Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Fuzz for Freaks – August Bank Holiday in Brighton 2014

August bank holiday is synonym with the mod pilgrimage to Brighton, a massive migration of hyper accessorized and pimped up scooters, but this year something was lurking beneath the green tide of parkas and amongst the hip suited gents crowding the sunny little town: the fuzz sect was in for a blitzkrieg!

And I, was called, along with fellow high priests (introducing – George Martin  “Theme One”) Alexander Cozzi Lepri of Embrooks fame , Andy Roseaman and Our Lady Holly Calder of the Glaswegian Church of Lysergic, to celebrate the heretic ritual.

First act took place at the Volks, under the arcade on Brighton seafront. There was the usual buzz of mods gathering, some veterans of the night before, some others just arrived and keen to open up the weekend and start the prelude drinking antics in the warm afternoon sun.

To shake this nearly pantheistic idyll here they came, from south France, Les GriGris. Glowering under their fringes, a riotous gang of five took over the stage. Thrilling the air with their mendacious raw rhythm and blues, the way it was, the way it should be, these chaps made their sweaty set of classic covers and standards and, believe me, the word that first arose in mind was “Authentic”!

Singer was sporting a deerstalker hat, Don Craine style, and it was pretty obvious what they were going to deliver… harmonica fuelled stormers from the likes of “Baby what you want me to do” and “Maybelline”, the sort of trembling guitars and raucous vocals renditions that would make the Strypes cringe, and make the Pretty Things, the Primitives and  Wally Tax’s Outsiders proud parents; and with lead guitarist Romeo Kizmiaz casting  pure hendrixian virtuosity and staging raving stunts definitely the best R&B act since the Jaybirds ruled the 90s. Mods around gave their nodding and finger tipping appreciation.

So the first night of Fuzz For Freaks was due to start and, before getting changed I managed, with Ale to have our own initiation passage rite and see the deepness of the obscure knowledge that comes before or in other words a pizza dinner with our very own god of hellfire Berto ‘d Sera.

The Sticky Mike’s Frog Bar, the venue chosen for the night, had a massive cellar complete with stage and a nice bar. At 9 the music was already on, with Lady Holly setting the pace and putting the beautiful people in the right vibe for what had to follow.

They say they hailed from Birmingham but they seemed more like being catapulted straight from the Middle Earth club circa 1968, ladies and gentlemen: The Exploding Sound Machine!

Organ propelled, these folks, who I already have seen at the Blues Kitchen in Camden, were just outstanding as both in the outfits and sound. You instantly got tripped up in a music journey, an all round whirlpool of psychedelic colours and kaleidoscopic noyze. Impressive in the use of all studio trickery, phasing and reverberation they built up the acid frame to inlay the rest of the night.

The venue was packed and the crowd we keen to sweat to the deceiving sound of the swinging sixties and shake their hair to garage punk stompers which the DJ crew was shooting at 1000mph.

At 3am we had to put the word end to the show, but the fun was yet to finish and we moved to the main venue, the Komedia and joined the rest of hardcore dancers till I dunno, but the sun was already up and the seagulls screaming…

No rest for the wicked, so after just a handful of hours I got back to the Volks, which if possible was even more crowded than the day before. The glare of the chrome on the hundreds of scooters in the sunset was epic. So it was the dinner later…one of those memories you always recall with affection, relaxed atmosphere and top, top people were sharing it with me (you know who you were). Back to the B&B to refresh before heading to Sticky Mike’s again.

Two bands were scheduled for the big final. Local band The Dials played an eclectic mix of genres from more gentle pop with a hint of 60s to stronger rock material. The atmosphere was a bit quieter compared to the night before, no matter the second band, The Hypnotic Eye, thought well to shake it up a bit, their way.

Keeping faith to their name, all the audience was indeed staring like they were hypnotized by the seductive vocals of their lead singer. Despite the frantic guitar riffs of Lindsay Murray, another devoted follower of the holy church of the Sixties Underground, I wouldn’t define them as a garage band they don’t fit the role of a revival band, but make their own sound which mixes well their ancestral heritage to the new millennium age.

Hipswinging tunes restarted just after the gig and despite the wreckage of the energies exhumed the night before, people seemed to be tireless so much that once again, captained by psychedelic Rambo Berto, strolled back to Komedia once again at 3 am…

Dr Rob was smoothly conducting the night upstairs and was relieved to see all of us back, and not lost through the Brighton alleys which given our state and the hour could have been a possibility…

If we ever needed to tone ourselves a bit more help was on hand from Mr Royston, who in his kindness, turned up at 5.30 am with a last serving of jagerbombs! We definitely wanted to make the final rush of the weekend at a cavalry charge pace and danced till death!

That was awesome and will be repeated next year. I personally wanted to thank all the night creatures that turned up, the New Untouchables DJ team and all those who managed to chat and put a wide grin on my face. May the fuzz be with you!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

carlosesto

Carlo Sesto is a witty and cheeky character and a mod scene darling from many years standing. He runs the Casbah Candy Records, a mail order shop specialised in mod sounds and beyond. He is the face behind the Italian “Impossibles” mod list and events like “A Hazy Shade of Winter”. An avid collector and an international DJ, his contributions are due on books and compilations.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Clubs DJs Events Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
0 Comment

Paul Orwell and the Night Falls (Newbreed)

This entry is part 4 of 9 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Paul Orwell (Guitar,Vox)
Michael Parrett (Bass)
Stu Marsh (Guitar)
Scotty Roberts (drums)

Discography:
Tell Me Tell Me (vinyl only) single,
Only 250 made and sold out in just 7 days of Pre Order a month before release

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: Tell Me Tell Me / Little Reason 45 on Heavy Soul Records (SOLD OUT)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

As a band not long, we have done around 14 shows, I met Michael at a gig we did ages ago in different shit bands, I trashed the stage before he got on, fun times!

I got him to trade the guitar in for a bass, the other members answered adverts I put out it’s worked out well.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Beatles and 60’s fashion.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Nah, they are all bleak, boring and predictable… well from what I can see and hear.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I haven’t found one, a massive gap in the market I think.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Freak Beat.

06. What are your live shows like?

Fun, tight, magical, raw.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

A lot of early beat, R&B and RnR. We only play lively covers if at all that we enjoy, not your every day covers the more obscure the better.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Hard one as my whole life is music, from producing, writing, and finding new gems. I love record collecting and Art.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Me (Paul Orwell) and my tainted heart, messed up mind and butchered soul.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

My personal favourite is “Little Reason” as I sometimes get a chance to go and interact and dance with the crowd, we sometimes do a cover of “When The Night Falls” By The Eyes, that’s fun!

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Not really, I’m only sociable around friends, family and fans. I’m not one of those who find it important to be part of a scene, just to do my own thing, that’s what is important. If people like it, great if they don’t, sod them.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Producing a track that takes me weeks to get right.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record?  Anything interesting coming up?

We are good with rehearsals, we are perfectionists so we can get everything right to enjoy being loose on stage. We only play gigs that suite our style, sod playing a load of indie gigs, no fun in that. I record every day, lots of interesting things coming up including new releases, new videos, maybe some more gigs abroad. I would love to do a tour.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s been along long while since I’ve read a music mag or listened to any up to date radio station, so I can’t really answer. I should imagine it’s all favouritism.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Again I don’t listen to much past 1972, I like some, Hypnotic Eye and The Teamsters seem to have some magical sounds going on.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Producers: George Martin, Joe Meek, Phil Spector

Artist alive: Paul McCartney,

Artist Dead: John Lennon, Jimi Hendrix, Syd Barrett, Otis Redding

These artists all play big parts in the way I think and are very important to me and music.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Record deal would be nice and some good support slots.
29 September 2014 – The Finsbury, London with Magnetic Mind
11 October 2014 – Crossfire 25, 229 venue, London

Web Links:

facebook.com/PAULORWELLOFFICIAL
twitter.com/PAULORWELLMUSIC
soundcloud.com/paulorwell


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

New Electric Ride (Newbreed)

This entry is part 5 of 9 in the series Newbreed4

Formed from the last surviving members of the hardest working pub/club band in north-east England, New Electric Ride have achieved some remarkable things in the short time they’ve been together. With support slots for legendary 1960’s group – The Pretty Things, under their belt, a Black Cab Session recorded, regular airplay on UK, Spanish, Belgian and French radio, it’s no wonder that N E R are hotly tipped as one of the best new acts to emerge from the recent psychedelic resurgence.

Band Members:
Jack Briggs (Guitar/Vocal)
Paul Nelson (Organ/Vocal)
Adam Cole (Bass/Vocal)
Craig Oxberry (Drums/Vocal)

Discography:
EP (2013)
Balloon Age (2014, Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records)

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: facebook.com/events  &  facebook.com/doublesightweekender

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been recording as New Electric Ride since November 2012! Jack, Adam and Craig played as a pub band for 3 years and we met Paul at a wedding gig we played. We were looking for an organist and he said he’d love to have a go. Sort of went from there, really!

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

A love and appreciation for music from the 1960’s/70s and a desire to write and record interesting pop music. We’re not real into ‘jamming’, as such. We’re much more interested in writing pop songs.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

We’re living in London at the moment, but where we’re from (Sunderland) there are some great bands kicking about. Lilliput, Hyde & Beast and Field Music stick out. They’re all just doing their own thing and not trying to play to any current popular genre.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

In Sunderland it’s pretty dead, but here in London is thriving! We really love it down here.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

Polished, lysergic sleaze-pop.

06. What are your live shows like?

I think they’re pretty intense! The songs can be quite complicated to play and a lot require 4-part harmony, so we’re always kept our toes to an extent. It can be quite hard work due to all the tempo changes and falsetto vocal, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Zappa, Beefheart, Moby Grape, Black Sabbath, Dungen, Peter Wyngarde, Cream, Jethro Tull, Colosseum, Mountain, Tame Impala, Can, Yes, Bobbie Gentry, the list is endless.

I’d like to cover some Tull songs. Any excuse to play the flute.

I don’t think we really despise any artist, to be honest! We despise a lot of how the music industry works, ha. I guess

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

London, Paris, Nepal, the Marquis de Sade, cacti, succulents, Ambrose Bierce, David Icke, isolation, insects, plants.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everyone writes individually, never together, for some reason!

Subjects range from Submarines, French libertines, love (of course), lust (of course), animals, cannibalism and the Royal Family.

10. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

I can’t speak for the other lads, but I love playing Mr. Bumblebee. It has a lovely bounce and interesting parts.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I think it’s thriving. People are really beginning to take note of all the great things that are happening at the moment. We don’t participate as much as we should, but when we do, we always have a great time.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording an LP was really bloody hard. Mainly because we had such a short period of time to get it completed, and we are split between London and Sunderland. We had to get the train/coach up to Sunderland every weekend for a month and just hammer the sounds out. It was tough.

13. How often do you rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We usually get together to rehearse before a show, but apart from that, never! We’re looking to hammer the gigs over the rest of the year and hopefully (fingers crossed) get over to the USA in 2015.

Always interesting things on the horizon! New single, collaboration with Peter Wyngarde, some debauched videos to name a few!

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Poor. The levels of snobbery and ‘cool’ are outrageous at the moment. The whole ‘psych revival’ is getting old, too. It seems like anyone with a phaser pedal and a fringe can be in a ‘psych band’.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Tame Impala are impeccable, Prince Rupert’s Drops should be on every radio station, Hidden Masters are absolutely brilliant. There are loads of great bands at the moment, but they’re all being overshadowed by the ones with money. Billboards on the London underground for Temples?! Crazy.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Jonathan Wilson for me, absolutely phenomenal musician and producer. It’d be worth it just to see his collection of amps. What a guy, so passionate.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

More music! We’re planning on releasing a single before Christmas that we think may draw some interest. Gig-wise we’re playing the Doublesight Weekender in Glasgow on October 4th and the amazing Crossfire 25 night on the 11th! Can’t wait for October!

Web Links:

newelectricride.com
facebook.com/newelectricride
soundcloud.com/newelectricride
newelectricride.bandcamp.com


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

The Wicked Whispers (Newbreed)

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series Newbreed4

Band Members:
Mike  Murphy (Vocals/Guitars)
Toby Virgo (Bass/Backing Vocals)
Steven Penn (Organist)
Andy Smith (Guitars)
Nathan Sayer (Drums)

Discography:
2011 – EP ‘The Dark Delights of the Wicked Whispers (Electone)
2012 – Single ‘Dandelion Eyes’ (Electone)
2013 – Single ‘Voodoo Moon’ (Electone)
2014 – Single ‘Chronological Astronaut’ (Electone)
2014 – LP ‘Maps of the Mystic’ (Electone)

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

The Wicked Whispers formed in 2010 but arrived in 2011 with ’‘The Dark Delights of The Wicked Whispers’ EP on limited 10” which put the band on the map. We  played our first debut show onown event called ‘The Butterflies Ball and The Grasshoppers Feast’ bringing Arthur Brown in as support.. Mike Murphy formed the band after demoing a new project and decided to put a band around it which then evolved into the band people know today.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

The Doors, Love, Strawberry Alarm Clock, The Byrds, Jimmy Campbell and James Brown.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Levons and Red Sands because they are great and also on Electone Records.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

It’s a small scene in Liverpool which we don’t have much involvement with being honest . There are regular nights at The Go Go Cage (held at the Cabin Club) but we occasionally put on huge shows ourselves like ‘The Butterflies Ball and the Grasshoppers Feast’.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

That’s up to the listeners but you could say it’s a melting pot of US west-coast meets London 60s jangle wrapping around some lucid songwriting.

06. What are your live shows like?

Pretty intense as a lot of our songs are very intricate and short but we like to put on a full on live performance and give it our everything on stage.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our main influences we’ve touched on. We rarely play covers as we put more time into developing our music but we have played tracks by Jimmy Campbell and the Velvet Underground at shows. We don’t despise anyone but we know what music we can relate to and like.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Love, lie and positivity. Plus a load of ale and general laddish behavior.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Mike Murphy writes the songs and prepares the music. The subject matter is vast but he mainly likes to develop dream like perspectives and tries to explore unanswered questions and wonders.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Each member of the group would say something different but ‘Chronological Astronaut’ has been a favorite since the band formed.
Same regards to our favorite songs but lets just say ‘Michaelangelo’ by Jimmy Campbell because it is a classic.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Were not too clued up but it seems fragmented currently. When we started hitting the road in 2011, there was a tight circuit of bands including us playing the same nights up and down the UK. We have seen sparks of this but its not as tight as it was. It would be great to get this going again but we will be popping up at a couple in the near future.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Recording our debut album and Mike Murphys challenge as first time producer.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

It all depends as there are several levels to consider. We are always working on the next thing and split rehearsals up to required functions. If we have a live obligation we prepare for it, we don’t rehearse blind. But weve already started working on the next thing to follow up from our debut album out September so we are doing sessions for that.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

This is a complicated one as we are fully aware of how the music industry works. We just want to play and release our music and if anyone in the press or media  likes our music and wants to play and write about it, that’s great.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Of course, there’s loads of great stuff currently. Highlights are Temples, French Boutique and Michael Head and the Red Elastic Band.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Theres loads we would like to do. Recording in Sunset Sound in LA is on our list. Regards producers that would be telling our next steps but someone looking to develop new ideas from our favorites music that inspires us.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

Theres always stuff coming up but we are most excited about promoting our debut album through the UK over the next few months with some great live shows. Our big album launch in Liverpool will be great as its being held at The Kazimier which is a stunning venue. We are also bringing the brass and string section with us on that one. We have an exciting Crossfire 25 show in October ( the 11th) launching the LP in London and then we are doing some tour dates with Ian McNabb and The Moons with much more on the way including another headline tour. Beyond our debut album lets just say the follow up will be quick as we are headed into the studio before Christmas.

Web Links:

thewickedwhispers.com
facebook.com/thewickedwhispers
twitter.com/Wicked_Whispers 
soundcloud.com/thewickedwhispers


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
1 Comments

20th Century Buy

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Movers and Shakers

Scotch Martin speaks to editor of MidCentury Magazine, Tabitha Teuma, to find out what makes MidCentury work, who buys it and how one lucky reader can win some goodies.

It’s a brave individual who launches a magazine these days, with circulation falling across the board as tablets and mobile technology change the way we access information and content. But this luxurious magazine is as suited to print as British R&B is to vinyl – and like a vintage 45, it even smells wonderful.

I’m amazed that I wasn’t aware of it until brought to my attention by a former work colleague and keen furniture collector. This is no flea-market guide book or junk shop Lonely Planet guide to old furniture. This is high-end, uber-design with exquisite taste but firmly rooted in genuine vintage designs.

The highlight of issue five, my review copy, is the feature on Fernley Hey, architect Peter Womersley’s amazing 1950s modernist house in Yorkshire. It looks so beautiful that it takes your breath away, filled as it is with original furniture, crockery and design of the highest quality. To borrow a MidCentury phrase, it’s ‘too much’.

nm_sept14_mcm3

Interview

Tabitha, how long has MidCentury magazine been operating and what was the motivation for setting it up originally?

MidCentury was first published in May 2011. It came about through my interest in 1950s and ’60s furniture and architecture. Having edited an arts journal for a couple of years, I was looking to start my own magazine and I could see that, despite several US titles, there was no UK publication covering the subject. I’d go to furniture fairs in London and see an array of magazines from the States, with advertisements for New York dealers (that I certainly couldn’t get to) and articles on homes in California or Cincinnati, but with little mention of Modernist architecture in Britain or even Europe.

Since when has MidCentury design and architecture been taken seriously by the professionals and art dealers as opposed to the vintage collectors?

An increase in appreciation and popularity of MidCentury design means that ‘MidCentury’ has become a valued genre in its own right, earning itself a permanent place in the design canon of furniture and architecture. High-end auction houses have held 20th-Century furniture sales for many years now and MidCentury pieces are now far more prominent in the mid-range market, with antique dealers and antique fairs increasingly swapping their previously fashionable Georgian or Victorian pieces for 20th century items.

Many of the Untouchables readers have been collecting 50s, 60s and 70s furniture and ceramics since the 1980s, what type of items are the most sought after by high-end collectors today?

The rarer Scandinavian classics, by designers like Finn Juhl and Tapio Wirkkala for instance, never fail to achieve high prices in the auction house market. However, even within the lifetime of MidCentury magazine, some British manufacturers, like Robin Day furniture for Hille, Merrow Associates, Gordon Russell and Robert Heritage for Archie Shine, have become popular with collectors and prices have increased to reflect this. Furniture by French designer Jean Prouvé was never manufactured on the scale of some of the American and Scandinavian pieces, and now fetches top dollar as a combined result of rarity and desirability. Pieces by Italian designer Gio Ponti are increasingly rare and very sought after by high-end collectors.

What town or conurbation in the UK has the best 1960s and 70s houses in your opinion in terms of design and durability? And what’s the greatest surviving MidCentury home in the UK, in your opinion?

There are plenty of interesting MidCentury estates dotted around the country, but for me it’s the Dulwich Estate in South-east London that I’m most fond of. Designed by Architects Austin Vernon and Partners and built by Wates between 1957 and 1970, the estate displays an extraordinary range of property ‘types’, many of them experiments at the time: from flat-roofed ranch-style bungalows and copper-roofed ‘pepperpot’ homes to tile-clad townhouses and high-rise apartments. I am probably a bit biased, as I once lived there myself.

In terms of the best surviving example of a British MidCentury home, a few places spring to mind. There’s Farnley Hey, the 1954 house designed by Peter Womersley in Yorkshire, the David Shelley House from 1970 near Nottingham (both of which we’ve been lucky enough to photograph for features in MidCentury), plus of course The Homewood in Surrey, which is open to the public. Designed by Patrick Gwynne in 1937 it is owned by the National Trust – I’d recommend booking a visit.

What do you think are the overlooked items from the period 1950 – 1980 that will become collectable in the future, for those without large budgets to but designer vintage items?

A couple of years ago, I would have advised anyone wanting to make a canny investment to buy Dutch. The designs were far more pared down and utilitarian than even the Scandinavian counterparts, with more metal utilised than timber – in fact, I used to hear people liken the pieces to the sort of thing they’d come across in the school common room. Tastes have moved on however and the price of Dutch furniture has soared, so it may now be necessary to look further afield. Increasingly though, as the MidCentury aesthetic establishes itself as a distinct genre, people are coming to appreciate good quality pieces form the period, regardless of whether they have a name attached to them.  As prices increase, it’s noticeable that names and brands are becoming less important to buyers at a lower price-point – I think that in the future, the quality and aesthetic of a piece will be key and these factors should be considered when collecting today.

Finally, what makes a collectable piece and how important is condition?

I’d say that as long as a piece displays skilled workmanship and is constructed from quality materials, it can make for a savvy collectable. It’s difficult to articulate what it is that sets apart the furniture of the most celebrated designers – it may be a subtle curve to a chair leg, a tapered back rest or the sensitive juxtaposition of caning and teak.

Always try to seek an item in the best condition possible. Severe structural damage can be detrimental to value, but these are not new pieces: as with vintage fashion, vinyl records or classic cars, they have a history, and this should be celebrated.

nm_sept14_mcm4

Nutsmag readers can enter a draw to win a copy of the current issue and a three-month subscription to the digital back catalogue (seven issues available currently via iTunes and Exact Editions) – these can be read on any tablet, smart phone or computer.

Using the subject line: ‘Sign me up to the MidCentury mailing list’ email editor@midcenturymagazine.com. This offer closes on Friday 31 October 2014 and the winner will be notified via the email supplied.

In joining the mailing list, you’ll be notified when new articles are posted on their website. There is no obligation and you can cancel your email alerts at any time using the same email with the subject line ‘Remove me from mailing list’.

Rules available on request. 

Photography ©Brotherton/Lock: www.brothertonlock.com &
Bruce Hemming Photography: www.bhphoto.biz


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

Scotch Martin

Since the local youth club in the early-eighties Martin’s been Djing with records of one sort or another. Spots at the CCI National Mod Rallies across Britain in the 80s were followed in 1990 by the first in a line of successful northern soul and mod clubs in Glasgow. With four others he started Goodfoot in 91, with Acid Jazz-influenced playlists of Blow Up in London, and Brighton Beach in Leeds. Goodfoot arguably paved the way for a new generation of mod-influenced clubs in Glasgow over the past 20 years. Living in London in the late 90s Martin DJ’d at neuvo-modernist clubs including Where’s Jude and Lordy Lord, as well as regularly spinning at Duffer of St. George parties and other happenings. A career highlight was supporting legendary organist, Jimmy Smith, as well as pulling off 10 consecutive club nights during the 1995 Glasgow Jazz Festival. By 2001, back in Glasgow, Caledoniasoul launched. A definitive milestone in the Scottish soul scene, the club ran for six years and brought Butch, Mick Smith, Mick H, Arthur Fenn, Mike Ritson, Dave Rimmer and Ady Croasdell to Scotland for the first time to experience the sweaty, full-on atmosphere for themselves. As a journalist Martin has always written about music. In 2004 he tracked down singer and organist, Bill Bush, whose soulful, jazzy rarity, I’m Waiting on Ronn, was hitting on the northern soul scene. After visiting Bill in the USA and interviewing him for Manifesto he brought the band over to perform in the UK, complete with Hammond B3, and has helped Bill profit for the first time from the 1968 b-side. Martin is married to Caroline, has two children, lives in the London suburbs. Still collecting after 30 years!

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : Articles Design Front Page Inspiration Interviews Objects Style Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment

Nick Brown – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 2 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Nick Brown is based in London, UK. He describes himself as a London Rare Soul DJ and promoter, ran the Scenesville nights at Notre Dame and The Camden Centre in the early Noughties. He took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

As a young kid I had older brothers and sisters, so I was always exposed to some sort of music, but really got into music seriously with 2-Tone in 1979/80 and was a regular at the Orpington Civic Hall Mod nights between then and 1984, when they finished. It was an under-18s ‘youth club’ night, but what an education!  The music I heard there was astonishing, from the standard Kinks/Who/Small Faces/Stones chart classics right through to stuff like Mary Love “Lay This Burden Down”, Huey Piano Smith “Don’t You Just Know It”, or The Action “I’ll Keep On Holding On – these might seem like basic things to us now, but if you think how unlikely a gig like that would be today, with 400 under-18s all going mad to something like The Carnaby or The 81, it will put into perspective what special times they were.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Bit of a dim memory, but I think it was a gig I put on myself somewhere around King’s Cross/Pentonville Road in about 1985. I can’t remember the name of the pub and when I’m in the area I do wonder what became of the place – they may even have demolished it for Thameslink or something.  We had about 30-40 in, which was OK for a small do in those days, and I would have played stuff like Donald Jenkins “I Walk Alone”, The Wanderers “You Can’t Run Away From Me”, The Rubies “Spanish Boy” and other popular but affordable 100 Club sounds of the time, as well as Flash McKinley “I’ll Rescue You”, which was largely unknown at the time, but my mate Miles liked it, so I’d always play it for him.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Probably the last half-hour of the final night at Notre Dame, when I was running Scenesville there. We were only there for about a year, but the whole year had gone as well as I could have hoped for, and I remember getting to the end of it and thinking “phew – got through all right”.  I think one of the things that made it quite special was the crowd was pretty emotional that night. They’d formed quite an attachment to the venue and they engaged very enthusiastically with the music that was played there, so I think it was a bit of a wrench for people to see it go. I played our last record (it was always Clyde McPhatter “Lonely People”), and then Andy Rix let me play his JD Bryant “I Won’t Be Coming Back”, which I thought was the most appropriate record we could say goodbye to the venue with. The handclaps cracking out from the dancefloor during those 2 ½ minutes are a memory that will stay with me forever!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

No real disasters, though I remember a funny incident DJing at a friend’s book launch sometime in the late ‘90s (John Reed’s Weller biog) at the Helter Skelter bookshop. The idea was to play all Weller-related stuff, and I was DJing from both my box and his, because I had a lot of the ‘earlier’ stuff (the Jam, their influences and the tracks they’d covered) and he had a good stock of Post-Jam stuff (Respond label, etc).  Great plan, great night, except there were no headphones, and I did get to a bit of the night when I was pulling unmarked 12” white labels out of his box and hoping the result was going to go my way! Proper seat-of the pants DJing, but it was all good fun!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Ady Croasdell, for playing one-offs next to pocket-money classics and treating them exactly the same; collector-researchers like Andy Rix and Gilly for the incredible stuff they are able to unearth by taking digging deep to another level; Kitch for blending a pioneering spirit with faultless taste and a staggering depth of 45s to select from;  Dean Anderson for his uncompromising sense of quality standards; Randy Cozens for playing sets dictated by pure taste rather than what’s big; the Stafford 60s Mafia for their campaigning determination; Chris Dale and John Weston for their imaginative approach with established records; my wife Dawn for not caring what anyone else is playing.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I came to the Northern Soul scene during the mid-80s when the Stafford/100 Club axis was setting the tone, and the whole ethos of the scene was about pioneering discovery and exploring the boundaries around the ‘core’ sound of traditional 70’s-style Northern Soul, while still keeping in touch with the essential spirit of dance Soul. The buzz of being at a venue the first night they play a new discovery is for me the best part of the Soul scene, and it’s probably an attitude I inherited from that time. It’s easy to find unknown records that are below par or that don’t fit the genre: it’s much more challenging to find new stuff and keep the standards up, but it’s more exciting too. As a DJ, I try to do that, but also to respect the heritage of what’s been found up to now, particularly if it’s good but currently ‘under-represented’ on the scene. The challenge is to put that all into a creative, entertaining and unpredictable blend, avoiding the easy option but still making sense to everyone in the room. It’s a tall order, but a good target to aim for.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Pic & Bill “What Does It Take” is probably the one that stands out. I bought it in about 1984 (when I was still at school) from a stall at Bromley Market for about £2 or £2.50. As I was a regular, the stallholder recommended it to me, saying anything by them was worth having. I took him up on it, and bought 3 or 4 P&B titles (including “Talk About Love”) for the same kind of money, and was a sworn Pic & Bill fan from then on. Because of its Northern Soul ingredients (it ticks just about every NS box you can think of and is a killer tune), I assumed “What Does It Take” was a widely-known oldie, but over the years it became clear it was virtually unknown and it has turned out to be freakishly rare. Up to today I only know of one other copy for certain, which  Ady Croasdell got from the Charay offices, so probably their file copy.  A real prized piece, and I play it out at every possible opportunity.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

The first band to really strike a deep chord with me was The Specials and I like any act like them that is really decisive about its attitude and its music. Favourite Soul acts include Ray Pollard, Pic & Bill, Johnny Gilliam, Carolyn Crawford, but if we’re honest, what we really collect on the Northern Soul scene is not so much vocalists as songwriters, arrangers and producers, and some of my favourites are Curtis Mayfield in his Okeh years, Eddie Singleton, The Funk Brothers, Eddie Silvers, Arthur Wright, Barry Despenza, The Harthon team and and Popcorn Wylie. Beyond the Soul Scene, I’m a big Garage fan and as far as I’m concerned there is nobody that comes close to The Dovers for an overall output of work. I’m also a great lover of Indie music, and the toppermost band for me will always be the Stone Roses, who to me personify the principle that it’s better for some of the people to like you a lot than for all of the people to like you a bit, which is a concept I think is good to keep in mind when promoting and DJing.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Currently, the general price of records means it doesn’t make sense for me to collect any labels or artists A to Z, but there are certainly some labels I like to pick up whenever I can because I know I’m going to get something good. Murco (Shreveport Louisianna) has never let me down for Southern dancers and Deep slowies, nor has Enjoy from New York for the Early Soul/R&B end of things. The label I’m most focused on at the moment is Gay Shel from Dallas, Texas, which has a few cheapies but much of it is very hard to find and all of it is excellent, so I’m trying to get it in before everyone catches on and the prices go through the roof! Dallas/Fort Worth in general is a recording centre I really rate for Soul releases, as are Georgia and the Carolinas, though only the proper Soul stuff from the Carolinas, not the ‘Carolinas Merseybeat’ stuff. I also like a nice bit of Lowrider.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Errr, anywhere that’ll have me! Actually, I’m planning to get some Scenesville events going by the end of the year, so I guess just watch this space…

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Hard to say without falling into cliché, but generally what gets me excited is a record with three characteristics: very rare, very good and very unknown. Something with all those three things to the max would be what I want most, and naturally, I don’t know what it is yet!  Out of the known things it would be something like original acetates of the Ringleaders “All Of My Life”, Little Ann “What Should I Do” The Temptones “That’s When You Know You’re In Love, etc. I remember seeing an Edgewood acetate of the slow side of the pulled Jimmy Armstrong release on Shrine, and it was the closest you’d ever get to owning a copy of the 45. I suppose an Edgewood acetate of the uptempo side must be out there somewhere – that’d be worth having!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

First two are dead certs, head and shoulders above everything else for me, the rest is in roughly the right order

  1. Shirley Edwards: Dream My Heart (Shrine)
  2. Bobbie Smith: Walk On Into My Heart (American Arts)
  3. Tommy Yates: Something’s Got To Give (Verve)
  4. The Dolls: The Reason Why (Toy)
  5. Al Williams: I Am Nothing (La Beat)
  6. Margaret Mandolph: Something Beautiful (Planetary)
  7. Anita Anderson: Little Bit Longer (Contact)
  8. Doris Troy: I’ll Do Anything (Calla)
  9. Eric Mercury: Lonely Girl (Sac)
  10. Arin Demain Silent Treatment (Blue Star)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Pic & Bill: What Does It Take (Charay)>
  2. Jessie James: Are You Gonna Leave Me (Shirley)
  3. Les Watson & The Panthers: Occasionally I Cry (Pompeii)
  4. Bob & Fred: I’ll Be On My Way (Big Mack)
  5. The Moments: Baby I Want You (Hog)

Web Links:

www.scenesville.co.uk

Next Club Spots: Crossfire 25, London, October 11th 2014


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Dawn Brown – Hey! Mrs DJ

This entry is part 3 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Dawn Brown is based in London, UK and describes herself as an avid record collector. She took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I remember getting a Drifters album for a birthday present when I was 9, which I distinctly remember playing over and over again. I remember my dad having lots of records that I raided, from the Platters to the Pioneers. I remember my dad telling me that he wrote songs for Chuck Berry and  Arthur Conley – a story that was completely untrue, but I believed it at that age. (He did produce some African highlife and reggae, so at the time it didn’t seem out of the realms of possibility)  Anyway, maybe the non- existent ‘family connection’ made me naturally take more interest in such artists. Music has always been a passion to listen to indoors, but it was definitely the mod revival that got me into a music ‘scene’. I used to go to Orpington Civic most weeks for maybe 2-3 years until it closed in 1984, but fortunately, it was that same year that I was introduced to the 100 Club by Gene Robertson and that was the start of my rare 60s soul journey.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I think it was a 100 Club warm up do, which was run by Gene Robertson, in a bar called ‘Liaisons’ near Great Portland Street. The first 100 Club spot I did was in 1987 I think. Not sure if this was the occasion I am thinking of, but I think that was one of the old ‘collectors nights’ that Ady did with everyone double-decking. I was with Ken Aitchison, who had a broken leg at the time, so somehow we had to get each other onto the stage.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I think the October Crossfire 2013 was really memorable in terms of the crowd/atmosphere being great, and there was a good balance of being able to play well-known things as well as being able to throw in lesser played records and the dancers being up for all of it. The 100 Club in March of 2011 was like that too. I used to love being on early at Scenesville at  Notre Dame as there was a freedom to play almost anything I wanted to without having to balance the needs of the dance floor too much.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Well, there haven’t been too many true disasters, but I do get a bit traumatized if the right tools aren’t available. E.g. record centres, headphones etc. I do make sure these days that I don’t drink too much red wine, as one time when I was double-decking with Nick, I went to take off his record in the middle of it playing, thinking I was removing my previous record. Once I managed to switch off the whole system by pressing one button.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

There are so many worthy people to mention, but I would highlight:

Ady Croasdell – incredible contribution to the scene.

Ian Clark – great taste in music, and I miss not getting to hear him these days.

Kitch, Dean Anderson, Jodie Daley, John Pugh, Cliff Steele, Frank Giacobbe, John Weston, Tony Smith, Roger Banks. All different to each other, but all with an integrity that I like. They all seem to play sounds they really believe in, and are not afraid to clear the odd floor.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I am grateful to have joined the northern soul scene in the mid 80s, when there was a richness and diversity in tempo and rhythm that has very much affected what I collect by having been exposed to it at that time. I really like big, epic male soul voices and a good melody. I am also really interested in the social history going on at the time that these records were produced, which gives another dimension to the records.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

It would have to be the Sparkels. I did not discover it, but bought Vince Ayres’ copy, which was sold as the first in the country and an unknown at the time, sometime in 1987. I remember buying it in McDonalds after the 100 Club and bidding against Nick for it!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

I wouldn’t say I have a favourite artist, but if I had to say one, it would be a hybrid of Sam Cooke, Clyde McPhatter, Levi Stubbs, Chuck Jackson and Ray Pollard.

In terms of musical influence – if around collecting, it would definitely be Val Palmer. She was seriously collecting in the mid eighties when it was rare for a woman to collect at all. There were a few others of her ilk that I knew of at the time, like Joan Livesey and Sarah Haden, Sharnya, (and Jo Wallace had even come and ‘gone’ by that time, but mainly, it was just men who collected that I personally knew of. She was a great role model for collecting independently from a partner and not using a boyfriend’s records to dj. She did it herself and was very much able to hold her own.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No definitely not – firstly, I would never be able to afford it, and secondly, I only buy records that I really like anyway. There are still far too many records that I love and do not have in my collection to justify spending on collecting lesser liked records on any particular label. Not for me.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Next Crossfire 11th October 2014. After that, God knows, wherever will have me.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Don Gardner – Cheatin Kind – Sedgrick. Can’t see it happening.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

  1. The Tempests – Someday
  2. Sonny Ace – Little Girl
  3. The Phonetics – Don’t Let Love …
  4. Tommy Ridgley – My Love Gets Stronger
  5. The Sparkels – Try Love

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Top Ten – in no particular order

  1. The Originals – Suspicion
  2. Teardrops – Every Step I Take
  3. Kae Williams –Our Love is Dying
  4. Billy Miranda – Count Your Teardrops
  5. Yvonne Carroll – Please Don’t Go
  6. George Lemmons – Fascinating Girl
  7. Brenda Holloway – Crying Time
  8. Jimmy James and the Vagabonds – Come to me Softly
  9. Martha Starr – Sweet Temptation
  10. The Isley Brothers – This Old Heart of Mine

Next Club Spots: Crossfire 25, London, 11th October 2014


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Craig Reece – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 4 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Craig Reece is based in Glasgow, Scotland and describes himself as a vinyl nut. He took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

At primary school a friend’s older brother made me a tape of Led Zeppelin IV and Electric Ladyland, been hooked ever since!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I used to dj at the school dances, playing a mix of older classics and newer tracks, it was a good introduction to playing to empty dancefloors… I’ve been lucky to have had a lot of busier ones since those days.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I played a huge Halloween party a few years ago in Brussels which was the biggest crowd I’ve ever seen, all in fancy dress and they went crazy for everything we played, and everytime I’ve had the chance to play at Cripz in Belfast has been incredible, though more difficult to remember!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I once got into a big argument with a guy because he thought every dj at a mod event should play Paul Weller and I don’t have any of his records, that was a bit uncomfortable, but on the scene, things are usually extremely friendly. “Civilain” weddings are a nightmare though!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

There are so many people I admire and respect for their tastes and will to try out new sounds; especially Lee Miller, Paddy & Sarge, Alessandro from Gothenburg, Rich Hero, Florian Tippelt, Fabrice from Paris, Rob and or course my fellow Doublesight djs and the extended family in Glasgow. They are all diggers and djs with attitude but love sharing music, that’s what it’s all about in my opinion.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I like to play things I enjoy, that make me want to move, I like to dip into different styles and always liked the records that don’t fit into categories neatly, the ones that cross over two or more between psych/folk/jazz/funk/r&b/beat/shakers etc are usually the ones I enjoy the most.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I’ve been lucky to have a lot of good finds, but as they say you need to spend to find the rarest stuff, either time or money, and at times I’ve sacrificed both. It’s the things you’ve never heard anyone play at the time. For rarity, I once rescued a copy of The Who’s “Who Did It” (withdrawn fanclub lp) from a box that was being thrown out.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

I’ve always loved the Stones, Led Zep, MC5 and Tubby Hayes. MC5 opened me up to jazz, political soul music and garage so probably them, but I got into them via Primal Scream who I’ve always been a huge fan of.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Tubby Hayes is the only artist I’d be keen to get absolutely everything by, I buy psych, garage, r&b, jazz 45s and lps, I also have a lot of latin, indian and african records, to be honest, anything I like to sound of, I’ve got a load of everything at home from detroit to claypso, I just love good records!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The first Saturday of every month I co-host Gimme Shelter in Glasgow with the uber-talented mod queen Holly Calder, and I’ve been lucky to join as a resident at the annual Doublesight Weekender (first weekend in October) as well (be there!).

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Tough question, err, the most amazing one no-one else has heard yet! I’ve got a huge wants list from the rarest classics to pretty unknown but under-appreciated randoms, I’d like them all ideally.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Malhalia Jackson – Elijah Rock
  2. Spencer Mac – Ka-Ka Kabya Mow-Mow (Penny Farthing)
  3. MFQ – Night Time Girl (RCA Victor)
  4. Terry Winter – I Know (New)
  5. Duane Yates – Passin’ On Bye (N-Joy

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Top Ten – in no particular order

  1. Don Wilkerson – Camp Meetin’ (Blue Note)
  2. John Cameron Quartet – Troublemaker (Deram)
  3. One In A Million – Frefereek Fernando (MGM)
  4. Fleur de Lys – Gong With The Luminous Nose (Polydor)
  5. The Gipsys – Malala! (Odeon Pops)
  6. Mr Dynamite – Sh’Mon (Sue)
  7. Ugly Custard – Custard’s Last Stand (Kaleidoscope)
  8. Manny Corchado – Pow Wow (Decca)
  9. Inell Young – The Next Ball Game (Big 9)
  10. Delphine – Le Fermeture Eclaire (Decca)

Web Links:

doublesightweekender.com
facebook.com/craig.reece

Next Club Spots: Gimme Shelter (Monthly), Glasgow, Doublesight 2014, Glasgow and Crossfire 25 11th October 2014,  London!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music UK Tags:, , , , ,
0 Comment

Pete Feely – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 5 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Pete Feely is based in Derby, UK and describes himself as Head Honcho at Perfumed Garden clothing and ‘The Perfumed Garden of Musical Delights’ club night. He took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into music at a very early age. The catalyst for me was when John Lennon was murdered: I remember in the days after his death, there being a lot of programmes on his life as a Beatle, on the television. As a very impressionable young boy, their look and music had an overwhelming effect on me, and still does to this day.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I started spinning the vinyl indirectly, at a very early age: This would usually occur over a weekend, when my dad, accompanied by some of inebriated  friends, would come back from the local pub. He would get me to play his Irish records for him, as he couldn’t operate the record player!

My first serious DJ slot would’ve been my first club night in Derby (The Deep 5) in the mid nineties. Mostly from compilations albums and the odd 45.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I’d say the first time I got to DJ at Mousetrap, London, back in the early noughties.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Ha Ha… The one that springs to mind (there has been quite a few!) It was a Mod Club night in Nottingham (I won’t name and shame) The organisers seemed to disapprove of my record choices (MC5, The Stooges etc) After 5 records, I was kindly asked to leave the decks…

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Rob Bailey, Speed and Jack White. Being lucky to have experienced these boys sharing the decks together at the Mousetrap in the late nineties. Amazing times.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I wouldn’t say I have really got a sound, as such. I just try to mix it up with rare and well known cuts.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I once stumbled upon a collection that was going for sale: It was a Psych collectors dream come true. The seller had doubles of records like, Turnstyle,July,The Attack… the list goes on. And all were at unbelievable prices!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

Like I mentioned earlier, The Beatles influence on my way of life is pretty monumental. The Byrds,The Move,The Hollies,The Small Faces,Abba and The Stone Roses have all played and still play their part in what I love to listen to.

I must also mention the Pebbles,Nuggets and Rubble compilations (and many more), which have all shaped the kind of 45’s I have wanted to own. And still do…

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

My collecting tastes are very eclectic.
The common thread being a psychedelic sound.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Crossfire, London in October. The Perfumed Garden Of Musical Delights, Derby in November.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Such a hard question, as it changes daily and there are so many I desire. If ‘push comes to shove’ The Smoke / Dreams of dreams.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

(in no particular order!)

1. The Move – Fire Brigade
2. The Beach Boys – God Only Knows
3. George Harrison – My Sweet Lord
4. The Beatles – And Your Bird Can Sing
5. Rupert’s People – Dream In My Mind
6. The Byrds – All I Really Want To Do
7. The Drag Set – Day And Night
8. The Hollies – I Can’t Let Go
9. Fleur De Lys – Circles
10. The Smoke – Dreams Of Dreams

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. The Hollies – I Can’t Let Go
2. Spice – In Love
3. Mike Stuart Span – Children Of Tomorrow
4. The Factory – Path Through The Forest
5. The Majority – Our Love Will Be So Strong (acetate)

Web Links:

facebook.com/theperfumedgarden
facebook.com/PerfumedGardenOfMusicalDelights

Next Club Spots: Crossfire 25, London, October 2014, and The Perfumed Garden of Musical Delights, Derby, November 2014


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 18, 2014 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music UK Tags:, , ,
0 Comment

Roberta – Hey! Mrs DJ

This entry is part 1 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 2

Roberta Pompetti is from Teramo, Italy and describes herself as a mom, wife and mod girl. She took some time out recently to talk to Dr. Robert @Nutsmag.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

It was in the early 90s, when the Brit Pop had spread to Italy. In particular I was a Blur fan and so, intrigued by the origins of the English music phenomenon, I discovered the 60 ‘s sound and bands such as The Kinks, The Who and The Creation and from this I discovered Mod!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first DJ slot was in Perugia, it was a night organized by Perugia Cool Scene, if my memory does not let me down it was in 2004. I remember my hands were shaking; my real fear was to do something technically wrong.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I am lucky to play around Europe and Italy. I really enjoyed the Clean Cut in Barcelona in 2014, Euro Ye Ye in 2012 and the Italian Job Rimini in 2013, but also the Kings ‘n Queens in Amburg 2006. This was because I was the only DJ to spin R&B to a large Soul crowd. I was scared about that, but thankfully it was a success.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

For sure some events outside the Mod/60 ‘s scene. Once someone asked me if I could spin Destiny Childs as the flyer said that I spin R&B!!!!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I might be biased but my favorite DJ is my countryman Andrea Ceritano, he has a really refined taste and although I have listened to him DJ very often I never tire of hearing him; I must say that I enjoyed Tomas McGrath too because he’s able to create a sound on his own. I love DJ’s who manage to make a set personal, not necessarily with unknown songs, but simply creating their own environment; and it is precisely this they’re able to do.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Listening to music in many clubs that I attended has helped me to grow musically. I think and hope that I’ve reached my own sound: a recognizable mix of R&B and Boogaloo for those who listen to my sets. I try to pay close attention to what is happening on the dance floor.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Discovering some new tracks is really difficult today. In general I dedicate a lot on listening and on researching for something new. Without presumption I think I can say that I’ve brought something new into the genre of “Boogaloo” where to discover something you must sip a good dose of “salsa”.  I think that “Boogaloo Hay” by Willie Rodriguez is my ‘discovery’ because I’m proposing that for eight years at least.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favorite artist(s)?

I really adore the obscure powerful sound so I love the big mama’s such as Tiny Topsy or Big Mama Thornton.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, I don’t collect labels or artists in particular. But among my 45s you can find a lot of Federal and King concerning R&B and Fania and Fonseca for Boogaloo.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Right now my next chance to slot some 45s is at “Crossfire 25” in London on October 2014.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

On my wish list are still a lot of 45s, but one that I was looking’ for was Joyce Troyano and it has been my 40 years gift by my husband… I couldn’t wish more.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

  1. Bruce Cloud – My Book
  2. Lou Lawton – Knick Knack Patty Wack
  3. Tiny Topsy – Just a Little Bit
  4. Anna Belle Caesar – Little Annie
  5. Bobby Moore’s Rhythm Aces – Go Ahead And Burn
  6. Little Joe Hinton – Let’s Start a Romance
  7. Tommy Jay – Tender Love
  8. Bobby Valentin – Geronimo
  9. Willie Rodriguez – Boogaloo Hay
  10. Nolan Porter- If I Could Only Be Sure
  11. Jackie Opel – Old Rocking Chair

Current Top 5 Tracks:

  1. Joyce Troyano – I Cry For The Boy
  2. Holy Disciples – Trying To Make a Hundred
  3. Sampy And The Bad Habits – Stick With Me
  4. The Monitors – Mama Linda
  5. Alfredito Linares – Bogaloo Girl

 Web Links:

facebook.com/originalmods.teramo
facebook.com/groups

Next Club Spots: Crossfire 25, 11th October 2014, London!


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 9, 2014 By : Category : DJs Europe Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
0 Comment