Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 2

This entry is part 6 of 8 in the series NUTsCast - Podcast

Welcome to The Nutscast Sessions, the newly revamped podcast from the New Untouchables. Each month we will bring you a band ‘in session’ recorded especially for Nutscast. In addition, your host Graham Lentz will play a mixture of the best new music, club classics and few surprises.

Part 2 of Nutscast Sessions is the Crossfire Special edition and features exclusive sets from New Electric Ride and Towerbrown.

Host Graham Lentz also plays tracks by Dustophinics, Heavyball, Big Boss Man, Attica Revolution, Wicked Whispers and a selection of great classics.

Crossfire 25 is on Saturday the 11th of October 2014 – 11pm till 6am with a Late Bar License! @ 229 The Venue, 229 Great Portland Street, London W1W 5PN


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 17, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music News Podcasts Scene Tags:, , , , ,
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Book & Mags Reviews – Sept 2014

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Elaine Constantine and Gareth Sweeney

Northern Soul – An Illustrated History

The scene has been awash with books this year. Evidence, as if it were needed, that mod culture is at an all-time high in terms of popularity. Every area is or has been covered and Northern Soul is no exception. This book is off the back of a new film of the same title due in selected cinemas very soon.

It is a creditable effort. The photographs are very good. Much of the written content ticks all the boxes from the preceding years of mods fascination with soul music to the Twisted Wheel and beyond. All the names you would expect to see are in there as well. Dave Godin, Roger Eagle, Ian Levine, Ady Croasdell and Richard Serling to mention a few.

I suspect this is more a coffee table addition to the dyed-in-the-wool Northern Soul fan. For those just discovering the music and the scene, this is a good grounding to find out more and lead them on to more detailed and specific works.

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Scootering Magazine Supplement

50 Years Of Mod In The Media

There was a modicum of mainstream coverage of the events of 1964 on the beaches of Brighton, Clacton and Margate. After all, it is 50 years since then, but was it really worth ‘glamourising’ what went on? Reminiscing about punch ups and the like?

Thankfully, Scootering Magazine got it right, (as they usually do) with a special supplement in the August edition. Titled ‘Celebrating 50 Years Of Mod In The Media’, it was placed in the very capable hands of Mark ‘Sarge’ Sargeant to pull the whole thing together and what a fine job he did too.

Outlining the whys and wherefores with his introduction, there follows a series of special interviews with mods from down the generations and brief overviews of key periods over the decades.

With the likes of our own Rob Bailey, Eddie Piller, John Hellier, Ray Dredge and Maria Veall not only supplying interviews, but some great photos, this is hardly a ‘usual suspects’ edition.

If you didn’t manage to get a copy, you could probably obtain it from the Scootering website, but I would highly recommend it. It is a wonderful addition to any collection of mod memorabilia, and there is also a nice piece on a mod author by the name of Graham Lentz (who ever he is !)


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Front Page Literature Reviews Tags:, , ,
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Record Reviews – Sept 2014 (Part 2)

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Dustaphonics

Big Smoke London Town – Album

From the first track, all I could think of was ‘hold on to your hats’!

Dustaphonics are about as incendiary as you can get when it comes to rockin’, rollin’ hard nosed blues.

Haley Red is that ‘perfect storm’ of 50s siren styling, inflecting the odd squeal for effect in her vocal performance and oozing sultry sex appeal. Dynamite stuff when applied to the driving, in-yer-face Dustapohonics sound.

Believe me, this is a whirlwind and a thoroughly enjoyable blast through all of the eleven songs.

Opening with ‘The Message’, followed by the sister track ‘When You Gonna Learn’, you barely have time to catch breath before the title track grabs you by the scruff and you’re off again.

The band only change gear when we get to track 9 and what a gorgeous slice of twangy, low-down dirty blues its is. ‘Fire Dance’ also happens to be a great instrumental.

This album may only be their second full length outing, but Dustaphonics have dispelled that myth that second LPs can be difficult. Not on this evidence.

The rest of the field should beware !

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Magnetic Mind

When The Morning Comes b/w Mumbai Firefly

It is not difficult to see where Magnetic Mind take their influences from. I would suggest Jefferson Airplane, July, Strawberry Alarm Clock, Big Brother and The Holding Company perhaps?

‘When The Morning Comes’ is most definitely a vehicle for Ellie Foden and Paul Milne to display their harmonising skills with this Jefferson-inspired foot-tapper.

‘Mumbai Firefly’ is an instrumental which rocks along at a decent pace while interspersed with folk-style backing vocals.

All in all, a very nice example of the psych scene today. All you Mousetrap Fuzz for Freaks regulars will love this.

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Groovy Uncle With Suzi Chunk

Barefoot In The Car Park b/w Wet Weekend – Single

Glenn Pragnell is the mastermind behind Groovy Uncle. A loose collaboration of musicians hand-picked for individual projects.

Suzi Chunck has worked with various bands as a session singer and released a solo project last year to rave reviews.

Here the pair join forces for a pop/radio-friendly rant at our obsession with our warmer weather; ‘Barefoot In The Car Park’. For some reason, Katrina and The Waves sprang to mind and not for the obvious comparison. It is not a bad song. Maybe just a touch ‘commercial’?

The flip side, ‘Wet Weekend’ is a more dreamy affair and probably my preference out of the two songs. The guitar work gives it a slightly edgy, darker feel, but again, a good song.

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The Impellers

My Certainty  – Album

When the Legere Record label sends a new disc to NUTS Towers, I can’t wait to hear it. Their roster rarely disappoints and this release is no exception.

The Impellers are a Brighton-based outfit and ‘My Certainty’ is their third album.

When it comes to raw funk, you would be hard pushed to find a better band around right now.

Main man, Glenn Fallows leads a water-tight outfit with the superb Clair Witcher on vocals. Every influence you can think of is here among the 14 original tracks. James Brown, George Clinton, Prince, Barkays, Chuck Brown (anyone remember the ‘Go-Go’ fad from around 1980-81?) with a touch of Masters At Work / Nu-Yorican  flavour thrown in for good measure.

‘My Tears (Are too Good For You)’ sounds like it could have come from a Lyn Collins or Vicki Anderson solo project. The title track, ‘My Certainty’ is a laid-back  ballad with a nod to Marvin Gaye during his early 70s output.

‘Last Dance Of The Moai’ is a stone-groove ripe for bright colours, flared trousers and afro hair. You’ve seen clips of Soul Train, right?

‘Sworn In Enemy’ takes us into the Jazz-Funk world, while ‘Put The Man In Egomaniac’ puts us back on the good foot.

If the usual radio and podcast funk and soul specialists don’t pick up on this album, they must be either mad or unaware. I have also seen The Impellers live and they are even better. Not to be missed.

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Los Chavales

Asulado – EP

Another offering from Spain, this time in the form of Los Chavales. A four-piece outfit from Santiago de Compostela with a very nice blend of Hammond-led beat and garage.

‘Freno Y Orgullo’ and ‘Casi Nada’ are danceable freakbeat belters, while on the flip side ‘Cien Anos’ continues the mood. ‘Xa Non Quedan Homes’ is the odd-one-out, being a product of a Britpop influence.

This appears to be their only recorded work to date, but there is a great deal of potential, based on this EP.

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Galileo 7

False Memory Lane Album

Just in case you’re not quite ‘au fait’ with Galileo 7’s front man Allan Crockford, here’s a quick history lesson.

Allan started his career as a member of The Prisoners, the legendary and highly influential 80’s band from the Medway delta. With fellow Prisoner, Graham Day the pair went on to form both The Prime Movers and The Solar Flares as well as working with others on various projects over the years.

Today, Allan is a member of Graham Day and The Forefathers as well as fronting Galileo 7.

‘False Memory Lane’ is their third album and is far from the Medway garage that Mr Crockford might be associated with. The writing is at times, whimsical, then a bit ‘tongue-in-cheek’. The songs display all the finest qualities of that area of popular music where the likes of Ray Davies reside. Classically English and (dare I say it?) working class.

Astute observations, well-crafted lyrics all backed up with carefully-thought-out rhythms and riffs.

‘Don’t Know What I’m Waiting For’ is about as close as you get to a pacey garage track, whereas ‘Fools’ is (for my money) a brilliant song that has become a personal favourite. In short, there is not a duff track on this album and definitely a must for those of you at the softer end of the psych and garage spectrum.


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , , ,
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Record Reviews – Sept 2014 (Part 1)

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Big Boss Man

Last Man On Earth – Album

It’s been four years since we last saw a new release from Big Boss Man (BBM). Happily, it was well worth the wait. Nasser Bouzida, Trev Harding, Scott Milsom and Desmond Rogers have once again shown they are a force to be reckoned with in the studio or live.

While four albums in 15 years are not prolific, (they have had sideline projects in between times) this latest release further enhances Big Boss Man’s reputation. There is no finer example of the saying ‘less is more’. Each LP is top draw and ‘Last Man On Earth’ is a continuation.

Those of you familiar with their work, will know Big Boss Man are all about a hip hybrid of 60s and 70s drenched R&B, funk, Latin, jazz, soul and psych.

Interestingly, BBM include a couple of guest vocalists here. Princess Freesia who takes charge of the title track (an instrumental version is also included) and ‘Painted Rainbow’, while Al Greener assumes the duties on ‘Changing Faces’ and a very fine job they do.

I usually try to pick some highlights for my album reviews, but this is so good, I’m spoilt for choice. Let’s start with the title track and the only single so far, ‘Aardvark’. They happen to be the first two tracks on the album, but they really set the standard for the rest of it.

‘Crimson 6T’s’ rhythm is heavily influenced by Little Walter’s ‘My Babe’, but with the addition of a brass section, it is a slice of gorgeous Hammond R&B.

‘Shot Down’ takes into the realms of psychy, fuzzy groove, while ‘Hail Caesar’ with its Latin overtones is about as cool as it gets.

I do hope the lads do not leave it another four years before they put out their next release. More please.

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Button Up

Beat Street – Album

Not long after I started writing the reviews for Nutsmag, I was handed an album, ep and single by a band from Glasgow called Button Up.

It was the first time I had heard their music and I was impressed by the sound, the writing and the performance, especially Sara Kerr, the lead singer.

I’m happy to say that, even though it has been a while since those releases, Button Up is back with this wonderful new album.

Dripping with danceable beats, stabbing brass and catchy choruses, this is a welcome return by our Scottish friends.

Garry John Kane (with assistance from Sara Kerr on four tracks) has written another raft of quality new songs.

‘Don’t Ask Me To Choose’ is a sumptuous mid-paced soul ballad, ‘I’m Going Home’ barely disguises the blues influences at play, while the band’s interpretation of Miles Kane’s ‘Inhaler’ is first class.

The mighty and funky tribute to Suffragette martyr ‘Emily’ Pankhurst is another fine song. ‘I Can Fall’ is about as close to a pop song as you get on this LP and it is a million times better than any mainstream pop song you may have heard in the past decade.

I’ve sang the praises of singer Sara Kerr before and based on this performance, nothing has changed. She is still one of the finest and most accomplished female singers in the UK.

Shortly after this LP was completed, Sara Kerr announced she was departing to pursue a solo project. I wish her well for the future.

As for Button Up, this album proves once again they are a force to be reckoned with in the soul genre. Long may it continue.

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Dub Rifles

No Town, No Country – Album

This is interesting. A collection of the best tracks from one of Canada’s finest. So to the history lesson; formed in 1980 and based in Winnipeg, the band recorded three EPs before their final gig at Toronto’s El Mocambo club on May 31, 1984.

Fronted by songwriter Colin Bryce, listening through this album comprised of all their studio recordings and some live tracks, it is difficult to figure out why they were not bigger.

They were definitely a band ‘of their time’, attitude a-plenty, with ska, power pop and punky influences. They would not have been out of place alongside the Two-Tone stable, Ian Dury or The Buzzcocks.

With today’s technological advances in communication, I suspect Dub Rifles might have faired a great deal better and certainly would have found a willing audience. As it is, we have to content ourselves with this terrific album and a sense of what might have been.

The title track ‘No Town, No Country’ is a manic rant at the self-appointed old guard of music who try to block new talent and perfectly sets you up for the rest of this collection.

‘Mine’ is a live recording that invokes the spirit of Jonathan Richman and The Modern Lovers. ‘Number One’ is a quite brilliant saxophone-led ska track that would have graced Two-Tone label.

While Canada’s musical heritage is patchy to say the least, here is a real gem of a band and a fine collection of their best material. It’s just a shame they were not able to make it to the UK at the time. I think they would have been very welcome over here.

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Attica Revolution

Gimme Some Love b/w Blue Eyes – Single

I’m not sure the scene across Europe has been as vibrant as it is now. Great new music is making itself known across the continent and none more so than Spain where Attica Revolution sit very comfortably alongside fellow-countrymen I have praised in previous editions of Nutsmag.

Both sides of this single are catchy slices of brass-laidened soul. They are so good, I played ‘Gimme Your Love’ on the September Nutscast Sessions.

The band themselves come from Gijon, which will be familiar to NUTs members as the home of Euro YeYe.

On this evidence, Attica Revolution will be a band to watch out for in future.

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Operation Two Fold

Hold Me b/w On Our Way – Single

When this single came in from Detour Records, looking at the personnel, it looked extremely promising. Karla Milton, Kym Bradshaw, Sara Kerr, Garry John Kane, Armand Thompson and Toby Hounsham.

The songs themselves are really good. ‘Hold Me’ has a nice Northern feel to it and rolls along, complimented by an infectious chorus hook.

‘On Our Way’ is a slower pace, but again a very listenable song. The production and arrangement of both songs are first-class as you would expect from such a talented bunch. Carla Milton’s vocals are spot on with just the right amount of emotion and delivery to do both songs justice.

There is only one improvement I would have suggested. A proper brass section would have given both songs a lift and an authentic sound. The use of a keyboard as a stand-in for the real thing doesn’t do the songs or the performance justice.

Both deserved better. A decision like that can be the difference between brilliant and good. This should have been brilliant.


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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A is for Action and Artwoods

Hello all, and welcome to my occasional delve into the strange and wonderful world of UK record collecting. I’m hoping to dip into some of the many different types of music that’s not just rare, but great and sometimes incredibly collectable too. Although I will mostly keep to the humble 7″, still the most coveted of form for the 60’s record collector, I will occasionally cover some of the lovely EP’s and LP’s released on these shores from the mid ’50’s to the early 70’s. What better way to start our musical voyage with two of the best UK bands to come out of the beat and blues boom, The Action and The Artwoods.

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The vinyl career of The Action can be traced back to March 1964 when as The Boys, Reg, Alan, Mike and Roger backed Sandra Barry on the beat mover “Really gonna shake” (Decca F11851). The track sank without trace and is incredibly hard to find now, especially as a stock release and will set you back at least £120 for a nice copy. Strangely enough a Scopitone colour promo film of the band performing the track actually managed to survive and can be seen in all it’s fine glory on youtube.

The Boys next cropped up on Pye Records in November 1964 with the Reg King penned and Kenny Lynch produced “It ain’t fair” (Pye 7N15726). Somehow this cracking two sider managed to flop too leaving behind a £100-120 collectors piece although both demos and stock copies seem to both crop up evenly. With Pete now on board they decamped to Parlophone where with the production genius of George Martin behind them conspired to make five of the most wonderous singles of all time, and each one somehow managed to miss the top fifty. The first release came out in November 1965, both soul covers, “The land of one thousand dances” backed by “In my lonely room” (Parlophone R5354). February 1966 saw the band raiding two more soul standards, “I’ll keep holdin’ on” and “Hey sah-lo-ney” (R5410). The A side is one of the all time great Motown cover versions but once again sales were poor. July 1966 saw the release of the up-tempo “Baby you’ve got it” (R5474) with Reg’s vocals working overtime on their cover of the smooth Temptations USA hit “Since I lost my baby” on the B side. After this also missed the charts February 1967 saw a change of direction with a self penned double sider “Never ever” / “Twenty fourth hour” (R5572). Such a good track it even got a US release on Capitol, it was alas another chart miss.

The last UK 45 came in June 1967, the two sided genius of “Shadows and reflections” and “Something has hit me” (R5610). After this too missed the band recorded an (then) unreleased album which was finally released thirty years later as “Rolled gold”. All five Parlophone 45’s do appear quite regularly with the first three appearing most often, both as black label stock and demo copies, whilst “Never ever” seems to be the hardest to find. Expect to pay £60 plus for nice copies of all singles, and up to £100 for excellent condition ones, though mint copies of “I’ll keep holding on” have gone for up to £200 in the past. Edsel re-issued four Action 45’s in the early 1980’s which are an easy and cheap way to pick some cracking tunes. All come with lovely colour picture sleeves and a couple of non UK B sides on them too.

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The Artwoods, like The Action, seemed to release a string of brilliant singles throughout the 60’s without once ever achieving any of the kind of success they deserved. Featuring some stellar musicians in their line-up (including Jon Lord and Keef Hartley) The Art Wood combo changed their name in late 1964 and the first single, a cover of the Leadbelly song “Sweet Mary” was released on Decca (F12015) in October that year. This sold in poor quantities and is probably the hardest of the Decca singles to find.

March 1965 saw the release of “Oh my love” / “Big City” (F12091) which was also a poor seller. August 1965 saw the release of “Goodbye sisters” backed with the mod classic “She knows what to do” (F12206). The top side should have been a hit and actually sold in quite good quantities, as did the next release, and probably the easiest Artwoods single to find, “I take what I want” / “I’m Looking For A Saxophonist Doubling French Horn Wearing Size 37 Boots” (F12384). The last Decca 45 came in August 1966 which coupled the fuzz filled cracker “I feel good” coupled with “Molly Anderson’s cookery book” on the flip side (F12465). Decca 45’s appear in demo and stock form in equal measures so prices should be the same on both, usually hitting between £50 and £100 each at auction, though occasionally mint copies can fetch more. Much more wallet emptying are two Decca releases that have collectors drooling when they do occasionally turn up. In April 1966 Decca released an EP “Jazz in jeans” which sold in such miniscule quantities it seldom appears and when a mint copy does it usually goes for well over £400. Decca astonishingly even afforded the band an album in the same year called “Art Gallery” (LK4830) which came in an iconic full colour band shot cover and should easily set you back over £500 in top condition. Luckily it was re-issued in Decca Eclipse in the early 70’s which is a much less wallet busting way of owning this classic album. A couple of great foreign releases worth looking out for are the Turkish only 45s of album highlights “Keep lookin'” and “Down in the valley” which are both incredibly hard to find in decent condition, especially with their original Turkish Decca company sleeves.

After Decca and the ‘woods parted company in late ’66 they soon re-appeared on Parlophone with a harder edged sound. April 1967 saw the release of “What shall I do” and it’s breakneck B side “In the deep end”. Stupidly rare, this is the hardest single of theirs to find, especially as a black label issue, and prices usually settle around the £150-200 for nice copies. Before the band went their seperate ways with varying degrees of success there was time for one last shot at the big time. Trying to cash in on the Bonnie & Clyde craze of 1967 and changing their name to St Valentine’s Day Massacre they released “Brother can you spare a dime” / “Al’s party” on Fontana in November 1967 (TF 883). Even a beautiful picture sleeve couldn’t tempt the public to part with their cash and this too spent years in bargain bins and obscurity until years later when it became a £100+ rarity.

Even though both bands couldn’t muster up one hit between them a full set of both artists original releases is truly a sight to behold and a full time hobby finding… happy hunting!


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music News Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Fuzz for Freaks – August Bank Holiday in Brighton 2014

August bank holiday is synonym with the mod pilgrimage to Brighton, a massive migration of hyper accessorized and pimped up scooters, but this year something was lurking beneath the green tide of parkas and amongst the hip suited gents crowding the sunny little town: the fuzz sect was in for a blitzkrieg!

And I, was called, along with fellow high priests (introducing – George Martin  “Theme One”) Alexander Cozzi Lepri of Embrooks fame , Andy Roseaman and Our Lady Holly Calder of the Glaswegian Church of Lysergic, to celebrate the heretic ritual.

First act took place at the Volks, under the arcade on Brighton seafront. There was the usual buzz of mods gathering, some veterans of the night before, some others just arrived and keen to open up the weekend and start the prelude drinking antics in the warm afternoon sun.

To shake this nearly pantheistic idyll here they came, from south France, Les GriGris. Glowering under their fringes, a riotous gang of five took over the stage. Thrilling the air with their mendacious raw rhythm and blues, the way it was, the way it should be, these chaps made their sweaty set of classic covers and standards and, believe me, the word that first arose in mind was “Authentic”!

Singer was sporting a deerstalker hat, Don Craine style, and it was pretty obvious what they were going to deliver… harmonica fuelled stormers from the likes of “Baby what you want me to do” and “Maybelline”, the sort of trembling guitars and raucous vocals renditions that would make the Strypes cringe, and make the Pretty Things, the Primitives and  Wally Tax’s Outsiders proud parents; and with lead guitarist Romeo Kizmiaz casting  pure hendrixian virtuosity and staging raving stunts definitely the best R&B act since the Jaybirds ruled the 90s. Mods around gave their nodding and finger tipping appreciation.

So the first night of Fuzz For Freaks was due to start and, before getting changed I managed, with Ale to have our own initiation passage rite and see the deepness of the obscure knowledge that comes before or in other words a pizza dinner with our very own god of hellfire Berto ‘d Sera.

The Sticky Mike’s Frog Bar, the venue chosen for the night, had a massive cellar complete with stage and a nice bar. At 9 the music was already on, with Lady Holly setting the pace and putting the beautiful people in the right vibe for what had to follow.

They say they hailed from Birmingham but they seemed more like being catapulted straight from the Middle Earth club circa 1968, ladies and gentlemen: The Exploding Sound Machine!

Organ propelled, these folks, who I already have seen at the Blues Kitchen in Camden, were just outstanding as both in the outfits and sound. You instantly got tripped up in a music journey, an all round whirlpool of psychedelic colours and kaleidoscopic noyze. Impressive in the use of all studio trickery, phasing and reverberation they built up the acid frame to inlay the rest of the night.

The venue was packed and the crowd we keen to sweat to the deceiving sound of the swinging sixties and shake their hair to garage punk stompers which the DJ crew was shooting at 1000mph.

At 3am we had to put the word end to the show, but the fun was yet to finish and we moved to the main venue, the Komedia and joined the rest of hardcore dancers till I dunno, but the sun was already up and the seagulls screaming…

No rest for the wicked, so after just a handful of hours I got back to the Volks, which if possible was even more crowded than the day before. The glare of the chrome on the hundreds of scooters in the sunset was epic. So it was the dinner later…one of those memories you always recall with affection, relaxed atmosphere and top, top people were sharing it with me (you know who you were). Back to the B&B to refresh before heading to Sticky Mike’s again.

Two bands were scheduled for the big final. Local band The Dials played an eclectic mix of genres from more gentle pop with a hint of 60s to stronger rock material. The atmosphere was a bit quieter compared to the night before, no matter the second band, The Hypnotic Eye, thought well to shake it up a bit, their way.

Keeping faith to their name, all the audience was indeed staring like they were hypnotized by the seductive vocals of their lead singer. Despite the frantic guitar riffs of Lindsay Murray, another devoted follower of the holy church of the Sixties Underground, I wouldn’t define them as a garage band they don’t fit the role of a revival band, but make their own sound which mixes well their ancestral heritage to the new millennium age.

Hipswinging tunes restarted just after the gig and despite the wreckage of the energies exhumed the night before, people seemed to be tireless so much that once again, captained by psychedelic Rambo Berto, strolled back to Komedia once again at 3 am…

Dr Rob was smoothly conducting the night upstairs and was relieved to see all of us back, and not lost through the Brighton alleys which given our state and the hour could have been a possibility…

If we ever needed to tone ourselves a bit more help was on hand from Mr Royston, who in his kindness, turned up at 5.30 am with a last serving of jagerbombs! We definitely wanted to make the final rush of the weekend at a cavalry charge pace and danced till death!

That was awesome and will be repeated next year. I personally wanted to thank all the night creatures that turned up, the New Untouchables DJ team and all those who managed to chat and put a wide grin on my face. May the fuzz be with you!


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carlosesto

Carlo Sesto is a witty and cheeky character and a mod scene darling from many years standing. He runs the Casbah Candy Records, a mail order shop specialised in mod sounds and beyond. He is the face behind the Italian “Impossibles” mod list and events like “A Hazy Shade of Winter”. An avid collector and an international DJ, his contributions are due on books and compilations.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Clubs DJs Events Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Paul Orwell and the Night Falls (Newbreed)

This entry is part 4 of 9 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Paul Orwell (Guitar,Vox)
Michael Parrett (Bass)
Stu Marsh (Guitar)
Scotty Roberts (drums)

Discography:
Tell Me Tell Me (vinyl only) single,
Only 250 made and sold out in just 7 days of Pre Order a month before release

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: Tell Me Tell Me / Little Reason 45 on Heavy Soul Records (SOLD OUT)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

As a band not long, we have done around 14 shows, I met Michael at a gig we did ages ago in different shit bands, I trashed the stage before he got on, fun times!

I got him to trade the guitar in for a bass, the other members answered adverts I put out it’s worked out well.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Beatles and 60’s fashion.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Nah, they are all bleak, boring and predictable… well from what I can see and hear.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I haven’t found one, a massive gap in the market I think.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Freak Beat.

06. What are your live shows like?

Fun, tight, magical, raw.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

A lot of early beat, R&B and RnR. We only play lively covers if at all that we enjoy, not your every day covers the more obscure the better.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Hard one as my whole life is music, from producing, writing, and finding new gems. I love record collecting and Art.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Me (Paul Orwell) and my tainted heart, messed up mind and butchered soul.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

My personal favourite is “Little Reason” as I sometimes get a chance to go and interact and dance with the crowd, we sometimes do a cover of “When The Night Falls” By The Eyes, that’s fun!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Not really, I’m only sociable around friends, family and fans. I’m not one of those who find it important to be part of a scene, just to do my own thing, that’s what is important. If people like it, great if they don’t, sod them.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Producing a track that takes me weeks to get right.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record?  Anything interesting coming up?

We are good with rehearsals, we are perfectionists so we can get everything right to enjoy being loose on stage. We only play gigs that suite our style, sod playing a load of indie gigs, no fun in that. I record every day, lots of interesting things coming up including new releases, new videos, maybe some more gigs abroad. I would love to do a tour.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s been along long while since I’ve read a music mag or listened to any up to date radio station, so I can’t really answer. I should imagine it’s all favouritism.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Again I don’t listen to much past 1972, I like some, Hypnotic Eye and The Teamsters seem to have some magical sounds going on.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Producers: George Martin, Joe Meek, Phil Spector

Artist alive: Paul McCartney,

Artist Dead: John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Syd Barrett, Otis Redding

These artists all play big parts in the way I think and are very important to me and music.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Record deal would be nice and some good support slots.
29 September 2014 – The Finsbury, London with Magnetic Mind
11 October 2014 – Crossfire 25, 229 venue, London

Web Links:

facebook.com/PAULORWELLOFFICIAL
twitter.com/PAULORWELLMUSIC
soundcloud.com/paulorwell


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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New Electric Ride (Newbreed)

This entry is part 5 of 9 in the series Newbreed4

Formed from the last surviving members of the hardest working pub/club band in north-east England, New Electric Ride have achieved some remarkable things in the short time they’ve been together. With support slots for legendary 1960’s group – The Pretty Things, under their belt, a Black Cab Session recorded, regular airplay on UK, Spanish, Belgian and French radio, it’s no wonder that N E R are hotly tipped as one of the best new acts to emerge from the recent psychedelic resurgence.

Band Members:
Jack Briggs (Guitar/Vocal)
Paul Nelson (Organ/Vocal)
Adam Cole (Bass/Vocal)
Craig Oxberry (Drums/Vocal)

Discography:
EP (2013)
Balloon Age (2014, Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records)

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: facebook.com/events  &  facebook.com/doublesightweekender

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been recording as New Electric Ride since November 2012! Jack, Adam and Craig played as a pub band for 3 years and we met Paul at a wedding gig we played. We were looking for an organist and he said he’d love to have a go. Sort of went from there, really!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love and appreciation for music from the 1960’s/70s and a desire to write and record interesting pop music. We’re not real into ‘jamming’, as such. We’re much more interested in writing pop songs.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

We’re living in London at the moment, but where we’re from (Sunderland) there are some great bands kicking about. Lilliput, Hyde & Beast and Field Music stick out. They’re all just doing their own thing and not trying to play to any current popular genre.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

In Sunderland it’s pretty dead, but here in London is thriving! We really love it down here.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Polished, lysergic sleaze-pop.

06. What are your live shows like?

I think they’re pretty intense! The songs can be quite complicated to play and a lot require 4-part harmony, so we’re always kept our toes to an extent. It can be quite hard work due to all the tempo changes and falsetto vocal, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Zappa, Beefheart, Moby Grape, Black Sabbath, Dungen, Peter Wyngarde, Cream, Jethro Tull, Colosseum, Mountain, Tame Impala, Can, Yes, Bobbie Gentry, the list is endless.

I’d like to cover some Tull songs. Any excuse to play the flute.

I don’t think we really despise any artist, to be honest! We despise a lot of how the music industry works, ha. I guess

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

London, Paris, Nepal, the Marquis de Sade, cacti, succulents, Ambrose Bierce, David Icke, isolation, insects, plants.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everyone writes individually, never together, for some reason!

Subjects range from Submarines, French libertines, love (of course), lust (of course), animals, cannibalism and the Royal Family.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

I can’t speak for the other lads, but I love playing Mr. Bumblebee. It has a lovely bounce and interesting parts.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think it’s thriving. People are really beginning to take note of all the great things that are happening at the moment. We don’t participate as much as we should, but when we do, we always have a great time.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording an LP was really bloody hard. Mainly because we had such a short period of time to get it completed, and we are split between London and Sunderland. We had to get the train/coach up to Sunderland every weekend for a month and just hammer the sounds out. It was tough.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We usually get together to rehearse before a show, but apart from that, never! We’re looking to hammer the gigs over the rest of the year and hopefully (fingers crossed) get over to the USA in 2015.

Always interesting things on the horizon! New single, collaboration with Peter Wyngarde, some debauched videos to name a few!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Poor. The levels of snobbery and ‘cool’ are outrageous at the moment. The whole ‘psych revival’ is getting old, too. It seems like anyone with a phaser pedal and a fringe can be in a ‘psych band’.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Tame Impala are impeccable, Prince Rupert’s Drops should be on every radio station, Hidden Masters are absolutely brilliant. There are loads of great bands at the moment, but they’re all being overshadowed by the ones with money. Billboards on the London underground for Temples?! Crazy.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Jonathan Wilson for me, absolutely phenomenal musician and producer. It’d be worth it just to see his collection of amps. What a guy, so passionate.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

More music! We’re planning on releasing a single before Christmas that we think may draw some interest. Gig-wise we’re playing the Doublesight Weekender in Glasgow on October 4th and the amazing Crossfire 25 night on the 11th! Can’t wait for October!

Web Links:

newelectricride.com
facebook.com/newelectricride
soundcloud.com/newelectricride
newelectricride.bandcamp.com


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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The Wicked Whispers (Newbreed)

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Mike  Murphy (Vocals/Guitars)
Toby Virgo (Bass/Backing Vocals)
Steven Penn (Organist)
Andy Smith (Guitars)
Nathan Sayer (Drums)

Discography:
2011 – EP ‘The Dark Delights of the Wicked Whispers (Electone)
2012 – Single ‘Dandelion Eyes’ (Electone)
2013 – Single ‘Voodoo Moon’ (Electone)
2014 – Single ‘Chronological Astronaut’ (Electone)
2014 – LP ‘Maps of the Mystic’ (Electone)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The Wicked Whispers formed in 2010 but arrived in 2011 with ’‘The Dark Delights of The Wicked Whispers’ EP on limited 10” which put the band on the map. We  played our first debut show onown event called ‘The Butterflies Ball and The Grasshoppers Feast’ bringing Arthur Brown in as support.. Mike Murphy formed the band after demoing a new project and decided to put a band around it which then evolved into the band people know today.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Doors, Love, Strawberry Alarm Clock, The Byrds, Jimmy Campbell and James Brown.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Levons and Red Sands because they are great and also on Electone Records.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s a small scene in Liverpool which we don’t have much involvement with being honest . There are regular nights at The Go Go Cage (held at the Cabin Club) but we occasionally put on huge shows ourselves like ‘The Butterflies Ball and the Grasshoppers Feast’.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

That’s up to the listeners but you could say it’s a melting pot of US west-coast meets London 60s jangle wrapping around some lucid songwriting.

06. What are your live shows like?

Pretty intense as a lot of our songs are very intricate and short but we like to put on a full on live performance and give it our everything on stage.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our main influences we’ve touched on. We rarely play covers as we put more time into developing our music but we have played tracks by Jimmy Campbell and the Velvet Underground at shows. We don’t despise anyone but we know what music we can relate to and like.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Love, lie and positivity. Plus a load of ale and general laddish behavior.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Mike Murphy writes the songs and prepares the music. The subject matter is vast but he mainly likes to develop dream like perspectives and tries to explore unanswered questions and wonders.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Each member of the group would say something different but ‘Chronological Astronaut’ has been a favorite since the band formed.
Same regards to our favorite songs but lets just say ‘Michaelangelo’ by Jimmy Campbell because it is a classic.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Were not too clued up but it seems fragmented currently. When we started hitting the road in 2011, there was a tight circuit of bands including us playing the same nights up and down the UK. We have seen sparks of this but its not as tight as it was. It would be great to get this going again but we will be popping up at a couple in the near future.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording our debut album and Mike Murphys challenge as first time producer.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

It all depends as there are several levels to consider. We are always working on the next thing and split rehearsals up to required functions. If we have a live obligation we prepare for it, we don’t rehearse blind. But weve already started working on the next thing to follow up from our debut album out September so we are doing sessions for that.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

This is a complicated one as we are fully aware of how the music industry works. We just want to play and release our music and if anyone in the press or media  likes our music and wants to play and write about it, that’s great.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Of course, there’s loads of great stuff currently. Highlights are Temples, French Boutique and Michael Head and the Red Elastic Band.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Theres loads we would like to do. Recording in Sunset Sound in LA is on our list. Regards producers that would be telling our next steps but someone looking to develop new ideas from our favorites music that inspires us.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Theres always stuff coming up but we are most excited about promoting our debut album through the UK over the next few months with some great live shows. Our big album launch in Liverpool will be great as its being held at The Kazimier which is a stunning venue. We are also bringing the brass and string section with us on that one. We have an exciting Crossfire 25 show in October ( the 11th) launching the LP in London and then we are doing some tour dates with Ian McNabb and The Moons with much more on the way including another headline tour. Beyond our debut album lets just say the follow up will be quick as we are headed into the studio before Christmas.

Web Links:

thewickedwhispers.com
facebook.com/thewickedwhispers
twitter.com/Wicked_Whispers 
soundcloud.com/thewickedwhispers


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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20th Century Buy

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Movers and Shakers

Scotch Martin speaks to editor of MidCentury Magazine, Tabitha Teuma, to find out what makes MidCentury work, who buys it and how one lucky reader can win some goodies.

It’s a brave individual who launches a magazine these days, with circulation falling across the board as tablets and mobile technology change the way we access information and content. But this luxurious magazine is as suited to print as British R&B is to vinyl – and like a vintage 45, it even smells wonderful.

I’m amazed that I wasn’t aware of it until brought to my attention by a former work colleague and keen furniture collector. This is no flea-market guide book or junk shop Lonely Planet guide to old furniture. This is high-end, uber-design with exquisite taste but firmly rooted in genuine vintage designs.

The highlight of issue five, my review copy, is the feature on Fernley Hey, architect Peter Womersley’s amazing 1950s modernist house in Yorkshire. It looks so beautiful that it takes your breath away, filled as it is with original furniture, crockery and design of the highest quality. To borrow a MidCentury phrase, it’s ‘too much’.

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Interview

Tabitha, how long has MidCentury magazine been operating and what was the motivation for setting it up originally?

MidCentury was first published in May 2011. It came about through my interest in 1950s and ’60s furniture and architecture. Having edited an arts journal for a couple of years, I was looking to start my own magazine and I could see that, despite several US titles, there was no UK publication covering the subject. I’d go to furniture fairs in London and see an array of magazines from the States, with advertisements for New York dealers (that I certainly couldn’t get to) and articles on homes in California or Cincinnati, but with little mention of Modernist architecture in Britain or even Europe.

Since when has MidCentury design and architecture been taken seriously by the professionals and art dealers as opposed to the vintage collectors?

An increase in appreciation and popularity of MidCentury design means that ‘MidCentury’ has become a valued genre in its own right, earning itself a permanent place in the design canon of furniture and architecture. High-end auction houses have held 20th-Century furniture sales for many years now and MidCentury pieces are now far more prominent in the mid-range market, with antique dealers and antique fairs increasingly swapping their previously fashionable Georgian or Victorian pieces for 20th century items.

Many of the Untouchables readers have been collecting 50s, 60s and 70s furniture and ceramics since the 1980s, what type of items are the most sought after by high-end collectors today?

The rarer Scandinavian classics, by designers like Finn Juhl and Tapio Wirkkala for instance, never fail to achieve high prices in the auction house market. However, even within the lifetime of MidCentury magazine, some British manufacturers, like Robin Day furniture for Hille, Merrow Associates, Gordon Russell and Robert Heritage for Archie Shine, have become popular with collectors and prices have increased to reflect this. Furniture by French designer Jean Prouvé was never manufactured on the scale of some of the American and Scandinavian pieces, and now fetches top dollar as a combined result of rarity and desirability. Pieces by Italian designer Gio Ponti are increasingly rare and very sought after by high-end collectors.

What town or conurbation in the UK has the best 1960s and 70s houses in your opinion in terms of design and durability? And what’s the greatest surviving MidCentury home in the UK, in your opinion?

There are plenty of interesting MidCentury estates dotted around the country, but for me it’s the Dulwich Estate in South-east London that I’m most fond of. Designed by Architects Austin Vernon and Partners and built by Wates between 1957 and 1970, the estate displays an extraordinary range of property ‘types’, many of them experiments at the time: from flat-roofed ranch-style bungalows and copper-roofed ‘pepperpot’ homes to tile-clad townhouses and high-rise apartments. I am probably a bit biased, as I once lived there myself.

In terms of the best surviving example of a British MidCentury home, a few places spring to mind. There’s Farnley Hey, the 1954 house designed by Peter Womersley in Yorkshire, the David Shelley House from 1970 near Nottingham (both of which we’ve been lucky enough to photograph for features in MidCentury), plus of course The Homewood in Surrey, which is open to the public. Designed by Patrick Gwynne in 1937 it is owned by the National Trust – I’d recommend booking a visit.

What do you think are the overlooked items from the period 1950 – 1980 that will become collectable in the future, for those without large budgets to but designer vintage items?

A couple of years ago, I would have advised anyone wanting to make a canny investment to buy Dutch. The designs were far more pared down and utilitarian than even the Scandinavian counterparts, with more metal utilised than timber – in fact, I used to hear people liken the pieces to the sort of thing they’d come across in the school common room. Tastes have moved on however and the price of Dutch furniture has soared, so it may now be necessary to look further afield. Increasingly though, as the MidCentury aesthetic establishes itself as a distinct genre, people are coming to appreciate good quality pieces form the period, regardless of whether they have a name attached to them.  As prices increase, it’s noticeable that names and brands are becoming less important to buyers at a lower price-point – I think that in the future, the quality and aesthetic of a piece will be key and these factors should be considered when collecting today.

Finally, what makes a collectable piece and how important is condition?

I’d say that as long as a piece displays skilled workmanship and is constructed from quality materials, it can make for a savvy collectable. It’s difficult to articulate what it is that sets apart the furniture of the most celebrated designers – it may be a subtle curve to a chair leg, a tapered back rest or the sensitive juxtaposition of caning and teak.

Always try to seek an item in the best condition possible. Severe structural damage can be detrimental to value, but these are not new pieces: as with vintage fashion, vinyl records or classic cars, they have a history, and this should be celebrated.

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Nutsmag readers can enter a draw to win a copy of the current issue and a three-month subscription to the digital back catalogue (seven issues available currently via iTunes and Exact Editions) – these can be read on any tablet, smart phone or computer.

Using the subject line: ‘Sign me up to the MidCentury mailing list’ email editor@midcenturymagazine.com. This offer closes on Friday 31 October 2014 and the winner will be notified via the email supplied.

In joining the mailing list, you’ll be notified when new articles are posted on their website. There is no obligation and you can cancel your email alerts at any time using the same email with the subject line ‘Remove me from mailing list’.

Rules available on request. 

Photography ©Brotherton/Lock: www.brothertonlock.com &
Bruce Hemming Photography: www.bhphoto.biz


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Scotch Martin

Since the local youth club in the early-eighties Martin’s been Djing with records of one sort or another. Spots at the CCI National Mod Rallies across Britain in the 80s were followed in 1990 by the first in a line of successful northern soul and mod clubs in Glasgow. With four others he started Goodfoot in 91, with Acid Jazz-influenced playlists of Blow Up in London, and Brighton Beach in Leeds. Goodfoot arguably paved the way for a new generation of mod-influenced clubs in Glasgow over the past 20 years. Living in London in the late 90s Martin DJ’d at neuvo-modernist clubs including Where’s Jude and Lordy Lord, as well as regularly spinning at Duffer of St. George parties and other happenings. A career highlight was supporting legendary organist, Jimmy Smith, as well as pulling off 10 consecutive club nights during the 1995 Glasgow Jazz Festival. By 2001, back in Glasgow, Caledoniasoul launched. A definitive milestone in the Scottish soul scene, the club ran for six years and brought Butch, Mick Smith, Mick H, Arthur Fenn, Mike Ritson, Dave Rimmer and Ady Croasdell to Scotland for the first time to experience the sweaty, full-on atmosphere for themselves. As a journalist Martin has always written about music. In 2004 he tracked down singer and organist, Bill Bush, whose soulful, jazzy rarity, I’m Waiting on Ronn, was hitting on the northern soul scene. After visiting Bill in the USA and interviewing him for Manifesto he brought the band over to perform in the UK, complete with Hammond B3, and has helped Bill profit for the first time from the 1968 b-side. Martin is married to Caroline, has two children, lives in the London suburbs. Still collecting after 30 years!

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Articles Design Front Page Inspiration Interviews Objects Style Tags:, , , ,
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