Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Record Reviews April 2016 – Part 3

 

rsz_nm_april_2016_generation-mod

Generation Mod Compilation 

The Well Suspect label release their second album on 6 May featuring tracks from current mod-influenced bands, some of whom have been championed in previous Nutsmag Reviews. As a snapshot of what is happening now, this is a pretty good compilation covering all the bases. From the soul and northern soul inspired Samuel S Parkes, Men Of The North Country and New Street Adventure, to the young turks like Dogtooth, Private Jones and the psychy garage of Dave’s Doors Of Perception, this is one of the better collections around at the moment. Private Jones’s ‘Tamla’ treatment of The Jam’s ‘I Got By In Time’ is a real joy along with more familiar tracks like ‘Mieux Comme Ca’ by French Boutik, The Get Go’s bluesy take on ‘Nutbush City Limits’ and The Moons’ ‘Everyday Heroes’. If nothing else, ‘Generation Mod’ highlights the diversity of mod/60s inspired music in 2016. Fair to say the future looks bright.

www.wellsuspect.com

rsz_nm_april_2016_french_boutik

 

French Boutik – Essential Album

Unless you have lived in a cave for the last three years, or you have stayed off social media and the mod scene, you must be at least aware of Paris-based modernistias, French Boutik. They have played our Nutsmag Nights at Blues Kitchen a couple of times and are often here in the UK playing gigs, such is their popularity. They have just completed their debut album of original material which is due for release later this year, but as a taster, Detour Records have complied all of French Boutiks output thus far on this absolute ‘must’ for Boutik fans and newcomers alike. Comprising of all the tracks from their three EPs, plus a couple of charity singles, this 15 track compilation really is the ‘essential’ collection. With ‘modern classics’ like ‘Pousse Au Crime’, ‘Les Chats De Gouttiere’ and ‘Mieux Comme Ca’, it is easy to see why the Boutiks have such a devoted following in the UK. Throw in major favourites at their live shows, like ‘Facile’ and ‘End Of The Line’ and you have a worthy addition to any collection of current mod scene favourites. If you are curious to find out what all the fuss is about, this is definitely the album for you.

twitter.com/frenchboutik
www.facebook.com/frenchboutik
soundcloud.com/french-boutik

rsz_nm_april_2016_franklys

 

The Franklys – Comedown b/w Long Way

Nutsmag Reviews have been massive supporters of this band from day one. Yes, they are a no-nonsense rock band, but they kick ass and this new single is no exception. Since signing up to a management deal late last year, the Franklys have been touring a lot across the UK and Europe and they have finished their debut album which will be out later this year. All of which bodes well and the work they have put in so far is paying dividends. If this single is a preview of what is to come, then I’m willing to bet the album will hit big. The Rock-orientated radio stations should be all over this like a rash. There is a vacuum in the rock world right now and by rights the Franklys should fill it. ‘Comedown’ is familiar territory and solidifies the Franklys ‘sound’. It’s loud, catchy and bursting with energy. ‘Long Way’ is a slower, more controlled outing. It’s really well-produced and this exemplifies why I believe the Franklys have ‘come-of-age’. It’s superb. Hopefully, by the time the album is released, I will have either grown my hair… or bought a big wig… it looks far more impressive than a bald head nodding up and down!

www.thefranklys.com
twitter.com/TheFranklysUK
www.facebook.com/thefranklys/

rsz_nm_april_2016_extended_plays

 

Extended Plays – Twilight b/w Amazing Scenery

Formed in 2011, the Extended Plays have been building quite nicely on the mod/psych scene in their native Spain, culminating last year with an appearance at Euro YeYe. This single typifies the band’s sound. ‘Twilight’ is full of swirling Hammond, fuzzy guitar and dreamy vocals while ‘Amazing Scenery’ is a more uptempo and danceable (for you Beat Basement fans). While their recorded work has not been prolific by any definition, let’s hope this is the start of more to come. There is definitely much untapped potential in this band, based on the evidence of this promising single.

theextendedplays.bandcamp.com
www.facebook.com/The-Extended-Plays
soundcloud.com/thejohncolbysect/sets/


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment

Masters – The Stairs

This entry is part 10 of 11 in the series Masters2

The Stairs were truly one of the great lost bands of the early Nineties, championed by Elvis Costello, Paul Weller and many other luminaries, they influenced (along with the La’s), a whole new generation of musicians including The Coral & The Zutons).

We are delighted to have The Stairs headline at Le Beat Bespoke, London, on Thursday 24 March. See full details HERE!

Mark Raison caught up with drummer Paul Maguire  & vocalist and bassist Edgar “Summertyme” Jones.

01. The Stairs first came to most people’s notice after you signed to Go! Discs and released “Weed Bus” in 1991. Can you tell us a bit about the formation of the band and your history up to that point?

Edgar: We were just psychedelically attached friends having a laugh really in bedrooms and bedsits with acoustic guitars banging ashtrays etc . Eventually we were borrowing the only spare time in my bro’s pracky room with a friend Pete Baker (the sleeping mexican on LP sleeve) on bass and me on guitar. Pete didn’t really take to the bass so things were slow. We gradually gained some momentum when I joined in Ian McCulloch’s group on bass (mid 89) and took over the bass duties in the group. Also now we were able to afford are own room and gear.

It wasn’t till we played and handful of our songs at a ridiculously rammed new years eve party (1990) at Mike Mooneys house that we realised that we were capable of pleasing anyone other than ourselves. We got a fortnightly residency at the Cosmos club playing covers & originals. Marc Riley was often in attendance & Alan Duffy from imaginary records came to check us and plans were formulated to record our 1st Ep (later sold on to Go Discs) with them.

Paul: Me and Edgar met on a youth music scheme around 89, we had a similar music interest of 60s garage punk. Ed had a few tunes he had written including weed bus, which we jammed and me and him started there. Ed knew Ged who was on the same music scheme so we roped him in . We skinned up and we got it together. We had our own night every Friday in the cosmos club where we played a set of covers, then we’d dj then we would play our numbers.

02. The first couple of EP sleeves and the shows around that time featured a fourth member, Jason. What was his role and what happened to him?

Edgar: Jason was a friend whose role was originally in his words as personal manager but eventually we managed to Coax him on-stage to play percussion, gob iron & keys as required. I don’t think he really took to the role as he would come & go frequently from the group. The comparisons to Bez & Eric Idle didn’t really help I suppose.

Paul: Jason was meant to be our manager in the beginning, but he wasn’t any good at that stuff. So we gave him a harmonica and maracas which he played. Haven’t seen him for years.

03. Go! Discs seemed to understand where the Stairs were at: recording in mono, strong 60s artwork etc. How was your relationship with them and why did it come to an end? What was their expectation of the band you signed?

Edgar: Thanks to being well-managed at the time by Pam Young we went to them with a strong vision of how we wanted things to look and I think they had fun what with it being a little different from their norm at the time. Our A+R man initially was Carl Smith (chas smash) from Madness. We were his first signing and he was very accommodating and enthusiastic. Unfortunately Madness reformed shortly a few months after our LP came out. With no key man clause in contract that was were our troubles began.

Paul: With go discs we were signed by Carl smith (chas smash from madness) who really loved our band. He got us the deal, liked all the artwork and the mono deal. He understood our band and was good dealing with us.
Then he decided to leave go discs. When Carl left there was no one there who understood the band. They thought we were a bit of a joke and didn’t know what to do with us. We left them pretty soon after.

The Stairs

04. Mexican R’n’B is, quite rightly, regarded is a classic LP. How did you feel about it when it came out and how do you view it now?

Edgar: Why thank you sir! How I felt at the time is a complex affair I’d need Sigmund Freud and couch and a few hours to get to the bottom of that. I’m definitely happier now as it seems to have stood the test of time. We definitely created a little slice of the 60’s in the early 90’s there.

Paul: I loved that album then and I still love it now. I’m very proud to have been involved and made Mexican. We were still all learning our instruments and grooves and singing when we recorded it. I thought at the time and I still think it now that Edgar is a genius. His songs and playing were so fucking cool. We were recording this at a time most of the world was getting into acid house. We wanted to give the general public something else to listen to. Get them on the Weed bus so to speak.

05. People often refer to your marijuana singles – ‘Weed Bus’, ‘Mary Joanna’ – but I’ve always noticed the preoccupation with rain on Mexican R’n’B, at least three songs mention it. Any correlation?

Edgar: I was probably because I was spending too much time in Manchester as their retrogressive shopping experience has always been far superior to ours despite the constant rain!

Paul: Well you’d have to ask Edgar that. Personally I like rain, except when it gets me spliff wet at the bus stop.

06. After being released from Go! Discs you were still gigging, recording and exploring different styles. How were the band developing at that time and why didn’t a second album materialise?

Edgar: Looking back I think we were too eager to move on from the Mexican R’n’B sound (we should have made another 3 of those really) and with having no one at Go to recognise this (not that we’d have listened) and with the copious amounts of weed being smoked I think we just wanted our music to be more mad really both structurally and sonically. The fact that I was just starting wholeheartedly to discover Soul music too just confused matters. We we’re constantly demoing but Go weren’t prepared to let us start a new LP as such. This went on for about 2 yrs and then we left the Label.

Paul: We started to sound a bit heavier, and we got better at playing. We loved touring always a good laugh. But it was hard to get any backing , we weren’t being taken seriously by any record company or music papers. We spent all our money recording the second album, so at the end no one wanted to release it.

The Stairs

07. Viper Records eventually released Who Is This Is. What are your thoughts on that? Is that how you’d envisaged the second album?

Edgar: After leaving Go we thought it a good idea to record the LP ourselves. A long-winded complicated affair with members coming & going. By the time it was done we’d about run out of speed hence it not seeing the light of day till Viper’s release.

Paul: I’m glad we did it, for me it has some great moments. But looking back it also sounds confused,which I suppose we were also at the time.

08. How did you feel about the reaction from your reunion gig in Liverpool? Had you kept in touch? Is it something you’d thought about over the years?

Edgar: Absolutely smashing! We’d all kept in touch but our paths only ever brought us together sporadically but usually only 2 of us in same room at same time. The first rehearsal was great when we kicked into Mary Jo it was more like we’d had 2 weeks off rather than 20+yrs. It was great to see the 2 tiers in our fan base that night. Those who were older and were coming back to see us again and the younguns who were there to witness the legend that got created by word of mouth in the past 20 yrs. The crowd reaction was fantastic I don’t think either tier felt let down.

Paul: The reunion gig was magik, the reaction was just overwhelming for all of us I think. Incredible, old fans , new fans. They knew all the words ha ha. I’ve always bumped into Ed round town when I’m there as I live in Reykjavik. I hadn’t seen Ged for years. We all moved in slightly different circles. I’d been hoping we could do at least one gig for a few years. And when Mike from the Wicked Whispers called me up, it felt exactly right. With the amount of toss that goes by the name of music nowadays, I think you need the stairs in your life.

The Stairs

09. What are the plans for the band now? Will you be recording new material? Any old material we’ve not heard before be resurrected from your archives or will you write from scratch?

Paul: We’re not sure just yet. Anything can happen in the next half hour.

10. There’s a new Stairs collection The Great Lemonade Machine In The Sky out now. Tell us about what’s on that.

Edgar: I’d recently found a suitcase full of cassettes in the loft at my mum’s that I thought had been thrown out when I’d left home way back. The previous Viper comp had come from the collections of friends and colleagues with my own thought lost at the time. So the idea was to create a second volume of ‘right in the back’ . I spent a fair bit of time trawling through them (lots were mix tapes etc.) and mixing down the 4 tracks where available and it was a real nice touch that it all came together in time the reforming of the group.

Paul: I left my copy in Liverpool so I haven’t listed to it yet. But I think it’s old demo tapes and some live tracks.

11. ‘Shit Town’ is a pretty mad single taken from it and might come as a bit of surprise to people who only know Mexican R’n’B. What was the story behind it and is it about anywhere in particular?

Edgar: It’s primarily about Liverpool if I’m right (Ged?). It was definitely one of the finest finds of the suitcase trawling. It was recorded during 2nd LP sessions. What you’re listening to is a remastered monitor mix. It was mixed with the others as Ged had left the group by that point.

Paul: You’d have to ask Ged, It’s obviously about Liverpool. The city was a lot different from it is now. On the other hand…

12. Which are your favourite three Stairs songs and why?

Edgar:

Weed Bus will always be big in my heart as it was my first song written in the Stairs style as such. Although it’s not our song I’ve always been proud of our arrangement of’ You Don’t Love Me. I guess to pick a third from the rest it’d be Right in the Back of Your Mind as its pretty kick ass and stress free to play out live (well for me anyhow?)

Paul:

1. Woman gone said goodbye. It’s just the best of us. Growly, beaty,
big and bouncy.

2. Mundane Monday. I think it’s such cool little groove, and we sing about rain.

3. Skin up. I love playing this live, but it’s a bit tricky to skin up and play the drums at the same time. I used to do it back in the days.

 

Photos: Mark McNulty

Website: www.markmcnulty.co.uk
Blog: www.rivercool.co.uk


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Mark Raison

I've spent three-quarters of my life wandering the mod path with detours down its side streets and dark alleys. From an enthusiastic youth to a still-enthusiastic-but-harder-to-tell grizzled old goat, I've dabbled in all parts of the scene from writing fanzines 'Round Midnight and Something Has Hit Me; to promoting bands; attempting to manage bands; singing in the mighty garage combo The Electric Fayre; putting on indie, psych and soul clubs including Freak Scene, Orange Sunshine, and Shake!; writing liner notes for Reg King releases on Circle Records; and, in fitter times, tucking away the odd goal for the New Untouchables. I still DJ from my box of R&B humdingers but more often you’ll find me tapping away on my blog at monkeypicks.co.uk. I like the poetry of Charles Bukowski and dislike the taste of cheese.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Events Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Little Barrie

Little Barrie are a trio originally formed in Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England, who since relocated to London. Their sound is a mixture of Garage Rock, Rhythm & Blues, Surf and Psychedelia. The trio is behind the opening theme to ‘Better Call Saul’. Fronted by vocalist/guitarist Barrie Cadogan who has been a touring member of Primal Scream since 2006 and has also worked with artists such as Anton Newcombe, Spiritualized, Paul Weller, Pete Molinari and Scott Asheton. Drummer Virgil Howe is the son of Yes guitarist Steve Howe.

We very much look forwards to seeing them at Le Beat Bespoke 11 on the Saturday night! Darius Drewe caught up with them recently.

Over the last ten years, we have definitely seen a resurgence of musicians with similar inclinations, from Jim Jones’ numerous bands to the Stone Foundation, Cat Black (featuring your ex drummer Billy Skinner) Lynne Jackaman/Saint Jude, Miraculous Mule, Marcus Bonfanti and Vintage Trouble (USA). It seems like a “vintage rock” explosion. But do you see it as a scene? Or is it merely a simple case of several individual bands happening to be in similar places at similar times?

I don’t think some of the bands you mentioned have much in common musically. In cities there are always people making all different kinds of music at any given time. There’s also been an interest in rawer, stripped down forms of rock music for many years. There are bands and musicians that we have a camaraderie with like Jim Jones and Gil De Ray, either through gigging and working together or just liking each others music and having in interest in similar music, but I don’t see it as a scene.

How important is it to have clubs such as Blues Kitchen, What’s Cookin’, Heavy Load and of course our very own NUTs been to establishing it and encouraging musicians and music lovers to combine? And, conversely, now that venues all over the capital seem to be closing every day, how do you think it will be affected? Is there ANYTHING that you think should be done to prevent this wanton destruction?

Music venues, bars and clubs are hugely important to any cities music culture. Some new venues have appeared, but there are so many we’ve played over the years that are now sadly gone. Places where we also saw great gigs, heard new music and met people who have been important to our lives in many ways. These places should definitely be preserved for future generations. The social and cultural cleansing going on in London right now seems to be purely in the name of profit. The people at the top simply don’t care about places of artistic importance or encouraging creativity in the artists of the future. Central London is becoming more bland and boring each year. London could end up just being a giant dull shopping centre no one wants to hang out in, with only Disneyfied versions of its old cultural haunts aimed at the tourist market. The power of change lies with the money men, but I don’t think they give a shit.

On saying that though, the public shouldn’t be underestimated. People will still want to play and listen to music, go out and have a good time, you won’t stop that. Maybe folk will get more guerilla about things and get creative. It’s also easier for people to communicate now through technology and get their heads together.

Lewis: – I feel the  scene / atmosphere in London since I moved here in the early nineties has changed massively. I moved to London excited about music old and new, there were so many outlets for me to DJ music I had already collected and find out about and hear new things I was yet to discover. I genuinely felt I was in the middle of something really vibrant. I used to go to clubs and if I heard a song that was good but unknown people would react positively and now new things seem to clear the dance floor unless they have been on a major advert or radio campaign of some kind. I feel now that there is very little outlet for a scene to develop. Nothing is hidden or underground these days it seems so it doesn’t seem exotic or special. There are a very few venues such as the Blues kitchen that keep what I remember as a night dedicated to a certain quality of music rather than chasing the pound and playing it safe.

As a vocalist and guitarist, who would you say influenced you (Barrie) the most? I can hear traces of everyone from Steve Marriott and Robert Plant to Van Morrison, John Lennon, Dave Berry and even Duffy Power in there: I can even pick up a few traces of Brian Setzer and Gene Vincent!! However, all these could just as easily be accidental…

I’ve had so many influences over the years. As a vocalist I’m pretty limited but I was first drawn to more rhythmical singers like Chuck Berry, Bob Dylan and Lee Dorsey. I do love vocalists like Steve Marriott and Van Morrison but they’re leagues above me. As are all of my favourite singers like Sly and Rose Stone, Iggy Pop, Roky Erickson, Tina Turner, Gene Clark and the mighty Howlin’ Wolf to name a but a few.

My sisters record collection in the late ’80s was a huge influence on me guitar wise. My first big influence was John Squire, followed shortly by Johnny Marr, J Mascis, Jimi Hendrix (from my dad’s records), Ray Hanson from Jim Jones’ band Thee Hypnotics. From there everything opened up and over time keeps going. I’ll keep this short but I love Steve Cropper, Hubert Sumlin, Jimmy Nolen, Magic Sam, Neil Young, Michael Karoli, Ron Asheton, James Williamson, Tom Verlaine & Richard Lloyd, Stacey Sutherland, Danny Kirwan, Steve Jones, Link Wray, Wayne Kramer & Sonic Smith, Cliff Gallup… Better stop!

Though the band’s name is taken from your frontman, the sound is very much the combined work of three people. Do you think listeners sometimes have difficulty remembering that, and tend to not give Lewis and Virgil enough credit for what they bring to the table?

I can’t speak for other people but I think Lewis and Virgil’s presence on Little Barrie recordings and onstage is incredibly powerful. People definitely pick up on that at our live shows. Although the guitar can be upfront in our music and the sound has evolved over the years, it’s always been very rhythmical and beat driven. So much of that comes from the bass and drums. They have their own sound and groove. I do write alone a lot but it’s only when the three of us play together do the songs become what they should be. They’re brilliant musicians.

Has having a drummer with a world-famous father also been in any way advantageous to you, or might it be actually something you perceive as a bit of a millstone? Or do you reckon many people aren’t that aware of it anyway, and simply judge your music on its own merits?

Over to you Virgil: Virgil declined to answer!

Although you’re a contemporary band, your sound is undoubtedly rooted in the classic period of soul, blues and rock 1965-75: a song like Precious Pressure, for instance, sounds like it could easily have been lifted from an album of that period. When recording and playing, therefore, is there any particular guitar amplification, drum kit, bass cab, vocal mike, strings or even choice of instrument you would consider essential to achieving this sound?

We do like a lot of music from that era but we’ve never been on a mission just to replicate old records, we’re not purists. We just want to make music that sounds exciting to us and captures the feel we’re after. The aim is to find sounds we like and try to use them in our own way. Although I love a lot of old guitars and amps for their tone and character, they’re not essential. The key to capturing certain sounds in the studio or onstage has a huge amount to do with how the sounds are being recorded and who’s playing the instrument. To find engineers who understand the difference isn’t always easy. Two people I think are fantastic are Mike Burnham at Lovebuzz Studios in Bermondsey and Seb Lewsley who has worked with Edwyn Collins for many years. They know how to get great sounds. A lot of modern recordings involve over clinical by the book techniques which can kill the soul out of any performance. And for some reason some people nowadays seem reluctant to break those rules. Twelve high spec modern microphones on a drum kit and into a state of the art digital mixing desk won’t help you get a filthy sound like The Sonics. You’re better off with a cassette 4-Track or recording the band in one go on your phone and adding the vocal after.

How important is the bands image and how you present yourselves?

Image is important to us in our own ways. We all look different from each other and dress a little different too. I’m not really a flash dresser, but I do really like clothes and it’s always been important to me. I love old denim, vintage sweatshirts, military and motorcycle leathers and simple slim cut smarter jackets etc. and 60’s style boots. I wear a lot of ladies shirts.

Lewis: I have very little interest in following current trends unless something vibrant and vital has cropped up, most of it is the same old crap being regurgitated or some random baseless idea invented by people desperate to keep their job at a fashion / music mag. A lot of classic styles that I’m personally interested in are because they are things that have been generated by and represent attitude toward how you personally choose to live your life.

As a guitarist, you, Barrie, have played with some of music’s most legendarily “awkward” frontmen, such as Morrissey, Bobby Gillespie and Anton Newcombe, while the entire band has backed Paul Weller (also perceived as being slightly ‘difficult’ on occasion) Are these people the enfants terribles that their legends would suggest, or is it mainly press speculation and exaggeration?

I can only speak from my own experience. These people have all been cool
with me.

One of the biggest influences all three members share is obviously the blues, and a few years ago, two of you got to “live the dream”, as it were, when you went to New York to play for Hubert Sumlin. Tell us a little about that experience.

We opened for Hubert at a gig in 2005. We first met him the year before when we were both on the same US label for a few years. We’d asked if there was any chance of meeting him but didn’t expect anything. So we were in New York for the first time on a promo ‘meet and greet’ trip and had to do this awkward lunchtime showcase gig in the label office in front of the staff (about 15 of them) playing through little amps. We were just setting up and Hubert walks in and sits down right in front of us. I was half over the moon and half shitting myself because now we had to play in front of him. It seemed to go ok although it was nerve-wracking as hell, he was the guitar on Killing Floor! Hubert was a lovely guy, very kind mannered and charismatic. He spent quite a lot of time chatting and took a few pictures with us. He was very encouraging. The following year we were recording in Brooklyn with Russell Simins playing drums. The label had brought him to the studio with the idea of us doing a song together but we never got chance to get stuck into anything. But a week or so later we got a gig opening for him in Manhattan. Towards the end of his set he called me up onstage to play Got My Mojo Working with him. I couldn’t believe it was happening. It was one of the best moments of my life, a true privilege. We hung out and talked with him longer that night. He told us some amazing stories, about him getting his first guitar, him leaving Wolf’s band for a short while to play with Muddy Waters and also that he thought his brother was a better guitar player than he was. It means even more now he’s no longer with us. We were all grateful to have met him.

We couldn’t go much further without discussing your highest-profile recording to date, the theme to the hit US TV show Better Call Saul. How did this come about?

We were approached by Thomas the music director for the series. He was into the band and had all of our albums, which was bizarre to us as he was based in LA and we hadn’t played there much at all. He asked if I could write 17 variations of a short guitar piece for the main title theme of the show and get them recorded in three days. I scrapped all other plans, got them done and we recorded and mixed them on day three and sent them off to him that evening. A few days later he got back to us and asked for 12 more variations, so we did the same thing. Other people were pitching for it too. A few weeks later we found out they’d chosen our theme, which was really cool. It was nice surprise – I’d never even seen
Breaking Bad.

Your new album has seen you experimenting with Krautrock influences- is this something you’ve always been a fan of?

Yes I first discovered Can in the early/mid 1990’s. I’d read somewhere that their sound may have influenced band like the Stone Roses and Happy Mondays who inspired me a great deal. I went out to Selectadisc and bought the Ege Bamyasi album – It totally blew me away. It sounded so modern still and it was from 1972 or something. It was mesmerising, they had a fairly regular rock band set up – guitar, bass, drums & keys but played nothing like British or American rock n roll or R&B. The core of it being that amazing hypnotic rhythm of Jaki Leibezeit’s drums. I got to play with Damo Suzuki a few years back in Paris with a few friends of mine. It was great. He’s an amazing guy, he had some stories too. About his adventures traveling the world solo in the late ’60s. He came to see us when we played in Cologne and took us a Russian bar after the show. A gentleman, a hero and a great host.

You’re already onto your fourth album, in what seems like a short space of time, and each has been a progression from the last, suggesting immense longevity for the future. But where do you see Little Barrie in two decades? Will you still be touring and recording?

To be honest I think we make albums fairly slowly, but some of that can be down to other commitments and financial constraints. We’re writing a new album right now. Little Barrie in two decades??! Who knows… It would be cool if we still played together though. I want to play for as long as I can.

I’m actually doing what you did in reverse in a few months, and decamping from the South to the East Midlands. How would you describe the music scene up there, and are there any clubs or venues you’d particularly recommend, particularly with regard to psych, garage, freakbeat, prog or vintage rock?

I’m probably the worst person to ask Darius… I’ve been in London for 15 years now and am very out of touch with what’s happening in Nottingham these days. I don’t get to go back very often and when I do it’s all about seeing family and a few old friends if I can. But I’ll try to ask a few people and get back to you if they have any ideas. Quite a few of my old friends are music fans and big record collectors. There’s some good record shops there – Look up Rob’s Records and Big Apple for second-hand stuff. There’s also a Rough Trade and probably others too. They could be good places to meet people.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 22, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Jim Jones And The Righteous Mind

Jim Jones and the Righteous Mind, the new band from former Jim Jones Revue / Black Moses / Thee Hypnotics front man. The new band doesn’t exactly pick up where his previous one left off, there is bluesy garage rock guitars and honky-tonk style piano, but also more reflective and more experimental sounds. Tracks like Boil Yer Blood, the title track of their debut EP, are loud and raucous; but the gently psychedelic 1000 Miles From The Sure is more distinctive and the groovy Hold Up is driven by drums, handclaps and backing vocals in counterpoint to Jones’ crooning.

We very much look forwards to seeing them at Le Beat Bespoke 11 on the Saturday night! Darius Drewe caught up with them recently.

01. Let’s start with the new songs. The three I’ve heard already, from the “Boil Yer Blood” single, are sonically very disparate, meaning that whereas I could get a “handle” on your previous bands quite easily, I’m still slightly perplexed by the Righteous Mind. Is this band deliberately meant to be un-classifiable, or is there a more clearly defined “modus operandi” you haven’t unveiled yet?

Hello mate, Yeh, the Jim Jones Revue was a fairly specific sound and, as you say, easy to get a handle on, so, after eight years or so of that, which involved a lot of touring, the first thing you want to do is ‘everything else’ .. you know, travel to new and exotic lands etc.

There’s already more than an albums worth of Righteous Mind material recorded, and it is fairly varied, by design, but there is a thread, or a kind of pattern that you can get a hold of once you’ve heard a number tracks… On the Boil Yer Blood EP. though, it was a conscious decision to put quite a wide spectrum across as the first release, so as not to get boxed in too early in the game.

02. What particular musical influences have shaped this new venture? Have you discovered any new sounds that excite and thrill you, and if so, what are they?

All the same stuff mostly; roots music especially, but from a different angle than before; from the standpoint of time and experience… I think all truly great music comes back to haunt you again and again in the best possible way; it’s like a lesson that you learn a little deeper each time.

03. On a similar subject, do you ever get tired of shifting from band to band? This will be the fourth group you’ve fronted in just under 30 years, and from the MC5/Stooges-infused psychedelia of Thee Hypnotics through the funky soul rock of Black Moses to the rock’n’roll revivalism of the Revue, they’ve all differed from each other significantly. Obviously, many of music’s greatest innovators, from Bowie to Miles Davis, constantly reinvented themselves but do you think people ever wonder why you can’t/won’t remain in the same outfit for more than five years at a time? Or has it simply been an accidental mixture of coincidence and circumstance?

It’s probably more like eight to ten years at a time, but I’m not counting. Trouble is: not everyone has the stamina to regularly get out on the road for long periods of time and give a hundred and ten percent of yourself night after night, it can take it’s toll… Once it’s in the blood though, it’s hard to do anything else. Most people will have a lineup change and keep the same name, which I guess is the smart way to do it, but I suppose I’ve never been business minded in that way, I always see it as a chance to wipe the slate clean and reinvent yourself. Hopefully The Righteous Mind will be the one that keeps rolling. Which is another good reason for the broad horizon on the first single.

04. Tell me a little about the other members of the line-up and how you came to know them.

I’ve always been pretty lucky when it comes to finding good people to play with, and The Righteous Mind is no exception, in fact it maybe the best unit so far.

Gavin Jay, as you know, was also the bass player in the Jim Jones Revue. First time I saw him, he was playing in a small club, the band and the crowd were pretty static, but he was throwing himself into it with gusto; a sharp dressed man, who could play well, and knew how to put some presence onto the stage… I’ll have some of that! I ‘borrowed’ him at first but the Revue soon became ten times busier than his other band and the rest, as they say etc etc. Gav is really great to work with and is also known as ‘Mr One Take’ in the studio – He plays amazing stand up bass too, with and without a bow, which was ignored in the Revue for one reason or another, so that was one of the first things I wanted to utilize with the Righteous Mind.

Phil Martini is on drums, I’ve known Phil from a while back and from his previous band The Tokyo Dragons. He was my first choice for someone to work with, and I approached him as soon as JJR started making noises about calling it a day. I’m always pushing the drummer to try to find an unconventional groove, a different approach and something unusual sounding for each song, which isn’t always easy for them, but Phil’s taken everything I can throw at him without batting an eyelid. This has meant that I could work really fast at getting new material together.

On piano we have the brilliantly mysterious Matt Millership. Originally, Henri Herbert was set to be part of the project, but around the same time I was starting to work on the bare bones beginnings of the songs that I had, Henri’s YouTube clip of him playing piano in St Pancreas station went viral and he was flooded with offers to come and play straight boogie woogie piano which had been a lifetime dream for him, so I just said good luck, and wondered where the hell I was going to find someone as good as him (???) It was Henri himself who recommended Joe Glossop. Joe’s an amazing intuitive player who’s been around the block, we worked with him and got the lions share of the songs up to speed and subsequently recorded. Joe did the first short tour with us, but when it came time for the first single release he couldn’t do the show’s that went with it… ‘what do you mean you can’t do the shows ?’ – ‘Sorry, I’ve been asked to go on the road with Tom Jones’… fair enough, as long as it’s a Jones… So I had to hunt around again and was lucky enough to get Matt. He had been in the frame to possibly replace Elliot Mortimer in the JJR but the timing hadn’t worked out and that’s when Henri had turned up just in time. Matt jumped straight in where Joe left off and without missing a beat, we were on the road again.

Malcolm Troon (Dr Troon) is playing pedal steel, theremin, additional guitar and percussion. I’ve known Malcolm for a while as a hot-shot Denmark street guitarist. He’s a formidable musician, and also, like Matt, stepped in to rescue the band when our original and also incredibly talented guy David Page was called away by Rick Ruben and the gang to work on an LP.recording with The Ruen Brothers… Phil had worked with Mal before in the Dragons and it was his suggestion to get in touch with him. As you can imagine; finding a pedal steel player isn’t the easiest thing, let alone finding two of em! The pedal steel itself takes a high degree of skill and confidence to master, and to make matters worse; I’m asking these guys to then NOT play it in the traditional way but to subvert it and use it to create new sounds. They’re all great to work with and easy to be around, I can’t believe how lucky I am really.

05. Do you think this band has an advantage over its predecessors, inasmuch as that whereas all the others began at “cult” level and attempted to work their way up, you were already famous by the time you formed this one? It has enabled you to more or less launch straight into medium-sized venues and big festivals, whereas both Black Moses and the Revue began their careers in small clubs..

Yeh, it’s definitely taken some of the slog out of the thing.

06. With the Revue, you were definitely perceived as a flag bearer for the vintage/retro/revivalist scene that was proliferating in the UK at the time, filled out by bands like your close friends the Urban Voodoo Machine on one side and the likes of Vintage Trouble and Little Barrie on the other. Did that sort of tag piss you off? And if so, is the Righteous Mind a deliberate attempt to escape it?

To a certain extent yes; on the one hand it’s frustrating to be misperceived, as I’ve never viewed the old/new thing in that way… It was never to do with a trend; in fact it’s more of a ‘reaction’ to bullshit trend’s or fashions… It can be a fine line sometimes, and I’m quite aware of how easy it is to fall into a weird kind of role play, and you have to avoid that at all costs if you want to feel you’re doing something valid and not just regurgitating the past. Just to be clear though: if there’s a choice between old and new; and the old thing is still valid and in working order; 9 times out of 10 the old shit is 100 times better than the new shit.

07. When I first knew you, you were living near Ladbroke Grove but these days, you reside in “trendy” Dalston. How do you view the perceived “hipsterization” of the East End these days, and more importantly, the music scene in London in general?

Hackney has now become a bit like Ladbroke Grove was when I left there… I live in Walthamstow now, which is where I was actually born and it still hasn’t been completely gentrified.

08. And what about equipment? One musician of my acquaintance (won’t name him, but he recently joined a reformed 70s punk act on drums) is such a purist that in order to achieve what the believes to be the “true rock and roll sound”, he insists his other band, in which he writes the material, only use certain guitars, basses, kits and amps. And, though I wouldn’t take that approach myself, he’s not the only one. But where do you stand on it? Obviously I can imagine what you wouldn’t use- I’d be unlikely, for instance, to ever see you playing a BC Rich or an Ibanez- but are there any particular brands you favour? And how essential are they to your music?

It’s not to try to sound like someone else; because that’s a dead-end; but I like old stuff, if it’s still working, or new stuff that’s built as good as the old stuff. It feels more honest, like it’s come out of the earth.

09. A lot of your music tends to celebrate an atmosphere of bohemian, bacchanalian decadence. How much of it is genuine? Is it a creed by which you live your life? I only ask because I’ve seen you leap across tabletops at a party with drink in hand, surrounded by stunning burlesque women, but I’ve also seen you being domestic, reading your kid bedtime stories. Is there a “real” Jim Jones? Or is he a mixture of all those disparate elements?

Yeh, it’s always nice to be a little more three three-dimensional, don’t you think? You really can move between worlds, as Tom Waits says: ‘You don’t always have to stay the night.’

10. On that subject, do you think rock’n’roll musicians sometimes have to play up too hard to their public persona, sometimes resulting in their premature demise?

Yeh, it can become that ‘role play’ thing again. It’s all nonsense really… I think what a lot of people miss, is that the difference with people like Lemmy or Keef is that they put their work first.

11. Final question. It’s taken you approximately 28 years’ worth of work, self-belief and dedication to get where you are now – do you think everything you’ve had to endure along the way has been worth it? Or do you think that it’s more a reflection of how long it takes to achieve anything in this country outside of the mundane, and that had you been born in the US or Europe, you’d have been a star by your 20s instead of your 40s? More to the point, if longevity is the goal, do you think you’ll stay the course like your mentors Iggy Pop, Wayne Kramer and Tom Waits have?

I don’t think it’s any easier in the States or Europe although there is more money for arts in places like France, but then that’s one less thing to kick against… I’m a lifer, there’s no getting around it, and it’s not really a matter of choice, you know, more of a vocation… I think the key is: don’t look back !

Web Links:

www.righteousmind.co.uk
www.facebook.com/jjatrm
www.twitter.com/JJandtheRM
www.instagram.com/jjandtherm


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Clubs Events Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

The Dustaphonics (Newbreed)

This entry is part 18 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

NUTSMAG recently caught up with the band in London…

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Started 2008 in Hackney, when the actress Tura Satana (Faster Pussycat Kill Kill) asked me to create a few pieces of music for her new film. Sadly she passed away a few months after our first single was released on Dirty Water with the song we co-wrote: “Burlesque Queen”.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

With an additional horn section, we’ve been the backing band of the Blues Brothers’ Dan Aykroyd, and James Moore, Big Mama Thornton (RIP) and Sugar Pie Desanto’s manager, asked us to be Sugar’s backing band for some future UK shows. We love all kinds of good music, but the main thing the band members all have in common is a passion for Rhythm & Blues and R&B-based music.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

I lived in London for 20 years, and there are always some great bands in the big smoke. I am in Lille now (North of France) where you can find cool kids: The Arrogants, The Hoodoo Tones, etc.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I stopped my weekly club night in London (Raison D’Etre) to start the Lille-Roubaix Vintage Weekender (17,000 visitors). Lille is a vibrant city with a great eclectic music scene. The perfect crossroads between London, Paris, Brussels and Amsterdam. John Sinclair (MC5/White Panthers) was there in January for The Detroit Boom Boom; I played guitar alongside his great live poetry performance.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

As a DJ, musician, producer, I’ve been influenced by many genres: Rhythm & Blues, Surf, Rocknroll, Rockabilly, Soul, 60’s/90’s Garage Punk, 70’s PunkRock, British R&B, Latin Boogaloo, Funk, Jazz, Bossa Nova, Ska, Early Reggae, Country, Mambo, etc.  All those elements, at different doses, combine to make the sound of The Dustaphonics! Some people love it and understand the idea beyond and see something fresh. Some people start off really confused about it but often they’re up and dancing a few songs into the set. Would “Vavavoom Rock’n’Roll”
describe us?

06. What are your live shows like?

“Dustaphonics! You are a world-class act and a very fine RockNRoll band!”  Rob Lind (The Sonics) described us that way on stage after we’d supported them at the Forum London. He also asked for a cd, as did Martha Reeves and her 2 sisters when we played with the Vandellas. They even asked us for signed copies of our new single. How crazy is that – some of our heroes asking for our music! Hayley joined us only 3 years ago and she has made great progress, considering that she never really had a proper band before. She does the show on 10,000 volts, BOOM! While, us, the boys, are at the “back” making sure all sounds solid and tight! Dustaphonics shows are simple, energetic, good vibe and open to all.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Despise? I prefer keeping my ears fresh for the bands and artists that I love and ignore the rest. My influence comes from the music arrangements of the 1960s Motown (like the Ramones; not much guitar hero guitar solo), Bo Diddley, Sonics, Hubert Sumlin, Link Wray, Mickey Baker, Cliff Gallup, Them, Ramones, Dick Dale, Larry Collins, The Animals, Ronnie Dawson, Joe Clay, The Saints, The Jam, etc. We do and love covers: Bo Diddley “Dearest Darling”, Sugar Pie Desanto “Witch of The Night”, Louisiana Red “Ride on”, Sonics “Shotdown”,  Sonny Burgess  “Red Headed Woman”,  Ike & Tina Turner “Worried and Hurting”, Howlin’ Wolf “You Gonna Wreck my life”,  traditional Gospel “Don’t let the Devil Drive your car”, The Strangeloves “Night Time”. The other 20 songs or so in the set are originals.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

The good and the bad sides of our society. Girls, 1950s, 60s, 70s Cinema, design, literature. Helping and producing young music talent. Organising music and cultural events.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

I bring the theme, the idea, the melody, the riff, Hayley or Aina write the lyrics, I work on the global arrangement while the lyrics are done, then we give a go all together with the full band. We deal about positive things, nothing really dark or too serious. No politics. Few examples: “Party Girl “was influenced by my girlfriend, “When you gonna learn” is about mistakes we can all make sometimes, “Rockin’ Boogaloo” is a tribute to all the DJs who are spinning/collecting the goodies on vinyl.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Too many great songs made by so many great artists. As for the Dustaphonics’ repertoire, they have to be all our favourites, otherwise they won’t be played on stage with soul and passion.

11.How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think the global underground scene at the moment is booming, vibrant with a fresh energy from a new generation of great musicians and bands. Same wherever we are playing: Spain, UK. France, Italy, in a small club for 100 people or on a big festival’s stage for 20,000 people. There is always a great multi generation mix of people at our gigs: Mods, Garage, Surf, Punk, Rockers, Cats, Beatnicks, Bikers and classic music lovers. It is not that easy to be semi-pro musicians by playing niche music in a specific closed circuit, so for that reason, we cannot belong to only one circuit or one scene, we do participate in various scenes who are booking and looking after us.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Coming back alive from 5 fantastic Spanish tours, no, joking. Few years ago I had a very serious accident and ended up paralysed for few months. I had to learn again how to walk, to talk and play guitar, The biggest challenge was my body/brain synchronization and to run the band, keep on doing tours and gigging whilst in a very weak physical and mental condition, but it was the only way, the best therapy for getting better.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We are playing Le Beat Bespoke Festival in London Saturday 26th March! A fast 40 min set before the great Little Barrie and Jim Jones. Book your ticket for the 3 days, there Is an amazing line up of great bands and DJs.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Dustaphonics members can speak English, Spanish, French, German and Italian, so we can read/translate specialist magazines like Mojo, Blues & Soul Mag, Shindig, Vive Le Rock in UK, Ugly Things in US, Ruta 66 in Spain, Soul Bag, Dig It in France. Blow up in Italy, Dynamite in Germany plus some great online blogs too. We would love to have more coverage in the media but we cannot afford to pay a PR for that.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

I am ok with a few, like The Hives, Shingai Shoniwa, Erykah Badu, etc. I love and collect mostly vintage 50s and 60s stuff but I do enjoy a lot of current bands like: James Hunter, Sharon Jones, Nick Waterhouse, Jd Mc Pherson ,Phantom Surfers, Mike Sanchez, Lee Field, Junior Brown, Little Victor & Co, Masonics, Bill Kirchen, Bellfuries , Urban Voodoo Machine, Nico Duportal, etc…and of course the new generation too, like in France Fuzzy Vox or Les Grys-Grys, who headlined my event the Roubaix Vintage Weekender 2 years ago.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

1/ Muscle Shoal (Sheffield-Alabama) with Mark Neil? Why? Because I am a big fan of The Unknowns and Mark’s work. In the late 90s we even recorded a song together, that is locked in the secret vault of Toe Rag Studios, with Mark (guitar), Dave Doyle (bass) Liam Waston (drums) and me (guitar). 2/ RCA Studio Nashville with Mark Neil and Liam Watson or Mark Neil and Jim Diamond? 3/ Toe Rag (London )with Liam and Ed? 4/ Rimshot Studio (London (with Mike Thorne and Healer Selecta? 5/ Circo Perrotti (Gijon) with Jorge and Healer Selecta?

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Meeting more and more fans and great people on the road, recording our 3rd album, doing some shows with Sugar Pie Desanto and other legends, coming back alive from our 6th Spanish tour in September. We have just done a great interview too for Ruta 66 magazine (booking Spain via soundealer Madrid).  We are playing a great Blues Soul Festival in France in March with another Motown legend: Bettye LaVette.

Band Members:

Lead Vocal: Hayley Red
Guitar: Yvan Serrano Aka Dj Healer Selecta
Drums: Eric Frajiria
Bass: Devid + Special Guest
Guitar: Dan Whaley
Harmonica: Kevin Smith

Discography:

2015
EP: Q Sound Groove
Q Sound Records Paris

2014
LP: Big Smoke London Town
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Dirty Water Records )

2012
LP: Party Girl
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Dirty Water Records)

2012
Single Jinx/lookin’ At You
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Munster Records/vampisoul Madrid)

2009
CD: Burlesque Queen Cd
(Kingaling Records) 2009

Single: Burlesque Queen/tornado
(King-a-ling Records Under License To Dirty Water Records) 2009

Compilation:

LP/CD Gangster on Specialized compilation: A Modern Take On Specials Classics (Teenage Cancer Trust) 2012 UK

Main Site: www.healerselecta.co.uk
Social Networks:
Facebook: www.facebook.com/TheDustaphonics
MySpace: www.myspace.com/thedustaphonics
Twitter: www.twitter.com/dustaphonics
Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/dustaphonics
Videos: Big Smoke London Town & Party Girl
Updated Releases and Tour Dates: www.reverbnation.com/dustaphonics


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 2, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

NUTsCast – Sessions – part 10 (episode 19)

NUTsCast Feb 2016

In this latest edition of the Nutscast Sessions, The Baron looks ahead to the Easter extravaganza that is Le Beat Bespoke 11 from 24th to 27 March 2016.

Playing tracks by the featured artists and selections from our guest djs, it is the prefect prelude to another great weekend in London hosted by The New Untouchables.


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 11, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Podcasts Reviews Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

The Meyer Dancers

The Meyer Dancers are London’s finest specialist 1960s Go Go Dance Company. The Meyer Dancers are made up of professionally trained dancers and choreographers. TMD are assisted by professional make up artists and costume designers to create a truly authentic experience. The Meyer dancers have been performing Go Go for 3 years & are well established with support slots to names such as Geno Washington & The Sonics.

01. How did the The Meyer Dancers originally get going?

Treacle and Cherry founded TMD when they met at dance school and discovered a mutual passion for all things 60’s and 70’s. Treacle was spinning records regularly at club nights around north London and Soho, with Cherry being one of the regular attendees at her nights. The duo had an admiration for 60’s movies and in particular cult legend Russ Meyer. This was where the Meyer Dancers were born and took inspiration from. Swerving a far left from the burlesque movement The Meyer Dancers recreate authentic Go-Go dancing from the podiums reminiscent from ‘Whisky A Go-Go’, shindigs and soul trains!

02. How long have you been interested in this type of dancing?

All our dancers have been dancing since they were nippers but as a company we’ve been Go-Going for 6 years and we are still the first cats on the dance floor! We love to perform our routines but we also like getting up to freestyle. We are trying to get the ‘Go-Go’ word around town teaching a great cardio 60’s workout and learning some of the classic moves! We are currently holding classes twice a month at Haunt in Dalston.

03. What was it like to go from an Idea to your actual first early bookings?

We started off by learning many of the ‘classic’ moves, watching hours of YouTube videos, original film footage, and studying the whole look and vibe. We started out performing with a northern soul cover band in east London every month and it progressed from there into different kinds of bookings from music videos, to dancing for some of our idols!

04. How did you research the types of moves and the sounds and styles and set-ups?

We went out to as many clubs as possible, you learn so much from chatting to people and the dance floors. We also watched endless soul train and Shindig plus loads of Ike and Tina Turner footage!

05. Tell us about your usual preparation behind the scenes for a show?

It usually consists of an overflowing suitcase full of costumes, hairspray and pins. We come dressed in our ’60’s day wear’ ; we get a lot of stuff from charity shops, Paperdress vintage and E-Bay! We also have a constant supply of fake eyelashes! Pre performance you’ll find us backstage warming up and wiggling into costumes, plus some extra backcombing never goes a miss!

06. Where have you appeared over the years?

We have been booked for such a variety! We’ve performed at most of the festivals, Glastonbury, Lattitude, Wilderness, Isle of Wight. Lots of fabulous clubs in London, the North of England and Spain! We have also danced for dome seriously groovy parties one we loved recently was in a disused building on the south bank it was lovingly recreated as Andy Warhols factory and we had pride of place – shakin and shimmying next to the DJ! Not forgetting one of our favourite annual performances at Le Beat Bespoke where we have supported The Sonics, danced our socks off for The Pretty Things and even done ‘the bird’ with The Trashmen!

07. Tell us about your involvement with the New Untouchables?

The New Untouchables make so many people happy – it’s just a pleasure working with them! We started by coming to the nights as punters and Rob Bailey asked The Meyers to perform at Le Beat Bespoke about five years ago and I think we have performed every year since making more glamorous friends every time
we do!

08. What are some of the best and worst memories from your performances?

The worst was probably the back stage glamour being told to head to your dressing room and then arriving to find they’ve whacked a sign up on a random door and the reality is that 5 of us have to get changed in a disabled toilet, then opening the door to a northern man having a piss!

The best bit is we get to do what we love! We love a great crowd who vibe off us and get dancing and we love performing with bands and DJs who are just as passionate as us! We love to keep the authenticity as much as we can to the go-go girls of the era.

09. How do you keep the performances so fresh and vibrant?

Within the paradigm of 60’s go-go we like to go into the sub genres such as psychedelia, mod, French ye-ye and surf so we make routines which suit these vibes and always make a new costume for each of them! We often have clients ask us to perform specific styles within Go-Go so its good to have some variation. We love shopping trips to record shops to find new songs to dance to!

10. Who are your big inspirations in the world of dance and performance?

We love love love Pans People but the original line up to around ’73, they had to put their heads together every week and make magic happen to whatever was the latest hit and sometimes we get given themes or tracks that bring a whole new approach to how we choreograph or style ourselves so it is exciting, exhilarating and also a bit of a giggle! We also love The Hullaballoo dancers and The Gazzarri girls off Hollywood A-Go-Go but inspiration can come from everywhere! The buxom babes of Russ Meyers films of course and party scenes in cult classics like Riot On The Sunset Strip or The Trip Out. Last but definitely not least those Ikettes sure could shake a tail feather too!

11. What are some of your favourite soundtracks to your favourite routines?

Oh we have had so many! We have danced to everything from The Clapping Song by Shirley Ellis, to Henry Mancini’s corker Experiment in Terror (Twist) to Coz I Luv You by Slade! But one of our favourites is probably our routine to Liar Liar by The Castaways.

12. How do people tend to re-act when they see you live on stage?

We get them dancing, some people don’t know what to expect, but then they see what a good time we’re having and they want in on the party you see the feet
start tapping!

13. Who makes your outfits and stage-wear?

We buy original pieces where possible but we also make a fair bit ourselves we love collaboration any fashionistas of costume designers do get in contact! We have been styled by Lucy In disguise and more recently we has costumes made by HUZZAR HUZZAR vintage.

14. What have you got planned for the future?

2016 is going to be an exciting year for us as we have lots of new projects to delve into, we have a project with a fashion designer coming up soon and bookings for the major festivals in the UK and Europe. Watch this space groovy people!

Le Beat Bespoké 11 – London (Easter 2016) 24th to 27th March – see all the details HERE!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

admin

Pip! Pip! Are the Creative Business Engine behind various music based organisations of the cool underground variety. Providing angst, confusion, bewilderment and annoyance in equal amounts. We design/host/manage great sites like this one! Why not hire us one day soon?

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 2, 2016 By : Category : Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Flo – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 14 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with Flo recently who lives in Munich, Germany to talk about his passion for good music.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I grew up listening to my dad’s Rolling Stones and my mum’s Beatles records as a child. I loved them both at that time (talking about the bands here). When I played guitar in a heavy rock band as a teen, we shared a rehearsal room with a pretty cool 60s garage band. I really liked their sound and got introduced to the Pebbles and Nuggets compilations later on. I became addicted to collecting vinyl when I moved to Munich and had my first 60s night outs at the legendary Atomic Café. “Deeper Shade” and “Beatschuppen” were my favorite parties at that time. We were dancing to soul, beat, garage and power pop.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first proper DJ slot was probably at the Atomic Café back in the early 2000s (thanks, Bella, for inviting me!). Such a shame it had to close its doors forever
last year.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

The most incredible and unforgettable spot I got the opportunity to spin records was “Double Sight Tokyo” this year. What an amazing location and beautiful crowd! I can really recommend a visit to swinging Tokyo, when there´s anything like this on the menu again. It´s totally worth it. Thanks to Satoshi again.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I guess every DJ remembers a horrible gig at a mediocre bar, involving a broken sound system and a terrible birthday crowd asking for some “fun music”. Oh and deejaying at a wedding can be awkward too.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

That might be Stephan Golowka (was good to host “Echoes Of Time” with him back in the days) and Paddy & Sarge (always great fun).

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I think travelling across Europe and listening to so many great DJ sets at weekenders like Lavarone, Double Sight or Le Beat Bespoke shaped my sound as a DJ. It has been inspiring to dance to so many great records I never heard
of before.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Maybe that hidden Greek grill & bar place around the corner (just kidding) and probably a copy of “La Metamorfosi” a while ago.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Kinks, Sonics, Music Machine, Who, Small Faces, Rolling Stones, Charlatans, Stone Roses, Kula Shaker and many more…

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I’m afraid – no. I’m into US garage, UK psych, freakbeat and groovy stuff from all around the globe. A good choon should include fuzz, wha wha sounds, phasings and tape delay if you ask me.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Me and my mate Claude Gagalka host a club night called “News from the Moon” every now and then. You should come to Munich!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

That would be “Pretty – Mustache In Your Face”

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

La Metamorfosi – Scusa eh (Polydor, 1969)
Calum Bryce – Love Maker (Conder, 1968)
Mike Stuart Span – Children Of Tomorrow (Jewel, 1968)
Icarus – You´re In Life (Spark, 1968)
The Unit – Would You Believe What I Say (Fontana, 1967)
Daddy Lindberg – Wade In The Shade (Columbia, 1967)
Zorba & The Greeks – One And Only Girl (Golden State)
Paul St James & The Franky’s – Girl In Future (Monopole)
The Legends – High Towers (Railroad House, 1969)
Shades Of Morley Brown – Pretty Blue Bird (Mercury, 1968)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

The Pagens – Mystic Cloud (ISH-KOMM)
Jude – The Inner Me (Brownstaff)
Graf Zepplin – You´re In My Mind (Orlyn, 1968)
Walham Green East Wapping – Sorry Mr. Green (Columbia, 1968)
The Longboatmen – Take Her Any Time (Polydor, 1966)

Reference: Resident DJ at “News From The Moon” / “Echoes Of Time” in Munich

Social Networks:
Facebook: facebook.com/flo.tipptop 
Mixcloud: mixcloud.com/claude-ga

Videos: Jude – The Inner Me

Next Club Spots:

Friday 12 February 2016 – News From The Moon, or go here for info!
Saturday 12 March 2016 – CRIPZ, or go here for info!

Le Beat Bespoké 11 – London (Easter 2016) 24th to 27th March – see all the details HERE!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 1, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Sebas Avilés – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 12 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with Sebas Avilés (Capitán Groovy) recently who lives in Palma de Mallorca, Spain to talk about his passion for good music.

Reference: Organizer IOM Mod & 60’s Weekend (Mallorca)

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My interest in music started early. With 13 years, early 80s, I was very interested in what I heard on the radio: new wave of Spanish and international groups. I had a sports lesion that forced me to stay in bed for several months and listen to the radio was very good company.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

At first, I recorded tapes at home then reproduces in some bar, club in Mallorca, but the first time I was playing records was in Lleida (Catalonia),1989 in a local pub “Pentagrama” It was there, during the time I was studying, that I started playing music in local Allnighters and the Mod & 60’s weekender
“Walrus Weekend”.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I remember many good times in the last 25 years .. my first time at the International Purple Weekend (León) and my first time outside Spain, Aachen (Germany) in the mid 90’s. Also, closing several festivals in Spain playing music for more than 2 hours… Surely my best moments have been in Spain, the parties are very long and crazy ha ha ha.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I only remember one, because of the drink … I had the feeling that the decks were moving from side to side, it was hard fit the records, but really I just needed a bit of concentration!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Many Djs ! Rob, Speed, Alex Diez, Mr.Anello … were my teachers … they played the records I wanted to play and I only had in Lp compilations.
In the last years: Miguel Ygarza, Lolo, Tony Sanchez, Stephan Golowka, Frantz, they always discover new songs!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I think it was the variety of styles in which I move. From the beat to psychedelia, through the freak beat, blue-eyed soul, garage. I’m pretty eclectic when I play records and try to give new life to the dance floor.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Surely it was Fire & Ice – Music Man.
I bought this record by less than 5 dollars without having heard and just because I liked his song “Mirrors”. Over time it became a classic in the box of many djs

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I have gone through many stages of mod & 60’s music scene. So my influence is very great: hammond groovers, rare soul, beat, British R & B, garage, pop-psych … groovy baby, groovy! I love Small Faces!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, I collect everything that I like. See previous answer!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

In Mallorca I usually play records in different places and when I travel out. The next travels : Rome, London, Lleida

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

All records I have in my home, all have their moment.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
1. Eddie Jefferson – Psychedelic Sally
2. The Richard Kent Style – You Can’t Put Me Down
3. The Bit’ A Sweet – Is It on, Is In Off
4. The Who – Daddy Rollin’ Stone
5. The Birds – Say Those Magic Words
6. Small Faces – Grow Your Own
7. The Standells – Try It
8. 13th Floor Elevators – You’re Gonna Miss Me
9. The Zombies – Just Out Of Reach
10. The Left Banke – I’ve Got Something On My Mind

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. Shel Naylor – One Fine Day
2. Tony Colton – I’ve Laid Some Down In My Time
3. Tonto & The Renegades – Little Boy Blue
4. Tony And The Vizitors – Saturday’s Son
5. The Bucket – I Can’t Help Thinking Of You

Web Links:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/CapitanGroovy

Next Club Spots:

Massimo fa 50 anni – ROME 4 March
LE BEAT BESPOKE 11 – EASTER 2016 – LONDON 24-27 March


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

March 2, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
0 Comment

Juan VG Duque – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 13 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with Juan VG Duque recently who lives in Madrid, Spain to talk about his passion for good music.

Reference: Resident DJ at Mod Generation Club, Madrid. Part of The John Colby Sect Record Label

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

When I was a child I used to look over my parents’ records collection. I was fascinated by one box of cassettes recorded by a friend of them who traveled to London frequently. There was 60’s pop, punk or even reggae. Lucky me! I’ve always been very DIY so I have made/done my own style with all the things I have learnt or someone share with me.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

As far as I remember was in Madrid at Groovie, 2010.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Mushroom Machine Club in Feb’15. Crazy and funny day…and night! I was with Fogbound traveling from León to Madrid when our van broke down. We spent the evening waiting for a friend to pick us up…

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve been very lucky spinning records. I can’t remember a bad experience at all.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I love a lot of Djs from Spain: Miguel, Sebas, Emilio, Xavi… They are real friends, amazing record collectors & Djs, I could stay with them days and days learning and talking about music. But if I have to choose my favourites Lolo and Ángel Brocos are the DJs. They’ve taught me almost everything I know about DJing and I love their taste. Coruña rules, neno!

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

In my box there is place for anything : from soul rhythms to garage punk. A DJ must be versatile spinning records.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I like when I find some U.S. band with british influences. I think records like Meddy’s People – Fantasy World or Mechanical Switch – Everything is red are good examples.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I love all freakbeat & popsike records from UK. Classic or rare; Pretty Things or Winston Fumbs. I never get tired of this amazing music.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, but I’m always filling gaps in Decca & Deram labels.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Mod Generation Club, the club I run with Miguel Ygarza & Alber Acedos
in Madrid.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I couldn’t say just one … I want all the records of the world in my library haha!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
1. Caleb – Woman of distinction (Phillips – 1967)
2. The End – Cardboard watch ( Introspection – Decca – 1969)
3. Outsiders – You remind me (Polydor – 1968)
4. The Byrds – I Wasn’t born to follow ( Columbia – 1969)
5. Gene Latter – Holding a dream ( Spark – 1969)
6. Actress – It’s what you give ( CBS – 1969).
7. Left Banke – She may call you up tonight ( Smash – 1967)
8. Turquoise – Saynia ( Decca -1968)
9. 4PK – Down and Out ( No Label – 1966)
10. Barrier – Spot the lights ( Philips – 1968)

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. MG & Escorts – A Someday Fool
2. Enough’s Enough – Please Remember
3. Paper Blitz Tissue – Grey Man
4. Stone Cutters – Fellow Slave
5. The Attraction – She’s a Girl

Web Links:

Main Site: www.thejohncolbysect.com
Mod Generation Club – Facebook: www.facebook.com/modgenerationclub
The John Colby Sect – Facebook – www.facebook.com/thejohncolbysect 
Twitter: twitter.com/johncolbysect 
Instagram: www.instagram.com/thejohncolbysect
Soundcloud: www.soundcloud.com/thejohncolbysect

Next Club Spots: Saturday 12 Mar, 2016 – Mod Generation Club

Le Beat Bespoké 11 – London (Easter 2016) 24th to 27th March – see all the details HERE!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

February 20, 2016 By : Category : Bands DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
0 Comment