Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Brighton; about the young idea

Claire Mahoney looks at the young generation of mods that set the New Untouchables Brighton Mod Weekender alight this August with
impeccable style.

It’s not often that you use the word ‘Face’ when talking about mods these days. The term seems a little outmoded, especially when so many of us in the scene are way past our prime. But this year at the New Untouchables Brighton Weekender, a clutch of young mods seemed to get everyone talking, staring and most likely wondering just how they managed to get it so right.

It was as if the many black and white images of the 60s we so lovingly scoured for inspiration had suddenly come alive but with little twists of today. Of course, red lipstick was not really ‘a thing’ in the early to mid-60s as it is now. In fact, the 60s mod girls were pretty much bare-faced by today’s standards.

Original mod women that had perhaps painstakingly applied kohl eyeliner and battled with unforgiving false eye-lash glue some 50 years ago, would be forgiven for feeling a little envious of the flawless application of cat-eye flicks and eyebrow arches on these young doll-like faces. But everyone was in agreement that they looked absolutely brilliant.

Lara Bossence was at Brighton again this year and at just 14 is probably the youngest of the gang. She combines a traditional 60s look with early 60s skin and suede-head touches.

She says: “I like a clean-cut yet, young and fun style. I’m young and want to have fun with my style. I think attention to detail is key. For me, mod is standing out a little from the norm. I definitely see the difference between the Go-Go and psych styles. Mod is more classic.”

She says that she takes a lot of her inspiration from the continental styles of the French and Italians. Because of her age of course, she hasn’t just got first generation mods to look to for inspiration and has, in fact four or more decades of mod’s evolution to take ideas from.

“I suppose the hard mod/suedehead look is also of interest to me. I also admire the early rude girl look too. I just seem drawn to these styles the most. I don’t wish to stick rigidly to a ‘uniform’ as it were but, more to add my own twist and ideas to keep it fun too. My boyfriend is a skinhead and the smart, traditional skinhead look is also of interest.”

One thing that unites all of these girls it that their look is so true to original mod 60s styling. They don’t really do dresses and instead focus on well-chosen separates and accessories. Knee length skirts, loafers, driving shoes, flat Mary Janes, boxy jackets (bum freezers) and fitted knitwear.

Scarlett Bayliss is pretty much the British face of young mods today. Her look is unmistakable. And like any mod she is obsessed by detail. Last year at Brighton, I remember her raving to me about anoraks with a particular type of zip and was proudly sporting a hard to get hold of pair of brown Dr Scholl ladies driving shoes. At the moment she has a thing for green: “I don’t think I could live without my green jackets whether it’s an anorak or my green suede coat.”

What would be her wardrobe staples I ask?: “Essential elements would probably be any items in green or suede, or both! That would be something special. A nice fitted pair of trousers and smart bum freezer jacket, you can never go wrong.”


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Style Tags:, , , ,
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V & A Exhibition – Revolution: Records and rebels 1966 – 70

Saturday 11th September – Revolution: Records and Rebels 1966 – 70

At the Victoria and Albert Museum

This most eagerly anticipated of exhibitions has been on the radar for anyone with even the most passing of interests in the 1960’s counter-culture movement for some months now. These monumental events that are covered within this exhibition, all seemed to occur or explode, as the case may be – concurrently, all over the world. And all of this was happening in which must seem like medieval times to folk of a certain age, who have never lived in an age before mobile phones and the internet.

The exhibition itself was two years in the making, and to have the extra financial clout (sponsorship) of the Levi brand on board – the signs are good, even before you start on your excursion into what is an Aladdin’s cave of ultra rare artifacts & memorabilia from 1966 – 70.

On entering the exhibition, you’re given a head-set – which is all part of getting your mind and soul in the correct frame-of-mind. So while your eyes are busy eating-up all the scrumptious feasts on display, your ears are also being fed a constant menu of your favourite music!

The exhibition itself is set out in a considered and chronological order. Which I personally appreciate, as I am a guy who likes to have his record collection, book collection and clothing organised into considered groups!

I don’t really want to give the game away, (which in essence makes doing a review – redundant) as I strongly feel that the individual needs to experience this most incredible of collections for oneself. I will promise that you will be welcomed by the most amazing of visual surprises throughout your visit.

My personal passion lies within the music and fashion of the counter-culture movement, which just seemed to appear, just-like-magic – and on a daily basis, throughout this era! And much of it is now just an arm’s length away from
your eyes!

What made the whole experience so much more special for myself, was the more serious subjects that really influenced the whole counter-culture movement and were all represented within this exhibition. From Pete Seeger’s guitar (with the ultimate proto slogan that has never been bettered) right through to the race and gay right activist movements. And too many more to mention – that all need to be experienced on your visit.

When my group of friends finally left the exhibition, we were met by a member of staff who was quite astonished that we had spent 210 minutes within the exhibition. And chose to mention that we’d by far spent the most time within the exhibition. (It’s only been open a week, so I not too proud of that fact) Well, I am planning a return visit in the coming months and I predict a new record being set…


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Peter Feely

Married to Susie, both actively involved in the UK 60s scene for many years. My personal interest in 1960s culture goes back over 30 years, with my main two passions being music and fashion, both in equal measure. I run my own menswear label – ‘Perfumed Garden’ clothing, catering for the discerning dandy male - in addition to sourcing and selling vintage mens’ gear, with a particular interest in those hard-to-find jackets and shoes! I also run the Facebook group, ‘Psychedelic Clothing for Men: Then and Now’, with 2200+ members. Although I have no formal training in the fashion industry, what I do possess is a real passion, and through the years I have gained valuable knowledge of many areas of mens’ fashion from the mid to late 1960s. I’m also a musician and have played in many bands in my younger years. I’m an avid collector of music and music-related paraphernalia. I started running my own club nights back in the mid-1990s, and at present I run a psychedelic night in Derby – ‘The Perfumed Garden Of Musical Delights’. Through this I also get to DJ at many exciting events up and down the country

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : Articles Arts Design Fashion Front Page Inspiration Style Tags:, , , ,
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Collectors Corner – “The UK Atlantic Records story Pt 2”

This entry is part 2 of 4 in the series Collectors Corner 3

In mid 1964 Britain’s hit parade was in the middle of a musical hurricane sweeping the country, home-grown guitar and harmonica wielding beat groups. From a chart ruled by Cliff Richard, Frank Ifield and Billy Fury barely a year earlier, 1964 found 45’s by young, modern and decidedly hipper groups such as The Animals, Rolling Stones, Georgie Fame & the Blue Flames and The Kinks hitting the number one spot. One thing all these artists had in common was the great big influence of American rhythm & blues, and more recently soul music. This in turn made the kids who bought records by those artists want to hear the original music itself. Along with constant name checking from stars like Dusty Springfield, John Lennon and Eric Burdon, soul music was coming out from the underground discotheques and into households via plays on the new pirate radio stations and Redifusion’s Friday evening must-see TV show “Ready, Steady, Go!”. This was where you could hear, and also see, the latest releases from Martha & The Vandellas, James Brown and Otis Redding (who even got a whole episode to himself, watch it on YouTube!). Although R’N’B had been released in the UK in large amounts since the mid ’50’s, the major labels now realised this stuff could sell, and in large amounts too. Pye records set up the International imprint back in 1958 which was followed in 1963 with an R&B series, EMI followed suit with it’s Stateside imprint which released heaps of great black American soul music, and Decca had London American which did the same thing, the jewel in it’s crown being the licence to release Atlantic tracks over here. On 24th July 1964 Decca took the plunge and Atlantic Records UK received its first proper British release, the recent US hitbound smash by The Drifters “Under the boardwalk”. This was given the number AT 4001 and was issued over here on the classic black and silver designed label with a plain white sleeve. Over the next two years nearly another 100 45’s were pressed up and released, encompassing classic soul, jazz, garage and even a number one hit single.

at4057

After the first AT release by The Drifters hit the UK charts, albeit hitting a lowly number 45, they were graced with a further eight releases in the series including such classic tracks as “Come over to my place”, “Saturday night at the movies” and “At the club”. Like a lot of the black label Atlantic series, even though most releases didn’t hit the top of the charts they were all mostly steady sellers and apart from a few nuggets (more about those later) can be picked up for under a tenner each. Despite continually releasing great singles in the sixties, including the legendary “Everybody needs somebody to love” (AT 4004), Solomon Burke didn’t crack the charts until 2003. This didn’t stop him having seven AT releases, including “Peepin” and a great driving version of Bob Dylan’s “Maggie’s Farm”. Otis Redding was a massive success in Britain and narrowly missed the top ten when his cover of “My girl” (AT 4050) reached number 11 in 1965. He had four releases on the label including his storming version of “Satisfaction” (AT 4080), but his 45 of “I’ve been loving you too long” (AT4029) was never released, instead being relegated to the B side of “Respect” (AT 4039) a short while later. Rufus Thomas had US singles released as far back as 1953 and had a great two sider pressed up over here in 1965, “Jump back” / “All night worker” (AT 4009). Stax favourites Booker T and the M.G’s continued their run of great R’N’B instrumentals with two releases “Boot-leg” (AT 4033) and “Red beans and rice” (AT 4063) , another two dance floor winners. Amongst the other legendary names you’ll find in this glorious run include Barbara Lewis, Joe Tex, Don Covay, Wilson Pickett, Carla Thomas, Sam & Dave and Patti Labelle.

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Two releases stood amongst the release sheets of 1965, the first was AT 4035, “I got you babe” by Sonny and Cher. None of the previous releases (apart from Bobby Darin) had been straight forward pop, but this fantastic duet was a perfect commercial nugget and duly sailed up the UK charts, nestling up at the number one slot in the autumn of 1965. If you haven’t seen the legendary Ready, Steady, Go performance of this, have a look on YouTube for a visual feast complete with members of the Rolling Stones hamming it up for the cameras along with the loved up couple. The second, and a taster for the shape of things come for the ever-expanding label, was Bocky and the Visions “I go crazy” (AT 4049), a prime slice of American garage. This was swiftly followed by Levon and the Hawks “The stones I throw” (AT 4054) which featured future members of The Band, The Young Rascals “I ain’t gonna eat out my heart anymore” (AT 4059) which came out shortly after, and then in March 1966 came the release of garage legends The Shadows of Knight with their killer version of “Gloria” (AT 4085). All of these are very collectable, not just with UK garage release collectors but with Atlantic label completest too and prices do reflect this.

at4076

But in 1965 and 1966 soul was still Atlantic’s main selling point and the label released a whole glut of classic tracks, some of which somehow managed to sell next to nothing over here, becoming long-term expensive rarities in the following years. Although it was a UK top five smash in the early 70’s, Tami Lynn’s all time classic “I’m gonna run away from you” (AT 4071) originally was released in March 1966 and sold nothing hence it’s rarity and value nowadays. Esther Phillips end of night favourite “Just say goodbye” (AT 4077) is another hard one to source, and can easily reach £100 in nice condition. Googie Rene Combo’s jazz tinged 45 “Smokey Joe’s La La” (AT 4076) is another hard to find great, as is Travis Wammack’s instrumental classic “Scratchy” (AT 4017) and The Astors “Candy” (AT 4037) also goes for top money. Other tough but great tunes to seek out include Joe Turner’s “Midnight cannonball” (AT 4026), The Isley Brothers “The last girl” (AT 4010), Jimmy Williams “Walking on air” (AT 4042), “Chills and fever” (AT 4053) by Paul Williams, and Jackie Ivory’s “Hi heel sneakers” (AT 4075). As with most soul releases in the UK never forget that black label “Stock copies” will usually be available at a cheaper price than the more prized yellow label “demo copies”. Luckily these can be found without spending the ridiculous amount of money you’d need to collect the classic Atlantic R’N’B released by London in the 1950’s and most should be findable with a bit of luck, patience and a full wallet. And when it’s complete you’ll be the owner of one of the best runs of musical genius released, ever.

at4077


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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September 22, 2016 By : Category : Articles Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, ,
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Record Reviews October 2016 – Part 1

The Alloy Six

Ross Ellis 12" 3mm 11073

‘Turn Out The Lights’ – LP

This is an impressive debut outing for Sweden’s newest psych/garage band, Alloy Six. In truth, the band emerged from the pieces of Stockholm based The Moving Sounds and The Fortune Tellers in 2013, so it has taken a while to get this first album together, but it has been well worth the wait. With twelve cuts of jangling and fuzzy guitars, swirling organ and solid vocal harmonies, I can see this being pretty popular among the Mousetrap Psych crowd. ‘You And I’, ‘Lights Out’ and ‘Each Night’ give you a good idea where Alloy Six are coming from musically. It’s all very tight, well-produced and has those quirky melodies that you often find in this genre. It’s available from Copase Disques who are putting together a decent catalogue of releases by some of Europe’s best. This album sits very comfortably among them.

facebook.com/thealloysix
bandpage.com/TheAlloySix

Chris Pope & The Chords UK

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‘Take On Life’ – LP

For all those die-hard Chords fans and lovers of the ’79 revival period, let’s get one thing straight. The original line up will never get back together for a whole host of reasons. End of. There has been much debate about the rights and wrongs of Chris Pope continuing The Chords name. It’s a pointless exercise. The Chords (be they the original line up or the current one) deserve their place in British music history and if the current line up gains new fans with this album which in turn will guide them to the back catalogue, then the band and its members past and present will be remembered and appreciated for what they have achieved. It’s the difference between being just a ‘tribute’ band or being relevant to your fan base and beyond. It worked for Secret Affair a few years ago and with ‘Take On Life’, I see no reason why it should not work for Chris Pope and The Chords UK. Some of these songs are revived demos that never saw release way-back-when. To be honest, you would be hard pushed to tell which were which as Mr Pope has proved he still has an ‘angry man’ in there somewhere. His observations on society, like ‘Burning All Around’ or ‘Heart Of The Matter’ are as sharp today as they have ever been. ‘A Life Less Ordinary’ is a splendid tale of a modern-day Bonnie & Clyde, while ‘Dreams Of Yesterday’ finds him in reflective mood. It helps that Mic Stoner on bass, Kenny Cooper on Drums and Sandy Michie on guitar do a great job and they are joined by Mick Talbot on keyboards as a guest on the album. ‘Take On Life’ is full of that aggressive energy that typifies Chris Pope’s song writing and he and The Chords UK deliver.

www.popemusic.co.uk
facebook.com/TheChordsUK

The Embrooks

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‘Nightmare’ b/w ‘Helen’ – Single

The Embrooks are one of those bands fondly remembered by those on the scene back in the mid-nineties when the trio was formed by bassist/vocalist Mole (ex-Mystreated/Stewed), guitarist/vocalist Alessandro Cozzi Lepri (ex-Head & The Hares), and drummer Lois Tozer who is currently with Thee Jezebels. Their output was pretty damn good and they were firm favourites on the live circuit. Eventually, life took the three in different directions and the band disappeared for a while, but they are back with this corking single and they’ve not lost any of the mod/freakbeat vitality they were known for. Full-on thrashing drums, driving bass lines and fuzz guitar a-plenty makes both sides sound authentically ’66 or ’67. Only the band know if there is more to come, but on this evidence, let’s hope so!

facebook.com/theembrooks

The Fast Camels

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‘Tales Of The Expected’ – LP

It’s great to see The Fast Camels back with their third album following on from their highly successful debut in 2007 ‘The Magic Optician’ followed some years later by the excellent ‘Deadrooms & Butterfly Dreams’. Hailing from Glasgow, Fast Camels comprise of original members: Drew Sturgeon (Vocals and Guitar), Mark O’Connor (Vocals and Guitar) and Stephan Mors (Drums). They were joined by Allan McGarry (Vocals and Keyboards) and Neil Menzies (Bass). ‘Tales Of The Expected’ is sure to be a hit with those of a psych/garage tendency. It has the feel of a concept album, but it is a collection of ten new songs about a disparate and desperate group of individuals. Be they ‘Madame Matron’, ‘Dead Celebs’ or ‘Chicken Bo’ they are all acutely observed portrayals of ‘ordinary people’ who all have an un-nerving, dark quality about them. Co-produced by the band and Paul Gallagher, it’s fair to say the Fast Camels are back with a bang.

www.thefastcamels.com
facebook.com/thefastcamels

French Boutik

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‘Front Pop’ – LP

If you want to sound ultra-cool and sound like you’re a ‘finger-on-the-pulse’ type on the scene, French Boutik are one of a handful of bands to mention among your peers. Three critically acclaimed and successful EPs, regular contributors to ‘Specialized’ and ‘March Of The Mods’ fundraisers for Teenage Cancer Trust and a growing UK fan base attending their now customary three-date mini tours, this really is one of THE bands of the moment and on October 22, they release their debut LP on Copase Disques.

I’ll admit I am and have been a huge fan and make no apology for praising this album. It typifies their sound, their unique style and highlights exactly why they are so popular. One of the best facets of French Boutik is that they do not fit into a predetermined category. They don’t sound like a ‘mod’ band (whatever that is supposed to be?!) In fact they don’t ‘sound’ like anyone except French Boutik and that can only be a good thing. ‘Front Pop’ features the digital single ‘Le Mac’ and ‘Hitch A Ride’ which were part of the crowdfunding campaign for this album and have been reviewed here before, so I will concentrate on the other tracks.

There is the sophistication of ‘Costard Italien’, the superb cover of Francois Hardy’s ‘Je Ne Suis La Pour Personne’, the rip-roaring ‘Regard Les Tigres’ and the delightful ‘Impitoyable’. The vocals are shared between Gabriela Giacoman and Serge Hoffman with drummer Zelda Aquil providing her usual high standard of backing. Indeed, Giacoman and Aquil are becoming much-sought-after session vocalists with other bands, such is the perfection of their harmonies. Hoffman’s guitar work and Aquil’s drumming are all underpinned by Jean-Marc Johannes’
perfect baselines.

There is nothing predictable about this album, except its ability to surprise. It’s not often I say this about any album, but there is not a duff or throw-away track anywhere. ‘The Rent’, ‘La Chemise’, ‘Le Casse’, ‘Je Louche’, all of them instantly becoming ‘ear-worms’. There have been some great releases this year and a few still to come, but ‘Front Pop’ by French Boutik will take some beating for album of the year in my book.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , ,
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Record Reviews October 2016 – Part 2

The Sound Of Pop Art

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‘Drama’ – LP

If memory serves, this is the third album by Cambridge-based Sound Of Pop Art. The band is becoming more of a loose co-operative of musicians with head honcho Chris Free and stellar bassist Sara Onyett the two permanent members. ‘Drama’ sees the pair joined by such outstanding names as Big Boss Man’s Nasser Bouzida, Simon Wells, Dave Oakley (keyboard player with The Fliks), Gary Malby, Tony Jenkins, Gabriela Giacoman from French Boutik and the delightful Louise Turner from Turner and Electric Stars fame. Mr Free is a dab hand at infectious sixties-inspired pop, a skill he honed during his time with Paul Weller’s Respond label. In my humble opinion, this album is the best from the band to date and without doing the splendid Tony Jenkins a disservice, I do think Chris Free’s compositions suit a female vocal. The lead track ‘Freedom’ is a delightfully lilting dancer and the title track ‘Drama’ has a nice haunting quality to it. There are shades of the old Respond days with tracks like ‘So High’ and ‘Generation X’ which is so blatantly inspired by that early Style Council period that gave us ‘Long Hot Summer’. ‘Kiss The World Goodbye’ sees Madame Giacoman’s distinctive backing vocals adding a pleasant dimension to the ballad. For my money, ‘Universal’ with Tony Jenkins on duty was the pick of the male led-songs.With mixing duties shared between Andy Crofts, Graham Potter, John Metcalfe and James Parrett, the balance is well maintained across the album. It will be interesting to see where Sound Of Pop Art go next, but this album will take some beating. Very enjoyable quality pop.

facebook.com/thesoundofpopart

Teetotum

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‘Mind Your Teeth’ EP – Download

At our Nutsmag Review Night at Blues Kitchen back in August, I introduced this band. I’d not heard of them before, but I did recognise one member of the band from somewhere. It turns out he was Ross Robertson who I had last seen as a member of New Street Adventure four years ago. Along with Larry Marks and Simon Gledhill, Teetotum played a great set which included the four songs on this debut ep. They may not thank me for this, but they are like Lindisfarne on acid (having got to meet them, they have a great sense of humour and hopefully won’t take offence.) My point is, they are a superb three-part harmony rock band that are as good as any you are likely to find. All four of the tracks on this EP bear me out. ‘Day & Night’ is a prime example, but it doesn’t end there. ‘Heart of The Sun’, ‘Just My Luck’ and ‘One More Time’ ooze sophistication with a late Sixties, early Seventies influence. It’s rock for grown-ups. The Brighton-based trio are using guest drummers at present while they search for a full-time replacement, so if anyone is interested, now’s your chance to hook up with a class act.

teetotum.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/teetotumofficial

The Missing Souls

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‘Sweet, Sweet Sadie’ b/w ‘The Aligator’ – Single

Another blistering single released on one of the best garage/psych labels around, State Records. Both tracks are covers; ‘Sweet, Sweet Sadie’ originally by The Teardrops and ‘The Aligator’ by The Us Four. This single came about after State Records owner Mole played some shows alongside Missing Souls in France as drummer with The Baron Four. He brought the band over to the State studios in Sussex and the result is two sides of unbridled fuzz-tone, rip-roaring psych. Missing Souls have an album available via bandcamp and on the evidence of this single, I had to investigate. If you’re into psych/garage, get into this band. For a combo from Lyon who have only been together two years, this is mightily impressive stuff.

facebook.com/themissingsouls
themissingsouls.bandcamp.com

The Ace

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‘Riot Of Sound’ – LP
‘I Dream Love’ b/w ‘Man Out Of Time’ – Single

This was a happy coincidence, the album and the single arrived independently, but within a few days of each other. The album is released by Wedigthis on cd, while the single is available on 7 inch vinyl from Crocodile Records. Both tracks on the single are also on the album. So let’s deal with the single first. As a sample of the album, these were two very good choices. Both tracks are full of reference points that inspire The Ace. ‘Man Out Of Time’ has a Foxton-influenced bass line that reminds me of The Jam’s ‘Monday’, but that is where the similarity ends. ‘I Dream Love’ could be a Monkee’s track in another era. Both songs are laced with jangly guitars and harmonies-a-plenty. The rest of the album is in a similar vein. Really well-crafted and produced psych/garage/freakbeat songs which have just the right amount of variety to make them all worth a listen. ‘ Misunderstood’ and ‘Somewhere In The Back Of My Mind’ are the two from the album that really stood out for me. Great stuff from the Leeds outfit.

facebook.com/The-Ace
wedigthistheace.blogspot.com


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 27, 2016 By : Category : Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Phil Bush

We caught up with Phil Bush recently for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Regrettably, my first record was a Gary Glitter 7” but I didn’t get it off him personally. First got heavily interested in music at school, late 70’s 2-tone and mod revival era.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Good question – I don’t know exactly. It would have been one of our local scooter club nights during the early 80’s. But I wouldn’t have called myself a DJ then because we all used to get stuck in on the decks back then.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

I’ve had some very memorable nights. Recently I got the chance to take my full valve system to Reggae Geel in Belgium. 60,000 people (not all in my Marquee, though!) and a fantastic event, even though I was very ill. We used to run some weekenders down Margate – the ones we had with Dave Barker and Derrick Morgan were out of this world.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I had an experience abroad a few years ago where we got caught up in a full-scale district riot, which was lively. Then at the same event, a rock fell out of the wall and went through a £1000 Buster tune of mine. I decided to call it a night!

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I am not going to make friends here am I? The lads up the Itch in Hull play good R&B which is not what you normally hear on the broader scene. I like listening to what Craig Simpson has to play when I get to hear him. On the reggae scene, the likes of Asher G, King Floyd and Sugar Merchant are all a great listen on the right night. On the skinhead scene, Brian Kelson is always trying out new tunes which is, what it’s all about.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

My selection is driven by Sound System. I’ll play some tunes that others would probably swerve because I know I can get something more out of them on a heavy-set. Reggae sound system is an instrument, not a PA, and should be used as such.

07. How did the Sounds & Pressure Sound system come about?

I got disillusioned with hearing reggae on weak PA systems and I wasn’t known as DJ so I never got asked to play. Also no-one on the skinhead, mod or scooter scenes had built a big vintage sound system before so I decided to solve all my problems in one go. S&P was the first by many years and it sparked some interest because now there are quite a few of them.

08. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I guess my real discoveries are some Buster pre’s that no-one has as far as I know. They’ll only get drawn in a clash. In reality, a lot of finds and discoveries are really just re-discoveries. Simple £5 tunes that hit a sweet spot with an audience and become popular. Take Girls for instance by Jerry and the Bluebells from ’75. No one knew it. Not even any of the reggae old guard had heard it before, but now loads of people play it.

09. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Musically it would be Paul Huxtable who owns Axis Sound System. Myself and he are completely aligned in attitude when it comes to sound system matters. Favorite artists – I guess overall has to be Prince Buster.

10. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I collect anything. Any genre, any speed, any size.

11. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Bamboo Club, Lincoln.

12. What is the record you would most like to own?

Black Dragon, Buster’s Allstars. I believe the acetate is in Japan.

13. Please give us a top 5 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Let’s Get Together – Henry Buckley, Gayfeet ‘68
2. Tribute to Nehru – Skatalites, Randy’s ‘64
3. I love the reggae – Gaylads, Randy’s ‘68
4. Girls, Jerry and the Bluebells – Torpedo ‘75
5. Nameless – Busters Allstars Pre ‘65

Top 5 Tracks of All Time:

1. Heavenless – Vin Gordon, Studio 1 ‘68
2. Going home – Theo Beckford, Worldisc ‘60
3. Just tell me – Maytals, Beverley’s ‘68
4. Blueberry Hill – Fats Domino
5. Manny oh – Higgs and Wilson, WIRL, ‘60

weblinks

Our Facebook Group

Next Club Spots:
Saturday 22nd October, Crossfire 29, London
Saturday Dec 10th, Bamboo Club, Lincoln


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 27, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Joel Maslin

We recently caught up with DJ Joel Maslin to talk about his musical outlook.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into R&B and soul (and later rocksteady) alongside my best mate Ollie when I was 18 or so, after discovering the Mod scene. We’d previously been into house and drum & bass until then!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I was very lucky to be asked to DJ at Shotgun with Vic Ranger and Gav Evans, one of the best mod/rhythm & soul nights in London at the time.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Probably the first time I was asked to DJ at the 100 Club as I was so nervous. I had a fantastic time but I can remember having pretty bad butterflies as I got up onto the stage. Outside of that pretty much all of my experiences DJ-ing in Spain, (particularly Runaway Love in Asturias) have been amazing. The venues, the beautiful scenery, the food but mainly the great friends.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I’ve fallen over, dropped records down the back of stages, broken the mixer, although I did DJ at a big gig a few years back and completely bombed, not sure why but I was trying out a new aftershave at the time so it could have
been that.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Rare soul – Butch, Dave Thorley, Marco Santucci, Keith Money. The incredible unissued records, new sounds and rare 45s that you hear every time they play is what keeps me interested in the music. R&B wise I always like the sounds that Callum Simpson plays.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve been through a number of different ‘sub-genres’ of soul music, from R&B to the odd funk track but I just try to keep my ear to the ground and talk to collectors and other fanatics of this brilliant music to discover new records that I like and I hope will work on the dance floor. Sometimes I try to play more R&B and 60’s orientated sounds, and other times crossover and funkier tracks. Sometimes I even get it right!

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Most records have been ‘discovered’ by one of the manically dedicated diggers on the scene way before my time, so I can’t claim anything there – but I remember being pretty chuffed when I finally got a copy of Little Tommy ‘Baby Can’t You See’ many years ago. And the seller had used a couple of really good R&B records as record stiffeners!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Ace Of Bass. Or everyone at Motown.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No I’m a bit too haphazard for that!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

100 Club 6ts Allnighters -London, VaVaVoom – London

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Way too many to mention but I’ve always coveted a copy of Jimmy Gresham ‘This Feelin’ I Have’.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Et White – Got To Find A True Love – Great Potential
2. Charles Smith – You Need Education – Trend
3. Little Soul – Problems – Solid Soul
4. Emanons – Bird Walkin’ – All Brothers
5. Emma Frances – Leave You Runnin’ – De Mo Rr Is

Top 10 Tracks Of All Time:

At The Moment – In No Particular Order:
1. ‘Keni Lewis’ – She’s Not The Marrying Kind – Unissued
2. BB King – Think It Over
3. Lil Major Williams – Girl You’re So Sweet, You’re So Fine
4. Alton Ellis – Breaking Up Or Willow Tree
5. John Bowie – You’re Gonna Miss A Good Thing Baby
6. Jimmy Gresham – This Feelin’ I Have
7. Deon Jackson – Someday The Sun Will Shine – Unissued
8. Guitar Ray – You Gonna Wreck My Life
9. Gwen Owens – Just Say You’re Wanted (And Needed)
10. Parliaments – This Is My Rainy Day

Weblinks

Facebook

Next Club Spots:

Friday 7th: Soul Shaker At The Gowlett, Gowlett Road, London SE15 4HT
Dec 3rd: 100 Club
Dec 31st: VaVaVoom NYE, 229 The Venue as part of Nutty New Year!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 26, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Hey Mr DJ! Charlie Salvidge

NUTsMag caught up with Charlie Salvidge recently for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My Dad was a local radio DJ and growing up I immersed myself in his collection of 45s, many of which had been relieved from the BBC grams library in Bristol. The Beatles’ ‘She Loves You’ and The Tornados’ ‘Telstar’ were the ones that left the most profound impact.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Probably my cousin Leila’s Wedding in Edinburgh. I played some melt melting psychedelia to an indifferent audience then received a substantial burn injury when a stray spark from an indoor sparkler lodged itself between my leather wristband and wrist.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

DJing at The Park stage, Glastonbury 2015. Feeling the vibrations from the immense PA and witnessing a crowd of trollied festival goers get their groove on to Hawkwind and Sabbath through an inch-high slit in front of the decks was exhilarating stuff!

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

When a bloke came up and ‘scratched’ with one of my most treasured discs (think it was Paul & Richie and The Crying Shames) at some gig in central London. I almost scratched his block off.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Me old pal Rhys Webb has most of the best psych singles, me old pal Sam Davies has got all the others.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I enjoy sounds that are of a fast tempo just as much as languid folky numbers. Above all I love well-produced pop singles or things with weird effects. I don’t really know why! I just like a song with a lot going on instrumentally or
production wise.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

In all the years of searching for bargains I’ve only ever successfully found two rare records for cheap, The First Editions’ ‘Just Dropped In..’ and Don Fardon’s ‘Belfast Boy’, both for 50p in a Gloucester charity shop. San Francisco seems to be a good place to find albums by people like Country Joe and Quicksilver Messenger Service for a dollar, usually they’re a bit battered but you can’t find anything like that in an English record shop for less than a days wages of a brakeman.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Beatles.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Mud, Bread, Pilot, Vladimir Ussachevsky and The Master Musicians of Joujouka.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Occasionally at The Lexington, Islington, and sometimes at one of Mr. Bailey’s nights. I’m doing Crossfire later this year.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Kevin Ayers – Soon, Soon, Soon. Unfortunately it doesn’t exist!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

The Rationals – Guitar Army (Crewe – ‘70)
Motions – Take The Fast Train (Decca, ‘68)
Clear Light – She’S Ready To Be Free (Elektra, ‘67)
Steve Flynn – Mr Rainbow (Parlophone, ‘68)
Yellow Taxi – Anna Laura Lee (President, 70)

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

The Beatles – Strawberry Fields Forever
July – Dandelion Seeds
Buffalo Springfield – Rock &Amp; Roll Woman
Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday
Names And Faces – The Killer
The Zombies – Leave Me Be
Jon – Is It Love
Kevin Ayers – Singing A Song In The Morning
The Byrds – Lady Friend
The Who – Cobwebs And Strange

Social Networks:

Main Site: www.thebandtoy.com
facebook.com/charliesalvidge

Next Club Spots:
Crossfire 29 – 22nd October, London


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 22, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ LongTall Simon

NUTsMag caught up with LongTall Simon recently for a chat about his passion for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I guess I got into music about 11 years old, I used to make tapes of the Essex Radio Soul Show in the late 80s and John Peel as well. I then started saving my school lunch money and going into Southend on a Saturday and buying records. My Dad had loads of records as well, a mixture of early 60s Jazz LPs and a box of 45s left over from when he and his friend put on nights in Southend in the early 70s, these were a mixture of Motown, Stax, Soul, Reggae and stuff, tunes like 25 Miles, Aint Nothing But A house Party – Show Stoppers, The Night – Frankie Valli (and some crud too!) But these 45s became the base of what I played when I started DJing a few years later.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

My first Dj gig was in 1996 aged 19 supporting The Phrogs at Mr Grays in Westcliff (near Southend). My mate Handy Joe used to organise the DJs for them and I convinced him to let me play. If memory serves I think Martin Morgan was the main DJ that night. I then started DJing for them at some of their gigs and
club nights.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Too many to pick one, I’ve been fortunate to play records in lots of different scenes and places and if I’m honest I can’t remember a lot of them, haha.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If I’ve had bad DJ experiences it’s usually been my own fault for accepting gigs I knew would be trouble, never had a bad one on the mod scene or where the crowd are there for the music. I’ve got plenty of “have you got any Britney Spears” moments but that just makes me laugh, you have to take it all with a pinch of salt really. I actually enjoy the challenge of playing music to townies that they don’t know and making them dance, it can be done if you stand your ground and have a sense of humour 🙂

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Well half my friends are bloody DJs so it would be unfair to single anyone out! A good DJ to me is someone who first and foremost is enjoying what they’re doing and having fun. Some DJs just play their rarest records back to back to impress their mates, but that to me is just dull, you need some improvisation, imagination and some risk-taking, take people on a journey, surprise them a bit and enjoy yourself.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve been into (and still am) all different types of music and try to be open-minded, after being into the mod scene for a few years I got into funk/disco breaks, Old School Hip Hop, Jazz, Afrobeat, Electronic stuff and all sorts and it was always surprising to me how many of the same tunes keep cropping up in different worlds, music is all connected. My sets nowadays are primarily 60s but that could mean Soul, Jazz, Latin, Cumbia, Gospel, Popcorn, Funk, R&B, Ska, Reggae or whatever.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I went to Cuba a couple of years ago and picked up some nice 60s latin/salsa/boogaloo 45s for £1 each in Havana that I play out quite often, I’ve looked them up and there’s no record of them anywhere on the internet!

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I’ve never had a favourite artist as such, I’ve always just picked bits I like from wherever I find them.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not really, I’m not fanatical (not there’s anything wrong with that) about labels etc, I just buy stuff I like.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

1st Saturday of the month at Bande a Part – R&B Club, Troy Bar, Hoxton Street. And here and there all over London.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Probably Mulatu Astatke – Yegele Tezeta an Ethiopian release on Amah Records from 69, I love the Ethiopian/Egyptian jazz sound.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

Orchestra Harlow – Freak Off
Derek Martin – Daddy Rollin’ Stone
Hank Jacobs – Elijah Rockin’ with Soul
Jorge Ben – Take it Easy My Brother Charles
Darrow Fletcher – The Pain Just Gets a Little Deeper
Mark Murphy – Why Don’t You do Right
La Lupe – Fever (1968 version on Tico)
The Hustlers – Boston Monkey
Harvey Averne Dozen – Never Learned to Dance
B. B. King – Think it Over

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – I Put a Spell on You (1966 version on Decca)
Afro Blues Quintet Plus One – La la La la la
Sylvia Robbins – Don’t Let Your Eyes Get Bigger Than Your Heart
Milton Grayson – It Aint Necessarily So
Lee Moses – Reach Out I’ll Be There

Social Networks:

Main Site: facebook.com/bandea

Next Club Spots: 1st Saturday of the month at Bande a Part, Troy Bar, Hoxton


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

October 3, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ Liam Large

NUTsMag caught up with Liam Large recently for a chat about his passion
for music.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

There were records and music around me when I was young as my father is a musician. I would listen to what was playing and then began to develop my own taste at quite a young age, from around 9 or so gravitating to the soul and blues stuff in my Dad’s collection and a couple of years later getting into Hip Hop which really opened me up to the full spectrum of black American music, and since then I’ve been constantly trying to find new sounds and styles which fit my ear. Record collecting might be a strange and ignoble pursuit at times but music is always an enriching, pure and wholesome addiction!

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

I honestly can’t recall. I was always trying to broadcast my tastes to my friends via mixtapes etc. My first public outing as a DJ was probably a house party when I was 15 or 16, then I would do turns on the little common room radio thing at 6th Form College. In terms of first playing at a club, I was probably around 17 or 18 but I can’t remember where or what.

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Another one that’s hard to answer, there are so many memories, most of them vague. I enjoyed it when Jukebox Jam hit its peak after about a year at the original venue, the George Tavern. Other than that, there’s been lots of times throughout my many years DJing here and there when you just feel that you have the crowd in tune perfectly, which may not happen as often as I’d like because I tend to go for a more roundabout approach, not playing too many obvious classics. This does mean that when you do connect fully with the crowd, it feels more rewarding I think, when you’re playing stuff from different genres and things they may never have heard before, and they go with it.

04. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Similar answer – too many to pick from, haha. DJing is not nearly as glamorous as people may think, and if you’re ploughing away at a niche angle, even less so. You can find yourself doing near-pointless spots to indifferent bordering on hostile crowds for the sake of a little bit of pocket-money.

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

I’m going to mainly list a couple of people I know, and not because they would be offended if I didn’t mention them, but because these are people I’ve connected with predominantly through music so it means there is some shared taste – I’ll go with Duncan Brooker, who is the most dogged record obsessive I know, has compiled many very successful compilations but is yet still largely under-exposed, Snakester who played at Jukebox Jam with me and is probably still the best DJ I’ve heard for 50s R&B. On the R&B / mod scene in particular, I give credit to Mik and the Pow Wow lads obviously, for popularizing so many great records – any scene needs reinvention to survive, and they breathed fresh air into it.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

You take up influences all over the place, but the one thing that really guides you – or at least should do – is nothing more complicated than your own taste. For me, I have always honed in on a kind of melancholic sound. Black Music from all around the world is often infused with melancholy, so even the best, seemingly joyful and uptempo dance music has this underpinning juxtaposition of sadness found either in the key, melody or lyrics – or all at once. I also like many genres, I don’t want to ever limit myself to one particular era or style, and I’m constantly trying to find that sound in many different areas and if at all possible build those different records into my sets.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I don’t know, I think the concept of discoveries is a bit bogus. A bit Christopher Columbus! There are plenty of records I’ve picked up and not seen anyone else I know either listing or playing, but I don’t know if that’s because other people didn’t really feel them as I did, and either way I don’t really claim to have discovered anything – all old second-hand records by definition have been owned and played by someone before you!

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

From a young age, people like James Brown, Otis Redding, Elmore James, and rap groups like ATCQ, Nas, De La Soul, Ultramagnetic and many others.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No, label running is a collecting thing primarily. I’ve always seen myself as a DJ who collects, so the music is the first thing I care about, not the logo on the label.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’ve been a bit quieter than normal this year, but I do a residency at Strongroom with Cousin Benson and guest spots around and about. Will hopefully be getting back into a little promoting soon.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

I’m not telling.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Fitz Vaughan Bryan – Koyato
Morris Pejoe – Screaming And Crying (Abco)
Delores Ealy – I’Ve Been Looking (Velvet)
Ethiopians – Give Me Your Love (Doctor Bird)
Creations – I Wanna Talk To You

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

I like so many different kinds of music that this is really difficult, and if I tried to compile this list again in 30 minutes time the songs would probably be completely different, but here are 10 songs that after all the times I’ve listened and loved them, I can only presume I’ll never grow tired of hearing again. Most of these aren’t songs to dance to, they’re mostly ballads. I love uptempo stuff, especially to DJ obviously, but for me it’s the deeper stuff which seem to stay with me the longest. No order to these.

Irma Thomas – It’s Raining
Sun Ra – Somewhere In Space
Slum Village – Untitled
Combo Loco – Ven Mi Amore
Paragons – Danger In Your Eyes
Little Ann – Deep Shadows
Muddy Waters – Can’t Be Satisfied
Ornette Coleman – Lonely Woman
Howlin Wolf – Moanin At Midnight
Theron & Darrell – I Was Made To Love Her

Social Networks:

Main Site: www.jukeboxjam.org
facebook.com/Liamlarge

Videos: My channel is here, all kinds of random stuff
www.youtube.com/liamsrekkids

Next Club Spots: Crossfire 29, October 22nd, London


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

October 3, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 12 (episode 21)

NUTsCast July 2016
Join the Baron for a look ahead to Euro YeYe and the Brighton Mod Weekender with tracks from some of the featured bands playing these events. The live session comes from The Beatniks, plus new tracks from The Kumari, Bongoloian, Senior Service and classic floor-fillers as chosen by our stable of guest DJs.


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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July 23, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Podcasts Reviews Tags:, , ,
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Dr Robert – Hey! Mr DJ

This entry is part 2 of 20 in the series Hey! Mr DJ

A short profile of New Untouchables Head Honcho and globe spinning DJ Dr Robert 

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Through the kids at our school and one of our teachers who used to DJ and played ‘Green Onions’ at the Christmas disco (quite sure they don’t play that anymore). Mum and Dad’s old vinyls – mainly 60’s pop and the odd Motown and Ray Charles record. We also had some great local bands in the Medway area including the Prisoners and Milkshakes.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Along with old pal Lee Miller at our local ‘Cool Running Scooter Club’ nights held at Ditton Community Centre. The system comprised of two old 70’s record players from our homes hooked up to two speakers.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Wow, tough one! So many great experiences in the last twenty-five years.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

My worst experience has to be the trip to the Wilderbeat Festival in Canada. After a long travel by airplane and then a car ride from Toronto down to the lakes. An hour before I was meant to start the festival was closed down by the Police for noise problems.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Another tough question! So many good DJ’s on the scene that are easily identifiable for particular songs or sounds that contributed so much. Ady Croasdell as the first ten Kent albums had a profound influence on getting me interested in buying the rarer Mod club sounds. My DJ team Pid, Chris Dale, Speed and Lee Miller for so many fantastic performances over the last twenty years and also the great variety of Mod sounds. International DJ’s like Philippe Golbert, Michael Wink and Frantz who have contributed many great discoveries, I could go on and on.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

My sound has changed naturally over twenty-five years and I genuinely enjoy a wide variety of Mod and 60’s sounds which is why I’m still able to enjoy it after all this time. When I started DJing at the weekenders and London clubs it was a mix of Northern/R&B/Jazz/Ska and some British sounds. After a few years, I wanted to do something different as hardly anyone in the UK played Freakbeat and then Psychedelic and Garage music soon followed. In 2004 the NUTs Organisation started the Le Beat Bespoké LP series and the annual event. I still buy all the styles of music I love and play different choons at different venues.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

One that comes to mind is the Gene Latter – Holding a Dream on UK Spark which has a super blend of Soulful vocals, fuzz guitar with funky drums.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Beatles, as you can’t deny the consistent quality and the very same artists they themselves idolised and covered at the start of their career, ended up covering the Beatles songs a decade later.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Never fallen into that trap. I’m a DJ, not a collector. I buy records with the dance floor firmly in mind. It’s become such an expensive habit now, especially if you draw records from more than a couple of genres like I do.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

At numerous New Untouchables events and clubs like Mousetrap, Le Beat Bespoke, Brighton, Margate, Crossfire, Blues Kitchen and International weekenders and festivals. Keep an eye on the website and my facebook page.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Soul record: Gwen Owens – Just Say You’re Wanted (And Needed)
Groovy Record: The Pretty – Moustache in Your Face

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten

1. Mike Leslie – Right or Wrong

2. Caleb – Woman of Distinction

3. The Paragons – Abba

4. David Bowie & Lower Third- Can’t Help Thinking About Me

5. Rebel Rousers – As I Look

6. Eddie Jefferson – Psychedelic Sally

7. Billy Hawks – Oh Baby

8. Hold Back The Sunrise – Ron Gray

9. John Lee Hooker – Money

10. All My Loving – Prince Buster

Soulful Sounds

1. Charles Spurling – Just A Minute

2. Bo Junior – Coffee Pot Part 1

3. Vivian Reed – The Shape Of Things To Come

4. Jesse Slaughter – I Had a Dream

5. Utee – Rosa Lee Brooks

Groovy Sounds

1. The Cords – Too Late (To Kiss You Now

2. I know – Dan Nix & The Teen Sounds

3. Oedipus & The Mothers-  How It Used To Be

4. Travis Pike’s Tea Party – If I Didn’t Love You Girl

5. The Tears – Rat Race

 


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Eron Falbo - EDITOR

Brazilian polymath Eron Falbo came to London in 2009 after leaving his band ‘The Julians’ to pursue a solo career and become a cosmopolitician. Falbo began writing at the age of 11 for the school newspaper. By the age of 16 he had got his first job as a journalist. His experience in other magazines stretches from film critic to travel writer, passing through much but never leaving the culture spectrum. Apart from writing, Falbo is also an emerging singer. He was invited to record an album in one of the best studios in Nashville, Tennessee by none other than legendary producer Bob Johnston, who recorded the best material by the likes of Bob Dylan, Simon & Garfunkel, Leonard Cohen and Johnny Cash (all acclaimed writers). As of yet he’s only released one single, ‘Beat the Drums’ which was featured on Dermot O’Leary’s “Go Buy Monday” (single of the week) for BBC Radio 2, among other media. Currently, Falbo fronts the band ‘the Kyniks’ in venues in London and around the UK and can be occasionally spotted prowling the scene of the New Untouchables taking notes.

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February 14, 2017 By : Category : Articles Clubs DJs Events Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Paddy Dreadful

This entry is part 1 of 7 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 4

We recently caught up with Belfast DJ, Co-Reanimator, Dr Crippen’s Waiting Room; Chief Drummister @ Thee Penny Dreadfuls, Paddy Dreadful and quizzed him about his musical obsessions and passions.

01. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

The first music that caught my attention was my Mum n Dad’s Queen’s Greatest Hits tape in the car. I went with my pocket-money and bought A Night At The Opera, and on reflection, a 12-year-old buying a 1975 prog rock LP must’ve concerned my parents.

02. Where was your first DJ slot?

Lou’s 30th birthday party. We didn’t have any clubs that played the music we wanted to hear, so we started our own… and Cripz was born unto us!

03. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

DoubleSight Tokyo. Just the most bestest experience ever.

04. So far, what has been your worst DJ experience?

Doing the door at Cripz, where I was asexually harassed by a skinhead who looked like Nick Cotton. She was terrifying!

05. Your favourite scene DJ’s, and why?

Uncle Jack is the king of the mods, without Rob Bailey there wouldn’t be any of this; and when he turns up, Sarge is alright too I suppose.

06. What has shaped your DJ sound & why?

My frequent visits to Leeds to party with The Evil Hoodoo crew made me the man I am today. Blame them.

07. What was your best ever find/discovery?

A 6lb lump of ambergris on the beach. Result.

08. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist?

I had the honour of playing drums with Dave Lewis’ Andwellas Dream two years ago. Love & Poetry is such a good album, and playing with the band really was something special.

09. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Nope. If I like it… and I can afford it…. I buy it!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’m usually in from work before 3:00, but if you could leave til’ after The Chase.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

A Penny Dreadfuls platinum disc.

Next Club Spots: EuroYeYe, DoubleSight, Cripz

Current Top 5:
1. BZN – Just Fancy
2. Paul King – Mabrouk
3. Velvet Night – The Velvet Night
4. Equip 84 – Ladro
5. Love Society – Wanda

Alltime Top Ten :
1. Andwella – Hold On To Your Mind
2. Dick Wagner & The Frost – Sunshine
3. Sheephouse – Ladder
4. Rasputin – Sympathy For The Devil
5. Owl – Spirits
6. Rocky Cabbage – Freedom
7. La Revolution Francaise – Y Mouille A Sciaux
8. Help – Runaway
9. The Flies – Magic Train
10. Boney M – Belfast


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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June 15, 2016 By : Category : DJs Europe Front Page Music Tags:, , ,
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Big Boss Man (Newbreed)

This entry is part 22 of 22 in the series Newbreed4

1. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We’ve been together for 20 years and we met in a pub called the Dolphin.

What influences do the band members have in common?

Mexican Food-fine wine-an eye for the ladies.

3. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

The Wurzels are from our way and they are amazing.

4. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

I think the Godrergraig mod 60’s scene is among the best in the world.

5. How would you describe the style you play?

Hammond-Bongo-Fuzz.

6. What are your live shows like?

“The best live band in the uk” was a quote from alive and giving mag.

7. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Soul-Funk-Blues. We don’t play covers though we did used to play im a man and Cloud 9 with congas in.

8. What are your main influences outside of music?

Baking, shed building and goat herding.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Nasser writes a lot of the songs and the band also write collectively in their Welsh Mountain Studio “Beat Mountain” Subject matters usually revolve around horses.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Crimson 6ts is my live fave at the mo, fave song by another artist is
“summer holiday”

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

Thriving and yes I participate.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Getting the Hammond B3 down the stairs of the WAG club in an orthopedic shoe after ten pints.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse every week midweek and play live most weekends at the moment, the last few years have gone crazy, maybe down to BBC6 music plays I think. New Bongolian album is due for release in July.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Rubbish.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

The Mynd Set are a great band.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Georgie Fame would be cool I think.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

A new album in the winter, we’re playing live all over UK and the rest of Europe, A US tour is on the cards and Japan so its easy to see us live.

Web Links:

Main Site: www.big-boss-man.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bigbossmanofficial
Twitter: www.twitter.com/bigbossmanmusic 
Instagram: bigbossmanmusic 
Spotify: www.spotify.com/bigbossman

Band Members:

Nass Bouzida: Organ, Moog & Bongos
Des Rogers: Drums
Scott “the Hawk” Milsom: Electric Bass, Double Bass
Trev Harding: Guitar

Discography:

Vinyl Releases:
7” Singles:
2000: Sea Groove
2001: Big Boss Man
2004: The Hawk
2006: Party 7
Lps :
2001: Humanize
2005: Winner
2009: Full English Beat Breakfast
2014: Last Man on Earth

Updated Releases and Tour Dates:

22nd April ’16 Acapela Studio, Pentyrch Wales, UK
23rd April ’16 Destination Anywhere Swindon, UK
7th May ’16 TBA Cornwall, UK
27th May ’16 Blues Kitchen London, UK
29th May ’16 Mod & Sixties Festival Margate. UK
3rd June ’16 The Stoke Guildford, UK
24th June ’16 TBA FRANCE


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

April 19, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, ,
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