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Rat Race Interview

I caught up with Laurence the owner of Margate’s premiere Mod clothing shop Rat Race for a chat about his passion for fashion.

1. When and how did your passion for fashion come about?

As a young man growing up in Thanet, I experimented with many different styles of clothing. As I got older, I got more into stylish clothes but also wanted to wear something other than what could be found in regular department stores. I was fully aware of Margates’ role in harbouring the youth subcultures and styles from the 1960’s to 80’s and I loved looking at old photos of my father and his friends wearing their crombies, boots & braces.

2. When did you turn your passion into your profession?

I accompanied a friend to a trade show in London and spotted some classic Harrington jackets with an embroidered badge ‘Keep the Faith Margate’ on the sleeve. I thought the people of Margate would love them, the jackets were well made and in the original 60’s style. I opened my first fashion store in Margate in 2010 with the classic Harrington jackets, sta-prest trousers and traditional button-down shirts amongst other styles. This is where my passion for Mod and classic styles developed. I did not see the Mod trend as a sub-culture revival; I knew the style had never really gone away.

3. When and where did Rat Race first open?

During the Spring/Summer of 2014 and after experimenting with opening other stores in the South East I decided my passion for Modernist menswear was much better suited to Margate. I joined our two high street shops together internally, re-named and re-branded the stores to open as Rat Race and solely as a classic British clothier. Towards the end of 2015 my partner Bonnie and I expanded further, occupying our third neighbouring shop, which became Rat Race Girl, a store which stocks Mod, Skinhead, Rockabilly and Vintage girl styles .

4. Rat Race is a very popular amongst the Modernist fraternity, please tell us more about the clothing range available in the shop?

We’re a 21st century take on the 20th century’s finest subcultures, Mixing up mod clothing, skinhead style, a touch on the fifties and then adding a contemporary twist. We are official stockists of Merc, Art Gallery, Knightsbridge Neckwear, Brutus Trimfit, Trojan Clothing, Dr.Martens, Delicious Junction, Ikon Originals and many more. Rat Race also stock many other iconic brands, plus Rat Race Girl holds collections from Freddies of Pinewood, Collectif, Lindy Bop and Dolly & Dotty.

5. Are all the items sold in the shop available online?

We opened our online shop only at the beginning of 2016, a lot of our core items are available on our website. We’re growing our website all the time and new collections are added regularly. We always like to hold a few pieces back just for the shop-floor and for our not so web connected customers, so you’ll always find something which isn’t available online – I believe you still can’t beat that moment of stopping into the street to gaze at something in the window.

6. Any famous clientele dropped by the shop?

We’ve had a few well-known customers shop at Rat Race including Neville Staple, Dave Barker & Buster Bloodvessel. Our most recent being Paloma Faith, Preston and surprisingly enough the chatty man himself Alan Carr.

7. Any plans for a Rat Race clothing range in the future?

We have lots of plans and ideas we’re working towards. Our next project will be working in partnership with the 60’s Suit Co. to develop an off-the-peg range of suits designed exclusively for Rat Race. We work closely with the 60s Suit Co. and we would both be involved in the design process to create and release a range of suits, tailor-made for the Margate mods & skins. We are also going to be doing four types of trousers, all in different fabrics, and something to appeal to the Mods, Skinheads and Suedeheads.

8. Do Rat Race cover men and women’s fashion?

We certainly do, we have three high street shops conjoined to make one large shop. Within Rat Race you’ll find ‘Rat Race Girl’ which is our latest addition. It’s great to have a space solely for the girls but also where men and women can shop together.

9. How important to the Rat Race philosophy is it to have local people who know their onions about Modernist fashion working in the shop?

It’s very important to have knowledgeable staff, our Rat Race team certainly know their onions and they also have the same passion and enthusiasm as myself for what we do. I also think it’s important that our staff share the same vision and drive for Rat Race and help create something unique that will stand the test of time.

10. Why do you think the sixties style is still revered, respected and revisited with each new generation?

People from every new generation want to look good and find a style that suits them. When you look good, you feel good, it gives you confidence and young people look at the sixties style and see that un-apologetic swagger. They want to emulate that feeling, they want to know that they look good enough to stand out from the crowd. There is nothing better than Modernist fashion for a clean-cut style and sharpness.

11. What are your favorite vintage and modern fashion brands?

That’s not too easy to answer, there are many brands that I’m into. I love the stories behind the brands and how they have become popular, for example: Brutus Trimfits’ story of Keith Freedman’s visit to Hong Kong’s in 66’ to discover a shop selling half sleeve button-downs shirts for off-duty American soldiers. The shirts were not available in the UK and so with a few adaptations he ordered them in 12 different colours and to this day they still fly off the rails! There are many stories like this and it’s all part of the history of the brands we sell and love.

12. Where do you see Rat Race heading in the future and any exciting projects coming up you want to tell us about?

We hope to continue as we are doing, finding new brands to offer our customers and building up our online shop. We have a meeting with Gabicci this month and hope to become a Gabicci stockist before the coming Margate Mod and Sixties Festival. You can also find us at Folkestone Skabour in September, this will be our sixth trade event for Skabour. It’s a great Ska weekend where we meet many customers and friends, both old and new. Check our website or pop in to see us if you get a chance.

13. With the Mod/Sixties festival coming up at Whitsun where can we find you in Margate and what are the opening hours?

You can find Rat Race and Rat Race Girl at the lower end of Margate High Street, just up from the piazza and harbour. We’re open 7 days a week until 5.30pm and 5pm on Sundays. but check the links below and our website!

Now in-store & online at www.ratracemargate.co.uk // Spring/Summer 2016 Collections from Merc, Art Gallery, Brutus & Trojan Clothing.

Classic British mens & women’s wear.
Open 7 days a weekly 10-5.30 (10-5 Sundays)

Main Site:  ratracemargate.co.uk

Social Networks:

facebook.com/ratracemargate
twitter.com/ratracemargate
instagram.com/ratracemargate
pintrest.com/ratracemargate


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Fashion Front Page Interviews News Style UK Tags:, , ,
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UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside

“In my lonely room – UK Tamla Motown singles Part 2: Stateside”

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After beginning to make bigger leaps into the UK record buying markets in 1963, the Tamla / Motown / Gordy group found themselves under the umbrella of the EMI subsidiary label, Stateside in October of the same year. Stateside was formed in mid 1962 by EMI to release singles under licence from American labels such as Swan, Wand and Vee-Jay in a similar style to Decca records very successful London American imprint. Licensing tracks from many independent USA labels ensured Stateside released a whole slew of great current rhythm’n’blues and soul releases, and the label soon endeared itself to mods and soul fans on this side of the Atlantic. As well as having hits with Freddy Cannon and Gene Pitney, early releases included such stellar names as The Isley Brothers, Jimmy Reed, Chuck Jackson and The Shirelles. When Oriole’s UK contract with Motown ran out the previous month the new distributor launched its first release on Stateside on 11th October 1963 with Martha and the Vandellas all time classic “Heatwave” (SS228). When sales were quite brisk, the label then released three more singles the following month by Little Stevie Wonder, Mary Wells and Marvin Gaye’s fantastic “Can I get a witness” (SS243).

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By January 1964 Motown was causing quite a stir on these shores, being regularly name checked by the UK’s biggest pop combo, The Beatles, who took Mary Wells on tour with them and mentioning Motown artists numerous times in interviews. Add to this the burgeoning underground mod and soul club scene which was hungry for the dance floor friendly sounds coming out of Detroit and it wouldn’t be long before Stateside had a bona-fide hit single on their hands. Between January and April 1964, no less than twelve 45’s were released in the UK, including tracks by The Miracles, The Marvelettes and debut UK releases from The Temptations, “The way you do the things you do” (SS278), and the group that would soon hit the top spot, The Supremes “When the lovelight starts shining thru his eyes (SS257). On May 8th 1964 Stateside released a hook laden single written by Smokey Robinson, and it was sung by Motown’s number one lady of the time, Mary Wells, “My Guy” (SS288). Two weeks later, on the 21st May 1964, “My guy” entered the UK charts at number 37, finally hitting the heady heights of number 5 the following month. Berry Gordy’s company had now scored their first of many big hit singles in Britain.

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Between May ’64 and March 1965 Stateside issued a further 30 singles, including debuts from The Velvelettes, Earl Van Dyke, Four Tops and Kim Weston. Most of these were steady sellers, with titles by Marvin Gaye, Martha and the Vandellas, Mary Wells and The Temptations all scoring top fifty placings. On 28th August, and eight months after their initial flop, The Supremes “Where did our love go” (SS327) was released to an impressed public, who bought the single in droves, sending it number three in the chart. Less than two months later, and capitalising on the nation’s newfound love with the sounds from Motor City, “Baby love” (SS350) was released and hit the top spot soon after, with the group actually having two songs in the top ten at the same time for one week in October! Unfortunately not all releases were massive hits and some are now hard to find. These always sell for good prices when they appear on the market, especially in mint condition. Martha & The Vandellas “In my lonely room” (SS305), Brenda Holloway “Every little bit hurts” (SS307), The Tempations “Why you wanna make me blue” (SS348), Earl Van Dyke “Soul stomp” (SS357), Kim Weston “A little more love” (SS359), Four Tops “Without the one you love” (SS371), Carolyn Crawford “When someone’s good to you” (SS384) and Tony Martin “Talkin’ to your picture” (SS394) are probably the hardest to find, especially the last two. Also coming with a ridiculous price tag, all the Stateside EMI singles were sent to pluggers and radio DJ’s as red and white label demonstration discs and all are extremely collectable, and valuable too!

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EMI was also loved to release EP’s and hundreds of them were released across their labels from the early ’50’s to the late ’60’s. After no EP releases on Fontana or Oriole, Stateside bit the bullet and released no less than five of them in the time they were licensing material. Little Stevie Wonder was afforded the only single artist EP, “I call it pretty music but old people call it the blues” (SE1014) which is ridiculously hard to find. There were also four editions of a cracking new EP series, concentrating on material otherwise unavailable in the UK on 45, “R & B Chartmakers”. The series featured some great tracks, including two stellar previously USA only releases from Eddie Holland, “Just ain’t enough love” and “Leaving here”, all came in amazing picture sleeves too. Although steady sellers they’re hard to find in great condition nowadays, expect to pay between £50-£100 for each of them. By March 1965 the label was as big, if not bigger than Atlantic over here in the UK so it came as no surprise that, with a little help from super fan Dave Godin, Berry Gordy signed an exclusive deal with EMI to set up a brand new record company in Britain, Tamla Motown records. On 19th March 1965, clad in an iconic orange and white company sleeve, record stores took release of a new disc, TMG 501, “Stop! in the name of love” by The Supremes and the rest, as they say, is history.


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Articles Club Soul Front Page Music Picks Reviews UK USA Tags:, , , ,
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Interview with Mark ‘Bax’ Baxter about documentary Tubby Hayes: A Man in a Hurry (Part 1)

Jazz for Modernists 6 & 7 

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On a cold January afternoon in Soho, Jazz for Modernists had the pleasure of meeting Mark ‘Bax’ Baxter, author, stylist and producer of Mono Media’s groundbreaking Tubby Hayes, A Man In A Hurry (2015), a 50-minute documentary dedicated to the great, much-missed British jazz multi-instrumentalist Edward ‘Tubby’ Hayes (1935-1973). It’s a great film, already the subject of an excellent review in NutsMag by Graham Lentz HERE! Bax has been a fan of Tubby for over 30 years, embarking around 2011 on his four-year project to make a film paying tribute to a man he describes as “the face of modern jazz in the UK” in the late 50s and early 60s. Primarily a tenor saxophonist, but also an outstanding vibes player, Tubby, alongside Ronnie Scott part of the seminal Jazz Couriers from 1957 to 1959, appeared on over 60 LPs in a career that lasted until his untimely death in 1973, a sad consequence of a life lived ‘in a hurry’, but also to excess. His playing can be heard on such British 60s cinema classics as Alfie and The Italian Job, while he appeared in person in less-well-known cult films such as All Night Long (1962) and Dr. Terror’s House of Horrors (1965). Beyond jazz and film, he arranged and led the brass section on Family’s Music in a Doll’s House (1968) before the saxophone became a regular ingredient in early progressive and jazz-rock line-ups. Bax, who is also co-author with Paulo Hewitt of The A to Z of Mod (Prestel, 2012), explains in detail the genesis of his film and its subsequent success.

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01: So, how did this project come about?

MARK BAXTER – Initially through the mod scene, mod revival…My family have always been interested in clothing and bespoke-made suits. The mod thing fitted in with that. When Paul Weller formed The Style Council, I stayed with it…through some of his interviews he’d mention Blue Note jazz…He was quite a big influence on me finding other aspects of music and things. Someone said (early 80s) “try Ray’s Jazz Shop in Shaftesbury Avenue” and I just started going to the shop and picking up all the classic American jazz…Coltrane, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonius Monk, Chet Baker. One of the guys in the shop asked me if I knew the British angle on all this and I said “not really, I’m just trying to learn my way”. He said I should listen to the Jazz Couriers, a modern jazz outfit (’57-’59)…they’ve got a really good player called Tubby Hayes. I didn’t know that name at all – no Google or Internet back then. Ronnie Scott I knew, because of the club. I became a member of the club when I was 23, just to soak up a bit of the history, find out who was playing there and learn from that. I went to see Miles Davis at the Royal Festival Hall when he was wearing sort of what I’d call clown’s clothing, big flowy silk stuff, doing cover versions of Cyndi Lauper. It was completely wrong for me at the time, but he was still Miles Davis. One day I picked up a Jazz Couriers album. I really liked the late 50s sound and started looking for more stuff on Tubby which was quite hard to find. The vinyl was very rare and expensive, but you could pick up other Jazz Couriers reissues on vinyl and a couple of Tubby solo efforts. Then a compilation come out by a DJ called Paul Murphy who used to run nights at the Electric Ballroom in Camden, jazz-dance nights. I went down there a few times. He put out a compilation called Jazz Club 2… there’s a Tubby Hayes track called ‘A Pint of Bitter’ which he recorded in New York in 1961 – VIDEO. That song stayed with me, so I just carried on my journey of interest in music and fashion. As well as a 9 to 5 office job, I worked on market stalls, had a clothes shops, so was always doing various things, but always interested in jazz and music in general. Then, around 2002, I started to write, I wanted to give it a go and get some books published. I did do that in 2003/4 and one of the first interviewers asked me what my interests were. I said “Millwall Football Club, red wine and Tubby Hayes”. I used to throw that in to get a conversation going, cos most people said “Tubby Who?” That was the general starting point. About ten years ago, I said “I will write a book about Tubby Hayes”. At first, I couldn’t find anything about him. This was early 80s, no Google, no Internet. So that was really quite a tough subject.

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Jazz Club 2 (1985) featuring Tubby Hayes’ ‘A Pint of Bitter’

02: Back in the 80s, did you find any old copies of Melody Maker or Jazz Journal that had interviews with him?

MB: A couple of bits ‘n’ pieces. Back then, my general interest was 60s culture. It wasn’t specifically about Tubby or jazz in general. I was buying Rave magazines with stuff like Small Faces and The Who. I was into that general mod thing really…

03: In the mid-80s, then, was the mod scene in London moving towards a jazz direction as opposed to soul and r & b?

MB: Yeah. My main interests have always been clothes and music. Obviously, I went to a few club nights. When things started going more acid-jazzy, late 80s, Gilles Peterson, bands like Galliano, some of that woke me up because the look was quite moddy, Duffer of St. George, that clothing thing, but the music was more the stuff that I’d been listening too. The mod revival and stuff that purported to be ‘modern mod’ didn’t interest me at all. I was always going back… listening to the old bands, the originals and soul music and jazz were part of that really.

04: Around this time (early 90s), I learned a lot from the compilations by Dean Rudland…

MB: Yeah, that was always the entry point, the compilations. I was buying a lot of records, but mainly all the famous albums of Small Faces, Who, Action etc. Because jazz was so vast a subject, it was quite daunting. So compilations, I would start there, collect those and then you would pick the one or two acts or performers from those compilations and investigate further. That’s where Tubby came into it.

05: Some mods are clued up on soul jazz and Latin jazz. Would you agree, though, that some of the best 50s/60s modern jazz is still considered almost alien territory because it’s primarily music for listening to or watching rather than dancing?

MB: Yeah. I’d go to Dingwalls or Electric Ballroom and hear danceable jazz, but the stuff I was listening to at home was purely for listening to, like classic Miles Davis or Coltrane. You’d be in trouble trying to dance to some of that, I think. It was a real broad church but I kept coming back to Tubby Hayes for some reason. I’m not quite sure why.

06: You grew up in south London. Tubby Hayes grew up in south-west London. Was this a factor in your interest?

MB: Up until about 3 or 4 years ago, I didn’t know much about his personal life. Every now and then, I would need to find out something and with the Internet bits of information were coming through. But I didn’t know he was married or what he died of, or where he lived. I knew he was a London guy but I didn’t know where. I started googling his name quite a lot and I thought “there’s a book in this”. I kept seeing this guy called Simon Spillett, who’d been writing this book on Tubby Hayes for ten years (The Long Shadow of The Little Giant – The Life, Work and Legacy of Tubby Hayes (Equinox Publishing 2015). I emailed him one day, probably four years ago, and asked him if he was going to do this book because, if not, I’m a writer and I want to do it. He said he was nearly there, that he’d spent two years writing the book, eight years trying to find a publisher. I said “if you want to write a book, I want to make a film”. He gave me all his research notes which is very rare in this little tiny industry we’re in. No one really gives away anything, not like that!

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Simon Spillet’s authoritative volume on Tubby Hayes (2015)

07: That’s a pretty kind gesture!

MB: Yeah, that was really encouraging. I took it l on holiday with me to Italy and spent a week just reading all this stuff, which filled in all the blanks about Tubby. That he was married twice and had two kids, obviously a massive drug habit which I didn’t know much about really – that he lived in Raynes Park (South West London) as a kid, then here, there and everywhere. I still didn’t have a lot of his records at the time. The music side was “I like what I like” but I never really went mad on investigating it. Simon told me there were 60 albums out there and I thought I was never gonna get there, what with working full-time, trying to keep the wolf from the door. My first idea for the film was, having been through the publishing process, trying to get a commission. I couldn’t find anyone to back it though, so it became quickly evident that I’d have to do it myself and find the money myself.

08: Did that take a long time?

MB: Well, first of all, I saved up about three grand, thinking “well that’s a start”. Then I had to find someone who was a cameraman, editor, director, sound recordist all in one really, as I knew I couldn’t afford a crew. I do PR, short-term contracts, long-term contracts, and one job was for a band called Stone Foundation, a Midlands soul band. I went on a video shoot one day and the guy making the video was a self-contained one-man band called Lee Cogswell…[he was] very quiet, getting on with his work. I had a look through his viewfinder on his camera and the quality was great. It was really nicely framed. As luck would have it, Lee was looking to make a film. He knew nothing about jazz, but he was a musician, played drums and piano. So the music angle interested him. This was probably in 2012/13… I was aiming for a 2015 release, cos that would have been Tubby’s 80th birthday.

09: And you reached it…

MB: Yeah, just about made it. All the way through 2012-14, it was touch and go. We would find maybe two grand and then spend it quickly on expenses and bits of equipment and travelling around the country, interviewing these various people. My role of producer meant that I had to find a location; I had to get Lee down from the Midlands to film, and I had to pay for all that personally. So, it was just trying to find money all the time, really. We got the funds together and most of it was just getting Lee to film people, then obviously we needed some archive. So that was another process, getting involved with the BBC who own most of the archive.

10: What’s that archive like? The BBC is well-known for having deleted great footage from the 1960s.

MB: I had 8 or 9 hours of footage to go through including one-hour specials featuring him on one or two tracks. Ella Fitzgerald Live at the BBC from 1964/5 – a couple of solo spots where he’d stand up and play. So, in that 45-minute clip, there’d only be 5 minutes or so focussing on him, but he’d be in the line-up. We had to literally go through all these programmes trying to find the classic bits featuring Tubby. 9 hours sounds a lot, but there’s probably about an hour and a half of Tubby. But the fact that it still survives is incredible. There were one or two late 50s TV shows, then as the Sixties rolls on they are better quality and more Tubby-focussed. Jazz Goes to College, 45-minute sets with the big band, fantastic – so maybe two hours altogether. Also, Jazz 625, classic Tubby big band, which has been shown once there’s a load of clips of that on YouTube.


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Interview with Mark ‘Bax’ Baxter about documentary Tubby Hayes: A Man in a Hurry (Part 2)

Jazz for Modernists 6 & 7

11: How did you go about promotion and distribution?

MB: I got so entrenched with making the film, I didn’t think about showing it to anybody. We set ourselves that target (Spring 2015)…we were well short – we didn’t have enough footage, or enough money to finish it. We had to finance it ourselves. An archivist who was helping me find the footage from the BBC said to me one day, “you need a distributor, someone to put this out for you”. I thought that was a really good shout, I hadn’t really thought of that. I found a company called Proper Records, a reasonably sized independent record label, putting out lots of stuff by Nick Lowe and Van Morrison, I think. They had a jazz department and the guy I spoke to used to work for Mole Jazz in the 80s, who were like Ray’s, a destination shop for jazz buyers. He’d put out a couple of Tubby Hayes reissue compilations, one being Mexican Green (1967 LP), which he put out through his own Mole Jazz label. So, it was a done deal. Once I told him about Tubby Hayes, he said “we’ll have that!”. So we knew we could get it out into the shops, Amazon was taken care of, Waterstones etc. He also mentioned Foyles, which was where Ray’s Jazz shop is now.

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All Night Long (1962), featuring Patrick McGoohan, Charles Mingus and Tubby Hayes

12: The first showing was at Foyles in London [19 November 2015]. Tell us about that.

MB: That was amazing. I just walked in one day and said we were making a film about Tubby Hayes. Can we do a little bit of filming in Ray’s? People going through the racks – cut-away stuff. The guys there were great, really supportive. They said they had an auditorium upstairs and asked if I wanted to launch it up there. It was a 200-seater, fantastic space, so I thought “why not?” The [idea of the] film started in Ray’s, it’s gone back to Ray’s thirty years later. It was the London Jazz festival that week, around October. It all just came together, pure fluke. We were just desperately trying to get it out by a certain time. By getting those guys on board – Proper, Foyles and the London Jazz Festival, it suddenly became very serious. All of a sudden we had deadlines and fairly big-hitting companies looking to speak to us and put our product out.

13: Has the film done well?

MB: Yeah, it’s sold well, we had 2 000 DVDs made and pretty much sold them out within ten weeks. We were delighted with that. From those first sales we earned money to get some more made for Christmas. We’re into our second run. It’s worked.

14: Any evidence that sales of Tubby’s music have increased as a result of the DVD?

MB: I can’t say for certain, but the awareness of his name and his work has gone up. Through my social media, I get a lot of feedback, people saying they’ve never heard of this guy, but like the sound of him, the era, the music, the films he worked on (eg. The Italian Job, Alfie). A lot of 60s enthusiasts that I know personally would go and check out a film, or YouTube, or Spotify and then they may end up with a CD or a bit of vinyl, and then end up with the DVD. It had been quiet for a long time on the Tubby front but now there are a lot more reissues going on.

15: [question from April 2016]: What were the subsequent showings at Regent’s Street Cinema like, in February and just recently in April?

MB: Our screening at the Regent Street cinema in Feb 2016 was a sell out, which was very encouraging for us all and proved that word of the doc. had got round to the right people. A good mixture Mod and 60s enthusiasts as well as film buffs turned up in the 180-strong crowd.
We had Simon Spillett and his new quartet play live and after the doc, myself, Simon and director Lee Cogswell took part in a Q & A session. Then DJs took over in the bar with a fine selection of jazz-inspired tracks.
The night was such a success that the cinema immediately asked us back and in April we repeated it all again. This time we had an older, more jazz-based crowd, which pleased me. We had new people to tap into!
We also screened at Ronnie Scott’s in March, which was a real mark of approval from the UK jazz world. For the rest of 2016, we have other screenings already booked for Gateshead, Southend, Chichester, Brecon and back in London in the coming months.

16: If you had to recommend one Tubby Hayes LP, which would it be?

MB: The one album that everyone should get is Mexican Green, which he made in 66/67. It’s going the Coltrane style, more than the fast, ‘crash-bang-wallop’ sound of Tubby when he was in full flow in the early sixties. There are certain tracks with three or four different styles within one track. It’s not an easy listen, you’ve got to work at it, but that’s the education of it all. That’s the last album he made of any real note, he made a contractual album after that called The Orchestra (1970), an album of cover versions (‘These Boots Are Made for Walking’, ‘Hey Jude’ etc). But Mexican Green is the one I’d definitely go for. From the earlier period, Tubbs (1961), Tubbs’ Tours (1964) and Tubbs in NY (1961) are all valid.

MI0001492318

The classic Mexican Green LP (1967)

17: Of all the British sax players of the time, he was perhaps the most well-known in America…

MB: Yeah, definitely. There’d been a musicians’ ban on UK guys going over there. Then it was reciprocal. If Miles Davis played two weeks here, we had to send someone to the States. They didn’t want anybody. There was no one of any note that they wanted. When Tubby popped up, they said “he can do it”. He went to New York in 1961 at the Half Note Club. Miles Davis was in the audience on the first night. Tubby was the one guy who could go out and hold his own in that company. He played two weeks there, mixed with the musicians, recorded and became part of the scene for a little while. A lot of the guys we spoke to said he should have stayed there, committed to two or three years in the States. Personally, I think he liked being the big fish in a small pond. Over here, he’d get plenty of work, plenty of press, TV appearances. He was the only one anyone had heard of.

18: One UK-based artist who did go to America before Tubby was Dizzy Reece. Did Tubby play with him?

MB: They played on a Blue Note LP recorded over here [Blues in Trinity, 1959], with a version of ‘Round Midnight’ on it.
19: By the mid-sixties, of course, we were getting great jazz musicians, but in return were sending over the likes of Herman’s Hermits….
MB: Yeah. Once the beat boom started coming in, jazz clubs would become a beat club, or they’d book more acts like that. That’s what the kids were demanding. Jazz suddenly became quite old overnight. The work dried up quite quickly, or the club gigs dried up. The recordings weren’t selling massive numbers. The Stones and The Beatles were selling in big numbers. The trade papers stopped writing about them [jazz musicians], maybe a little bit of a mention. But really, the front cover would be given to the Beatles, Stones, Small Faces, Who, Otis and soul music. This is why he stared to play on jingles and films, looking for other work.

19: And this would lead Tubby to other work?

MB: Yeah, he’d be hired for a session. He wouldn’t know a lot about the band. His studio or agent would get him a bit of work. He would turn up and pretty much be able to play anything. But the timing was all wrong for him, because he wasn’t very well. He was in and out of hospital for months on end. He was probably offered work, but couldn’t make the gigs for one reason or another. His health wasn’t great [around 70/71] and there’s a school of thought that maybe he was still dabbling a little bit [heroin], and he had a heart valve operation in 1970, and then again in 1972. In 1973, he couldn’t play – he was physically incapable of playing.

20: Finally, would you consider making a feature film about Tubby Hayes starring James Corden in the title role?

MB: Simon (Spillett) has said that he’s aware of Tubby Hayes. The similarity has been pointed out to him. Whether that will ever go anywhere I don’t know? James Corden would be perfect. The only problem is Tubby lost about five stone, six stone, around the 60s when the drugs kicked in and I think Mr. Corden might struggle to lose the weight.


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James Thomas

James Thomas was born in Bristol just the wrong side of 1970 (1971). His first encounters with the 1960s were his two-year-old elder brother’s reminiscences of the Moon Landing (since deleted by the BBC) and an afternoon in 1975 listening to the Beatles with his parents. He remembers 2-Tone and the ’79 revival, but was the one in his primary school still wearing flares until he persuaded his mum to buy him a black Harrington jacket (a stylish-enough copy by Burtons) and asked a hair stylist to make him ‘look like Suggs’. In the 1980s he became obsessed with almost every aspect of the 1960s, whether it were Star Trek, the length of George Harrison’s hair in March 1965 or the first colour TV broadcast of a cricket match (he thinks it was 1968). After being side-tracked by progressive rock (an ongoing guilty pleasure), James came to his senses in 1986 on seeing footage of Booker T and the MGs and Otis Redding on a programme celebrating the 60th anniversary of television. A flirtation with ‘indie pop’ (in the bowl-cut and anorak days) led to too much introspection, but also a new interest in the psychedelic sounds of the 1960s that seemed to go hand in glove with a liking for The Pastels and The Razorcuts. A summery afternoon in the jazz tent at Bristol’s annual (and long gone) Ashton Court Festival in 1989 opened his mind to the sounds of Lee Morgan, Horace Silver, Art Blakey and most forms of modern jazz. In 1990, James attended his first proper 60s club night, the revered Kaleidoscope Pop! in Leeds. On his return from the North in 1992, he developed a new commitment to Mod culture. He recalls early Untouchables Brighton New Year rallies and in 1994 moved to London. A real education for him (in so many ways...) was a period in Barcelona (1997-2002) where he helped out with the Magic in the Air club for a year or two and where his IQ was permanently reduced by a record dealer who made him clean vinyl for four weeks in a windowless room. After a decade or so in the West Country, he is now living again in London, where he plans to write about jazz, meet like-minded people and study the history of the cravat.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Film Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Summer Fashion

Mods do like to be beside the sea-side in the sunnier months. Be it Brighton, Margate or even Beaulieu-sur-Mer. So in this issue of Nutsmag we have decided to take a look at the quintessential items of clothing that feature in the spring/summer Modernist wardrobe, plus a little history behind what makes these items so iconic in terms of style.

Breton tops
The fresh stripes on a boated-necked Breton top give an instant whiff of French New Wave to any summer outfit – especially when paired with a pair or cropped slim-fitting trousers. The tops have never really gone out of fashion since they were adopted by Beatniks, Mods and lovers of all things cool in the late 50s and 60s. They were also a favourite fashion item among movie stars sported by the likes of James Dean, Audrey Hepburn, Edie Sedgwick and Bridget Bardot. But the history behind the Breton goes back much further. Right back, in fact to 1858, when the Act of France introduced the tops for all French Navy seamen. The original design was said to feature 21 stripes, one for each of Napoleons’ victories. It was originally nicknamed the ‘Chandail’ which is a shortened version of the French Marchand d’Ail (garlic merchant) who would wear them as they crossed the English Channel to sell their wares. The tops were made and still are to this day, in the Normandy town of Saint-James. The original fisherman’s sweater version of the top had three buttons on the shoulder and was long and close-fitting with a slight turtle neck.

Loafers and drivers
Feet also need something a little lighter in summer and loafers and driving shoes are perfect for both men and women. With loafers, the slip-on style, based on a moccasin is both comfy and cool. Plus there are so many variations of loafer style that there is still room for some individualism, from tassels to a plainer penny-style. Opting for lighter colours in suedes or even a basket weave, keeps the look light and hip. Driving shoes were developed in the 60s off the back of the sports car boom by the brands Car Shoe and later Tods. Their design featured a longer ‘vamp’ than a loafer with a leather tie across the bridge of the shoe and the signature ‘nubs’ on the heel, which prevented you from damaging the shoe when you switched between accelerator and brake pedal. The good looks and comfort of the shoe meant that people wanted to be seen wearing them outside of their vehicles and were soon being sported by wealthy automobile fanatics. The original shoes were beautifully crafted out of fine leather but soon cheaper variations became widely available. However the style still gives off the requisite air of affluence due to its association with 60s motoring.

Summer strides
Levis are a mod staple, but come summer away went the dark denim and out came its white counterpart. This all started in the 60s when mods, in a bid to try anything different, started wearing their strides in a variety of colours. White was a particular favourite and was often sported by the likes of The Who and The Small Faces both on and off camera. But if you want to wear white, well you have to adhere to a few rules. First off you need to keep them really really clean. So try to avoid sitting anywhere likely to be even remotely grubby. Then there’s the cut itself. They should be of a slim fit (not too tight and not too baggy) with the hem ending just on the ankle, exposing a bit of flesh or a nicely coloured sock. Avoid wearing white with white and think of the jeans as a back-drop for the rest of your outfit to help make the colours ‘pop’ and to team them with a coloured polo top or merino knit for a touch of pure Riviera chic. For women, try a cotton trouser in white or pale pastels in a capri pant cut. Look for the signature slit at the hem, it’s much more flattering than a clam-digger! Again make sure they are slim-fit and not to tight or loose. This look is where coolness follows comfort and ease.


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Reviews Style Tags:, , , , ,
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Hey Mr DJ – The JJ’s

This entry is part 15 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We caught up with The JJ’s (Jay Bernal & Dean Bloxham) recently who live in London, UK to talk about his passion for good music.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Dean – My dad got me into reggae from a young age, and I’ve listened to it ever since.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Jay – the first time we played together was at Club JA in Deptford, about 7 years ago.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Dean – We have played loads of great gigs over the years, but nothing beats Up the Junction when it’s rocking.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Dean – Can’t think of any. We always have a giggle.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Jay – The lads at Endless Memories, Eindhoven. Dennis & Simon over in Hamburg… All good lads who like a party.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Dean – Nothing in particular… we just play the tunes we would dance to.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Jay – I found a gem in Amsterdam. Actually Dean found it, but I’ll say no more to prevent an argument.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Dean – David Rodigan! So many artists, loved seeing Hugh Roy this year, he’s near the top of my list.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Jay – Mainly Jamaican, but no specific labels or artists, whatever takes my fancy.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Dean – We put on Up the Junction in London every three months. Plus guest spots at other nights throughout the year.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Jay – Vernon Allen – Babylon

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Jay

Ken Boothe – Artibella
Austin Faithful – Uncle Joe
Ravers – I’ve Been Crying
Hugh Malcom – Good Time Rock
Jackie Opel – You’re Too Bad

Dean

Ed Nangle – Good Girl
Zodiacs – Renegade
The Skatalites – On Broadway
The Schoolboys – Guilty Of Love
Maytals – Just Tell Me


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Tony Jackson

This entry is part 16 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

First got seriously into music with the Mod Revival in 1979. The Jam and Secret Affair were my favourites. Also 2 Tone, particularly The Specials. After seeing Quadrophenia, I started buying 60’s records, good and bad ones!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Rhythm & Soul Revue (I think that’s what it was called) at Churchill’s, Ramsgate. I was just collecting then, but was invited to spin some tunes. I remember Jo Wallace giving me positive feedback, which encouraged me to do more, whenever opportunities arose. So basically, it’s all her fault!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Margate Mod & 60’s Festival last year. So nice to do a NUTS event with some legendary Mod DJ’s, bringing back happy memories!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

There have been one or two. Faulty equipment, power cuts, sewer blockage, rain, fights, venue running out of beer after two hours… and a plague of flies!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Lee Miller, Rob, Ian Jackson, Pid, Chris Dale, Speed and all the others who, over the years, have given myself and many others some great times. They’ve cost me a fortune in records though! And I must mention Tony Class (RIP). A CCI rally night wasn’t complete without his party music. I didn’t totally get it at the time, but I
do now!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I just play the music that I have collected over the years. It can be Northern, Mod, Jazz, Ska, Reggae, whatever.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I bought an original copy of Luther Ingram – “If It’s All The Same To You Babe” back in the late 80’s for £35. Not a bad investment!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The Mod Revival was what got me started, so it would have to be that. It just led on to so many other things and influences. Favourites? The Small Faces and
Dusty Springfield!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No. I try to keep an open mind!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

My regular haunt is The Black Cat Club in Margate. Find it or me on Facebook!

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

The one that James Clark HASN’T got!

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Small Faces – Don’t Burst My Bubble
2. Herbie Goins & The Nightimers – Cruisin’
3. Sonny Boy Williamson – Help Me
4. Brother Jack McDuff – Duffin’ Around
5. Prince Buster – Freezing Up Orange Street
6. Reg Guest Syndicate – Underworld
7. Geno Washington & The Ram Jam Band – I’ve Been Hurt By Love
8. Timebox – Beggin’
9. The Quik – Bert’s Apple Crumble
10. Walter Jackson – It’s An Uphill Climb To The Bottom

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Bob Seger System – Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man
2. Zu Zu Blues Band – Zu Zu Man
3. Reverend Cleophus Robinson – Shout Shout
4. We The People – Love Is A Beautiful Thing
5. Denny Belline & The Rich Kids – Money Isn’t Everything

Main Site:

www.facebook.com

Next Club Spots:

Soul Cellar on 30th April 2016
Sure Shot on 14th May 2016
Mod & 60’s Weekender on 27-30th May 2016 in sunny (hopefully!) Margate, see all the details HERE!


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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Hey Mr DJ – Callum Simpson

This entry is part 19 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into the mod/scooter scene at 15 years old. I bought my first scooter, a Vespa 50cc Special and joined a scooter club called High Moderation. My older brother and cousins were into the mod scene which influenced me massively. I started to take more of an interest and hang around with some Mods who were a year above me at school. Once into the fashion it was only a matter of time before I discovered the music. I started listening to bands such as Paul Weller, The Jam, Small Faces and The Who. My brother had a big part to play in my musical taste progressing, as he was listening to bands like The Specials, Madness and was listening to lots of soul and Motown compilations. At 16 I was able to start going to clubs like Brighton Beach, local soul nights and the occasional scooter rally. I was hearing records like Mel Torme – Coming Home, Sandi Sheldon – Gonna make me love you and Sam Dees – Lonely for my baby. As you can imagine I was blown away by which made me to start delving a little deeper into the music and vinyl records. I bought my first record from Boogaloo Records in Leicester when I was 17 for £6 and it was Ray Charles – Go on home.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My First DJ set was in Birmingham at a night organised by Pid. By now I was hooked and lived for the weekends by travelling up and down the country regularly attending mod/soul nights. Through attending nights on a regular basis Pid asked me to DJ along with a couple of close mates Soggy and Gibbo. I was so nervous but managed to get people dancing so it went relatively well. Records I was playing at this point were tunes like JJ Jackson – O Ma Liddi, Artisitcs – Hope We Have and Joe Tex – You Better Believe it Baby, all great tunes!

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My most memorable DJ set has to be in Barcelona at the Boiler Club. The city is amazing enough but the Boiler Club is how clubs should be, exciting, vibrant and a full on party from start to finish. I have so many great memories of this club!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

If ever you get asked to DJ at a wedding Don’t Do It! I was asked off the back of running a club called ‘Shoutin the Blues’. One of the bar men liked the music and asked me to play at his wedding. At the time I was about 18 or 19 and thought that I could make a few quid. I made it clear that I only had Soul, Mod, R&B, Latin records and that he wouldn’t be getting the usual type wedding DJ. The groom was adamant that he wanted something a bit different and that his guests would enjoy the music. I agreed to do it and for a price of £150, which I thought wasn’t bad for a few hours work! How wrong could I have been!

To cut a long story short only 1 person danced throughout the whole night and that was towards the end of the night… funnily enough it was probably the rarest record I played all night ‘Billy Hawkes – Oh Baby’.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Mik Parry – Forward thinking, has a great ear and is very knowledgeable! Check out his Youtube channel ‘Pow Wow Mik’. The second is Mr Karl Heard, he is what I call a proper DJ! This man has the ability to create an atmosphere like no other. Hopefully I’ll get to see Karl DJ again soon, I hear he is back and still unearthing new tunes!

Gav Arno – he’s a dark horse! Gav has a passion for unearthing quality unknown records like no other, he finds tomorrow’s big records today!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The three DJ’s I have mentioned in question 5 have helped me shape my taste, especially Karl Heard, over the last few years. Another is by regularly attending club nights and hearing DJ’s spinning new (to me) interesting records. The thing I love about Mod nights is you get such a varied taste of music from Soul right through to Jazz. The internet is also a great way to hear new records and other DJ’s from around the world. Shows such as Jester Wild and YouTube channels are a great way to hear new stuff. Over the years I have collected all sorts but now I am much more selective about what records I buy.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

My best discoveries are records I have recently posted on YouTube, Lil Archie & the Majestics, Leave my Girl Alone & Victor Lane – There’s something about you. A few copies have turned up since but they are both extremely rare records!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I honestly don’t have a favourite artist, I love Marvin Gaye but not sure I could call him my favourite. I would relate this back again to question 5 and say that in my time as a resident at The Pow Wow Club, Mik and Gav were massive influences over me musically. The stuff these guys were playing was unreal! Imagine being 19/20 and hearing The Jokers, Jonathan Capree, The Fads, Young Jessie etc. Both well ahead of their time and two great DJ’s.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not in the slightest, if it’s good and I like it I’ll buy it!

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I am a resident at the Pow Wow Club in Sheffield and I’ve recently joined the NUTS DJ team.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Another tough one, it would have to be either Eddie Parker, I’m Gone on Awake or The Hopkins Bros, Shake Cherri on Magnetik. I first heard Eddie Parker in Sweden at the Soulastic All-nighter when Ginger Taylor was playing. When the first few notes came in the reaction and atmosphere was something that I will never forget. I first heard Andy Dyson play The Hopkins Bros at Lifeline a few years back and again the place went crazy. Only a handful of DJ’s had it at the time (Dyson, Butch, Ian Wright, Mick H etc. Again the place went mental and the dancefloor was rammed!

Unfortunately both are well out of my price range and probably always will be, I’m hoping I’ll get lucky and find a copy in a charity shop or record fair. The chances of this happening are doubtful but never say never where records are concerned.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourite’s and a current top 5 spins?

Top Ten Favourites:
1. Eddie Parker – I’m gone
2. Hopkins Bros – Shake Cherri
3. Jonathan Capree – I’m gonna build me a mountain
4. Mel Williams – Groove my mind
5. Ray Agee – I’m losing again
6. Billy Hawkes – Oh baby
7. Volumes – I ain’t gonna give you up
8. Otis Lee – Hard Row to Hoe
9. Gene Toones – What more do you want
10. Tobi Lark – Sweep it out in the shed

Top Five Spins:
1. Pat Lewis – No One to Love
2. Wayne Champion – Don’t Panic Baby
3. King Carl – Everybody’s feeling good
4. Jokers – Soul Sound
5. Sal Davis – Makini


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, , , , , ,
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Hey! Mr DJ – Lee Petryszyn

This entry is part 18 of 19 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Growing up there was always music & records about, me old dear loved Motown, the old mans a huge soulie (DJ’s himself still) but was my older brother who introduced me to everything that was good growing up through the 90’s with Blur, Oasis, The Verve then the inspirations to those bands like The Who, Small Faces etc… It was The Horrors fanzine that I first got my early glimpse into Psych with a track off a CD that used to come with it… Hooterville Trolleys – No Silver Bird, which blew my mind and opened up a new one seeking similar sounds!

Where was your first DJ slot?

Used to play a couple of mates indie nights but the first 60s bash was as resident for a night that used to be called Psychedelic Sunday’s at the Lexington with my pal Jamie Cook a few years back with mostly cheap nuggets singles.

What was your most memorable DJ spot?

My second time at Mousetrap, one of my favourite 60s haunts as a punter, always a game crowd in a nowadays rare club that has all the right ingredients for a top night. At the brilliant Margate Mod weekender – playing records with my old man for a good while in the day. The farewell night at Berlin Beat Explosion which was open deck at Wowsville bar playing back to back with Riccardo Para from Italy.

What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Fortunately in my thus far short-lived Dee Jin escapades I’ve not endured any too drastic, My first time at Mousetrap had a couple of hiccups with the mixer not working to start with which didn’t help calm the nerves!

Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Joseph Spurgeon was the first DJ that initially captured my psychedelic imagination! Rob Bailey, Carolina Pastore, Rhys Webb, Peter Feeley, Holly Calder, Stephen McConville – in fact anyone who collects and plays as it’s not a cheap game to be in!

What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Mostly anything from 66 to 71 that’s uptempo, fast and frantic with a good groove.

What was your best ever find/discovery?

Discovering Psychedelic Music and all the nights that play it like Hidden Door Club/Cave/Le Beat Bespoke/Mousetrap.

Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

My Brother, My old man for the thirst for Vinyl, Cave Club & Mousetrap nights and the DJs that play. Brian Jonestown Massacre being my favourite artists.

Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

If I could choose it would be British Demos & Pictures sleeves but any great tune will do,but predominately French Psych/British & Dutch/Belgium Freakbeat.

Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Hidden Door Club at Mascara Bar in Stoke Newington Friday 8th April. Margate Mod & 60’s Weekender on Sat May 28th 2016, see all the details HERE!

What is the record you would most like to own?

Adams Recital – There’s no place for lonely people.

Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

The Fox – Hey! Mr Carpenter (CBS)

Legay – No one (Fontana)
The Accent – Red Sky at Night (Decca)
July – Dandelion Seeds (Major Minor)
Ruperts People – Dream on my Mind (Columbia)
The Mickey Finn – Garden of my Mind (Direction)
The Koobas – Royston Rose (Columbia)
Dragonfly – Celestial Empire (Philips)
The Orange Alabaster Mushroom – Tree Pie (POP 24)
Pink Floyd – See Emily Play (Columbia)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

Peshka – Danse Du Ventre (JAG)
Glass Sun – Silence of the Morning (Sound Patterns)
Sheephouse – Ladder (Decca)
Joys of Life – Descent (Columbia)
The Fairytale – Guess I Was Dreaming (Decca)

Web Links:

Facebook: facebook.com/LeePetryszyn
MySpace: myspace.com/drfloorshaker
Twitter: twitter.com/LeePetryszyn
Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/drfloorshaker


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Beat DJs Front Page Fuzz Garage Interviews Music Psych Tags:, , , ,
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NUTsCast – Sessions – part 11 (episode 20)

NUTsCast Apr 2016

In this latest edition of the Nutscast Sessions, The Baron looks ahead to the late May Bank Holiday Weekender from 27th to 30th May 2016.

Playing tracks by the featured artists and selections from our guest djs, it is the prefect prelude to a great weekend in Margate hosted by The New Untouchables. We have some incredible bands and djs lined up for this one. So let’s get going with a track from the headliners on Friday 27th May, The Rifles.

Track Listing:

01. The Rifles – The Great Escape
02. Night Dials – Waiting At Your Door
03. Magnectic Mind – Hold On To Me
04. The Embrooks- Francis
05. DJ Callum Simpson selects The Jokers – Soul Sound
06. Mynd Set – Tick Tock
07. Big Boss Man – Crimson 6Ts
08. DJ’s The JJ’s select Jackie Opel – You’re Too Bad
09. French Boutik
10. French Boutik
11. French Boutik
12. Tony Jackson selects The Reg Guest Syndicate – Underworld
13. Sonic Keys – Love Get Ready
14. Peter Feely selects – Spice In Love
15. Pid Selects Lloyd Nolan – I Don’t Know About You
16. Jo Wallace Selects Carl Underwood – Ain’t You Lying?
17. Jim Watson Selects The Dynels – Little Darlin’


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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May 4, 2016 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Podcasts Reviews Tags:, , ,
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