca had London American which did the same thing, the jewel in it’s crown being the licence to release Atlantic tracks over here. On 24th July 1964 Decca took the plunge and Atlantic Records UK received its first proper British release, the recent US hitbound smash by The Drifters “Under the boardwalk”. This was given the number AT 4001 and was issued over here on the classic black and silver designed label with a plain white sleeve. Over the next two years nearly another 100 45’s were pressed up and released, encompassing classic soul, jazz, garage and even a number one hit single.

at4057

After the first AT release by The Drifters hit the UK charts, albeit hitting a lowly number 45, they were graced with a further eight releases in the series including such classic tracks as “Come over to my place”, “Saturday night at the movies” and “At the club”. Like a lot of the black label Atlantic series, even though most releases didn’t hit the top of the charts they were all mostly steady sellers and apart from a few nuggets (more about those later) can be picked up for under a tenner each. Despite continually releasing great singles in the sixties, including the legendary “Everybody needs somebody to love” (AT 4004), Solomon Burke didn’t crack the charts until 2003. This didn’t stop him having seven AT releases, including “Peepin” and a great driving version of Bob Dylan’s “Maggie’s Farm”. Otis Redding was a massive success in Britain and narrowly missed the top ten when his cover of “My girl” (AT 4050) reached number 11 in 1965. He had four releases on the label including his storming version of “Satisfaction” (AT 4080), but his 45 of “I’ve been loving you too long” (AT4029) was never released, instead being relegated to the B side of “Respect” (AT 4039) a short while later. Rufus Thomas had US singles released as far back as 1953 and had a great two sider pressed up over here in 1965, “Jump back” / “All night worker” (AT 4009). Stax favourites Booker T and the M.G’s continued their run of great R’N’B instrumentals with two releases “Boot-leg” (AT 4033) and “Red beans and rice” (AT 4063) , another two dance floor winners. Amongst the other legendary names you’ll find in this glorious run include Barbara Lewis, Joe Tex, Don Covay, Wilson Pickett, Carla Thomas, Sam & Dave and Patti Labelle.

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Two releases stood amongst the release sheets of 1965, the first was AT 4035, “I got you babe” by Sonny and Cher. None of the previous releases (apart from Bobby Darin) had been straight forward pop, but this fantastic duet was a perfect commercial nugget and duly sailed up the UK charts, nestling up at the number one slot in the autumn of 1965. If you haven’t seen the legendary Ready, Steady, Go performance of this, have a look on YouTube for a visual feast complete with members of the Rolling Stones hamming it up for the cameras along with the loved up couple. The second, and a taster for the shape of things come for the ever-expanding label, was Bocky and the Visions “I go crazy” (AT 4049), a prime slice of American garage. This was swiftly followed by Levon and the Hawks “The stones I throw” (AT 4054) which featured future members of The Band, The Young Rascals “I ain’t gonna eat out my heart anymore” (AT 4059) which came out shortly after, and then in March 1966 came the release of garage legends The Shadows of Knight with their killer version of “Gloria” (AT 4085). All of these are very collectable, not just with UK garage release collectors but with Atlantic label completest too and prices do reflect this.

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But in 1965 and 1966 soul was still Atlantic’s main selling point and the label released a whole glut of classic tracks, some of which somehow managed to sell next to nothing over here, becoming long-term expensive rarities in the following years. Although it was a UK top five smash in the early 70’s, Tami Lynn’s all time classic “I’m gonna run away from you” (AT 4071) originally was released in March 1966 and sold nothing hence it’s rarity and value nowadays. Esther Phillips end of night favourite “Just say goodbye” (AT 4077) is another hard one to source, and can easily reach £100 in nice condition. Googie Rene Combo’s jazz tinged 45 “Smokey Joe’s La La” (AT 4076) is another hard to find great, as is Travis Wammack’s instrumental classic “Scratchy” (AT 4017) and The Astors “Candy” (AT 4037) also goes for top money. Other tough but great tunes to seek out include Joe Turner’s “Midnight cannonball” (AT 4026), The Isley Brothers “The last girl” (AT 4010), Jimmy Williams “Walking on air” (AT 4042), “Chills and fever” (AT 4053) by Paul Williams, and Jackie Ivory’s “Hi heel sneakers” (AT 4075). As with most soul releases in the UK never forget that black label “Stock copies” will usually be available at a cheaper price than the more prized yellow label “demo copies”. Luckily these can be found without spending the ridiculous amount of money you’d need to collect the classic Atlantic R’N’B released by London in the 1950’s and most should be findable with a bit of luck, patience and a full wallet. And when it’s complete you’ll be the owner of one of the best runs of musical genius released, ever.

at4077


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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September 22, 2016 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, ,
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Record Reviews October 2016 – Part 1

The Alloy Six

Ross Ellis 12" 3mm 11073

‘Turn Out The Lights’ – LP

This is an impressive debut outing for Sweden’s newest psych/garage band, Alloy Six. In truth, the band emerged from the pieces of Stockholm based The Moving Sounds and The Fortune Tellers in 2013, so it has taken a while to get this first album together, but it has been well worth the wait. With twelve cuts of jangling and fuzzy guitars, swirling organ and solid vocal harmonies, I can see this being pretty popular among the Mousetrap Psych crowd. ‘You And I’, ‘Lights Out’ and ‘Each Night’ give you a good idea where Alloy Six are coming from musically. It’s all very tight, well-produced and has those quirky melodies that you often find in this genre. It’s available from Copase Disques who are putting together a decent catalogue of releases by some of Europe’s best. This album sits very comfortably among them.

facebook.com/thealloysix
bandpage.com/TheAlloySix

Chris Pope & The Chords UK

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‘Take On Life’ – LP

For all those die-hard Chords fans and lovers of the ’79 revival period, let’s get one thing straight. The original line up will never get back together for a whole host of reasons. End of. There has been much debate about the rights and wrongs of Chris Pope continuing The Chords name. It’s a pointless exercise. The Chords (be they the original line up or the current one) deserve their place in British music history and if the current line up gains new fans with this album which in turn will guide them to the back catalogue, then the band and its members past and present will be remembered and appreciated for what they have achieved. It’s the difference between being just a ‘tribute’ band or being relevant to your fan base and beyond. It worked for Secret Affair a few years ago and with ‘Take On Life’, I see no reason why it should not work for Chris Pope and The Chords UK. Some of these songs are revived demos that never saw release way-back-when. To be honest, you would be hard pushed to tell which were which as Mr Pope has proved he still has an ‘angry man’ in there somewhere. His observations on society, like ‘Burning All Around’ or ‘Heart Of The Matter’ are as sharp today as they have ever been. ‘A Life Less Ordinary’ is a splendid tale of a modern-day Bonnie & Clyde, while ‘Dreams Of Yesterday’ finds him in reflective mood. It helps that Mic Stoner on bass, Kenny Cooper on Drums and Sandy Michie on guitar do a great job and they are joined by Mick Talbot on keyboards as a guest on the album. ‘Take On Life’ is full of that aggressive energy that typifies Chris Pope’s song writing and he and The Chords UK deliver.

www.popemusic.co.uk
facebook.com/TheChordsUK

The Embrooks

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‘Nightmare’ b/w ‘Helen’ – Single

The Embrooks are one of those bands fondly remembered by those on the scene back in the mid-nineties when the trio was formed by bassist/vocalist Mole (ex-Mystreated/Stewed), guitarist/vocalist Alessandro Cozzi Lepri (ex-Head & The Hares), and drummer Lois Tozer who is currently with Thee Jezebels. Their output was pretty damn good and they were firm favourites on the live circuit. Eventually, life took the three in different directions and the band disappeared for a while, but they are back with this corking single and they’ve not lost any of the mod/freakbeat vitality they were known for. Full-on thrashing drums, driving bass lines and fuzz guitar a-plenty makes both sides sound authentically ’66 or ’67. Only the band know if there is more to come, but on this evidence, let’s hope so!

facebook.com/theembrooks

The Fast Camels

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‘Tales Of The Expected’ – LP

It’s great to see The Fast Camels back with their third album following on from their highly successful debut in 2007 ‘The Magic Optician’ followed some years later by the excellent ‘Deadrooms & Butterfly Dreams’. Hailing from Glasgow, Fast Camels comprise of original members: Drew Sturgeon (Vocals and Guitar), Mark O’Connor (Vocals and Guitar) and Stephan Mors (Drums). They were joined by Allan McGarry (Vocals and Keyboards) and Neil Menzies (Bass). ‘Tales Of The Expected’ is sure to be a hit with those of a psych/garage tendency. It has the feel of a concept album, but it is a collection of ten new songs about a disparate and desperate group of individuals. Be they ‘Madame Matron’, ‘Dead Celebs’ or ‘Chicken Bo’ they are all acutely observed portrayals of ‘ordinary people’ who all have an un-nerving, dark quality about them. Co-produced by the band and Paul Gallagher, it’s fair to say the Fast Camels are back with a bang.

www.thefastcamels.com
facebook.com/thefastcamels

French Boutik

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‘Front Pop’ – LP

If you want to sound ultra-cool and sound like you’re a ‘finger-on-the-pulse’ type on the scene, French Boutik are one of a handful of bands to mention among your peers. Three critically acclaimed and successful EPs, regular contributors to ‘Specialized’ and ‘March Of The Mods’ fundraisers for Teenage Cancer Trust and a growing UK fan base attending their now customary three-date mini tours, this really is one of THE bands of the moment and on October 22, they release their debut LP on Copase Disques.

I’ll admit I am and have been a huge fan and make no apology for praising this album. It typifies their sound, their unique style and highlights exactly why they are so popular. One of the best facets of French Boutik is that they do not fit into a predetermined category. They don’t sound like a ‘mod’ band (whatever that is supposed to be?!) In fact they don’t ‘sound’ like anyone except French Boutik and that can only be a good thing. ‘Front Pop’ features the digital single ‘Le Mac’ and ‘Hitch A Ride’ which were part of the crowdfunding campaign for this album and have been reviewed here before, so I will concentrate on the other tracks.

There is the sophistication of ‘Costard Italien’, the superb cover of Francois Hardy’s ‘Je Ne Suis La Pour Personne’, the rip-roaring ‘Regard Les Tigres’ and the delightful ‘Impitoyable’. The vocals are shared between Gabriela Giacoman and Serge Hoffman with drummer Zelda Aquil providing her usual high standard of backing. Indeed, Giacoman and Aquil are becoming much-sought-after session vocalists with other bands, such is the perfection of their harmonies. Hoffman’s guitar work and Aquil’s drumming are all underpinned by Jean-Marc Johannes’
perfect baselines.

There is nothing predictable about this album, except its ability to surprise. It’s not often I say this about any album, but there is not a duff or throw-away track anywhere. ‘The Rent’, ‘La Chemise’, ‘Le Casse’, ‘Je Louche’, all of them instantly becoming ‘ear-worms’. There have been some great releases this year and a few still to come, but ‘Front Pop’ by French Boutik will take some beating for album of the year in my book.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 27, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Record Reviews October 2016 – Part 2

The Sound Of Pop Art

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‘Drama’ – LP

If memory serves, this is the third album by Cambridge-based Sound Of Pop Art. The band is becoming more of a loose co-operative of musicians with head honcho Chris Free and stellar bassist Sara Onyett the two permanent members. ‘Drama’ sees the pair joined by such outstanding names as Big Boss Man’s Nasser Bouzida, Simon Wells, Dave Oakley (keyboard player with The Fliks), Gary Malby, Tony Jenkins, Gabriela Giacoman from French Boutik and the delightful Louise Turner from Turner and Electric Stars fame. Mr Free is a dab hand at infectious sixties-inspired pop, a skill he honed during his time with Paul Weller’s Respond label. In my humble opinion, this album is the best from the band to date and without doing the splendid Tony Jenkins a disservice, I do think Chris Free’s compositions suit a female vocal. The lead track ‘Freedom’ is a delightfully lilting dancer and the title track ‘Drama’ has a nice haunting quality to it. There are shades of the old Respond days with tracks like ‘So High’ and ‘Generation X’ which is so blatantly inspired by that early Style Council period that gave us ‘Long Hot Summer’. ‘Kiss The World Goodbye’ sees Madame Giacoman’s distinctive backing vocals adding a pleasant dimension to the ballad. For my money, ‘Universal’ with Tony Jenkins on duty was the pick of the male led-songs.With mixing duties shared between Andy Crofts, Graham Potter, John Metcalfe and James Parrett, the balance is well maintained across the album. It will be interesting to see where Sound Of Pop Art go next, but this album will take some beating. Very enjoyable quality pop.

facebook.com/thesoundofpopart

Teetotum

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‘Mind Your Teeth’ EP – Download

At our Nutsmag Review Night at Blues Kitchen back in August, I introduced this band. I’d not heard of them before, but I did recognise one member of the band from somewhere. It turns out he was Ross Robertson who I had last seen as a member of New Street Adventure four years ago. Along with Larry Marks and Simon Gledhill, Teetotum played a great set which included the four songs on this debut ep. They may not thank me for this, but they are like Lindisfarne on acid (having got to meet them, they have a great sense of humour and hopefully won’t take offence.) My point is, they are a superb three-part harmony rock band that are as good as any you are likely to find. All four of the tracks on this EP bear me out. ‘Day & Night’ is a prime example, but it doesn’t end there. ‘Heart of The Sun’, ‘Just My Luck’ and ‘One More Time’ ooze sophistication with a late Sixties, early Seventies influence. It’s rock for grown-ups. The Brighton-based trio are using guest drummers at present while they search for a full-time replacement, so if anyone is interested, now’s your chance to hook up with a class act.

teetotum.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/teetotumofficial

The Missing Souls

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‘Sweet, Sweet Sadie’ b/w ‘The Aligator’ – Single

Another blistering single released on one of the best garage/psych labels around, State Records. Both tracks are covers; ‘Sweet, Sweet Sadie’ originally by The Teardrops and ‘The Aligator’ by The Us Four. This single came about after State Records owner Mole played some shows alongside Missing Souls in France as drummer with The Baron Four. He brought the band over to the State studios in Sussex and the result is two sides of unbridled fuzz-tone, rip-roaring psych. Missing Souls have an album available via bandcamp and on the evidence of this single, I had to investigate. If you’re into psych/garage, get into this band. For a combo from Lyon who have only been together two years, this is mightily impressive stuff.

facebook.com/themissingsouls
themissingsouls.bandcamp.com

The Ace

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‘Riot Of Sound’ – LP
‘I Dream Love’ b/w ‘Man Out Of Time’ – Single

This was a happy coincidence, the album and the single arrived independently, but within a few days of each other. The album is released by Wedigthis on cd, while the single is available on 7 inch vinyl from Crocodile Records. Both tracks on the single are also on the album. So let’s deal with the single first. As a sample of the album, these were two very good choices. Both tracks are full of reference points that inspire The Ace. ‘Man Out Of Time’ has a Foxton-influenced bass line that reminds me of The Jam’s ‘Monday’, but that is where the similarity ends. ‘I Dream Love’ could be a Monkee’s track in another era. Both songs are laced with jangly guitars and harmonies-a-plenty. The rest of the album is in a similar vein. Really well-crafted and produced psych/garage/freakbeat songs which have just the right amount of variety to make them all worth a listen. ‘ Misunderstood’ and ‘Somewhere In The Back Of My Mind’ are the two from the album that really stood out for me. Great stuff from the Leeds outfit.

facebook.com/The-Ace
wedigthistheace.blogspot.com


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 27, 2016 By : Category : Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Phil Bush

We caught up with Phil Bush recently for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Regrettably, my first record was a Gary Glitter 7” but I didn’t get it off him personally. First got heavily interested in music at school, late 70’s 2-tone and mod revival era.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Good question – I don’t know exactly. It would have been one of our local scooter club nights during the early 80’s. But I wouldn’t have called myself a DJ then because we all used to get stuck in on the decks back then.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I’ve had some very memorable nights. Recently I got the chance to take my full valve system to Reggae Geel in Belgium. 60,000 people (not all in my Marquee, though!) and a fantastic event, even though I was very ill. We used to run some weekenders down Margate – the ones we had with Dave Barker and Derrick Morgan were out of this world.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I had an experience abroad a few years ago where we got caught up in a full-scale district riot, which was lively. Then at the same event, a rock fell out of the wall and went through a £1000 Buster tune of mine. I decided to call it a night!

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I am not going to make friends here am I? The lads up the Itch in Hull play good R&B which is not what you normally hear on the broader scene. I like listening to what Craig Simpson has to play when I get to hear him. On the reggae scene, the likes of Asher G, King Floyd and Sugar Merchant are all a great listen on the right night. On the skinhead scene, Brian Kelson is always trying out new tunes which is, what it’s all about.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

My selection is driven by Sound System. I’ll play some tunes that others would probably swerve because I know I can get something more out of them on a heavy-set. Reggae sound system is an instrument, not a PA, and should be used as such.

07. How did the Sounds & Pressure Sound system come about?

I got disillusioned with hearing reggae on weak PA systems and I wasn’t known as DJ so I never got asked to play. Also no-one on the skinhead, mod or scooter scenes had built a big vintage sound system before so I decided to solve all my problems in one go. S&P was the first by many years and it sparked some interest because now there are quite a few of them.

08. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I guess my real discoveries are some Buster pre’s that no-one has as far as I know. They’ll only get drawn in a clash. In reality, a lot of finds and discoveries are really just re-discoveries. Simple £5 tunes that hit a sweet spot with an audience and become popular. Take Girls for instance by Jerry and the Bluebells from ’75. No one knew it. Not even any of the reggae old guard had heard it before, but now loads of people play it.

09. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Musically it would be Paul Huxtable who owns Axis Sound System. Myself and he are completely aligned in attitude when it comes to sound system matters. Favorite artists – I guess overall has to be Prince Buster.

10. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I collect anything. Any genre, any speed, any size.

11. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Bamboo Club, Lincoln.

12. What is the record you would most like to own?

Black Dragon, Buster’s Allstars. I believe the acetate is in Japan.

13. Please give us a top 5 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Let’s Get Together – Henry Buckley, Gayfeet ‘68
2. Tribute to Nehru – Skatalites, Randy’s ‘64
3. I love the reggae – Gaylads, Randy’s ‘68
4. Girls, Jerry and the Bluebells – Torpedo ‘75
5. Nameless – Busters Allstars Pre ‘65

Top 5 Tracks of All Time:

1. Heavenless – Vin Gordon, Studio 1 ‘68
2. Going home – Theo Beckford, Worldisc ‘60
3. Just tell me – Maytals, Beverley’s ‘68
4. Blueberry Hill – Fats Domino
5. Manny oh – Higgs and Wilson, WIRL, ‘60

weblinks

Our Facebook Group

Next Club Spots:
Saturday 22nd October, Crossfire 29, London
Saturday Dec 10th, Bamboo Club, Lincoln


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 27, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Joel Maslin

We recently caught up with DJ Joel Maslin to talk about his musical outlook.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into R&B and soul (and later rocksteady) alongside my best mate Ollie when I was 18 or so, after discovering the Mod scene. We’d previously been into house and drum & bass until then!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I was very lucky to be asked to DJ at Shotgun with Vic Ranger and Gav Evans, one of the best mod/rhythm & soul nights in London at the time.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Probably the first time I was asked to DJ at the 100 Club as I was so nervous. I had a fantastic time but I can remember having pretty bad butterflies as I got up onto the stage. Outside of that pretty much all of my experiences DJ-ing in Spain, (particularly Runaway Love in Asturias) have been amazing. The venues, the beautiful scenery, the food but mainly the great friends.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve fallen over, dropped records down the back of stages, broken the mixer, although I did DJ at a big gig a few years back and completely bombed, not sure why but I was trying out a new aftershave at the time so it could have
been that.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Rare soul – Butch, Dave Thorley, Marco Santucci, Keith Money. The incredible unissued records, new sounds and rare 45s that you hear every time they play is what keeps me interested in the music. R&B wise I always like the sounds that Callum Simpson plays.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve been through a number of different ‘sub-genres’ of soul music, from R&B to the odd funk track but I just try to keep my ear to the ground and talk to collectors and other fanatics of this brilliant music to discover new records that I like and I hope will work on the dance floor. Sometimes I try to play more R&B and 60’s orientated sounds, and other times crossover and funkier tracks. Sometimes I even get it right!

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Most records have been ‘discovered’ by one of the manically dedicated diggers on the scene way before my time, so I can’t claim anything there – but I remember being pretty chuffed when I finally got a copy of Little Tommy ‘Baby Can’t You See’ many years ago. And the seller had used a couple of really good R&B records as record stiffeners!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Ace Of Bass. Or everyone at Motown.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No I’m a bit too haphazard for that!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

100 Club 6ts Allnighters -London, VaVaVoom – London

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Way too many to mention but I’ve always coveted a copy of Jimmy Gresham ‘This Feelin’ I Have’.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Et White – Got To Find A True Love – Great Potential
2. Charles Smith – You Need Education – Trend
3. Little Soul – Problems – Solid Soul
4. Emanons – Bird Walkin’ – All Brothers
5. Emma Frances – Leave You Runnin’ – De Mo Rr Is

Top 10 Tracks Of All Time:

At The Moment – In No Particular Order:
1. ‘Keni Lewis’ – She’s Not The Marrying Kind – Unissued
2. BB King – Think It Over
3. Lil Major Williams – Girl You’re So Sweet, You’re So Fine
4. Alton Ellis – Breaking Up Or Willow Tree
5. John Bowie – You’re Gonna Miss A Good Thing Baby
6. Jimmy Gresham – This Feelin’ I Have
7. Deon Jackson – Someday The Sun Will Shine – Unissued
8. Guitar Ray – You Gonna Wreck My Life
9. Gwen Owens – Just Say You’re Wanted (And Needed)
10. Parliaments – This Is My Rainy Day

Weblinks

Facebook

Next Club Spots:

Friday 7th: Soul Shaker At The Gowlett, Gowlett Road, London SE15 4HT
Dec 3rd: 100 Club
Dec 31st: VaVaVoom NYE, 229 The Venue as part of Nutty New Year!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 26, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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