Browsing Tag NUTSMAG

Fashion – Womans Revival Style

This entry is part 14 of 15 in the series Fashion Scene

Revival Style

Claire Mahoney decided it was time to take a trip down memory lane to the late 70s and 80s to take a look at how mod was then and how it has influenced women’s mod style in the here and now.

When we talk about mod – we tend to go straight back to the beginning: the early 60s (late 50s if you want to be precise). But this wasn’t the beginning for everyone. Indeed for most people active in the mod scene today, it all started around 1978.

The ‘revival’ or second generation mods, are sometimes seen as the brasher, less stylish relatives of their first generation forefathers and sisters. But as a growing number of teenagers and twenty-somethings are taking up the mod baton, we find that they are not just turning to the 60s for style inspiration – the mod look of the late seventies and 80s is just as inspirational.

So what’s the difference between the mod girls of the 60s and the ‘modettes’ as they were often called of the 70s and 80s? Well a lot of it is down to Punk and the rest was a mixture of the changing factions of mod through the 60s and 70s that gave us the hard mods, the suede heads and the skin heads. The mods of the revival were a kind of cross-breed of all of the above.

But at this particular time it was perhaps punk and its new wave legacy that had the most lasting influence on the resurgence of the scene. Punk blew fashion and music apart and gave it a completely uncharted direction. It was the biggest subculture that twinned music and fashion since mod and as such was a grass-roots force to be reckoned with.

As a result, the look of the young mod girl of that time was a lot more edgy and reflected the mixed bag of music we were listening to – Two-Tone, New Wave and Ska as well as the traditional revival bands like Secret Affair and Squire.

We wore pencil skirts just below the knee, with Fred Perry tops underneath loose-fitting v-neck sweaters. We wore tight-fitting jeans and trousers from brands such as Brutus and Harrington-style jackets with lots of badges. In fact badges and patches were a big deal then, another hangover from punk. If we wanted to be slightly more girly we would wear a head-band in our hair and a slick of eyeliner.

Leather coats were massive in the 70s and 80s and mod girls would wear them usually cropped with our ski-pants or slightly longer with a skirt or we would find ourselves a suede jacket with covered buttons from the local jumble sale.

Skirt suits with boxed jackets were also popular, worn with a plain shell top underneath or a checked or spotted shirt with a small near collar buttoned all the way to the top. We might even wear a tie! Any shoulder pads found lurking in our jackets would be promptly cut out.

Shoes were chunky loafers or flats, either a pump or a sling-back. These would be black, white or black & white. Our loafers would generally be worn with white socks. Often the only white socks available would be sports socks, so it would be a snug fit!

If you were into Ska and the skinhead girl look you would most likely wear these socks over your fishnets with your mini skirt just to add to the general feeling of gender confusion.

Even though the 80s were quite a garish era colour-wise, the smart mods of the 80s moved away from that and kept their palette plain and simple. We wore an awful lot of grey, blue and white, occasionally maroon and of course loads of black & white either in the form of checks, stripes or panels.

However 60s clothing was widely available in jumble sales if you wanted something original or indeed were on the hunt for a shift dress for a special occasion. There weren’t the charity shops of today and of course there was no ebay. More often than not though if would wanted something special you would have to make it yourself.

We asked some second generation mod girls about their revival style:

Tracey Dawn Wilmot

“I remember kitten heels and button earrings were all the rage and it was absolutely vital to have shoes and handbags matching. We were also challenged to find the perfect white lipstick in an age where Rimmel’s Black Tulip was the latest thing. In the early years, when I first discovered mod, I did look more like a boy than a girl, simply because none of us were clear what was the ultimate stylish look. Later in about 1980, I began to emulate the sixties models such as Twiggy and Jean Shrimpton’s style and watched 60s movies and TV shows for inspiration.”

Ann Matthews

“My look was mainly monochrome. I was very into the two-tone movement. I wore black ski pants and drain pipe jeans with sweaters. My day time look was a little boyish, but for evening I wore mini skirts and shell tops. I also used to pick up original 60s clothes from jumble sales.”

Tracey Williams

“In 1980 I used to wear tight jeans a Fred Perry polo, Fred Perry jumper and monkey boots. I also had a Crombie. So I looked like more of a Rude Girl.”

Jane Williams

“When we first turned mod everything had to be black and white. I had a couple of check dresses which I wore with white shoes, white fishnet tights and a home-made black and white hairband. I moved on to original 60s dresses, which I used to shorten (had to be mini length of course) and make a matching hairband out of the spare material. I didn’t hit knee-length skirts until the smart mod era of 84/85.”


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Claire Mahoney

At the age of 13 mod made perfect sense to me. I liked the look and the attitude - but most of all I liked the music. Secret Affair was my entry point, but they were soon playing second fiddle in my affections to The Jam. Paul Weller, of course, proceeded to break mine and many others hearts in 1982, when he put an end to that particular musical roller coaster – but what it meant was that, uninterested in anything else that was happening in music at the time, I had to look back. I was lucky enough to be given two plastic bags full of 60s 45s by my uncle who used to stock the jukeboxes back in the day. Their contents included a number of Stax originals, plus the Who and the Small Faces, as well as Motown classics from The Four Tops and the Supremes. So, when Phil Collins charted in the mid 80s with 'You Can't Hurry Love' it was nice to be able to say: “I've got the original of that!” It became quite an irritating habit of mine over the years. These days I still enjoy discovering new, old music, be it soul, rnb or jazz, as well as witnessing mod taken another turn among today's youth with bands like The Strypes. My day job as a journalist means I am lucky enough to be able to write about music and modernism now and again. Other than that you'll find me mostly on the dance floor or on eBay still looking for that perfect A line dress.

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September 7, 2015 By : Category : Articles Fashion Front Page Style UK Tags:, , , , , , , ,
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Roger Banks – Hey! Mr DJ

We recently caught up with DJ Roger Banks. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Friday night soul nights at the Winter Gardens in Cleethorpes followed by the allnighters circa. 1977/78 listening to Motown. Soul, Reggae and Northern.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

In a Scout Hut in Cleethorpes 1978, reviewed in Blues & Soul Magazine.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

The ones I can remember, lol.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Arriving at a club without my records (Bretby Allnighter) and arriving at the Mousetrap nighter without my box keys (boxes were locked).

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Windy Miller, John Weston, Hoss and Dave Rimmer cause they all drink the same as me, nothing to do with what they play!

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

The size of the records, they’re all round and easy to hold!

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Playing my last record and discovering that I still had a drink left!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

The people I first got to know in the 70’s, Rob Smith, Derek Allen and the late Nev Wherry. Favourite artists – Sam Cooke, Jerry Butler, Walter Jackson, Jerry Jackson, Jackie Edwards to name a few.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

The ones mentioned above plus Motown & Detroit as well as Vee Jay, Duke, Peacock. Back-Beat etc plus sheet music and promotional photos.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Most working mens clubs after the meat raffle.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

The ones that I haven’t got.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. O V Wright – You’re So Good To Me – Back Beat LP track
2. Harold Burrage – I’m In Love – P.Vine LP Track
3. Betty Everett – Someone Else Is Taking Your Place – Acetate
4. Johnny Guitar Watson – Wait A Minute Baby – Highland
5. Marvin L Sims – Disillusioned – Mellow

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. The Magnetics – Lady In Green – Bonnie
2. Jackey Beavers – I Need My Baby – Revilot
3. Al Williams – I am Nothing – La Beat
4. Lester Tipton – This won’t Change – La Beat
5. Ray Agee – I’m Losing Again – Soultown
6. Masqueraders – Do You Love Me Baby – Wand
7. Johnny Honeycutt – I’m Coming Over – Triode
8. George Pepp – The Feeling Is Real – Coleman
9. Tommy Ridgley – My Love Is Getting Stronger – International City
10. Kel Osbourne – A Law Against A Heartbreaker – Highland

Headquarters: Nottingham, UK – R & B Records have been supplying rare soul 45’s by mail order for 25 years. Email: roger-banks@supanet.com with your wants lists and for details of monthly sales CD’s

Reference: Resident at Radcliffe Manchester (New Century Soul), Crossfire London, Skegness Weekenders, Cleethorpes Weekenders

Next Club Spots: Rugby Allnighter, DFDS Amsterdam Weekender, Crossfire27, Sat 10th Oct 2015, London


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 23, 2015 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Val Palmer – Hey! Ms DJ

This entry is part 8 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We recently caught up with DJ Val Palmer. Here is what she had to say about her passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Being the youngest of seven kids I grew up listening to the Beatles, Stones, Kinks and Chuck Berry, so have always been into music and was buying records from the age of about nine. I caught the best of the 1970s from Roxy Music to punk, and gradually discovered the soul scene via the re-issues that came out of the ’79 mod revival. I just carried on buying records as usual.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

The er… glamorous Crown & Sceptre pub in Great Titchfield Street. A local new year’s eve bash run by my neighbour, Ady Croasdell.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Definitely the first time I DJ’d at the 100 Club all-nighter in the mid-80s – I’d arrived! Talk about a challenge – I heard some guy say ‘F*ck me – it’s a bird DJing…’ More recently, playing at the Subway Soul Club in New York is always a blast, there’s something very satisfying about playing those records back on their home turf.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

An excruciating ‘soul’ night at Whitechapel Art Gallery, of all places. It was the bad idea of some trendy arty types, so virtually zero punters. Me, Keb and Jo Wallace DJ’d to each other all night and there were no middles/spindles, so records were sliding all over the decks, we had to be creative with chewing gum. There were also no wages.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Ian Clarke, Ady C, Bob Jones and the London mob were a huge influence, and I’ve always really rated people like Dean Rudland who can play across any genre, any time. I admire DJs who’ll throw in a few £5 records along with all the uber-rare expensive stuff, there’s so much that is overlooked because it’s not obscure enough.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

Well, I’d like to think that good taste has something to do with it? I tend to ‘shape my sound’ depending on what kind of gig it is – from northern to 70s / crossover, or with a smidgen of r&b and funky stuff thrown in, as necessary. I think I’m fairly adaptable, so long as I get my cab fare home.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Stumbling across three mint copies of John & the Weirdest (Can’t get over these memories / No time) in a well picked-over record store in Los Angeles. (They were filed next to Elton John…) I flogged them all eventually, and am probably the only person to get a begging letter from Butch.

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

I guess it would have to be Curtis Mayfield, which may sound predictable, but the guy has shaped entire generations of music and political awareness. I saw him play a gig at the Town & Country Club in the 90s, just him on guitar plus bass and drums. It was incredible, yet he didn’t even have a record deal at the time.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not particularly, if you obsess over collecting labels, you end up having to buy the rubbish tunes too. In general I’m partial to mid-tempo, which seems to be rather unfashionable at the moment. However, these days I tend to rummage around the bargain bins for classic stuff that I missed the first time around.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

The next slot is New York’s Subway Soul club on October 3rd, and then back to London for Crossfire the following weekend, Sat the 10th of October.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Right this minute, it would be Charlene & the Soul Serenaders – Can you win. Everyone seems to have one except me, which is really irritating, and it’s not bloody cheap.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Impossible to answer of course, but off the top ‘o’ my head, these are some of my all time faves.

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Gambrells – You better move (Carla)
2. Tony Hestor – Watch yourself (Karate)
3. Larry Atkins – Ain’t that love enough (Highland)
4. Johnny Robinson – Gone but not forgotten (Okeh)
5. Sharon McMann – Got to find another guy (Karen)
6. Edwin Starr – Just my kind of woman (Ric Tic)
7. Carol Anderson – Taking my mind off love (Whip)
8. Willie Tee – First taste of hurt (Gatur)
9. Vows – Tell me (VIP)
10. Trends – Thanks for a little lovin’ (ABC)

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Rhetta Hughes – You’re doing it with her (Tetragrammaton)
2. Tommie Young – That’s all a part of loving him (Contempo)
3. Limitations – I’m lonely, I’m troubled (Bacone)
4. Brenda George – I can’t stand it (Kent)
5. Claude Huey – Why would you blow it (Galaxy)


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 23, 2015 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Cello – Hey! Mr DJ

We recently caught up with DJ Cello. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

My dad use to play records every Sunday on his day off…Pat Kelly’s ‘Striving for the Right’, ‘Tammy’, ‘How Long Will Take’, ‘If It Don’t Work Out’. Dave Barker’s ‘Prisoner of Love’, ‘Double Barrel, Dr Jekyll. Tony Tribe’s – ‘Red, Red Wine, Little Roy – You Run Come, Liquadator and many more reggae tunes from that time. Then Two-Tone come along in the late 70s and I became hooked and got more and more into the original stuff. First heard ‘Alcapone’ – Prince Buster on a John Peel Show, it was the best thing I’d ever heard and I’ve never looked back!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

My very first DJ slot was at the ‘Lucas Arms’, Kings Cross. First slot on a club night was Alan Miliner’s ‘Big Club’

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Difficult question, there’s been many, if I had to pick one, it was the night when ‘Intensified’ were my guests one night. The place was packed, everyone was really up for it, ‘Intensified’ were on fire and to top it all up ‘Dave Barker’ got up on stage unannounced did 6 songs, it was awesome!

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

When I turned up at a club night with my records and they only had CD decks!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Not sure, played with many good Dj’s.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve always been into Ska, Rocksteady & Reggae. When I first started Coast to Coast in 1999 it was more of a Ska, Reggae, Soul, Boogaloo mix but over the last few years the Jamaican stuff has taken over again…

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I’ve got quite a few of those, some are still unknown to me and to everyone else it seems, I like it that way!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

So many of those but I think if I had to pick one… Mr Jackie Opel!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Black music from the mid 60’s to very early 70’s, mainly Jamaican.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Every 3rd Saturday of the Month, Coast to Coast @ The Fiddlers Elbow, 1 Malden Rd, London NW5 3HS. An eclectic fusion of Ska, Reggae, Soul & Boogaloo combine in one of the unique club nights in London. Packed out with all types, enjoying rare black music from the 60s in an atmosphere more like your best friend’s birthday party… more info coasttocoast.org.uk

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

My want list is long…

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Diamond Baby – The Wailers
2. Tribute Nerhu – Skatalites
3. Mouth A Massy – Alton Ellis
4. Foey Man – George Dekker
5. Send Me – The Enchanters
6. Man Fe Getta Beatin’ – Wailers
7. Such is Life – Lord Creator
8. Mill Man – Jackie Opel
9. South China Sea – The Skatalites
10. Feel Like Jumping – Lee Perry

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. There’s A Light – Dave Barker
2. Unknown Rocksteady Instrumental – Lynn Tate & the Jets (I think)
3. I’m Alone – Boris Gardner
4. Let’s Get Together – Johnny & the Attractions
5. Shake it Up – The Termites

Next Club Spots: Crossfire27, Sat 10th Oct 2015, London. Dumplins & Coast to Coast every 3rd Saturday of the month etc.

Web Links:

www.coasttocoast.org.uk
www.facebook.com/cellos.coasttocoast
www.youtube.com/user/DJCelloSka


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

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September 23, 2015 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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Live! – The Monkees

This entry is part 16 of 18 in the series Live!

Hammersmith Apollo, 4th Sept 2015 

“You can turn the lights on now, we’re here…”

Indeed they can, and indeed “we” are. Sadly, the “we” referred to this time means only two Monkees: two actual members anyway, backed on this tour by a six-strong group of considerable dexterity. As Mickey Dolenz (whose sister Coco can be found assisting ably with robust backing vocals) points out later, Mike Nesmith does “his own thing” these days, no doubt due to his infamously being a Tippex billionaire: he will probably hook up with his buddies for another series of US dates next year, but whether we’ll see the trio this side of the pond again is uncertain. Yet following the untimely death of Davy Jones in 2012, the fact that we still have a Monkees at all in 2015 is something to be grateful for. So, for the moment, this will do quite nicely,
thank you very much.

Yes, there are two noticeable voids onstage where the others once stood (not to mention a few empty seats at the rear of the venue) and for some reason it’s nowhere near as loud as it could be (possibly due to Dolenz’ own hearing difficulties) but there’s no denying the passion, power and sheer enjoyment both he and the evergreen Peter Tork put into their performances. The new arrangement also gives them the chance to stretch out more: apart from some ominously bashed timpani during “Randy Scouse Git (Alternate Title)” which is prefaced by an extensive explanation of the song’s origins, Dolenz (clad in what appears to be the Paisley equivalent to a Two Ronnies yokel smock) plays no drums, preferring instead to concentrate on his vocals. And well he should, as, despite repeated microphone amplification problems, they’re outstanding.

Rich in timber, full of range and still able to reach the high notes with little difficulty, he even excels on songs he didn’t sing first time round: Tork’s multi-instrumental capabilities, meanwhile, reveal him as very much the hidden genius of the band (ala Maurice Gibb or Bill Wyman) whose tonal glue holds the sound together. It may have been Nesmith (as both remark a couple of times) that wrote more of the band’s material and had the more interesting solo career, but on piano, organ, percussion and a multitude of guitars, Tork’s versatility is flawless, bringing a kaleidoscope of colours to “She” “The Girl I Knew Somewhere” a slowed-down, country roots retake of “Last Train To Clarksville” (the first five songs of the second set are performed, campfire-style, in this mode) and the inevitable, audience-bouncing plink-plonk of “Daydream Believer”.

What perhaps works less well, aside from the insertion of a few too many newer/solo efforts (an inevitable bugbear, sadly, when viewing a veteran act) is the twin leaders’ tendency to sporadically walk offstage during each others’ songs for some reason (insurance? deafness? oxygen?) thereby giving the impression from time to time that you’re watching a band called “The Monkee” After all, you don’t get this jiggery-pokery from the two remaining original members of the Pretty Things or the New York Dolls, so it’s equally unnecessary here. As you might expect, the duo’s strength as on “Pleasant Valley Sunday” the strolling, vaudevillian “D.W. Washburn” their underrated 80s hit “That Was Then, This Is Now” and the simply beautiful “Porpoise Song” (yes, Head-heads, they play it) is their teamwork: the humorous interplay between them, such as confusing Neil Diamond with Neil Armstrong or complaining because the drummer they’d hired turned out to not be Buddy Rich (he’d pong a bit by now if he was, chaps) harks back beautifully to their TV days, and shows they’ve forgotten nothing of their comic timing.

Inevitably, we all pile down the front for “Stepping Stone” (still prefer the Flys version though) and “I’m A Believer”: in many ways, this tune, allegedly not even originally earmarked as an a-side, encapsulates all the reasons we from my fellow psychsters in their moptops and pinstripes to the gaggles of House Of Fraser housewives flanking the aisles still love and support this band. Initially conceived by a marketing exec as an ersatz Beatle cash-in, dismissed as bubblegum bopper fodder and infamously banned from performing anything other than vocals on their own albums, they soon both rejected and outgrew their restrictive straitjacket (as demonstrated tonight by a slinky jazz take on the song they legendarily passed over, “Sugar Sugar”) and in doing so laid half the foundation of American psych as we know it: without them, a large number of US bands now spun regularly on NUTs dancefloors (Paragons, Hooterville Trolley, Peanut Butter Conspiracy, Head Hunters) might not even have existed. Let us give thanks, therefore, that the Monkees, whether with our without Nesmith (though personally, I’d like to see him back in his rightful place next year) still do. They may not have (as they jokingly allude early on) walked on the moon, but they still have a few giant steps left to take yet.


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Darius Drewe

Darius Drewe was born in East London in 1974. As a small child, both parents inflicted their musical tastes, from The Beatles and The Moody Blues to Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis, on him, and he was never the same again. Despite being born and bred a 'Cockney tosser', Drewe actually spent his teenage years in and around Birmingham, attending his first 60s/50s-themed nights there at The Ship Ashore, before "coming home" in 1993 to the South, where, with the exception of three years spent in Glasgow between 2007-2010, he has remianed ever since. In the almost two decades that have passed he has trod a strange meandering path from a shy 60s/70s-obsessed teen with no 'scene' to speak of to a Metalhead, sleaze-glammie, Goth, indie kid, glam-punker, garage-rocker, eventual Mod and psych freak (first attending Mousetrap in 2000) In that time he's also written for Shindig! Britmovie, DarkSide, Black Velvet and Get Ready To Rock, promoted various vintage and veteran acts at Camden Underworld, Glasgow Ivory Blacks and several other venues, DJed everything from psych, garage and soul to Metal at practically every well-known club in central London. Drewe is trying to build a time machine that will enable him to visit any period between 1960 and 1980 but still be able to use a mobile and Facebook. His ambition, aside from directing films and building said machine, is to morph into a cross between Jason King, Timmy Lea, Jerry Cornelius and Richard Hannay, and drift about the ether having adventures in a kipper tie, pinstriped flares and camel hair coat.

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September 22, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, ,
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Lady Kamikaze – Hey! Ms DJ

This entry is part 9 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We recently caught up with DJ Lady Kamikaze. Here is what she had to say about her passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into Rock n Roll & Rockabilly, Blues and 50’s fashion when I was 16 through my friend in the late 80’s in Japan. I was hooked and then started listen related music.

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

Lady Luck Club (Organised by DJ El Nino, Jake Vegas & Ronnie King) in 2002. I went to Lady Luck Club when the club was held in the basement of Strip Joint and I had an awesome time. Saw Nino DJing there and I felt that he is really enjoying to play, I thought “I wanna feel that” So I asked him If I could have a spot at the Lady Luck Club. And the rest is history.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

At Hangar Rockin’ Festival 2012 in Switzerland. In the middle of the mountain in the witching hour of hot summer, The moon and the stars were shining overhead, I played with couple of other DJs who I met for the very first time. We all knew that everyone there was connected and feeling just happy by music and vibes without a doubt. A fantastic experience.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

At the 50’s – 60’s music event in London, A girl came up and requested me to play “R&B” when I was playing 50’s Rhythm & Blues. I said “I’m playing it right now” she said “You are not, Bitch”. Of course, she meant “Rihanna”.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Hard to choose, There’s so many great DJs out there! And I don’t really belong to a specific scene. But I must say that DJ Duncan Brooker, Marc Hype, El Nino have had kept me dancing all night and I was deeply impressed.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I play many genres of music from the 30’s to the 70’s that catch my ear and heart, and that I have got ants in my pants…

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

“SOUL Part 1 & Part 2” by S.O.U.L on Musicor Records. Love the lyrics on Part 1!

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Again it’s hard to choose, To many to list!

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

No but I collect and play 45’s & 78’s.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

CHAIN GANG – Every Last Saturday of the month – @ The Pack & Carriage, 162 Eversholt Street, London, NW1 1BL

TROPICAL YARD – Every 1st Sunday of the month – @ Floripa, 91 Great Eastern Street, London, EC2 3HZ

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Lindo Paisaje / Oscar Fajardo
I love The Reggay / The Gaylads

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Tolu / Lucho Bermudez
2. Jungle nights In Harlem / Duke Ellington
3. Midnight In Moscow / Kenny Ball
4. Minor Swing / Django Reinhardt
5. Sea Lion Woman / Nina Simone
6. Arte Belle / Ken Boothe
7. Truth And Rights / Johnny Osbourne
8. My Nerves / Little Willie John
9. Somewhere Down The Line / Little Johnny Taylor
10. I’m Troubled / Marie Knight

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Unchain My Heart / Herbie Mann
2. Baby You Got Soul / Van Preston
3. Voodoo Moon / Jackie Mitt
4. Pearl, Baby Pearl / Benny Poole
5. I’m back to stay / Hank Ballard

Next Club Spots: Crossfire27, Sat 10th Oct 2015, London.


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 23, 2015 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, ,
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Record Reviews – Sept 2015

This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Record Reviews 2

rsz_nm_sept_2015_stone_foundation

Stone Foundation

A Life Unlimited – LP

This was another one that arrived a few days after the deadline for the last edition of NutsMag Reviews, so it feels a bit like ‘closing the gate after the horse has bolted’, but what a ‘horse’! Pure thoroughbred from start to finish.

‘A Life Unlimited’ sees a progression from the previous outing ‘To Find The Spirit’. Indeed, the opening track on the new album is really the only reference point to the former.

‘Beverley’ is also the title song to a Cass Pennant short film and it conveys that lilting relaxed blue-eyed soul feel that Stone Foundation produce with consummate ease.

The main departure from their previous work is the influence of soul and jazz funk on this LP. I’m thinking of artists like Donald Byrd for example.
However, ‘Pushing Your Love’ is a sumptuous ballad, ‘These Life Stories’ exemplifies the jazz funk groove while ‘Leaning The Hard Way’ is a more upbeat soul.

Add the guest appearances by Graham Parker, Nolan Porter and Dr Robert (Blow Monkeys) to name a few and once again Stone Foundation have produced another great album. Since it’s release, ‘A Life Unlimited’ has reached the official national album chart with no major label backing. Now that is something worth celebrating because it proves there is hope after all and one wonders just how much longer the mainstream media (including radio) will ignore this band. Not much longer I’ll wager.

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Lois

The Polperro Horse Bus Company –  Album

If you can count Mark Radcliffe of BBC Radio 6 Music among your supporters, then you can’t be all bad. This four-piece from Nottingham have a knack of blending their various influences into a coherent and very appealing collection of songs on this album.

Radcliffe’s assertion that Lois sound both ‘retro and absolutely contemporary’ is spot on. The melting pot of Lois seems to range from the Kinks and the Zombies to Manic Street Preachers and Suede (at least, that’s what I’m getting).

Whether it’s the gently rocking along of ‘Jeanie (Ooh La La)’ or the up tempo ‘Monkey Girl’, the songs tend to grab you after just one listen.

For my money, ‘My Precious Love’ and ‘Star Is Falling’ are the outstanding tracks from this LP, and that is saying something when you have 16 gems to choose from. There is depth, a well-thought-out running order and texture to this collection and I am sure we will be seeing a lot more of Lois in the near future.

loistheband.com
facebook.com/loistheband
twitter.com/loistheband

rsz_nm_sept_2015_past_tense

The Past Tense

Heads Held High – Album

This album has been available for a few months, but it was kindly handed to me by the band shortly after the last edition of NUTsMAG, hence the delay in reviewing it.

For those unaware, Past Tense has been around for a few years, although the members of the band have worked together under various names since school days. Andy, Ken, Warren and Buzz believe this is their best work to date, and it is hard to disagree. Their influences are un-ashamedly Mod Revival, Punk, Garage and 60s Beat bands and this album encompasses all of them to a greater or lesser extent.

For me, the stand-out tracks are the ones that show Past Tense are not a one-trick-pony and have so much more in the locker.
‘Vision (From Another World)’ is a prime example with the inclusion of a Hammond organ growling away in the mix to give the song a different dimension.

‘Crying’ has a huge dose of Ray Davis about it with guest Paul R Osborn taking vocal duties on a song that is really catchy and thoroughly enjoyable.
‘No Apologies’ sees Past Tense dabble with a Northern Soul vibe that fairly rattles along. ‘Another Putney Sunrise’ is a pleasant surprise because it is unexpected and shows a real touch of finesse when it could so easily have been overcooked.

The closing track; ‘What’s Coming Next?’ has a touch of The Strokes about it and has another infectious chorus.
So, yes, I would agree, this is the best album by Past Tense to date. I’ve a funny feeling the next one might be even better.

thepasttense.fourfour.com
www.facebook.com/thepasttense

rsz_nm_sept_2015_jennie

Jennie And The Slingers

Tales Of The Unexpected – Album

Hands up all those who remember the Bellestars in the Eighties? How about the Polecats or Madness? Well, Jennie And The Slingers is made up of former members of those bands (although Lee Thompson makes a guest appearance). Apparently, this album was two years in the making, but it was well worth the wait.

It’s a combination of Rockabilly, Ska and R&B influences and with such seasoned professionals in the mix, it is a superb album. There are cleverly constructed lyrics (some done with humour sadly lacking in the last lot of decades) and some astute observations on society. It’s the kind of album we used to get on a regular basis 30 plus years ago and it made for an interesting mainstream music industry (which it certainly is not these days.)

The album gets off to a flyer with ‘Last Gang In Camden Town’, a solid rockabilly infused, catchy number. ‘Better Guy’ and ‘Gamblin Man’ provide the aforementioned humour and social commentary. In short, there is not a duff track to be found. The closer, ‘King Kong’ reminds me of that strange hybrid of rockabilly meets ska that Madness could deliver now and again.

I have to say though, Jennie Matthias (Bellestars) has never sounded better. There’s a quality to her voice and delivery that is an ideal match for the music. Take a listen to the ballad ‘Lady Sings The Blues’ (not the Billie Holliday tune I might add) and you will see what I mean. Jennie oozes class in a manner similar to the great ‘torch’ singers like Julie London.

If you like something a bit different, (and I do with bands like Rhythm Shakers, Dustaphonics, Gizzelle etc) this is definitely and album for you.

facebook.com/pages/Jennie…Slingers
diablorecordsuk.bandcamp.com/jennie-the-slingers


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

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September 22, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Picks Reviews Tags:, , , , ,
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Record & Book Reviews – Sept 2015

This entry is part 2 of 3 in the series Record Reviews 2

Los Moustros

rsz_nm_sept_2015_los_moustros

Dame Un Poco De Tu Amor b/w Mi Traje Nuevo –  Single

It was 2014 and the week before Easter. I was at Blues Kitchen with Dr Robert when we were approached by a guy from Mexico who came to London just for Modstock 3. His name was Moises Garcia. We let him play some records after the bands that night and it was clear this guy knew his stuff. Back home in Mexico, Moises has started his own business, Chez Nobody, and this is the first single on his record label. Los Moustros are a six-piece band with Rock n Roll and Rhythm & Blues influences and this single is a belter. ‘Dame Un Poco De Tu Amor’ (Give me Some Of Your Love) is a cracking R&B cut and one I will be playing at the Kitchen and the Nutscast in future. The ‘B’ side, ‘Mi Traje Nuevo’ (My New Suit) is a brilliant re-working of the High Numbers’ ‘Zoot Suit’. If Moises, Chez Nobody Records and Los Moustros deliver this kind of quality, this will be a band and label to keep an eye on. Great Stuff !

cheznobodyrecords
losmoustros
losmoustros.bandcamp.com

The Get Go

rsz_nm_sept_2015_get_go

Two Time Loser b/w Typically English –  Single

This new limited edition single is out on Crocodile Records based in Manchester and features two of my favourite songs from The Get Go’s album from last year. ‘Typically English’ is the title track and ‘Two Time Loser’ was my top choice from that LP. I would be surprised if you had not heard of The Get Go before. Comprised of Stuart Farnham, Brian Hall and Richard Metcalfe, they are a London-based proper Blues Rock band and probably the finest exponents around right now. Their influences are obvious. From Humble Pie to Dr Feelgood and everything in between, these lads know their stuff. ‘Two Time Loser’ has a killer riff and never fails to get feet tapping when I play it at Blues Kitchen. There are only 300 copies available, so if you are tempted, best be quick. Simply message Crocodile Records via their Facebook page.

facebook.com/crocodilerecords

Fay Hallam

rsz_nm_sept_2015_fay_hallam

Corona – Album

Fay Hallam’s credentials are unquestionable. From Makin’ Time, Phaze, Prime Movers and Gift Horses, she has made her mark and continues to be a considerable influence on several levels. Her latest incarnation is Fay Hallam Trinity and collaborating with The Bongolian on the acclaimed ‘Lost In Sound’ album. For this, her latest album, she has used her trusted circle of musical collaborators to provide the backing to a wonderful collection of new songs. Apparently, this set was mostly written over two days following her return from a tour of Italy and it does have an eclectic quality of Beck, while encompassing Bossa Nova and all manner of interesting production techniques.

The lead track and new single from the album, ‘Se Mi Ami’ is a gentle, haunting, but sumptuous slice of subtle Latin rhythm. By contrast, ‘Soul Revolution’ and ‘Let Me Into Your Soul’ are as close to her soul and R&B influences as you get on this album and they are great tracks. Without A Smile’ is the clearest example of the Beck influence, and the inclusion of her version of ‘Maybe I’m Amazed’ is a real treat. This is a ‘listening’ album and if you make the mistake of having it as background, you miss the point and miss the beauty of the work. Fay Hallam’s delivery is first-class and her voice is as rich and warm as it ever has been. ‘Corona’ is due for release in October on Blow Up Records. Pre-orders are now available.

www.blowuprecords.com
facebook.com/fayhallamandthebongolian

Book Review: Dani Llabres

rsz_nm_sept_2015_dani_llabres

Mods – Guia Para Una Vida Elegante –  Book

Well this is a challenge ! Write a review about a book written in Spanish. I confess, I am not conversant in that language, but I have a job to do, so here goes. First of all, it is a handy paperback size, easy to handle, easy to flick through. On closer inspection (ignoring the language barrier) this is an A-Z of people, places, music, fashion and all things mod covering several decades. Each entry is no more than a few hundred words long, so you could use an online translator app easily to get the English version of the text. The next question is; how comprehensive is the book? I’ll pick a few random pages to give you an idea. In between Arthur Alexander and Mose Allison is an entry for the film ‘All Night Long’ made in 1962. It is Shakespere’s Macbeth set in a contemporary modern jazz setting in London with a stellar cast and cameo slots for Tubby Hayes, Dave Brubeck and Johnny Dankworth to name a few. Further on we have the Ethiopians and the Eton Crop or Colin McInnes and Madras material, Smokey Robinson and Sneakers Club.

On that basis, this is pretty comprehensive. 600 entries and 300 photos and graphics. Author, Dani Llabres is originally from Valencia, but now lives in Columbia. He has been a mod for thirty years or more and is well-known on the Spanish and European mod scene, so his credentials are good. Obviously, the language barrier is awkward, but Spanish-speakers will enjoy this work along with collectors of mod books. One final point, in the entry for Mod Books, Rawlings, Hewitt, Anderson, Cohen, Beesley and Barnes are all name-checked along with other European titles that may not be familiar to you. Glad to say a book titled ‘The Influential Factor’ is included. Now who wrote that?


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Graham Lentz

AKA ‘The Baron’ - Like many of his generation, The Jam started Graham's love affair with all things mod back in 1977. He is the author of 'The Influential Factor - A History Of Mod' which was originally published in 2002. An extract from the book was re-printed in Paolo Hewitt's 'The Sharper Word - revised edition' in 2011. Being a self-confessed 'broad-church' mod, Graham's interests range from Modern Jazz to today's up-coming new bands and everything in between. Although he has a passion for mod history, he also has a passion for the new. Whether it's music, clubs, media of every kind, clothing, scooters or art and photography, Graham supports, promotes and encourages as much as he can, because that's how we keep going. 'Give it a chance' is his motto. If it's not for you, that's cool, at least you tried it.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

September 22, 2015 By : Category : Bands Front Page Music Reviews Tags:, , , , ,
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Paul Molloy – Hey Mr DJ!

This entry is part 4 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

We recently caught up with DJ Paul Molloy. Here is what he had to say about his passion for Music, DJing and rare records.

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

I got into music at school. At first it was Madness and the Specials and then I borrowed a Jam LP!

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

It would have been a do in Leeds in early 1986 (Conservative Club). There was a mass brawl, which was quite common in those days.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

Saturday night Glasgow Mod Weekender 2012 final slot. Place was packed out, and nearly everyone was dancing, a really good buzz.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

I suppose there’s been a fair few ‘Phoenix Nights’ type moments over the years, but hard to isolate a single time.

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

Gav Arno and Mick Parry from Pow Wow. Real music enthusiasts. Long time fave’s include Pid and Mark Ellis. Closer to home around Glasgow Nick Peacock, Mark Robb and my old buddy Mikey Collins are all tip-top.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I always like to hear a mix of all styles at Mod do’s. My sets try to reflect that.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

Well a find would be: I picked up some nice bargains over the years but the fist pumper was I’m the Face for £375.  Discovery: hard to say cause you might play a tune in Scotland that no one else has, yet it could have been popular elsewhere in the scene (the Scottish scene is fairly isolated).

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

Initially The Jam and Paul Weller. My fave artists are The Small Faces and The Action. Latter day loves are, The Five Aces and Big Boss Man.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

Not really. Like many though I have a decent pretty Motown section on the shelf.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

Tailor Made Mod Club (2nd saturday every month)
The Barony Strathclyde Student Uni
John Street, Glasgow 10- 3am

Finger Poppin (last Friday of the month)
Mc Chuils
High Street, Glasgow 8-12pm

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

Always fancied a copy of ‘I Dig Everything’ by David Bowie.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

Current Top 5 Tracks:
1. Baby Jean – If You Wanna (Stacy Demo)
2. Joe Simon – Long Hot Summer (Sound 7)
3. Berry St Station – King Bee (Le Cam)
4. Reg Guest Syndicate – Underworld (Mercury)
5. The Universals – Hey You (Page one)

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:
1. King Size Taylor – Somebodys Always Trying  (Decca)
2. Herbie Goins – Cruisin (Parlophone)
3. Ray Barretto – Mercy Mercy Baby  (London Demo)
4. Junior Walker & the All Stars – Shake and Finger Pop (Soul)
5. The High Numbers – I’m The Face (Fontana)
6. Brenda Hollaway – When I’m Gone (Tamla)
7. The Poets – Thats the way its got to be (Decca)
8. Jackie Edwards – I Feel so Bad (Island)
9. The Quick – Berts Apple Crumble (Deram)
10. Barry Barefoot Beefus – Barefoot Beefus (Loma)


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

July 7, 2015 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Tags:, , ,
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Mary Boogaloo – Hey Mrs DJ!

This entry is part 5 of 10 in the series Hey! Mr DJ 3

1. How and when did you get into music and what were you listening to then?

Music has always been of paramount importance to me and has completely shaped my life. When I was a little girl in the 60s, I got my parents to buy me a portable record player. I would ask for records instead of dolls, ice cream or whatever ‘normal’ girls would desire back then. I remember owning singles like soundtracks, kids tunes, glam rock that I played to death! Then in the 70s I graduated to tapes and a new world of possibilities opened up for me. I was constantly exchanging tapes and getting older friends to make compilations for me. Music was my mission and I very thirsty! Finally, in 1980 I moved to London because of its florid music scene and the rest is blah blah blah…

2. Where was your first DJ slot?

I can’t recall, but it must have been in Florence in the mid 80s, in a club called
Salt Peanuts.

3. What was your most memorable DJ spot?

In Rome a few years back, I DJ’d right next to an ancient Roman
burial monument.

4. What so far, has been your worst DJ experience?

Clearing dance floors!

5. Your favourite scene DJ’s and why?

No one. I don’t admire DJs.

6. What has shaped your DJ sound and why?

I’ve tackled many different genres throughout the years. The thing with me is that I’ve always played what I wanted, how I wanted, not what other DJs were playing. I’d play anything I like with dance floor appeal. My style is mostly characterised by a gritty, under-produced sound.

7. What was your best ever find/discovery?

I resent that word: ‘discovery’. How can anyone make such a claim on 40+ years old music?

8. Who was your biggest influence musically and your favourite artist(s)?

David Bowie and Iggy Pop.

9. Do you collect specific labels/artists/genres?

I only buy Jazz LPs.

10. Where can folks currently catch your DJ set?

I’m on a self-imposed semi-retirement and I only play whenever I’m in the mood.

11. What is the record you would most like to own?

So many but I’m not obsessed in finding any of them.

12. Please give us a top 10 all time favourites and a current top 5 spins?

There are an infinite amount of favourites, but from the top of my head:

Top 10 Tracks of All Time:

1. Yusef Lateef – Snafu (this track represents everything I love about jazz. Absolutely divine!)
2. Art Blakey – A night in Tunisia
3. Abbey Lincoln – Afro blue
4. Cal Tjader – Afro blue
5. Bud Powell – Coming up
6. Freddie Hubbard – Red clay
7. Clifford Jordan – John Coltrane
8. Miles Davis – Right off
9. Erroll Garner – Stormy weather
10. Bobby Hutcherson – Ummm

Current Top 5 Tracks:

1. Chico Hamilton – For mods only
2. Bro Jack McDuff – Hot barbecue
3. Blue Mitchell – High heel sneakers
4. Bill Doggett – Koko
5. Baby Face Willette – Swingin’ at Sugar Ray


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drrobert

I run The New Untouchables organization and events like the Brighton Mod Weekender, Le Beat Bespoké Festival (and compilation series of the same name) and I co-organize Euro Ye Ye with the Trouble & Tea crew. I have run many clubs over the last 20 years in London, where I live and current nights include Timebox, Zoo Zoo, Crossfire, 100 Club and Mousetrap allnighter which has just celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2011. I have been lucky to DJ all over the globe including Japan, Canada, USA and Europe and met some great people on my journey. I run RnB Records to offset my vinyl addiction: newuntouchables.com/rnbrecords for rare vintage vinyl.

More Posts - Website - Twitter - Facebook

June 28, 2015 By : Category : DJs Front Page Interviews Music Tags:, , ,
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