Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Live! – Tony Hatch: A Life in Song

This entry is part 11 of 11 in the series Live!

London Royal Festival Hall, July 5 2014

Tony Hatch, you’ve all heard of him, right? The TV bloke. The chap who wrote the music for Crossroads, Emmerdale and something else, now, what was it? Oh yes, Neighbours. Bloody Neighbours. The cheesiest soap ever, and the song wasn’t much cop either. Used to drive me barmy. So why would anyone want to go and see that? And what’s it got to do with NUTsmag?

Think again. Yes, he did write those tunes (as well as the themes to Champions, Mr And Mrs, Hadley, Sportsnight and other shows intrinsically associated with retro-lounge culture, all of which are splendidly aired tonight) but he also wrote some of the finest pop songs of the 1960s, as well as laying down superior reworkings of popular standards (such as his sitar-drenched interpretation of Bonnie Dobson’s “Morning Dew”, for instance, hands down the best cover of said song ever recorded) Even some of his lesser known efforts reside among the tunes you twist to regularly on soul dancefloors, whilst others well, to call them simply ‘classics’ wouldn’t even begin to do them justice.

I mean, Chris Montez’ “Call Me”, Jackie Trent’s “Where Are You”, Bobby Rydell’s “Forget Him”, the Searchers’ “Sugar And Spice” Scott Walker’s “Joanna” and most of all, Petula Clark’s “Don’t Sleep In The Subway” “Colour My World” and “Downtown” : That’s what I call an output. Yes, almost every single note and lyric of all of them- as well as producing Bowie, the the Montanas, the Overlanders, Brook Brothers, Viscounts and half the other acts signed during the early Beat boom to Pye, in stereo, before anyone else in the UK (with the obvious exception of Joe Meek) had even tried. In short, this geezer is seriously important to our lives, which therefore means that to witness him discussing and performing the songs that shaped them is an honour.

Unfortunately, the same can’t be said of some of the musicians- and I use the term in its broadest sense- chosen to interpret those compositions tonight. I mean, seriously, Rhydian? Joe McElderry? And in the case of Sophie Evans, er, who? Surely there are people within the indie scene- Jarvis, Neil Hannon and yes, even B*b St*nl*y springing to mind- whose sonic debt to the man is obvious, and understanding of his music greater? Of all the younger guests, the lounge-tastic Rumer leans closest to “our planet”, and thus, with her do any hopes of musical salvation lie. Sadly, despite managing deftly on two other numbers, she accidentally sings the first verse of “Call Me” (for which Hatch handles all keyboard duties himself sublimely, thus highlighting the error) in a key as yet unknown to human ears (a fact she is only too well aware of), fleeing the stage immediately after the final note in a visible huff. Oops. However, among this era’s “coffee table” chanteuses, she’s still the only one thus far displaying talent or originality enough to go the distance, and, even if she does reside slightly outside our orbit, I know she’ll recover from such minor embarrassments.

As for us, I suppose we’ll just have to batten down the hatches and concentrate on the genius himself… genius which, thankfully, remains unwithered by time. Not only does he still play piano with consummate skill (when the mood strikes) but he isn’t averse to taking the mike once in a while either, even treating us to a spirited rendition of a song I’m sure many had forgotten was his own in “Messing About On A River”. “Hang about”, I hear you cry, “that’s about as Mod as Nell Gwynne’s frock”… sure, but it’s another element of a multi-faceted man who is, in essence, our own Bacharach and David rolled into one. Admittedly I shan’t dwell too much on his showtunes (not up to the standard of his best work anyway), save to say that as a vocalist, Marti Webb still knocks almost everyone else onstage tonight into a cocked hat. But the stories behind those 60s standards… spellbinding isn’t the word. Just imagine, for a moment, what it was like to not only work, but be in demand, at the turn of the decade that revolutionised British music, in doing so leaving our stamp on the entire world? To produce beat groups when they were still a new invention, and show them how to use studios when the inherent possibilities of recording technology were only just being discovered?

Here, tonight, Hatch tells all and more, and jaws drop. Therefore to some extent, the spoken sections (with former agent Michael Grade acting as questionmaster) far outweigh the performances- again, understandable given the choice of singers- but regardless, the orchestra plays a blinder, recapturing perfectly the atmosphere of both London and New York circa 1963. It’s almost enough to make your NUTsmag correspondent saunter down the Kings road in his finest whistle’n’flute looking for a suitable dollybird with whom to repair to his space age bachelor pad- were he to own one, that is. There’s also a surprise in store for those whose love of 60s culture extends to British cinema: usually, I’d run a mile at the sight and sound of Les Miserables’ John Owen Jones, but witnessing the giant Welshman attempt “Look For A Star”, originally voiced by Garry Mills in 1960’s Circus Of Horrors, is a possibly never-to-be-repeated treat.

Yet ultimately, there’s only one singer, man or woman (or at least one still talking to him, in the absence of ex-wife, co-lyricist and muse Jackie Trent) whose name is synonymous with Hatch’s music, and who can truly do his songs justice: thus it’s Petula Clark, even if only performing three numbers, that everyone has really gathered to see. From her first entrance, the sprightly 82-year-old receives a heroine’s welcome from fans of all ages: rightly so too, for, even if the current generation of reality idols have misinterpreted, her back catalogue, within this woman lurks not only the essence of every descendant from Dusty to Cilla to Dionne, but most latterday post-punk indie-retro babes from Tracey Thorn via Sarah Cracknell to Nina Persson. In short, the true antecedent of every Mod feller’s dream, and that’s before you even acknowledge her peerless quality as an interpreter of popular song.

Her appearance could also only mean, after one promising new track, two things – “Don’t Sleep In The Subway” and “Downtown” , still better descriptions than any others of the respective ups and downs of metropolitan life, written by the man who somehow conveyed them better than anyone else of his age, sung by its true female voice. The cities described may now be poor shadows of those described within, but here, in context, they suddenly seem bearable- as does our intrepid endurance of certain earlier performers- and with Hatch and Clark’s arms linked in an exultant display of musical kinship, the end seems to have justified the means. Next time, though, assuming he’s around to celebrate his 80th- could we at NUTsmag pick the lineup (not to mention drop the Settlers’ “Major To Minor” and some Montanas tunes into the set?) Trust us, we know what we’re doing…


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Dashing Drewe Shimon

Dashing Darius Drewe Shimon, aka just 'Drewe' 'Druid' or 'The Shim' to his mates, was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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September 18, 2014 By : Category : Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , ,
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Epstein – The Man Who Made The Beatles

Leicester Square Theatre, London - 30th July to 6th September 2014

It is rare to be asked to review a play, so this is a welcome challenge. This production has a very short run, so you will have to be quick to get tickets, but I have to say it will be well worth it. This is a wonderful experience. Beautifully written, superbly acted and brilliantly directed.

For those expecting a ‘warts and all’ account with imitation Beatles in tow, you’d be wrong. This is the story behind the story of Brian Epstein, an examination of the life that shaped him. There are no answers.

From the outset you are challenged (as the audience) to watch, listen and decide for yourself, which Brian Epstein you prefer and which parts of his story you wish to believe.

Like many pop history figures, there is much that is either debatable or downright myth about Brian Epstein. This play draws it out, examines them all and never once pronounces its conclusion. You do that.

Andrew Lancel plays Brian Epstein, while Will Finlason plays the character of ‘This Boy’. You’re never quite sure who ‘This Boy’ really is. I thought he might be an amalgam of all the different ‘types’ that swamped Epstein’s life.

This is an emotional roller-coaster though. At times funny, violent, morose, desperate and hilarious. The humour is typically ‘Scouse’. Liverpool has a unique way of looking at life and situations and finding something funny in it.

Andrew Sherlock has written from extensive and exhaustive research, while Producer Bill Elms and Director Jen Heyes have treated it with all the love and attention it deserves.

No one knows what really happened during Epstein’s last weekend before being found dead from a suspected overdose. This play imagines this exchange between the two characters taking place during that time.

Lancel and Finlason are absolutely brilliant and this is a tall order to maintain a level of performance for two hours with a short intermission.

Needless to say, I rose to join the standing ovation at the end along with the likes of Gary Crowley, Holly Johnson, Mike McCartney (Sir Paul’s brother), Alistair McGowan and I’m sure I saw Bill Kenwright there as well.

I hope this gets an extended run, so more people have a chance to see it. I highly recommend it. BUY TICKETS HERE!


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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August 11, 2014 By : Category : Front Page Inspiration Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , ,
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Night Beats (Newbreed)

This entry is part 3 of 6 in the series Newbreed4

The Night Beats are an American psychedelic, garage and soul group based out of Seattle, Washington. The group consists of  Danny Lee Blackwell (Guitars, Vox), James Traeger (Drums) and Tarek Wegner (Bass/Vox). Night Beats incorporate sounds of early R&B, Texas Psychedelic Rock, Blues, Folk and Soul.

Discography:
2010 – Single ‘H-Bomb’
2011 – LP ‘Night Beats’, Split Single 10” Night Beats/UFO Club
2012 – Split Single 7” Night Beats/TRMRS
2013 – LP ‘Sonic Bloom’

Tour Dates: 
31/07/2014 Spain, Gijon – Euro Ye Ye Festival

Check our Facebook page for all other dates in August & September.

01. How long have you been playing together for and how did you meet?

James and I since we were 14, in grade school. Tarek in Seattle around 2009.

02. Two of you are from Texas originally, which has a rich history of psychedelic music, and Seattle is of course home to the Sonics. How have these, such important places, influenced your music – if at all?

Both places have been influential. From the R’n’B side of things to the freedom heard in a lot of the Texas psych. But our influences range from everywhere. Not to one genre or era, people listening should know this.

03. What are your main musical influences? There’s an obvious love of psychedelic garage shining through in your music, but your name is taken from a Sam Cooke record? Are Soul and R&B as big an influence as psychedelic music to you?

Both are important. So are movies. Places and people. We try not to focus or put things in order of influence.

04. You’re based in Seattle, are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area?

La Luz.

05. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like in Seattle, is there one? Do you feel a part of it?

60s scene? What year is it? We have our place in the underground yes, but it’s hard to see under the dirt and moss so were not sure sometimes.

05. Night Beats have played with some incredible acts… Roky Erikson, The Zombies, The Black Angels, The Black Lips, The Growlers. You are constantly touring, be it on your own tours or playing every psych festival going. What have been some of the highlights for you?  Do you prefer playing live to recording?

You’ve mostly listed them. We went to South Africa and made good friends down there. That was a big highlight. They’re 2 separate things so I can’t say.

06. Are you looking forward to playing Euro YeYe/in Gijon? You’ve toured quite extensively in Spain haven’t you? I hear their crowds can be pretty wild…

Yes. We love Spain.

07. What’s your favourite song in your repertoire currently? Is there anything you really love, or hate playing live?

Some things were tired of playing. So we give it a rest but maybe bring it back.

08. How do you approach the recording process, I can imagine it’s not very technology heavy – do you take a more, I guess, honest approach similar to your garage influences, using analogue equipment? Is it important to you to have a live sound, so you can easily replicate this on stage?

We generally use tape. Sometimes a little digital. We use electricity and some acoustic instruments. We record live. Some overdubs here and there. Not gonna give away any secrets.

09. Your second album, Sonic Bloom was released in Autumn last year, and showed a real progression from your self-titled debut. Have you already started thinking about recording the follow up? Or have any plans for any singles coming soon?

Thank you. Yes. Stay tuned

10. Between your non-stop touring and own releases as Night Beats, you have various collaborations under your belts already… you seem to be the hardest working band around! Danny Lee has put out some releases with Christian Bland of the Black Angels as The UFO Club, and with Curtis Harding and some of the Black Lips as Night Sun. How did these come about? Are there any more collaborations to look out for, or new projects planned? Will there be any more releases from these bands? Are Tarek or James working on anything on the side of Night Beats?

It happened naturally with each of my projects… Friends coming together with mutual respect and desire to collaborate. Night Sun and UFO Club releases coming soon. Also a jazz record. Tarek is working on a solo album as well.

11. Who are Night Beats listening to at the moment? Who are your favourite artists around right now, and who do you always return to listening to?

The new White Fence. The Oh Sees. An old ‘Sounds of Spain’ record I got for 5 cents. Donny Hathaway, Los Saicos, random hip hop, Love.

Web Links:

facebook.com/thenightbeats
instagram.com/thenightbeats


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Holly Calder

I’m one half of Eyes Wide Open in Glasgow, where we run a club, a label and now the Double Sight Psych & Garage Weekend, which takes place at the start of October. I love psych, garage, freakbeat, popsike, and have even been known to enjoy a wee bit of R&B! Always enjoy travelling to 60s clubs and weekenders around Europe, whether I’m there to DJ or just to mingle and dance!

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July 25, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Psych Scene USA Tags:, , ,
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Modstock – The Album

Modstock – The Album (LP & CD)

Dubbed ‘21st Century Club Classics’, this compilation is unlike many others. There are none of the ‘usual suspects’ of mod. You know the ones I mean? The dime-a-dozen, seen-it-all-before compilations that tick all the stereotypical mod boxes.

As compiler Rob Bailey says in the liner notes, he wanted to put together ‘future club classics’. It’s fair to say he has achieved his aim with this album. It has obviously had a lot of thought put into it in terms of tracks and running order.

It also provides a platform for most of the bands who appeared at Modstock 3 at Easter 2014.

We kick off with the brilliant ‘It’s Gonna Rain’ by Gentleman June Gardner. I heard this for the first time at a club night years ago and it became one of my all-time favs. Likewise, the Teddy Mack song ‘Hey Hey Gypsy Woman’, Brenda Holloway’s ‘I Ain’t Gonna Take You Back’ and Dean Carter’s ‘Love’s A Workin’.

The addition of songs from current bands slot very nicely alongside the ‘oldies’ in the seemless fabric of this compilation.

The Mergers, Secret Affair, The Apemen and Les Cappuccino all get a look-in, but for me the final track on the CD from Stone Foundation is the pick of the bunch.

‘The Right Place At The Right Time’ can only be found on this collection and it is another example of just why Stone Foundation are one of the best bands around at the moment. I remember hearing this during a Stone Foundation gig last year and I was really disappointed that it didn’t make it on to their most recent LP. I’m really pleased that it has been included here so others can hear it too.

If you are looking for a compilation of ‘modernist’ tunes that looks forwards as much as to the past, you could not find a better collection anywhere right now.

Get a copy here: www.newuntouchables.com/nutstores


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 8, 2014 By : Category : Front Page Reviews Tags:, , , ,
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Modstock 3 2014 Review

Modstock 3, 17 – 20 April 2014

What a weekender Modstock turned out to be! Even those of us lucky enough to be part of the ‘on site’ team here at Nuts HQ had no idea just how great the event would be.

It all began with Squire, The Apemen and Secret Affair headlining on the opening night on Thursday 17th

229 The Venue looked spectacular after its recent makeover. The sound quality in the main room has improved no end and the stage looks even more imposing than it did before.

As the doors opened to the sizable queue that waited patiently outside, you could sense something special was about to take shape. It wasn’t long before our MC and DJ for the evening, Eddie Piller, arrived on stage to introduce the first band.

For those of the ’79 Mod revival era, Squire were just one of the unsung heroes of that time. Their brand of catchy mod-pop may have gone un-noticed by the mainstream at the time, but it certainly gained a large and loyal following throughout the 80s.

Frontman and songwriter Anthony Meynell, got things underway with ‘It’s A Mod, Mod World’ followed by another classic, ‘Face Of Youth Today’.

The crowd didn’t take long to warm up as Squire ran through a selection of their best material. Needless to say, ‘Walking Down The Kings Road’ was one of the highlights for many, but the set was also a reminder of just how good a songwriter Anthony Meynell is. “September Gurls’, ‘Jesamine’, ‘Does Stephanie Know?’ and ‘B-A-B-Y Baby Love’ mod-pop gems one and all and a great way to get Modstock off to a flyer.

Next up, The Apemen from Germany. By contrast to Squire, The Apemen were full on rockin’, rollin’ R&B. They ripped through their set which included ‘Getting Closer’, ‘Mrs Applegate’ and ‘Desdemona’. At one point the lead singer decided to jump off the stage and join the crowd (which is not uncommon with The Apemen), all of which went down very well.

Then it was time for the headline act. I have seen Secret Affair many a time over the years and like all bands, I’ve seen them have good days and the odd not-so-good. This performance, however, was quite possibly the best I have ever seen from them.

There was Ian Page, all confidence and assured vocal delivery. Beside him, Dave Cairns, the electrifying bundle of controlled aggression on lead guitar. Backing them is a very fine and talented band.

Secret Affair’s set was effectively split in two. The first part included tracks from their most recent LP ‘Soho Dreams’ mixed in with a few covers, the crowd-pleasing ‘Do I Love You? Indeed I Do’ had everyone singing along.

As Page and Cairns left the stage, the band played an instrumental ‘Black Cat’ from the aforementioned LP and it served very neatly as an intermission before Page and Cairns returned to deliver the classics of yester-year. ‘My World’, ‘Time For Action’, ‘Let Your Heart Dance’, ‘Glory Boys’, ‘I’m Not Free (But I’m Cheap)’. It was a fitting end to a fantastic opening night of live music followed by Eddie Piller spinning discs until 2am.

After the show I spoke to Dave Cairns;

“We are very happy with the way it turned out. They were a great crowd and we were really enjoying it out there. I think everyone else did too.”

Friday 18 May was quite extraordinary in so many ways. I’ve seen queues outside 229 The Venue before, but not quite like this.

Neither had I ever met so many people, who had traveled hundreds of miles without a ticket, turning up an hour before opening to make sure they got one of the last remaining tickets for the Tamla Motown Night.

Once the doors opened and the main room filled very quickly, the atmosphere was something special. It was not long before the house band arrived on stage. Most of the band were made up from members of a cracking outfit called Speedometer. Joining them was ex-Style Council member Mick Talbot on keyboards.

The glamourous Brenda Holloway was next to arrive on stage, resplendent in her silver sequined dress and opening with ‘Just Look What You’ve Done’.

If there is one trait American entertainers have always been very good at, it is being able to work a crowd. They know how to establish a rapport very quickly and show a certain amount of class in the way they carry themselves on and off stage. They understand what being ‘a star’ means and what responsibilities come with that status. As Brenda’s set gathered pace with hits like ‘Operator’, ‘Reconsider’, ‘When I’m Gone’ and ‘Every Little Bit Hurts’, it was a joy to see a true professional at her craft enjoying the moment as much as the crowd were. She was in fine form and fine voice and she finished her set with an amazing rendition of a song she wrote with her sister Patrice, Frank Wilson and Berry Gordy; ‘You’ve Made Me So Very Happy’.

It was a huge hit for Blood, Sweat and Tears of course, but hearing Brenda sing it, the tune took on a new dimension. It was wonderful.

With barely a moment to catch our breath, the Velvelettes were on stage and more than matched the standard set by Brenda Holloway.

Polished without being corny. Professional without being kitsch.

Norma, Barbie, Cal and Millie gave the audience exactly what they wanted. ‘Lonely, Lonely Girl Am I’, ‘These Things Will Keep Me Loving You’, ‘Nowhere to Run’, Everybody Needs Love’ and of course, ‘He Was Really Saying Something’.

The Velvelettes again showed their presentation skills with a scintillating intro to the final song of their set. I hope the cameras were rolling because ‘Needle In A Haystack’ has to be heard to be believed.

They left the stage momentarily, but returned with Brenda Holloway to complete the finale with ‘I’ll Keep On Holding On’.

Afterwards I asked Mick Talbot for his views on the show?

“It was fantastic and a real privilege to play for these ladies. You know, they and Motown have been such a massive influence and presence in my life, it has been an honour. You never think for a second that one day you will be sharing a stage with people you have spent a lifetime listening to.”

I also managed to have a quick chat with Brenda Holloway. What did she think of the show?

“Oh it was wonderful! I love coming to the UK and singing for you guys. You never forget and you all seem to have such knowledge and appreciation of the music. It really is a special place and it has amazing fans. I would come back anytime to sing in the UK. It’s been just great.”

Saturday 19 April

229 The Venue was a hive of activity by midday as stall holders were preparing for an afternoon of trading in clothes, memorabilia and records.

The Beat Room was getting ready to host the Nutsmag Showcase session and outside, the Bar Italia Scooter Club was organizing the scooter rideout.

It is always an impressive sight watching well over 200 scooters moving off in unison to tour around London. When they completed their circuit, it was time to move into the Beat Room where yours truly was playing a selection of new sounds that have been reviewed on the Nutsmag website.

The two young bands on show have massive potential and Modstock was very pleased to present them. First was Alex Butler and The Opals. This was a rip-roaring set from the Geordie (plus one Italian) line up.

With songs like ‘Turn’, ‘Stole Her Away’, Come Out Of Your House’ and ‘***k it She Will Do’, it did not take long for the audience to warm to them, but Alex and his band got a well-deserved send off as they closed their set with ‘Bye Bye Love’.

The second band was The Turning. Where Alex Butler is more melodic new wave, The Turning are Beat and Rhythm and Blues, but in common with Alex Butler, there is a youthful energy and excitement about The Turning that has lifted their profile in recent months.

Their set included tracks from their debut EP; ‘Stand Clear Of My Mind’, ‘The Painful Art of Dreaming’ and ‘What You Think Is Right’. By the end of the set, the crowd demanded an encore and were treated to a red-hot rendition of ‘Gloria’.

A few hours break and it was back to the main room for the hotly anticipated ‘British Legends’ Night. Getting proceeding underway were the ‘house’ band Stone Foundation who played a selection of songs from their current album ‘To Find The Spirit’.

It is easy to see why they were chosen as the ‘house’ band. They are a very tight unit musically and with their brass section, they can produce an impressive wall of sound. Their brand of Northern, Jazz and Soul influenced tunes really left their mark and set things up nicely for the first of the legends.

Enter Eddie Philips, frontman of The Creation (with bow in hand) to take us through the classics; ‘Painterman’, ‘How Does It Feel’ and ‘Making Time’ among others. From my privileged vantage point, it was clear he was having the time of his life on stage and very humbled by the rapturous reception he received.

A short intermission was followed by the entrance of the one and only Kenney Jones at the drum kit. The man given the unenviable task of vocal duties was Jim Stapley. Having met him earlier in the day, I rather liked him.

However, his arrival on stage was met with some curious reactions as Jim’s appearance and stage presence was more rock than mod. After the first couple of numbers Jim spotted this dichotomy and made light of it with the audience who warmed to him afterwards.

That said, the set was a ‘greatest hits’ selection of Small Faces numbers and Mr Jones was clearly enjoying the experience. As the band left the stage at the end of the set, an encore was demanded and witnessing the discussions backstage was quite something. A reprise of ‘Tin Soldier’ brought the show to a close and the crowd seemed genuinely pleased. See another review HERE! with more videos.

Sunday 20 April

Another ‘early’ start for some of us! At 1pm I was at the entrance to the Pier on the South Bank to welcome those who had booked for the River Boat Party. The weather could have been better, but it didn’t dampen spirits one jot.

Once we were all aboard and underway, our DJs Lee Miller, Carlo Sesto, and Michael Wink got things going right from the get-go. The atmosphere was fantastic with a packed dancefloor throughout the afternoon and after we disembarked, it was nice to see the likes of Norman Jay MBE joining the fun.

With the Boat Trip concluded it was time to head back to 229 The Venue for the grand finale of the weekend.

That wrapped up the afternoon session, but it was not long before it was time to move to the main room for the Fashion Show curated by A Dandy in Aspic.

The assembled audience were thrilled by the show and gave all concerned a rapturous send off, see the fashion show article for in this edition for a in depth review. HERE!

There was a definite air of anticipation in the main hall as the room filled and I had the pleasure of introducing our first live act, The Mergers from Germany. As with all the bands across the weekend, The Mergers gave it their all playing tracks from their fantastic album ‘Monkey See, Monkey Do’. Their hybrid sound of The Remains, early Beatles and British Beat made quite an impression on the crowd. They loved them.

Following them on stage were the equally marvelous Les Cappuccino from Japan with their Hammond-heavy grooves and unique visual style. They did not disappoint either.

Within minutes the stage was set for the Crossfire Allnighter. The main room was packed solid for ‘The Story Of Northern Soul’ provided by a line up of specialist DJs that has rarely been assembled before. To say the night was immense is an understatement. The Beat and R&B rooms were equally packed out until the early hours. Crossfire really is one of the great events of the year and this night reinforced that reputation.

So that was the end of Modstock 3, 2014. It was memorable for so many reasons and the highlights were too many to mention. I’ve read many other reviews and comments about the weekend. A small handful pointing out a couple of minor grumbles, but the overwhelming majority were very positive and glowing in their praise about the event.

It was a great weekend, a fantastic effort by Rob Bailey and the New Untouchables Team. Stuart and his staff at 229 The Venue and all the bands, DJs and Bar Italia SC who provided the entertainment and rideout and A Dandy In Aspic for the fashion show.

We hope you had a great time too.


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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July 4, 2014 By : Category : Bands DJs Events Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
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Masters – Nolan Porter

This entry is part 22 of 22 in the series Masters

The song ‘If I Could Only Be Sure’ is attaining something of a legendary status. It has been covered by many bands in recent years, but arguably it was Paul Weller’s interpretation on 2004′s ‘Studio 150’ album that really brought the song to more than just a Northern Soul audience.

The man who wrote and sang the original is Nolan Porter. Thanks to one of the UK’s foremost soul bands, Stone Foundation, Nolan Porter is having an ‘Indian summer’ (for want of a better term) in his career. The much-deserved renewed interest in the man and his work is long overdue and he (along with Stone Foundation) will be appearing at Euro YeYe this August at Gijon in Spain.

Welcome to Nutsmag Mr Porter. How do you feel about the forthcoming trip to Spain?

I’m overwhelmed with joy!! All the things I’ve heard about Spain, the beauty of the land, the history, what’s there not to be excited about! My father spent time in Spain, Madrid mostly. He always said it was one of the best experiences of his life.

Of course you are reuniting once again with the fantastic Stone Foundation. What is it about this band in particular that has been such an attraction for you?

There is a real musical camaraderie between SF and myself. We both really love soul music and SF’s sound really shows that these guys have been raised on soul music and have a deep understanding of its cadence and meaning. Also we have the same warped sense of humor!

I’ve read in other interviews, that you have been very pleasantly surprised by the reception and knowledge of your UK and European fans. Have you got used to it yet?

Every time I travel overseas to sing, I’m always amazed by the warmth and kindness of Northern Soul Fans. “It’s always like the first time”.

I was in the audience for the 100 Club show in 2012 which then became a live album. Listening to it, it’s clear you are having a great time and in fine voice. What can we expect when you hit the stage for Euro YeYe?

First of all, thank you for going to see me at the 100 Club. I hope you had a good time! I’ll bring awe and enthusiasm and a great band, SF. They have some new material some of which I’m singing on and we’re all very happy to perform these songs at YeYe. I’ve only thought of Spain in my imagination and now I’ll be there! I am grateful.

You have written some incredible songs that have legendary status among the Northern Soul fraternity. ‘Keep On Keeping On’, ‘Fe-Fi-Fo-Fum’ and ‘I Like What You Give’ for example, but have you been writing any new material? Could a new LP be in the pipeline?

Yes, I perform originals by other artists some of which I am friends with as well as my own. My wife Patrice and I have been discussing an album we’d like to do together with new material, collected and recorded by the two of us. Also you will be seeing a couple of new releases from Crossfire Productions that I have collaborated on with an old time friend, Forrest Penner of Wild Child fame.

It is fair to say your route into music was not one shared by a great many of your contemporaries, (ie Church-Gospel-band.) and living in LA with its diverse communities had some influence on you. So what was your route from leaving education to recording in 1972?

I’m a typical L.A. Child of the 60′s. The route I took was through my interaction with other L.A. Musicians with a multitude of cultural backgrounds. My first love was classical music. (Something I have in common with Brenda Hollaway who also grew up in L.A. with a classical background in music.) I didn’t go the Gospel route, yet somehow I always found myself in someone’s choir for one organization or another. Singing in choirs around L.A. Was a great way to prepare me for singing my own originals, showing me the basics of music and how to work with a crowd. Growing up in L.A. In the 60′s was great. I sang in soul bands, with Latin Bands and even a couple of rock bands. L.A. was the place to experiment.

It appears much of your early work was caught up in a tangled web of licences and ‘who owns what’ for a long time. Has it all finally been cleared up?

No it has not been cleared up, but I remain positive that it will.

You had some great musicians on that early work, like Larry Carlton, Charles Owens and Johnny ‘Guitar’ Watson. How did that band come together?

I have to give Gabriel Mekler of Steppenwolf and 3 Dog Night credit for that. From his time producing many of Steppenwolf’s and 3 Dog Night’s hits, he made contacts and used some of the best musicians, in L.A. I owe a great big debt to Gabriel Mekler.

Brenda Holloway is part of the bill for the Euro YeYe weekend in Spain. I know you and your wife Patrice ‘Candy’ Zappa opened for Brenda in LA a couple of years ago. Do you know Brenda well?

I only met Brenda in 2012 and truly enjoyed working with her, however I was friends with her sister Patrice, in the early 70′s. My mother even knows and  has spent time with Brenda Holloway. My mother is crazy about her and her talent. I do hope this will be only one of several times I get to work with her, she is a truly amazing talent.

Stone Foundation revived another of your great songs, ‘Crazy Love’ for their latest LP. How much input did you have with the arrangement and what are your thoughts on the final product? Both the song and the whole LP?

I’m very happy with the product.  Much of the musical arrangement came from SF. The vocal was pretty much the same arrangement I had used all those years ago. The merging of the two, I feel, was very cool. Also I enjoyed recording it more with SF than when I recorded it all those years ago. Now the present vocal is how I sound at this time of my life. Which makes me happy.

You could say Stone Foundation have kept you pretty busy the last couple of years what with the tours, live album and the resultant dvd documentary about your time here. Have you got any other plans you can tell us about?

I’ve become such good friends with SF. I would like to personally keep it going with them for as long as possible. I owe them so much and we find it mutually gratifying to help each other’s careers.

Nolan Porter, on behalf of The New Untouchables, thank you very much for taking the time to complete this interview. I look forward to seeing you in London next month at the 100 Club again.

Photographs by: © Lee Cogswell


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Graham Lentz

Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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July 8, 2014 By : Category : Front Page Interviews Music News Tags:, , ,
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Introducing James Clark

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Collectors Corner

Good evening fellow NUT’ster’s. James Clark is my name, or Freakbeat James to some. I’m hopefully going to take you on a bi-monthly trawl of the magic 7″ vinyl treasures released in the UK in the magical musical period of the late 50′s to the early 70′s. I’m a complete 7″ vinyl obsessive and hope to share some ramblings and pictures of my vinyl loves with you over the next few months. Some titles you’ll probably know, maybe some you won’t, but I promise it’ll be kept light hearted and informative. My ears prick up at anything from classic 50′s rock’n’roll, r’n’b and doo-wop, through classic 60′s soul and Motown and they’re especially receptive to noisy British beat and psych,both well known and famous. So join me as we have a light hearted trawl through some of the great music of the past including London American R’n’B, The Creation, 60′s Bowie, Sue singles, Motown on Stateside, The Action, LaVern Baker, collectable company sleeves,  Kaliedoscope, Decca freakbeat rarities, and much, much more. Oh, and being a hopeless vinyl junkie myself, I promise there’ll be lots of pictures too!

See you at the record deck.

James


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James Clark

Loves collecting records. My main loves are 50's rock'n'roll, 60's soul and r'n'b, beat, mod and psych and hopefully will be sharing some nuggets with you over the next few months. Apart from being a vinyl junkie I'm a Arsenal obsessive and a hopelessly romantic drunkard, but don't let put you off, we all have our faults.

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July 8, 2014 By : Category : Front Page Picks Tags:,
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The Exploding Sound Machine (NewBreed)

This entry is part 2 of 6 in the series Newbreed4

We are the Exploding Sound Machine, a machine that has chewed, mangled and spat back out the sounds of the underground acid trips and nightmarish freakouts thrown into a blender of delay and reverb, mix in swirling organ and poundung beats to create something new from something old…

Band Members:
Joey Smiths (guitar, vocals)
Edward Sadowski (guitar, backing vocals)
Sarah Zietz (organ, backing vocals)
Lewis Spink (bass)
Simon Lee (drums)

Discography:
We’ve just recorded a little digital EP called “The First Twist in the Tale”, but hopefully we’ll be able to put it out as a physical release within the next few months.

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: songkick.com/exploding-sound-machine

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We had been going as a three piece with guitar, organ and drums for a while, but it wasn’t until early last year when we met our bass player Lewis that everything fell into place. Just recently, we’ve also added another guitar player which has made a massive difference to our sound. If you’re into a specific type of music, it’s always quite difficult to find like-minded people who share the same ethos, so I think we’ve been quite lucky in that respect.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

Our background in music is obviously quite similar. It’s a mutual love for British Psych, early Prog and Folk that has brought us all together, with Lewis also really being into Soul. I think it’s good if everyone has got slightly different preferences as it doesn’t limit us to one sound which hopefully comes across in the music that we make.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Birmingham has got quite a vivid music scene at the moment with lots of new bands emerging, but if I had to take my pick it would have to be Velvet Texas Cannonball. They have been around for a while, but they’re just a great live band with a very early Deep Purple sound.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Birmingham and the Midlands have always been quite renowned for their big Mod scene, but recently, the 60s Psych scene has really started to pick up here. There’s quite a good selection of events to go to now with The Exploding Bubble Club in Birmingham, The Perfumed Garden in Derby or Biff Bang Pow and  the Dandelion Club up in Leicester. It’s also so amazing how many people turn up to these events who you’ve never seen on the scene before but who are massively into that kind of music. Great to see!

05. How would you describe the style you play?

A mix between 60s influenced Psych and early Prog.

06. What are your live shows like?

It’s always hard to tell when you’re the one on stage as you obviously experience it completely different to the audience. Our general aim, however, is to capture people’s attention who might have never seen us before and therefore make our live shows as interesting as possible. We’ve tried to progress our live shows by creating an atmosphere using lighting and different sound effects.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

There are so many bands we feel we’re influenced by, the obvious ones would be Syd Barrett and Pink Floyd, hints of Donovan or even bands like King Crimson. One influence that we chose to cover for a while is The Moody Blues, not only because of their great music, but because it’s a nod to another band from Birmingham. In terms of despising a band, I can’t really say as we never really listen to mainstream radio enough to hate anything that’s out at the moment.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

It’s hard to say as music has always influenced a lot of other things in our lives, such as the clothes we wear, the books we read, the films we watch etc. It might sound silly, but I think a lot of these things are just connected subconsciously.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Joey is our main songwriter and all of our songs have a story somewhere down the line. All the songs seem to have a darker and more mystical edge to them than most standard love songs, something we never really wanted to write. Some of the songs are of course tales of love, but written from a different perspective.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

I think we probably all have different favourites, but some of the songs that are most fun to play are Brick Faced Man, Olympus Fallen and End Of The Sun. It’s difficult to specifically name another favourite song as there are so many, but we’ve been listening to a lot of The Moody Blues again, The Nice and Neil Young more recently.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

As mentioned above, the scene in Birmingham and the Midlands is definitely starting to pick up and it’s great to be a part of it, especially with Joey being the main organizer of The Exploding Bubble Club. Sarah used to live in London for three years when she first moved over to the UK and was totally blown away by the scene there. The amount of 60s clubs down there is just amazing as there’s literally something for everyone, no matter whether you’re into Psych, Soul, Garage or anything else. It’s also a great place to meet like-minded people. We’ve met most of our friends here in Birmingham and across the country through the scene, so it’s undeniably playing quite an important part in our lives.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Definitely finding the right people for the band, especially in a city that was so Soul orientated at the time.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

Since getting together, there have been very few days we’ve been apart from each other, whether it’s because we’re at our own studio (The Bubble Factory), on the road or recording, which I think has made us a tighter band. At the moment, we try to play at least three gigs a month, but we’re also really keen on getting our first EP “The First Twist in the Tale” out as a physical release.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

Personally, I think it’s a great time for underground music because it’s never been easier to find and read about new bands. It’s also far easier to reach people thanks to social media and magazines like Shindig.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

We all really love a German band called The Magnificent Brotherhood who are absolutely mind-blowing.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

Any studio that Brian Eno would come to and produce us (just in case you’re reading this Brian).

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

This year, we’ve been trying to get out of Birmingham a bit more and play some other places which has worked quite well so far. We’ve just played Lunar Festival alongside Donovan, Temples and Tim Burgess which was a really great experience. Generally, we would love to get some more support slots and start playing the North of England a bit more, so we are currently working on that.

Besides that, we have some more London shows coming up which we are thrilled about, plus, obviously the New Untouchables Brighton Fuzz 4 Freaks Weekender in August and the One Beast Festival in Birmingham in June which are set to be great as well.

Web Links:

facebook.com/TheExplodingSoundMachine
twitter.com/Exploding_Sound
soundcloud.com/explodingsoundmachine
theexplodingsoundmachine.bandcamp.com


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Scene UK Tags:, , , , ,
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Los Retrovisores (NewBreed)

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series Newbreed4

Los Retrovisores have been fluttering their sounds around since 2006, back then known as The Cutties. They generated a good impact here and internationally, playing in festivals like Essex Ska Festival or The Cooperate in Plymouth, UK. In 2006 they changed their name to Los Retrovisores after a small change in the band. Since then they’ve been serving the likes of soul, deep beat and luminous pop. String sections, wind and Hammonds. Iberian Mod that follows the tradition after bands like Los Salvajes, Los Bravos, Bruno Lomas or Los Canarios. Young, good looking and well dressed. Tibor Fischer once said “God bless a well dressed man”. Vespas, parkers and one foot side burns. Vitalized attitude, respect for the roots and adoration for the black gods of music. All these references are labels that could easily dress Los Retrovisores. A sixties aroma, that could knock you out like Floïd aftershave lotion. Something with character and personality. A true sixties concept we have to say, because words now a days have to be used with a certain tact, an adjective stuck to any manifestation that smells of Yé Yé or old moth balls. But none of that, here we can find reverence and honour. They search in the past for original sounds, drink from what we already know and admire, generate their own sonority, something identifiable. Something that feels good and sounds great.

Headquarters:
Barcelona, Spain

Band Members:
Victor Asensio (Lead Vocal)
Pere Duran (Lead Guitar)
Leo Hernández (Bass)
Quim Cormonias (Drums)
Goncalo Hipólito (Organ)
Hector Fábregas (Tamborine and chorus)
Sergio Sanchez (Bariton Sax)
Edu Polls (Alto Sax)
Alexis Albelda (Trumpet)

Discography:
2006 – VVAA – “L’Edat Daurada”
2007 - VVAA-“Moderno pero español, vol. 8”
2008 – “Somos los Mods” vol.1
2010 – LP “La nostalgia ya no es lo que era”
2013 – EP “Alma y Pisotón”
2014 – EP “En el surco”


01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

Since 2006, most of the members came from a Jamaican music band called
‘The Cutties’.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all are late 60’s and early 70’s dance sounds enthusiasts. We love most of the styles: from R & B to soul, reggae, psych or garage, back to rocksteady, and deep into beat… We’re also very influenced by the 60’s Spanish counterpart of that styles, as you could tell listening to our compositions.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

There are so many cool bands in our area: Rubén López & The Diatones (reggae) Penny Cocks (punk 77), Mambo Jambo, The Excitements or Los Fulanos (Latin Soul) to name a few…

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

Barcelona has several bands, clubs, promoters, collectors and festivals… Some clubs we highlight: The Boiler Club, Movin’ on, The Gambeat Weekend, Le clean Cut, Wamba buluba and Pill Box. There you’ll find some of our favorite DJ’s: Xavi Beat, Julian Reca, Jordi Duró and many more.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

We just play the music we love to listen and dance to, without more restrictions. Our style evolved at the same rate we did. In our current set list you can find from Spanish soul to groovy funk, even freakbeat.

06. What are your live shows like?

The audience define it as fresh and fun. We don’t like the bands that make a script for live shows. We improvise and always try to be ourselves. Our repertoire is compact, short and straight to the neck. No time for solos

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Our influences are as wide as our musical tastes. Mainly spanish sixties bands, that like us borrowed the patterns from their own referents, but projecting their own personality to their songs. We really love Bruno Lomas, Los Bravos, Los Canarios, Los Salvajes, Los Nivram, Pau Riba…
We despise too many people to name it here!

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

Our universe is strongly influenced by the sharp & surrealistic Monty Phyton’ sense of humor. The French nouvelle vague and its evolutions are also one source of inspiration for our lyrics and videos.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Everybody does his one’s bit, but to date most of the songs were written by Victor and Pere. This has changed in our last recordings introducing compositions by Leo and Hector.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Our favorite song from the current repertoire comes from our EP Alma y Pisotón. It’s named ‘Me olvidé de ti’ wich, by the way, it’s been just released on video in a ‘Horror B movie’ style. Check it out! Our choice by another artist is Fire & Ice’s Music Man. We loved the complex brass arrangements and changing our regular subject –love- to an ode to that DJs that make us dance party over party, and that’s why we covered it (you can find our version at Alma y Pisotón EP too)

11. How would you describe the current underground scene? Do you participate?

The underground scene, at least in our city, is in a good shape regarding shows and parties. We all participate in one way or another, Victor, for example, is deeply involved with The Gambeat Wekend & the clubs Pillbox 60’s Club and Bread & Groove.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

To forge ahead the band, beside the financial precarity of our members, the lack of public resources and benefits for empowering culture, and the economic depression that we are all suffering.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We rehearse minimum once a week, and play an average of three or four shows per month. More than two years passed between our debut album and our second release “Alma y pisotón”, but we’re reducing the time between recordings and we’ll release our third record on june, one year after than its previous work.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

In Catalonia the mass media doesn’t give coverage to the bands that doesn’t belong to the mainstream market. For some time now, specialized magazines start to writing about us. We also make an intensive use of the social networks for reaching our fans.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Unanswered.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

We’d love to record in London with George Martin and a gigantic strings & brass orchestra, just like spanish duet Manolo y Ramón did back in 1970. We’d also like to record with Ricard Miralles, arranger for Joan Manel Serrat in the album dedicated to Antonio Machado.

17. What should we expect from you in the future? What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We’re still working on consolidate our own sound and our show. We’d like to make people outside the scene dance, without losing authenticity neither selling us to the mainstream culture. We’d like to highlight our appearances at Euro Ye Ye Mod Festival (Gijon, SP) and Festigabal @Festes de Gracia (Barcelona, CAT) In August 2014.

Web Links:

bcoredisc.com
facebook.com/los.retrovisores
twitter.com/LosRetrovisores


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2014 By : Category : Bands Europe Front Page Interviews Music Scene Tags:, ,
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The Dials (NewBreed)

This entry is part 10 of 10 in the series Newbreed3

The Dials are a 4 piece band from Brighton in the UK. “Glides effortlessly between the harmonic swoon of The Byrds, the poppier elements of the Velvets and the child-like psych of Syd Barrett’s Pink Floyd.” Uncut Magazine
Dermot Watson took some time out to talk to Dr Robert for NUTsMag.

Band Members:
Andrew Taylor (Vocals & Keyboards)
Rich Parrish (Drums & Vocals)
Joe Allenby-Byrne (Bass and Vocals)
Dermot Watson (Guitars)

Discography:
‘The Dials’ Album (2007)
‘Companions Of The Rosy Album (2009)

Updated Releases and Tour Dates: thedials.co.uk/gigs

01. How long have you been active for and how did you get together?

We started in 2005 following a jam session in Brighton. The original idea was to put a few tunes together and – for a laugh – go busking on the seafront. We never got to go busking but the rest, as they say, is history.

02. What influences do the band members have in common?

We all have far too eclectic tastes, but we do share a taste for psychedelia – from Caravan to early Floyd. Beyond that, we have our individual musical ghettoes we retreat to and introduce from time to time.

03. Are there any other bands you’d recommend from your area? Why?

Unanswered.

04. What’s the 60’s/underground scene like where you’re from?

We live in Brighton. It never went away.

05. How would you describe the style you play?

The joy of The Dials is that we don’t have a single style. We’re known for mixing it up, adding our own flavors and coming up with something tasty.

06. What are your live shows like?

We try to mix raw and refined. They rock but they also make you think.

07. What are your main influences in music? Who do/would you play covers by? And who do you despise?

Influences range from The Faces and Nuggets garage to Miles Davis. We don’t do covers. Anything with the cynical, saccharine hand of Simon Cowell deserves an expression of distaste.

08. What are your main influences outside of music?

For the latest album – The End Of The Pier – we’ve been thinking a lot about our adopted town of Brighton. You can come for a day and see a certain side of it, but it becomes something else and something strange out of season and away from the tourists.

09. Who writes your songs and what subjects do you deal with?

Songwriting tends to be a collaborative business. Subjects range from the release and joy of jumping into sea after a hard week at work to the doubts that possess us all in the wee small hours. It’s all real.

10. What’s your favorite song in your repertoire currently? What’s your favourite song by another artist?

Each of us would have a different answer, but as I’m writing this, I’m going to say Over The Fence. It bothers me in a good way.

My choice of favourite song by another artist would be Red Cadillac and a Black Moustache by Warren Smith. It’s classic Sun Records, perfect tune and wonderful, understated guitar (my suggestion for best ever solo). Everything is right. My choice will, of course, change tomorrow.

11. How would you describe the current underground scene?  Do you participate?

I don’t really know what that means. Not wishing to be awkward, but there’s good and bad music. Whatever works, works.

12. What has been the biggest challenge to date?

Just keeping a band together can be hard. As life gets more complicated so do the demands on everyone. Luckily, we all believe this is a special band and worth it.

13. How often do you Rehearse? Play Live? Record? Anything interesting coming up?

We usually rehearse once a week with extra song writing sessions in between (they’re coming thick and fast at the minute… I can see another album not too far away. Gigs it depends, a couple a month generally but occasionally a few a week.

14. What do you think of the music coverage in the media?

It’s getting increasingly hard to get noticed by traditional media if you don’t fit a certain mould. Having said that, there are all sorts of new routes to look at now.

15. Do you rate any current mainstream or underground bands?

Some of the chaps like bands like White Denim or Tame Impala. Wooden Shjips are also a big hit with one of us. Another was recently going on about his love for Nick Lowe.

16. Who/Where would you most like to record with and why?

That is a very real question to which we are turning our attention to right now…
I would suspect we’re going to hire a cottage in the country to retreat to and do it all ourselves.

17. What should we expect from you in the future?  What are your plans and ambitions? What interesting gig dates have you got coming up?

We want to get in on the festival circuit more… we’ve never really cracked it. Radio play has been really good with Radio 6 and 2 giving us loads of exposure, so we’d like this to continue and build. We reckon there are many more people out there who would ‘get’ us. Finding more of them would be the best achievement. Interesting Gigs - the New Untouchables Brighton Fuzz 4 Freaks Weekender in August, the Bank Holiday

Web Links:

thedials.co.uk
facebook.com/TheDials
twitter.com/thedials
soundcloud.com/thedials
youtube.com/user/thedialsuk


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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July 8, 2014 By : Category : Bands Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , , ,
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